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Old 11-15-2008, 03:28 PM   #1
MacGyverCanada
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Default Bug-Out Bags (Survival Backpacks)

I've heard the concept of 'bug-out bags' discussed a few times on here, and I'd like to start a practical discussion on what one should have ready to go. There are quite a few factors to consider:

HOW FAR ARE YOU TRAVELLING? - Safety is a relative term, and moving a respectable distance may keep you safe from any immediate dangers. However, the idea here is to survive, and that is a different ball game. You need to find a new home which is near water, has a renewable and accessable food source, and will not be swarmed by the hungry mobs!

HOW STRONG ARE YOU? - You have to be able to carry your pack to your relocation spot. A healthy and somewhat athletic adult should be able to travel 20-30 kilometers (about 13-19 miles) per day on foot fairly comfortably. If you have small children, I know from experience as a camp counselor that kids age 5-10 tend to start complaining after about 4 kilometers. The size of your pack should also be carefully considered. If you need to move fast and far, I wouldn't recommend getting a pack that is larger that 40 litres. My tightly-packed 35 litre backpack feels fairly heavy after a long day of search & rescue operations.

WHAT ARE YOUR RESOURCES? - If you have lots of money to spend on luxuries, such as a $500.00 ultra-light super-compact all-weather tent, then by all means go out and buy that stuff now while it's still available! Even if 2012 is just a fart in the breeze, you'll have all of this cool camping gear to play with in 2013! If you are on a shoestring budget, like me, then take a survival course with a knowledgable outdoorsman and learn what you can from the internet.

FOOD, WATER and SHELTER! - Rule of thumb: "You can survive for 3 weeks without food, 3 days without water, and 3 hours without shelter". This, of course, is dependant upon both you and your environment, but it is a good rule to plan by. These are the heaviest things that you can pack! When you are walking in the summertime with a big pack, you should be drinking 3-6 litres per day. At 2.2 lbs. per litre, you can do the math.

CLOTHING - Never wear cotton!!! I've read a few pieces of 2012 advice that say "wear lightweight cotton". Cotton tends to hold any moisture that it contacts. In hot weather it soaks up sweat, making it very hard for your body to regulate heat (and it just feels totally gross). In cold weather, a little bit of sweat or moisture from the weather will suck the heat from your body. Wet skin loses body heat 25 times faster than dry skin. Wear breathable synthetic fabrics whenever possible. Suddenly, 100% polyester is fashionable again! Also, wear two or three pairs of socks; nothing decreases your mobility like a foot full of blisters!

MY BUG-OUT PACK CONTENTS - My pack list is set up for fast travel over long distances. I can wake up in the middle of the night, grab my pack and run outside in my boxer shorts, and I should be able to survive in ANY weather conditions for several days.

Water - I generally carry about 3 litres (a day's minimum supply), plus a water filter which should keep me hydrated for a few years.
Food - Enough for 2 days of normal, comfortable eating. Lightweight, high-calorie and high-protein! Also, a baggie full of Gatorade!
Shelter - A 7x12 high-strength grommeted tarp that can be a tent and ground pad all at once, and can be used as a carrying litter for injured persons.
Clothing - Very thick polar fleece pants, a hooded polar fleece sweatshirt, lightweight nylon rain gear, hat, gloves, extra socks...
Rope - 50 feet of parachute cord is compact and lightweight for shelter-building. Try to avoid cutting pieces off of the ends!
Fire Bowl - A steel salad bowl that can contain a small fire. This focuses the heat and makes your fire portable! Bring a tin cup to cook food in!
Fire-Building - Matches, lighters, flint... enough to build many fires if necessary!
Toiletries - Toilet paper, deodorant, toothbrush, etc.
Tools - LED dynamo-charged flashlight, multi-tool (Leatherman), combat knife, extra flashlights
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Old 11-15-2008, 03:46 PM   #2
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Default Re: Bug-Out Bags (Survival Backpacks)

Quote:
Originally Posted by MacGyverCanada View Post
I've heard the concept of 'bug-out bags' discussed a few times on here, and I'd like to start a practical discussion on what one should have ready to go. There are quite a few factors to consider:

HOW FAR ARE YOU TRAVELLING? - Safety is a relative term, and moving a respectable distance may keep you safe from any immediate dangers. However, the idea here is to survive, and that is a different ball game. You need to find a new home which is near water, has a renewable and accessable food source, and will not be swarmed by the hungry mobs!

