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Old 09-10-2008, 04:12 PM   #1
ISIS
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Post A simple beginners's guide to food storage

Hello everyone

I thought it would be of value for me to post this information here
especially for those of you who are just starting out with preparations.

This formula below may be of value to you.

For those people who have already started and are on their way , there may be some small fragment of information here that you can add to your own
preparation.

Also, at the bottom of this paper, there is a contact for those in the USA, and particularly those in the North West Pacific...

I have used this formula for my preparation for my family...

I hope this helps you in your journey..........


(I hope I have been in compiance with the GateKeeper including this info...)

My best wishes for all of you....


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

A SIMPLE BEGINNER'S GUIDE TO FOOD STORAGE
By Danielle Graham

Hello everyone:

Whether you are building your very first basic food storage program or updating your current inventory, this simple beginner's guide to food storage can help make your planning and labor easier.

Remember, people have been storing food since the beginnings of civilizations. However, since our current societies no longer maintain public granaries, it is up to each of us to wisely store foods for such times that either interruptions in distribution or crop failures leave us without the abundance of foodstuffs we have grown accustomed. Fortunately, our current technology and knowledge archives provide us with ample tools and the information necessary to make this responsibility easy to understand and implement.
The process of storing foods is quite simple, requiring good planning, a moderate budget and a constant-cool location for storage. Following these simple guidelines below can help eliminate the frustration of what may seem, at first, to be a daunting task. Yet, the goal of providing ample food stores for yourself and your family is easily attainable, and ultimately, a deeply satisfying experience. Once you have your food storage preparations under way, you will know a level of inner confidence and security that no 'world event' can take from you.

The wise basic food storage plan.

The wise food storage plan takes into consideration the possibility of dramatic changes from our current lifestyle and insures that our nutritional requirements are met no matter how much our physical activity increases or decreases.

Currently, we live quite comfortably: Cars, buses, trains and planes that carry us from location to location, and, markets, grocery stores and restaurants in which to satisfy our hunger. However, if we were suddenly required to walk or bicycle long distances, grow and prepare our own food, build and maintain our own homes, fields and crops, our gross nutritional requirements would increase exponentially.

By the same token, if we found ourselves in circumstances in which our physical activities were severely curtailed, our gross caloric requirements would decrease, but our bodies' need for vital nutrients would not: The nutritional requirements would shift from calorie rich foods to nutritionally dense foods with significantly fewer calorie requirements.

Thus, even during beginning planning for a basic storage plan, it is important to account for this wide range of possibilities when creating our food storage lists. The guidelines provided below do take into consideration the wide range of potentials and these basic recommendations are offered accordingly.

What basic foods should be stored?

The best foods to begin with for your storage are the foods that store the longest, are the easiest to store, and provide the best and broadest range of nutrition, : Whole grains, beans and whole seeds, salt, sweeteners, and spices. These foods form the foundation of all long-term food storage plans. These foods require the least monitoring and rotation, are the least expensive and provide for both the broad nutritional requirements as well as dense nutritional requirements.

There are many levels of important foods to include in your food storage plans, however for the purposes of offering a good basic guideline, we will focus on only these basic foods in this simple Beginner's Guide.

How much basic food should be stored?

To answer this question, ask yourself: How many people do you want to store food and for how many years? I call this people/years.
Let's say you are a family of five - 2 adults and 3 children. (Always consider children the same as adults for the purposes of this calculation.) And, you want to store enough basic food supplies for 2 years. Multiply 5 people by 2 years and you have 10 people/years.

Use this formula to multiply the recommended amounts below by the above 10 people/years to get the number for the bulk amounts you should acquire.
Grains: 300 lbs per person, per year
Beans: 100 lbs per person, per year
Sweeteners: at least 50 lbs per person, per year
Salt: at least 10 lbs per person, per year
Spices: at least 2 lbs per person, per year

Therefore, based on the calculation for the family of 5 for 2 years, multiply the amounts above by 10:
Grains: 300 x 10 = 3,000 lbs
Beans: 100 x 10 = 1,000 lbs
Sweeteners: 50 x 10 = 500 lbs
Salt: 10 x 10 = 100 lbs
Spices: 2 x 10 = 20 lbs
Now, this 2+ tons of dry food may seem like an overwhelming huge quantity, however, this is a very manageable amount of food that can easily be packed, stacked and stored away.
As well, the quantities may seem out of touch with your current dietary regime, but the high amounts of sweeteners and salt take into consideration elevated nutritional requirements during demanding physical activities.

How are these basic foods stored?
These basic foods are packed into buckets, and in the case of the grains and beans, with nitrogen. Heavy food-grade food storage pails with a food-grade gasket lid come in 3 sizes for the purposes of storing and accessing bulk foods: 3.5 gallon, 5 gallon and 6 gallon.

