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Old 03-28-2009, 05:45 AM   #201
Dantheman62
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Default Re: Breaking Codes

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Originally Posted by Dantheman62 View Post
Ceremonial corn, wine, and oil
Here's an interesting article on that very day back in 1793, and it's an easy read.

It was a beautiful day as accounts noted. September 18, 1793, found President George Washington decked out in his ceremonial Masonic apron festooned with the universal Masonic square and compass symbols.

That day, in a Masonic ritual, the president laid the cornerstone to the U.S. Capitol along with a dedicatory silver plate.

In a mysterious turn of events sometime thereafter, the priceless plate and cornerstone disappeared. Eluded by investigators and searches and clouded by false claims of discovery throughout the decades, the issue remains a puzzlement. Further complicating the matter is bureaucratic incompetence and a cover-up by the office of the Architect of the Capitol.

The disappearance of the silver plate and cornerstone is but one of many mysteries surrounding Washington’s beloved Masonry. Perhaps long ago these artifacts were taken covertly by the Masons in order to protect them from people bent on destroying them and their legacy.

For the rest of it..... http://townhall.com/Columnists/Craig...he_cornerstone
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Old 03-29-2009, 12:08 AM   #202
judykott
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Default Re: Breaking Codes

Thanks Dantheman, I love reading about History. I did a little digging in the George Washington Papers at the Library of Congress 1741-1799 and found these, I also found a transcription (below the letters) and other info on another link,Anyone who doubts conspiracies or the fact since the birth of the US they have always been present as well as the threat of the Illuminati needs to look at these. These would be a great starting point for non-believers in any sort of talk of conspiracy's, I am sending this to friends and family, as a history lesson.

http://memory.loc.gov/mss/mgw/mgw2/021/1820176.jpg


http://memory.loc.gov/mss/mgw/mgw2/021/2000194.jpg

http://memory.loc.gov/mss/mgw/mgw2/021/2010195.jpg




George Washington to George Washington Snyder, October 24, 1798 -- Transcription

Mount Vernon, October 24, 1798.

"Revd Sir: I have your favor of the 17th. instant before me; and my only motive to trouble you with the receipt of this letter, is to explain, and correct a mistake which I perceive the hurry in which I am obliged, often, to write letters, have led you into.

It was not my intention to doubt that, the Doctrines of the Illuminati, and principles of Jacobinism had not spread in the United States. On the contrary, no one is more truly satisfied of this fact than I am.

The idea that I meant to convey, was, that I did not believe that the Lodges of Free Masons in this Country had, as Societies, endeavoured to propagate the diabolical tenets of the first, or pernicious principles of the latter (if they are susceptible of seperation). That Individuals of them may have done it, or that the founder, or instrument employed to found, the Democratic Societies in the United States, may have had these objects; and actually had a seperation of the People from their Government in view, is too evident to be questioned.

My occupations are such, that but little leisure is allowed me to read News Papers, or Books of any kind; the reading of letters, and preparing answers, absorb much of my time.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Mount Vernon, September 25, 1798.

"Sir: Many apologies are due to you, for my not acknowledging the receipt of your obliging favour of the 22d. Ulto, and for not thanking you, at an earlier period, for the Book you had the goodness to send me.

I have heard much of the nefarious, and dangerous plan, and doctrines of the Illuminati, but never saw the Book until you were pleased to send it to me. The same causes which have prevented my acknowledging the receipt of your letter have prevented my reading the Book, hitherto; namely, the multiplicity of matters which pressed upon me before, and the debilitated state in which I was left after, a severe fever had been removed. And which allows me to add little more now, than thanks for your kind wishes and favourable sentiments, except to correct an error you have run into, of my Presiding over the English lodges in this Country. The fact is, I preside over none, nor have I been in one more than once or twice, within the last thirty years. I believe notwithstanding, that none of the Lodges in this Country are contaminated with the principles ascribed to the Society of the Illuminati. With respect I am &c."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
[Note : In a letter from Snyder (Aug. 22, 1798, which is in the Washington Papers), it is stated that this book "gives a full Account of a Society of Free-Masons, that distinguishes itself by the Name of 'Illuminati,' whose Plan is to overturn all Government and all Religion, even natural."]

http://www.consource.org/index.asp?b...cumentid=56418
G. W. Snyder to George Washington (August 22, 1798)

Certified: Yes

Volume: The Papers of George Washington: Retirement Series, 2 Pages: 554-557

Frederick-Town (Maryland) Augt 22. 1798.