HOW STRONG ARE YOU? - You have to be able to carry your pack to your relocation spot. A healthy and somewhat athletic adult should be able to travel 20-30 kilometers (about 13-19 miles) per day on foot fairly comfortably. If you have small children, I know from experience as a camp counselor that kids age 5-10 tend to start complaining after about 4 kilometers. The size of your pack should also be carefully considered. If you need to move fast and far, I wouldn't recommend getting a pack that is larger that 40 litres. My tightly-packed 35 litre backpack feels fairly heavy after a long day of search & rescue operations.

WHAT ARE YOUR RESOURCES? - If you have lots of money to spend on luxuries, such as a $500.00 ultra-light super-compact all-weather tent, then by all means go out and buy that stuff now while it's still available! Even if 2012 is just a fart in the breeze, you'll have all of this cool camping gear to play with in 2013! If you are on a shoestring budget, like me, then take a survival course with a knowledgable outdoorsman and learn what you can from the internet.

FOOD, WATER and SHELTER! - Rule of thumb: "You can survive for 3 weeks without food, 3 days without water, and 3 hours without shelter". This, of course, is dependant upon both you and your environment, but it is a good rule to plan by. These are the heaviest things that you can pack! When you are walking in the summertime with a big pack, you should be drinking 3-6 litres per day. At 2.2 lbs. per litre, you can do the math.

CLOTHING - Never wear cotton!!! I've read a few pieces of 2012 advice that say "wear lightweight cotton". Cotton tends to hold any moisture that it contacts. In hot weather it soaks up sweat, making it very hard for your body to regulate heat (and it just feels totally gross). In cold weather, a little bit of sweat or moisture from the weather will suck the heat from your body. Wet skin loses body heat 25 times faster than dry skin. Wear breathable synthetic fabrics whenever possible. Suddenly, 100% polyester is fashionable again! Also, wear two or three pairs of socks; nothing decreases your mobility like a foot full of blisters!

MY BUG-OUT PACK CONTENTS - My pack list is set up for fast travel over long distances. I can wake up in the middle of the night, grab my pack and run outside in my boxer shorts, and I should be able to survive in ANY weather conditions for several days.

Water - I generally carry about 3 litres (a day's minimum supply), plus a water filter which should keep me hydrated for a few years.
Food - Enough for 2 days of normal, comfortable eating. Lightweight, high-calorie and high-protein! Also, a baggie full of Gatorade!
Shelter - A 7x12 high-strength grommeted tarp that can be a tent and ground pad all at once, and can be used as a carrying litter for injured persons.
Clothing - Very thick polar fleece pants, a hooded polar fleece sweatshirt, lightweight nylon rain gear, hat, gloves, extra socks...
Rope - 50 feet of parachute cord is compact and lightweight for shelter-building. Try to avoid cutting pieces off of the ends!
Fire Bowl - A steel salad bowl that can contain a small fire. This focuses the heat and makes your fire portable! Bring a tin cup to cook food in!
Fire-Building - Matches, lighters, flint... enough to build many fires if necessary!
Toiletries - Toilet paper, deodorant, toothbrush, etc.
Tools - LED dynamo-charged flashlight, multi-tool (Leatherman), combat knife, extra flashlights
pocket size book sas survival guide or food for free may help
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Old 11-19-2008, 12:35 AM   #3
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Default Re: Bug-Out Bags (Survival Backpacks)

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Originally Posted by MacGyverCanada View Post


The size of your pack should also be carefully considered. If you need to move fast and far, I wouldn't recommend getting a pack that is larger that 40 litres. My tightly-packed 35 litre backpack feels fairly heavy after a long day of search & rescue operations.





CLOTHING - Never wear cotton!!! I've read a few pieces of 2012 advice that say "wear lightweight cotton". Cotton tends to hold any moisture that it contacts. In hot weather it soaks up sweat, making it very hard for your body to regulate heat (and it just feels totally gross).

