Go Back   Old Project Avalon Forum (ARCHIVE) > Project Avalon Forum > Project Avalon > Preparations / Advice

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-30-2008, 04:23 AM   #1
Sol Invictus
Banned
 
Sol Invictus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 599
Default Pine needle tea and phloem chips.

So your on the run or hid deep off the grid. Your hungry and thirsty and yet your stuck inside a pine forest. For miles around all you can see is white pines and no wild life for you to gain a meal from. To make it worse, its styarted to snow.

So, what are you going to do?

Eat, drink and be merry is the answer. Heres how.

First off, you have your survival kit yes? good. Inside it should be at least a fire starting kit, an axe and a shelter tarp and your steel mug.

Time to get working.

First off build your fire but DO NOT LIGHT IT. A fire thats not warming you or cooking your food is just an IR signal to those who are watching out for you. Your under pine, your signatures minimal, so keep it that way.

Gather up some of that snow. We are going to melt it to give us some nice fresh water for our tea. Yes, I did say tea.

Now, go to the lowest branches that have the newest needles on, and take a good hand full from as near to the trunk as you can get. This handful of needles holds five times the vitamin C weight for weight than two oranges or lemons. So gather up enough for yourself and never take more than you need to feed yourself.

Light your fire, take a good slug of that snow and melt it down, and then, taking those needles, place them inside a spare sock or spare bit of material to make a DIY tea bag, make it ready and then place the 'tea bag' into the water. Bring it to a nice rolling boil for 15 minutes.

When times up, remove the 'tea bag', and sup up. Instant cure for scurvy right there.

Trust me its really nice stuff is that tea.

Now, we are refreshed, but still hungry. Well, lets make some fries. Taking your axe, pick a good healthy tree. Strip off a patch of bark maybe a quarter of the diameter of the trunk and cut it away. Now, you have the wood exposed, cut into it till you reach the 'inner' wood (very hard, very resiliant to cutting) and peel off your strip. this is the phloem, the nutrient carrying 'outer layer' that sits under the bark. Its sappy and messy work, but guess what? its superbly edible.

Right, you have your large strip of phloem, now cut off thin wide strips, make them as thin as you can, and take them to your fire. Place them into the edges of your fire until they are a nice crispy golden colour.

Take from the fire, and eat.

Very sweet tasting, very crispy and very good for you. If you don't let them burn, thse chips will be full of sappy sugary goodness.

From one tree comes your hunger and thirst cure with a medical benefit to boot.
Sol Invictus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2008, 06:13 AM   #2
doodah
Avalon Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Virginia, USA
Posts: 373
Default Re: Pine needle tea and phloem chips.

This is a wonderful post, Sol. Thank you!

Yes, this planet has been designed to give us everything we need to live and stay healthy. It is only modern man that has short-circuited the knowledge with his greater "wisdom" [cough!]

Most of us know about dandelions, kudzu, and some other common plants. Please post more info if you've got it, about other stuff along the same lines.

Peace and light to you and all life on this planet!
doodah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2008, 06:27 AM   #3
Trishsgate
Avalon Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 140
Default Re: Pine needle tea and phloem chips.

This seems so simple. I hope I can remember it when I need to. Just great info. Thanks

Love & Peace
Trish
Trishsgate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2008, 11:58 PM   #4
Truth voice 2012
Avalon Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 110
Default Re: Pine needle tea and phloem chips.

Are all trees edible then?
Truth voice 2012 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2008, 01:27 AM   #5
Sol Invictus
Banned
 
Sol Invictus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 599
Default Re: Pine needle tea and phloem chips.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Truth voice 2012 View Post
Are all trees edible then?
No, far from it.

The Yew is a dark green with red berries on it and is very common in parks and gardens. It is deadly poisonous (every single part is toxic to humans). Stay WELL away from it. Don't even burn the woods as it gives off a weird very acrid smoke that irritates the lungs badly.

What can be eaten? Young leaves from the Lime, beech and Hawthorn in spring time are really nice, with the lime making a great addition to a salad as they really have a great taste. There are many others, but do not eat anything you are unsure of.
Sol Invictus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2008, 01:34 AM   #6
Sol Invictus
Banned
 
Sol Invictus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 599
Default Re: Pine needle tea and phloem chips.

Heres one for those who live near the water.

Bull Rushes.

These are awesome.