"Sir,

You will, I hope, not think it a Presumption in a Stranger, whose Name, perhaps never reached your Ears, to address himself to you the Commanding General of a great Nation. I am a German, born and liberally educated in the City of Heydelberg in the Palatinate of the Rhine. I came to this Country in 1776, and felt soon after my Arrival a close Attachment to the Liberty for which these confederated States then struggled. The same Attachment still remains not glowing, but burning in my Breast. At the same Time that I am exulting in the Measures adopted by our Government, I feel myself elevated in the Idea of my adopted Country. I am attached both from the Bent of Education and mature Enquiry and Search to the simple Doctrines of Christianity, which I have the Honor to teach in Public; and I do heartily despise all the Cavils of Infidelity. Our present Time, pregnant with the most shocking Evils and Calamities, threatens Ruin to our Liberty and Goverment. Secret, the most secret Plans are in Agitation: Plans, calculated to ensnare the Unwary, to attract the Gay and irreligious, and to entice even the Well-disposed to combine in the general Machine for overturning all Government and all Religion.

It was some Time since that a Book fell into my Hands entituled "Proofs of a Conspiracy &c. by John Robison," which gives a full Account of a Society of Freemasons, that distinguishes itself by the Name "of Illuminati," whose Plan is to overturn all Government and all Religion, even natural; and who endeavour to eradicate every Idea of a Supreme Being, and distinguish Man from Beast by his Shape only. A Thought suggested itself to me, that some of the Lodges in the United States might have caught the Infection, and might cooperate with the Illuminati or the Jacobine Club in France. Fauchet is mentioned by Robison as a zealous Member: and who can doubt of Genet and Adet? Have not these their Confidants in this Country? They use the same Expressions and are generally Men of no Religion. Upon serious Reflection I was led to think that it might be within your Power to prevent the horrid Plan from corrupting the Brethren of the English Lodge over which you preside.

I send you the "Proof of a Conspiracy &c." which, I doubt not, will give you Satisfaction and afford you Matter for a Train of Ideas, that may operate to our national Felicity. If, however, you have already perused the Book, it will not, I trust, be disagreeable to you that I have presumed to address you with this Letter and the Book accompanying it. It proceeded from the Sincerity of my Heart and my ardent Wishes for the common Good.

May the Supreme Ruler of all Things continue You long with us in these perilous Times: may he endow you with Strength and Wisdom to save our Country in the threatening Storms and gathering Clouds of Factions and Commotions! and after you have completed his Work on this terrene Spot, may He bring you to the full Possession of the glorious Liberty of the Children of God, is the hearty and most sincere Wish of Your Excellency's very humble and devoted Servant"

G. W. Snyder

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The archives from George Washington himself prove that not only they exist, but they were intensively active in America. Though George Washington, as Freemason, denied participation of Freemasonry as a whole in the Illuminati order - which was known to recruit members inside the freemasonry - he acknowledged that their presence in America was not unknown to him, "on the contrary" in his own word, as seen in the above authentic documents.
***********************************

"Knowledge makes a man unfit to be a slave."-- Frederick Douglass

http://www.911oz.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?p=20325

Last edited by judykott; 03-29-2009 at 12:18 AM.
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Old 03-29-2009, 01:46 AM   #203
Dantheman62
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Default Re: Breaking Codes

Wow good find judykott!!
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Old 03-29-2009, 05:30 AM   #204
judykott
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Default Re: Breaking Codes

Another Letter from the Library of Congress mentioning Illuminati in Russia, John Adams letter to Jefferson.
*******************************
Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation: U.S. Congressional Documents and Debates, 1774-1875

Item 2 of 5 The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence --J. Adams to Jefferson.* PREVIOUS SECTION .. NEXT SECTION .. NAVIGATOR
The Revolutionary Diplomatic Correspondence of the United States, Volume 3
J. Adams to Jefferson.*

[Note *: * 7 J. Adams' Works, 210.]

Paris, June 29, 1780.