MY BUG-OUT PACK CONTENTS - My pack list is set up for fast travel over long distances. I can wake up in the middle of the night, grab my pack and run outside in my boxer shorts, and I should be able to survive in ANY weather conditions for several days.

Water - I generally carry about 3 litres (a day's minimum supply), plus a water filter which should keep me hydrated for a few years.
Food - Enough for 2 days of normal, comfortable eating. Lightweight, high-calorie and high-protein! Also, a baggie full of Gatorade!
Carrying water? why? whats wrong with buying a filter that is attached to a flask and can be filled as needed? carry a litre max per person and then the rest is 'wild water'. Water equals alot of weight and space, and is a burden you don't need.

Food. Your writing like you have no planned area to go to and have not stashed any food in said area. If thats the case, why bother moving from your house? get a map, find a place you want to bug to, get used to the area, the sights, the smells, the sounds and the wild life, and stash you a small cache of food stuffs. Saves you humping alot of food for miles and miles won't it?

Wear cotton in hot climates. Military and civil research in the last 50 years proves that it is THE best temperature regulator in a hot climate bar pure silk. Will provide thousands of links as proof if need be for this. Polar fleece pants and jackets? what ever happend to layering for your exercise levels? on foot these clothes will sweat you up and when static the sweat pool will chill and then kill you. Layering will save you, as you can add / detract as and when needed. Merino wool should not be overlooked as a base layer either - I take a mix - a warmer wool base and a lighter poly prop top - one keeps me warmer when slower, and the other wicks fast for high activity.

My next post will look at your 'kit list'.
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Old 11-19-2008, 12:50 AM   #4
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Default Re: Bug-Out Bags (Survival Backpacks)

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Rope - 50 feet of parachute cord is compact and lightweight for shelter-building. Try to avoid cutting pieces off of the ends!
Fire Bowl - A steel salad bowl that can contain a small fire. This focuses the heat and makes your fire portable! Bring a tin cup to cook food in!
Fire-Building - Matches, lighters, flint... enough to build many fires if necessary!
Toiletries - Toilet paper, deodorant, toothbrush, etc.
Tools - LED dynamo-charged flashlight, multi-tool (Leatherman), combat knife, extra flashlights
para cord is great. But why cannot it be cut? how can you secure a basha without cutting off say 1 meter lengths? Take two 25 meter lots. One for cutting and use, the other as back up.
A steel salad bowel? who ever told you that needs his nuts punting up to his ears. Portable fire? wtf do i want a portable fire for? if on the move is a fire some thing you want to 'carry'? hell no its not. A cooking / boiling tin however is a good idea for obviouse reasons.

Matches, lighters... many fires if necessary? you think after bugging out your going to be going home any time soon? Learn to make a friction bow. problem solved, forever. However, fire steel, magnesium blocks, matches and lighters all have their place. Great for quick moral boosters in the first few days. However, don't think they will last forever.

Deoderant????????????????????????????????????????? ?????????????????????

Think the forest or the bears give a damn what you smell like? uh...nope. What will happen though is that a hunter force will sweep through a forest, smell a tarts boudoir and know your there and hunt you down. Smell like the forest and the forest will smell like you. Toiletries are a HUGE no no. Paper? oh man, guess you never been out in the wilds for more than a month then. Tooth brush? well if you must, then you must, but don't bring mint tooth paste for goodness sake.... bring a neutral smelling neutral tasting paste... if you must.

Tools. I'll say this; who ever gave you that list, go kick them square in the nuts for me, because they are a God damned idiot.

Axe, saw, large knife, small knife. Sharpening stones.

If your not bugging out with those, your half way to dead already.

Add to that list of tools tin snips, a glass cutter and a multi tool like you said. Looking at a wee bit of weight, but remember your not ever coming home again...

Flashlights. l.e.d dynamo is a good solid choice. Anything with batteries thats not a throw away is bad. Batteries will not be available in the boonies.
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Old 11-19-2008, 12:59 AM   #5
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Default Re: Bug-Out Bags (Survival Backpacks)

Shelter.

A tarp is a great idea. Top marks for carrying one, much more sense than a tent as weight is cut to a bare minimum. I would advise you to start now learning how to build a good solid shelter from your surroundings. Get used to axe and saw work.