The root can be boiled and eaten like a potatoe (mashes well), or ground down dry to make a great flour substitute / bulking agent, or just plain eaten raw (washed of course).
Sol Invictus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2008, 03:43 AM   #7
DiVineEnvy
Avalon Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 128
Default Re: Pine needle tea and phloem chips.

Sol Invictus- How do you like this one for synchronicity - yesterday author Derrick Jensen was on the radio remarking how strange it is that we know so many intimate and trivial details about movie stars yet do not know something as fundamental as how to identify and utilize five edible plants in the area where we live. Well, that started me thinking about where I should begin. Then I got home and found your thread on pine needle tea and phloem chips! I'm sold. Thanks for sharing, and getting me started on this quest...will add a small axe to my walk-about pack soon!!
DiVineEnvy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2008, 03:58 AM   #8
Waterman
Avalon Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 345
Default Re: Pine needle tea and phloem chips.

Just to verify the yew, it is the source for chemotherapy drugs. You know that wonderful feel good therapy.
Waterman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2008, 04:04 AM   #9
Sol Invictus
Banned
 
Sol Invictus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 599
Default Re: Pine needle tea and phloem chips.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DiVineEnvy View Post
Sol Invictus- How do you like this one for synchronicity - yesterday author Derrick Jensen was on the radio remarking how strange it is that we know so many intimate and trivial details about movie stars yet do not know something as fundamental as how to identify and utilize five edible plants in the area where we live. Well, that started me thinking about where I should begin. Then I got home and found your thread on pine needle tea and phloem chips! I'm sold. Thanks for sharing, and getting me started on this quest...will add a small axe to my walk-about pack soon!!

Now that is synchronicity.

I was sat thinking 'what could I share that others might need'. I thought about it, and decided 'edible foods in the wild'.

Next up is nettle tea and salad.
Sol Invictus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2008, 04:14 AM   #10
333mark333
Avalon Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: The Western Shore of the Hudson Bay-churchill, manitoba, canada
Posts: 301
Default Re: Pine needle tea and phloem chips.

Nice Thread If i may add- The inner bark and twigs are a natural Expectorant and Demulcent, steep in boiling water for around 20mins and Gargle/drink. Its great for cough's, colds, bronchitis and many other chest condition's- awesome for expelling phlegm from the lungs. Remember a common cold in the bush can lead to BIG trouble if not addressed.
333mark333 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2008, 04:15 AM   #11
Sol Invictus
Banned
 
Sol Invictus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 599
Default Re: Pine needle tea and phloem chips.

Nettle tea.

Every ones heard of it, but do you know how to actually make it? if not, read on!

Early spring or late winter produces the sweetest flavour, but when ever you find nettles growing and there are plentiful young plants about you can utilise them.

First off, find a nettle patch that has new growth. You are looking for growth no higher than 6 inches. Reason is that the taller they get, the more bitter they will taste, so short is sweet wins here.

Find your plants and de-leaf them. The way i do it is to wear a glove, start at the base and forefinger and thumb upwards taking off all of the leaves. You want a good fist sized ball of leaves per person for your brew if your making a large pot, so don't be stingy!

Right, then get your make shift tea bag (a sock, tight, woven mesh bag) and place your leaves in it. Bring your water to a nice rolling boil and for 15 minutes just let the leaves roll about. The water will start to go green, and the deeper the green, the 'fuller' the flavour will be. i like mine so green its almost black but each to their own, and I suggest you start off with a lighter shade.

So remove the 'tea bag' but DO NOT THROW THEM AWAY.

Now, add a slice of any available sweetener be it apple or black berry or even a handful of rose hip skins. Enjoy your brew.

Why didn't we throw away the leaves? because when we were out walking we collected a good sac full of lime leaves too. Its salad time.

Mix the nettle leaves in with your cool lime leaves, add a seasoning of your choice and enjoy your salad. They actually taste rather nice in a perfect blend of sweet lime tree leaves and slightly earthy nettle leaf, very much like a boiled spinnach.
Sol Invictus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2008, 04:23 AM   #12
333mark333
Avalon Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: The Western Shore of the Hudson Bay-churchill, manitoba, canada
Posts: 301
Default Re: Pine needle tea and phloem chips.

If i may suggest a book- The Peterson's Field Guides, There are many version's ranging from Eastern/Western Medicinals to wild edibles, Tracking, birds, fish. They will cover pretty well everything you will need to know about the area you are living in- including poisonous plants and what you can/cannot eat.
Its is important that you have a field guide as a wrong choice in plants can lead to sickness and even death.
333mark333 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2008, 04:29 AM   #13
OceanWinds
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Pine needle tea and phloem chips.

good stuff!