My Dear Sir: Mr. Mazzei† called on me last evening to let me know he was this morning at 3 to set off on his journey to Italy. He desired me to write you that he has communicated to me the nature of his errand, but that, his papers being lost, he waits for a commission and instructions from you; that being limited to five per cent., and more than that being given by the powers of Europe, and, indeed, having been offered by other States, and even by the ministers of Congress, he

[Note †: † Philip Mazzei was born in Tuscany in 1730, and from 1755 to 1773 was engaged in business in London. In December, 1773, he came to Virginia, with a party of Italians, with the view of superintending the introduction of grapes and other fruits and of silk culture in Virginia. When in America he became intimate with Jefferson, Madison, and Adams. In 1779 he went to Europe for the purpose of obtaining arms for Virginia; and when in Paris came in conflict with Franklin, who discountenanced all movements on behalf of separate States to obtain European aid. This produced in him a prejudice against Franklin, afterwards deprecated by Jefferson. Mazzei revisited the United States in 1784, but afteward returned to Europe, where he attained political preferment in Poland. In 1802, when the Emperor Alexander was interested in the illuminati, to whose mystical views Mazzei approached, Mazzei received a Russian pension, which, strange as the inconsistency may appear, he seems to have enjoyed till his death. It was to Mazzei that Jefferson wrote a famous letter (April 24, 1796, 4 Jeff. Works, 139), which, as translated (for the original never was produced) seemed to imply that Washington was affected by the reaction towards Congress then exhibiting itself in the United States. With Madison Mazzei was in constant correspondence (see 1 Madison's Writings, 44, 444), and he appears to have been on friendly terms with Patrick Henry (id., 77). His visit to the United States in 1784 was, in part, to obtain a foreign consulate, in which he was disappointed. "Mr. Adams is the only public man whom he thinks favorably of, or seems to have associated with; a circumstance which their mutual characters may perhaps account for." (Madison to Jefferson, April 25, 1784, id., 78.) From this letter, and from that of Jefferson, to which it is a reply, it appears that Jefferson looked with no favor on Mazzei's political utterances. Neither Madison nor Jefferson had any idea that Mazzei was then a Russian pensioner. Mazzei published in 1788 a work on America, which, from its ultra radicalism and its misconception of the American system, Madison severely condemns in a letter to Mazzei of December 10, 1788. (Id., 444.)
Mazzei--for Mazzei's correspondence with John Adams, see John Adams' Works, vol. 7, p. 608; vol. 9, p. 552.
An interesting letter, dated April 16, 1781 of Patrick Henry, recommending Mazzei is in the Dreer Collection in Philadelphia.
The only letter on record from Franklin to Mazzei was written before Franklin left for France, and relates mainly to Mazzei's plans for silk and fruit culture in America. Mazzei's abandonment of his silk and fruit enterprise in Virginia arose from his inability to obtain Italian experts in consequence of the breaking out of the Revolution. The estate of Collei, near Monticello, which was bought for him by an American company as a vineyard for experiment, has since been shown to be in a climate suited for that culture. This neighborhood brought about Jefferson's acquaintance with him, and the obnoxious passage about reaction, above alluded to, which Mazzei selected for publication, was given at the end of a long answer by Jefferson to enquiries by Mazzei as to his private affairs. It may be a mistake to distrust Mazzei's professions of radicalism, but his relations to the Emperor Alexander and his bitter antagonism to American statesmen of democratic tendencies make his sincerity open to doubt.]

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has little hopes of succeeding at so low an interest; that he shall, however, endeavor to prepare the way in Italy for borrowing, and hopes to be useful to Virginia and the United States.

I know nothing of this gentleman but what I have learned of him here. His great affection for you, Mr. Wythe, Mr. Mason, and other choice spirits in Virginia, recommended him to me. I know not in what light he stands in your part; but here, as far as I have had opportunity to see and hear, he has been useful to us. He kept good company and a good deal of it. He talks a great deal, and is a zealous defender of our affairs. His variety of languages and his knowledge of American affairs gave him advantages which he did not neglect.

What his success will be in borrowing money I know not. We are impatient to learn whether Virginia and the other States have adopted the plan of finances recommended by Congress on the 18th of March. I think we shall do no great things at borrowing, unless that system or some other, calculated to bring things to some certain and steady standard, succeeds.

Before this reaches you you will have learned the circumstances of the insurrections in England, which discover so deep and so general a discontent and distress, that no wonder the nations stand gazing at one another in astonishment and horror. To what extremities their confusions will proceed no man can tell. They seem unable to unite in any principle, and to have no confidence in one another. Thus it is, when truth and virtue are lost. These, surely, are not the people who ought to have absolute authority over us in all cases whatsoever; this not the nation which is to bring us to unconditional submission. The loss of Charleston has given a rude shock to our feelings. I am distressed for our worthy friends in that quarter. But the possession of that town must weaken and perplex the enemy more than us.

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By this time you know more than I do of the destination and the operations of French and Spanish armaments. May they have success, and give us case and liberty, if the English will not give us peace.

I have the honor to be, with affectionate respect, etc.,

John Adams.
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