A tarp can make a great place for a night or two, but you will need a more permanent shelter for long term. No axe or saw, no home .

Do carry survival bags with you - I advise a mountain survival bag that has a reflecting inner liner, shoved inside a goretex bivvie bag. These save lives daily, and you will appreciate that extra warmth as your getting your home made. Children will appreciate a place to warm up in as you work away too.



.
I am sorry to sound like an ****, or you think 'who the hell is this guy telling me what to do' or 'who is he to rip my thread apart', but trust me when I tell you I am the man who will have a warm shelter, pine needle tea on the boil, nettle and lime leaf salad with fish all nice and cooked ready for me before the end of the second days bugging out. I will also be busy setting my snares to catch me a few rabbits for the pot.
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Old 11-19-2008, 01:15 PM   #6
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I strongly advise that you have within your kit enough fishing wire and snare wire for at least 10 traps. Use high strength fishing line and a varied selection of hook sizes - remember that big hooks will catch small AND big fish, where as small hooks will only catch small fish.

I also see that you contained inside your kit no first aid supplies. I suggest you add post haste, as if your never coming home, where are you going to get your medical supplies from? I strongly suggest making a waterproof container kit, one that is tethered to your BOB and will float if dropped into water by accident.

Saws and axes are of your own choice, but I strongly advise to never go out into the wilds without an axe. Shelter building with a 'combat knife' is so painfully slow....

Sorry to hit you with so many negatives, but I am a wee bit unwell and short of patience at the minute, and really just have a desire to see that no harm comes to well meaning people like yourself who have been given some very poor advice.

Sol.
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Old 11-19-2008, 02:16 PM   #7
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Default Re: Bug-Out Bags (Survival Backpacks)

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I strongly advise that you have within your kit enough fishing wire and snare wire for at least 10 traps. Use high strength fishing line and a varied selection of hook sizes - remember that big hooks will catch small AND big fish, where as small hooks will only catch small fish.

I also see that you contained inside your kit no first aid supplies. I suggest you add post haste, as if your never coming home, where are you going to get your medical supplies from? I strongly suggest making a waterproof container kit, one that is tethered to your BOB and will float if dropped into water by accident.

Saws and axes are of your own choice, but I strongly advise to never go out into the wilds without an axe. Shelter building with a 'combat knife' is so painfully slow....

Sorry to hit you with so many negatives, but I am a wee bit unwell and short of patience at the minute, and really just have a desire to see that no harm comes to well meaning people like yourself who have been given some very poor advice.

Sol.
Sol, good advise. a couple of comments from me.

I am not from the US so my conditions are a little different.
> Get a survival book to use as reference.
> GOt a good army buddy - talk and learn from him on the technique of survival
> IF you watch Man Versus WIld on Discovery - this guy is ex-SAS and he really good at survival. Very good pointers!! get his CDs..
> attend a survival training course.
> A light hammock is good
> for energy, I stick to chocolates and biscuits
> Energy Drink - get those in powder form.
> Fire Starters - water proof matchsticks are great.
> BEsides Parachute cords, how about getting those bicycle cords.. extremely useful
> 2 compasses
> Saw/ Knives - short and long
> FIRST AID kit - u going to need this.
> A personal survival kit that is located on you.
> Cyalum sticks - last 6 hours per stick.
> Solid Fuel
> Thermal Blanket (like a large chocolate wrapper)
> Good thick socks and good walking shoes like timberland
> Long cotton pants.
> Long Scarf

some pointers from me.!
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Old 11-19-2008, 02:32 PM   #8
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Default Re: Bug-Out Bags (Survival Backpacks)

everybody get a bike .
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Old 11-24-2008, 09:11 AM   #9
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Default Re: Bug-Out Bags (Survival Backpacks)

Axe.
Saw.
Fishing line & Fishing hooks.
Snare wire.
Knife.
Water pruification kit.
Water boiling tins.(Kelly Kettle is fab, totaly fab, I advise get one if you can afford it.
Fire starting kit [magnesium block, fire steel, your choice really].
First Aid kit. [Get as much and as good stuff and knowledge as you can]
Shelter bags.
Shelter Tarp.
Para cord.
Elastic bungees.
Compass & maps.
Duct tape roll.
Spare base layer, spare mid layer and if possible a poncho as a spare outer layer.
Gloves, hats, socks, pants... lifes little 'nice things'.
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Old 11-24-2008, 09:13 AM   #10
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Default Re: Bug-Out Bags (Survival Backpacks)