Here is a good one... juice grass. It has everything we need. Wheatgrass juice can be used in blood transfusions.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2008, 04:51 AM   #14
Sol Invictus
Banned
 
Sol Invictus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 599
Default Re: Pine needle tea and phloem chips.

Edible fungi.

First off a warning: IF YOU ARE IN ANY DOUBT AS TO WHAT YOU ARE PICKING OR EATING, STOP RIGHT AWAY. ONLY PICK FRESH HEALTHY FUNGI WITH NO ROTTEN AREAS OR DISCOLOURING THAT MAY LEAD TO MISTAKEN IDENTITY. PICK AND EAT AT YOUR OWN RISK.

So, edible fungi. I have provided links to pictures of very edible and delicious fungi that I eat. I will not link to anything i have not eaten in quantaties myself.

1) Chicken of the woods.
http://www.northamptonshirewildlife...._sulfureus.jpg

Beautiful taste, elegant additive to your cooking. Prepare to your liking, but is delicious in a salad or fried in a little butter or oil.

2) Branching Oyster.
http://www.northamptonshirewildlife....ornucopiae.jpg

Has a relative,
http://www.northamptonshirewildlife...._ostreatus.jpg
That is also suitably edible. Pick only young fresh ones, any age related yellowing will make their taste and texture a bit 'tough'. Cook in a sauce or add to a stew.

3) Jews ear.
http://www.northamptonshirewildlife....cula-judae.jpg

Is ideal as a filler for a salad or stir fry. Absorbs flavours from any sauces, and thinly sliced makes a very tasty treat. Don't over use it as you will find much of your sauce being sucked up by it!
Sol Invictus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2008, 04:53 AM   #15
Sol Invictus
Banned
 
Sol Invictus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 599
Default Re: Pine needle tea and phloem chips.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 333mark333 View Post
If i may suggest a book- The Peterson's Field Guides, There are many version's ranging from Eastern/Western Medicinals to wild edibles, Tracking, birds, fish. They will cover pretty well everything you will need to know about the area you are living in- including poisonous plants and what you can/cannot eat.
Its is important that you have a field guide as a wrong choice in plants can lead to sickness and even death.
Books are always good. I like having a guide stuffed in my daypack for reference if i am unsure about plants ect.

However, like every thing in life, experience counts.
Sol Invictus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2008, 04:57 AM   #16
333mark333
Avalon Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: The Western Shore of the Hudson Bay-churchill, manitoba, canada
Posts: 301
Default Re: Pine needle tea and phloem chips.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sol Invictus View Post
Books are always good. I like having a guide stuffed in my daypack for reference if i am unsure about plants ect.

However, like every thing in life, experience counts.
I agree, even the pictures in the books can be deceiving as the plants change through their cycles and identification is sometimes difficult ( Mainly in the early stage ). Experience is knowledge
333mark333 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2008, 05:57 AM   #17
Sol Invictus
Banned
 
Sol Invictus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 599
Default Re: Pine needle tea and phloem chips.

Oh yes.

I learnt from a master class expert on fungi, and believe me, she laid out a few for us to identify. Those I placed in the post above are the only ones I can identify 100% certain.

The other folks 'guessed' a couple of them, and their guesses would of led to their deaths.

Experience and knowledge is vital. A book is a great tool, but like all tools, is only as good as the hand that guides it.
Sol Invictus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2008, 06:15 AM   #18
Trishsgate
Avalon Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 140
Default Re: Pine needle tea and phloem chips.

These are some of the best tips on survival even local living I have come across. I hope you don't mind but am saving them for future reference. In my area if you don't have a greenhouse in the winter we would not eat so these tips are great. Not to mention if we had to leave suddenly with no transportation and had to survive. Thanks again.
Trishsgate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2008, 06:45 AM   #19
Sol Invictus
Banned
 
Sol Invictus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 599
Default Re: Pine needle tea and phloem chips.

Trish,
later on today i will do a piece about edible fungi i have eaten whilst in North America and Canada.

But now.... I must log off till this evening.

Sol.
Sol Invictus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2008, 07:44 PM   #20
Sol Invictus
Banned
 
Sol Invictus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 599
Default Re: Pine needle tea and phloem chips.

