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Old 09-16-2008, 10:23 AM   #4
QtesUKStoke
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Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire. UK
Posts: 42
Default Re: De-Humidifiers and Water Purification

Quote:
Originally Posted by doodah View Post
I've researched this before. Almost everybody says not to use dehumidifier water -- straight, anyway. But to use it after some purification process, yes, why not?

One of the coolest purification methods I've seen so far goes something like this:
1. You get a bunch of unglazed clay flowerpots.
2. Plug the holes in the bottom of them.
3. Stack them up, maybe 5 high, one inside the other.
4. Put water in the top one.
5. The water slowly percolates down through the first clay pot, then the second, third, etc., until all the water has been filtered through clay.

I haven't tried this construction, but am keeping it in mind for when I come across some cheap clay pots. This sounds to me like it would work, and it's energy-free. All it would require is some planning in advance, once you know how long it takes for the full process.

By the way, I don't waste hardly any water. This summer I hooked my air conditioner drain spout to a 32-gallon Rubbermaid trash can and collected about 64 gallons of water, which I used to water vegetables. They're growing fine, so I guess they liked it. An air conditioner is just a dehumidifier that sits in your window and puts out cool air. So, really, if you have a dehumidifier, and electricity, you can make water!

I feel like I have to apologize for using an air conditioner, but I live in a very humid climate. This summer I didn't use it all that much, but to get 64 gallons of water tells you how humid it can be. When it gets to be 85 degrees and 80% humidity, and all my printer paper is getting soggy, I do use it. It's a very efficient unit, energywise.

Great idea! thx for sharing
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