Please note that i don't include torches ect. There is a reason. If its needing batteries, leave it at home. Your not ever coming back again, so unless its rechargable in the field, leave it. less weight that way.
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Old 11-24-2008, 06:40 PM   #11
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Default Re: Bug-Out Bags (Survival Backpacks)

Wow Sol

A fello bushcrafter eh. I would add a survival tin, kept on your body at ALL times incase you get seperated from your backpack. Do a search on it and you can either buy one pre made or just make your own to your requirements.

Dont forget spectacles and medication.

Ammit
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Old 11-24-2008, 06:55 PM   #12
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A list of items for my bug-out bag. 1 per person. This does not include my tent, sleeping bag and cook ware.

http://beprepared.com/
Order Detail:
Item: IN FM R360 - MAINSTAYT 3,600 Calorie Food Bar - 3
Item: IN WS B500 - Emergency Essentials Inc. 32 oz Blue Polycarbonate Water Bottle - 1
Item: IN CW W110 - 18+ Hour Hand and Body Warmer - 3
Item: IN CW P110 - PVC Poncho w/ Hood - 1
Item: IN CW B090 - Emergency Bag (reflective) - 1
Item: IN CW B100 - Wool Blend Blanket - 1
Item: IN CW B250 - Space® Brand All Weather Blanket - 1
Item: IN CL M400 - Windproof/Waterproof Matches (1 box) - 1
Item: IN CK S170 - Flat-Fold Stove Combo - 1
Item: IN CK S160 - Heat Cell Fuel (1 can) - 1
Item: IN CL C700 - Clear Mist Emergency Candle 100 Hour - 1
Item: IN CU K162 - Polycarbonate Blue Fork - 1
Item: IN CU K182 - Polycarbonate Blue Spoon - 1
Item: IN CU K172 - Polycarbonate Blue Knife - 1
Item: IN CM W400 - 5-in-1 Survival Whistle - 1
Item: IN CL S107 - LIGHTSTICK 6" Inch White - 8-hour - 3
Item: IN CL F412 - High Uinta GearT Endurance Headlamp - 1
Item: IN CL F280 - Ever-On2 LED Shaker Flashlight - 1
Item: IN CA L011 - SunX SPF 30+ Towelette - 2
Item: IN CA L006 - NoBuzzZone Bug Repellent - 2
Item: IN CA L016 - Katadyn Klean Foaming Hand Sanitizer - 1
Item: IN MF T101 - Iosat Potassium Iodide Tablets - 1
Item: IN WP T200 - Potable Aqua and Neutralizer - 1
Item: IN ZA B100 - 5-Gallon Mylar Water Bag - 1
Item: IN CU R250 - Emergency Rope - 1
Item: IN CU T200 - High Uinta GearT Multi-Function Tool - 1
Item: IN CU G100 - 1 Pair Leather Gloves - 1
Item: IN CU S100 - Tri-Fold Foldable Shovel - 1
Item: IN MK S100 - Sewing Kit - 1
Item: IN CH S600 - Family Sanitation Kit - 1
Item: IN WP S800 - ASAPT Colloidal Silver Solution 8 oz. - 1
Item: IN WS P101 - Mainstay Water Pouches (1 Pouch 4.2 ounce) - 12

Last edited by David; 11-24-2008 at 06:57 PM.
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Old 11-24-2008, 06:59 PM   #13
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Sorry, leather gloves?

Why, wooly ones if wet dry quickly, leather ones dont
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Old 11-24-2008, 07:03 PM   #14
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If your worried about wet leather gloves, the rest of your body may be soaked as well. Time to start a fire and get dry.
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Old 11-24-2008, 09:40 PM   #15
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Wow Sol

A fello bushcrafter eh. I would add a survival tin, kept on your body at ALL times incase you get seperated from your backpack. Do a search on it and you can either buy one pre made or just make your own to your requirements.

Dont forget spectacles and medication.