Trish, as promised, edible fungi i have eaten in North America and Canada.

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/139/3...g?v=1165810420

Lions Mane fungi. Sea food in taste when immature, is a good bulker for soups and dishes or again fried in a little oil or butter thinly sliced.

Conifer coral.
http://www.pfc.forestry.ca/diseases/...ges/fig14a.gif

Do not be fooled by its appearence. This is so nice I would if I could grow a whole garden of these for my own use. Grated on a pasta sauce with a bit of cheese, or fried off or added to a salad its use is up to you. Delicious.

Now, this next one isn't edible as its very tough, but here is a perfect use for it. Dried off and stripped it makes the best dry fire starting material you could ever want. Powdered down it will ignite almost instantly, and can make awesome kindling for a fire, just make sure its stored and dried before use i.e. cut some down, dry it, strip it and make your kindling and then keep it in your kit in a waterproof container.
Sol Invictus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2008, 09:47 PM   #21
371
Banned
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 503
Default Re: Pine needle tea and phloem chips.

Nice info!!

I've found this to be most educational:MULTISERVICE
PROCEDURES FOR
SURVIVAL, EVASION, AND
RECOVERY

MULTISERVICE
PROCEDURES FOR
SURVIVAL, EVASION, AND
RECOVERY
371 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2008, 10:10 PM   #22
Sol Invictus
Banned
 
Sol Invictus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 599
Default Re: Pine needle tea and phloem chips.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 371 View Post
Nice info!!

I've found this to be most educational:MULTISERVICE
PROCEDURES FOR
SURVIVAL, EVASION, AND
RECOVERY

MULTISERVICE
PROCEDURES FOR
SURVIVAL, EVASION, AND
RECOVERY
Nice, I like it. More links like this means more info is out for people to ponder over.
Sol Invictus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2008, 04:46 AM   #23
Trishsgate
Avalon Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 140
Default Re: Pine needle tea and phloem chips.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sol Invictus View Post
Trish, as promised, edible fungi i have eaten in North America and Canada.

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/139/3...g?v=1165810420

Lions Mane fungi. Sea food in taste when immature, is a good bulker for soups and dishes or again fried in a little oil or butter thinly sliced.

Conifer coral.
http://www.pfc.forestry.ca/diseases/...ges/fig14a.gif

Do not be fooled by its appearence. This is so nice I would if I could grow a whole garden of these for my own use. Grated on a pasta sauce with a bit of cheese, or fried off or added to a salad its use is up to you. Delicious.

Now, this next one isn't edible as its very tough, but here is a perfect use for it. Dried off and stripped it makes the best dry fire starting material you could ever want. Powdered down it will ignite almost instantly, and can make awesome kindling for a fire, just make sure its stored and dried before use i.e. cut some down, dry it, strip it and make your kindling and then keep it in your kit in a waterproof container.

Thanks got them and thank you also 371. Great info. On the last item would that be tinder fungus? This can be some of the best life saving tips available. OBTW on your survival thread did not post to it but understood what you meant about waiting that to was what I feel inward.

Love & Peace
Trish
Trishsgate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2008, 05:03 AM   #24
Sol Invictus
Banned
 
Sol Invictus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 599
Default Re: Pine needle tea and phloem chips.

http://edibletulip.typepad.com/edibl.../puff_ball.jpg

(Didn't post these as I presumed people would know these were edible. Added to cover my presumption. My bad).

Tasty! Young puffballs are also very nice - I didn't add them as i didn't know they grew in the USA too Here in the UK they are very common along the edges of pine forests, especially those plantations that are left alone for a while.
very tasty, like an almond nutty type of flavour.

Now, I'll leave fungi alone, as most others that are edible have highly toxic 'look alikes' and can be easily mistaken.

Will move back to plants and berries
Sol Invictus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2008, 05:13 AM   #25
Sol Invictus
Banned
 
Sol Invictus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 599
Default Re: Pine needle tea and phloem chips.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sol Invictus View Post
Heres one for those who live near the water.

Bull Rushes.

These are awesome.

The root can be boiled and eaten like a potatoe (mashes well), or ground down dry to make a great flour substitute / bulking agent, or just plain eaten raw (washed of course).
A question - I always called these plants Bullrushes. Now, I had a USA based survival instructor who called them cat tails. Now, are these one and the same? can any one roll me up a piccie of what they think a cat tail is?
Sol Invictus is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 08:39 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Project Avalon