Ammit
My surival tin is a standard size soup or beans tin. With a resealable plastic lid that the kind customer service of a catfood company sent me. Before you tape the lid shut, is best to apply sillicon kit paste to make it waterproof. The tin itself can be used as cooking pan or cup. Any gaps between the goodies I filled up with unboiled rice for a nice porridge - so don't forget a stock cube.
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Old 11-24-2008, 10:42 PM   #16
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If your worried about wet leather gloves, the rest of your body may be soaked as well. Time to start a fire and get dry.
Gloves.

Leather are good for mild to moderate cold that is dry. They are also very durable and will last a good 20 years if a good decent pair.

However.

They suck in the wet and the snow and will cause cold injuries to occour rapidly.

Wollen gloves. Good for mild to moderate dry cold. They don't last long and suck in the wind.

Goretex.

Great, warm, dry, but fragile. Best left for wet winters where hands are not going to be used alot in rough jobs. Think of as more of a static protection than on the move on the work trail tools.

All in all, gloves are a personal choice, but, they are all at their limitations in a stressed environment.

My advice? take three pairs.
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Old 11-24-2008, 10:43 PM   #17
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Wow Sol

A fello bushcrafter eh. I would add a survival tin, kept on your body at ALL times incase you get seperated from your backpack. Do a search on it and you can either buy one pre made or just make your own to your requirements.

Dont forget spectacles and medication.

Ammit
Rides at all times in my chest rig. Never parted from it, period.
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Old 11-25-2008, 03:37 AM   #18
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Gloves.

Leather are good for mild to moderate cold that is dry. They are also very durable and will last a good 20 years if a good decent pair.

However.

They suck in the wet and the snow and will cause cold injuries to occour rapidly.

Wollen gloves. Good for mild to moderate dry cold. They don't last long and suck in the wind.

Goretex.

Great, warm, dry, but fragile. Best left for wet winters where hands are not going to be used alot in rough jobs. Think of as more of a static protection than on the move on the work trail tools.

All in all, gloves are a personal choice, but, they are all at their limitations in a stressed environment.

My advice? take three pairs.
Excellent break down. I usually use gortex for hunting and leather for working. At the time of purchase, I was trying to keep cost down and find a happy medium between the two. Purchasing a set of everything on the list for 3 people kind of got expensive and had to make some sacrifices.
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Old 11-25-2008, 06:29 AM   #19
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Excellent break down. I usually use gortex for hunting and leather for working. At the time of purchase, I was trying to keep cost down and find a happy medium between the two. Purchasing a set of everything on the list for 3 people kind of got expensive and had to make some sacrifices.
Well if I have to choose, the wooly gloves are binned first as they are the worst of the three in my opinion as their uses are very limited.

If I had to go less expensive, I would buy a pair of riggers gloves / ranchers gloves and a set of goretex winter gloves. Riggers are great all rounders for working in all weathers, and will dry in front of the fire in the evening. A plus is that you can add a poly pro liner to up the warmth ratio of the rigger for use into late autum.
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Old 11-25-2008, 02:23 PM   #20
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OK a lot of points to answer here:

Carrying water: A litre of water is about a 2-hour supply if you're hiking lightly in temperate weather. 3 litres is enough to get by one 8-hour day of hiking, as long as there is a replenishing water source at your destination or along the way. A water filter is no good if there's no water to filter!

Food: Same deal. A 2-day supply of food could be a half-dozen Powerbars.

Clothing: Agreed, but it's hot and dry climates where cotton works, because it won't store body moisture. Agreed with the importance of layering; my cold-weather layering consists of one synthetic t-shirt, one fleece-lined synth t-shirt one zip-up fleece hooded sweater and my heavy raingear on top, plus synthetic shorts, side-zip fleece pants and breathable rain pants on top. It all zips open to regulate heat.

Rope: It's nice to keep a long length of rope for many reasons; hanging food in a tree, weaving carrying slings and rescue slings, long lashings to secure objects... I'm not saying that you should never cut the riope, but while it is easy to cut a rope, it is much more difficult to make a long rope from short pieces.

Portable fire: Build your shelter, cook your food over the fire bowl, and before sleeping bring the bowl full of coals near your head to keep yourself a bit warmer. Also nice if you accidentally light some grass on fire; you can pick up and preserve your fire before dousing the unwanted flames. The bowl also reflects a great deal of heat, making boiling times shorter.

Fire: A book of paper matches won't last long in the hands of someone inexperienced in fire lighting. They'll likely use most of the book to light their first fire. Making a fire bow is a great skill to have for emergencies, but have you ever tried to build and use one in the rain?

Deodorant: Wiping your butt isn't necessary either, but it sure is nice.

Tools: Axe, saw and multiple knives are great additions. Actually, I think tools are incredibly valuable in a survival situation. They do weigh quite a lot, as you said Sol, so that's why I went with a multitool, which contains all of the following: saw, screwdrivers, knife, pliers, hex drivers, can opener, wire strippers, etc. While none are ideal tools, they'll do in a pinch.

Flashlight: A dynamo or shake light is essential. Even in a highly efficient LED flashlight, the batteries won't last more than a few nights, and batteries are heavy. However, carrying a small battery-powered high-intensity LED light is nice, because most of those dynamo or shake lights are fairly weak.

Survival bag: Great idea, how much do they cost?

Snares: Definitely something I overlooked. I've never been taught how to use them so I've been reading up on some simple ones.

First Aid: Neglected to mention, sorry. I do carry a first aid kit, containing only items that I am comfortable using. That list keeps getting longer as I do more exercises with SAR; education is more important than a kit.

Survival Book: Nice, there are some good pocket ones out there.

Energy Drink: I have Gatorade powder in the survival kit and Jello powder in the first aid kit. Jello has a tiny bit of protein, and it's a really powerful ally in combating the progression of hypothermia.

Bicycle Cords: You mean bungees? They're a little dangerous, it's not really worth the risk, however minor, to have a big hook on an elastic.

2 Compasses: Good call, I need to get a backup.

Personal Survival Kit: What's contained in a USAF ejection seat survival kit?

Cyalum Sticks: Hardcore glow sticks. A small flashlight with batteries lasts just as long for the same weight, and there's a chance you could use it again.

Solid Fuel: Sure, if you want the weight. Those little burners used for chafing dishes work well!

Thermal Blanket: in the first aid kit!

Duct tape: I carry a stick with medical, reflective, and duct tapes wrapped around it. Saves on space and packaging materials.

Whistle: Fox 40 Classic, pealess signalling whistle

Gloves: I have a base layer of a cheap $1 pair of acryllic gloves, followed by a pair of thin high-grip Kevlar work gloves, all inside a heavy nylon-shelled overmitten.



Thanks for the input, it's good to see that some other people are interested in the topic!
Hey, it's good to see a fellow fencer, David!
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Old 11-25-2008, 07:56 PM   #21
Sol Invictus
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Default Re: Bug-Out Bags (Survival Backpacks)

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Originally Posted by MacGyverCanada View Post

Carrying water: A litre of water is about a 2-hour supply if you're hiking lightly in temperate weather. 3 litres is enough to get by one 8-hour day of hiking, as long as there is a replenishing water source at your destination or along the way. A water filter is no good if there's no water to filter!
Bugging out to a location with no water? errrr..... you wouldn't really do that would you? really?

Quote:
Food: Same deal. A 2-day supply of food could be a half-dozen Powerbars.
Agreed.

Quote:
Rope: It's nice to keep a long length of rope for many reasons; hanging food in a tree, weaving carrying slings and rescue slings, long lashings to secure objects... I'm not saying that you should never cut the riope, but while it is easy to cut a rope, it is much more difficult to make a long rope from short pieces.
My bad, I read it as not cutting paracord, not rope. Sorry for the misunderstanding.

Quote:
Portable fire: Build your shelter, cook your food over the fire bowl, and before sleeping bring the bowl full of coals near your head to keep yourself a bit warmer.
A Mr B# died doing this very thing. Rolled over in the night and died of hot coal inhalation. I'll pass on that one cheers.

Quote:
Fire: A book of paper matches won't last long in the hands of someone inexperienced in fire lighting. They'll likely use most of the book to light their first fire. Making a fire bow is a great skill to have for emergencies, but have you ever tried to build and use one in the rain?
Yes i have built one in the rain, and yes I have used it. I however put up my tarp first to give me an area to work under. . As a pointer though, I carry a triple redundant fire starting kit to be on the very safe side.

Quote:
Deodorant: Wiping your butt isn't necessary either, but it sure is nice.
Wrong. Deoderant is a non-needed luxury. Wiping poo off your body is a cleanliness / disease issue. HUGE difference. But it did make me laugh.

Quote:
Tools: Axe, saw and multiple knives are great additions. Actually, I think tools are incredibly valuable in a survival situation. They do weigh quite a lot, as you said Sol, so that's why I went with a multitool, which contains all of the following: saw, screwdrivers, knife, pliers, hex drivers, can opener, wire strippers, etc. While none are ideal tools, they'll do in a pinch.
Agreed 100%. Better a multi tool than nothing at all. Tools FTW.

Quote:
Survival bag: Great idea, how much do they cost?
£4 from millets or any outdoor shop.

Quote:
Snares: Definitely something I overlooked. I've never been taught how to use them so I've been reading up on some simple ones.
I did a little piece on here about snares and fish traps. Ill link it for you.



as for every thing else, I do agree with you. Education over gear is vital; an absolute total 100% must do. ignorance will kill you in half an hour on a cold snowy winday day in the out doors.
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Old 11-26-2008, 10:09 AM   #22
raulduke
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Default Re: Bug-Out Bags (Survival Backpacks)

Good thread Macgyver (and sweet screen name btw).

"Bug out bag". That's good, I've never heard that term. I've been refering to my version as my "armageddon bag".

So a couple things i don't think I saw on anyone's lists were:

Portable Sunshower: not much added weight, beats deoderant and is basicly renewable cleanliness.

Survival blankets: The shiny plastic ones. If you're going hypothermic, you can get naked and wrap yourself in these things to raise your bodytemp in a hurry.

And the best one (these things are great):
Fire Piston: Endless firestarter (if you've got just a bit of tinder).


And about the sleeping next to the fire thing. Yeah it's dangerous, so heat a few rocks in the fire and sleep w/ those around you. Get a few and keep 'em rotating in the fire and next to you.
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Old 11-26-2008, 10:13 AM   #23
eurosceptic
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Default Re: Bug-Out Bags (Survival Backpacks)

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Originally Posted by burgundia View Post
everybody get a bike .
good idea got a brilliant road bike already - need a more suitable off road version - and a repair kit!
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Old 11-27-2008, 08:25 AM   #24
raulduke
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Default Re: Bug-Out Bags (Survival Backpacks)

I just thought of another gadget I didn't notice on anyone's list.

I suppose some may think this is silly but it's in my bag.

Magnesium solar charger



They'll charge literally anything that can be charged via usb and hold the charge for a year. 8 hours of direct sunlight is enough to charge my phone or ipod completely or about two hours of battery on the laptop.
They're kind of expensive ($150. there are cheaper ones, but this one works very well from my experience w/ it), but I think it's worth the extra weight (then again I'm a pretty big guy and I can handle a fairly heavy bag). The device itself is only 6 ounces but w/ my laptop, ipod, cell phone, vid cam, the total extra (electronics) weight is aboout 3 to 4 lbs. That's not bad imo for some potential news of what might be happening that you needed to bug out from. If the networks are still up I can even tether my laptop to my cell to upload a vid or check the news or something.
If it all goes down, then meh, I chuck the phone and I've still got all the good tunes and stuff on my ipod and laptop. If you're buggin' (stressed) out it may be good to chill and listen to some music to get your bearings so to speak. Plus the long nites can get pretty boring if you're flying solo for awhile. So I've even got a few books in the bag too, some survival texts and a few novels. Sh*t I'd like to bring my banjo too, but that would have to be a driving bug out situation and that's a different story all together of course.

Last edited by raulduke; 11-27-2008 at 08:27 AM.
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Old 11-27-2008, 09:58 AM   #25
Wormhole
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Default Re: Bug-Out Bags (Survival Backpacks)

Great thread. Thanks. I've started lurking more than posting recently. Once in a while I find a pony. This is one.
Peace of Mind,
Wormhole

Last edited by Wormhole; 11-27-2008 at 10:32 AM.
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