Although utilizing 6 gallon buckets is the most cost efficient, please consider the weight of these buckets before deciding on the bucket sizes. I rarely recommend 6 gallon buckets, preferring instead the 5 gallon and the 3.5 gallon sizes.
6 gallon buckets generally hold 43 to 48 lbs of food for a total weight of about 50 lbs. each
5 gallon buckets generally hold 30 to 33 lbs of food for a total weight of about 35 lbs. each
3.5 gallon buckets generally hold 25 lbs of food for a total weight of about 27 lbs. each
With the recommended 5 and 3.5 gallon buckets, each 100# of bulk grain or beans would fit into three 5 gallon bucket or four 3.5 gallon buckets. These weights are easier to manage, carry and utilize by putting less stress on the physical body over time.
Oxygen is forced out from around the grains and beans with nitrogen, protecting these foods from common, nesting insects. A slow flow regulator should be used with the nitrogen tank to slowly release the nitrogen from the bottom of the bucket upwards, displacing the oxygen as the nitrogen rises. Though many other packing options exist, this packing technique is the most effective and least expensive option for preserving food long term.

Why buy bulk food and pack the foods yourself?
There are 2 main reasons to pack your own storage foods: First and foremost, putting your own energy into the foods you are storing for the potential use of your family and yourself adds value to these foods by simply putting your own mind and consciousness into the foods.

Secondly, by packing your own food storage, you will have the opportunity to inspect the quality of the foods. How do these foods look and feel? This knowledge can add value when your utilization of the foods later on.

Highest recommended foods for long term bulk storage:
Recommended grains: hard red spring wheat, hard white wheat, soft pastry wheat, unhulled buckwheat, hulled barley, rye, quinoa, kamut, spelt, oat groats.
Millet, rice, rolled oats, cracked grains, etc., have a significantly shorter shelf life and should not be chosen for long term storage. They can be regularly rotated into any food storage plan.

Recommended beans: adzuki, green lentils, black beans, garbanzo, soybeans, whole green pea, mung beans. These beans perform the best, are the most diverse, are easiest to sprout and have the highest usable protein.
Recommended sweeteners: honey, molasses, maple syrup, white and/or brown sugar, depending on taste and budget.
Recommended salt: Redmond real salt is mineral rich. Salt is one of our most important and necessary minerals. There is no such thing as too much salt for food storage.
Recommended spices: allspice, cloves, cinnamon, peppers, cumin, nutmeg, chilies, cardamom, curry, ginger, paprika, peppercorns, vanilla bean.
Summary:
Remember, these recommendations are for basic, long-term storage, utilizing foods that have demonstrated to be the hardiest and best foods for storage over time. However, your own food storage plan will certainly contain many more foods than these.
Be sure to include foods you are familiar with, but be careful to respect their shelf life. Additionally, items like freeze-dried meal packets, although expensive, offer the benefit of a quickly prepared and hardy meal, quite valuable during stressful situations.
Comfort foods have an important place in any food storage program. Be sure to include your favorites like chocolate, sauces, liquors, wine, coffee, tea, powered milk, meat, etc.
I hope this simple outline will be of value during your preparations.

Resources:
Bulk Organic Foods: Yelm Food Co-op - 404 1st Street South, Yelm, WA (360) 894-8151
Buckets: Ryco Packaging - Kent, WA (253) 872-0858
Nitrogen: Airgas or Pacific Welding, Olympia, WA
Pre-packaged Food Storage:
Happy Hovel Foods: info@happyhovelfoods.com
Healthy Harvest: annecassidy@fairpoint.net
Survival Center: info@survivalcenter.com
Danielle Graham was the founder of Good FoodStuffs, then the largest bulk organic foods wholesale warehouse on the west coast, (1989-1991). She is currently the founder and executive director of NW Frontier Research Institute, an independent, non-profit, international scientific research lab exploring the fundamental implications of natural human potential. Danielle is also science editor, co-content editor, and 'Future Science' columnist for the new SuperConsciousness magazine, as well as co-founder of the new, soon-to-be-premiered business, Living with Nature, offering superior and storable nutritional products
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Old 09-10-2008, 04:37 PM   #2
firstfruit
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Default Re: A simple beginners's guide to food storage

I was wondering about the very good advice of the post above. Dose anyone know of a supplier or suppliers of the need bulk storable foods in the UK.

This would be so helpful

sorry i got it i will learn to read it all before i get excited

Last edited by firstfruit; 09-10-2008 at 04:40 PM.
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Old 09-10-2008, 05:18 PM   #3
ISIS
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Default Re: A simple beginners's guide to food storage

Hello FIRSTFRUITMy suggestion would be to make email contact with HAPPY HOVEL.Let them know where you are and that you request info for your area of SCOTLAND.I'm sure they would happy to help you.They are a nice group of people.
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Old 09-13-2008, 03:39 AM   #4
khepran
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Default Re: A simple beginners's guide to food storage

You are a Goddess for sharing this info. You just saved
me days, maybe weeks of research time. Thank you, your
post is a blessing! love, k
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Old 09-13-2008, 10:35 AM   #5
Pithiny
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Default Re: A simple beginners's guide to food storage

Incredible, as stated above--you have just saved me an incredible amount of research and figuring out how to prioritize, etc. God Bless You!
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Old 09-13-2008, 10:46 AM   #6
Vicki
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Default Re: A simple beginners's guide to food storage

Thank you from me too - I'd already made a start but hadn't considered many of the items you mention.
With love and thanks
Vicki
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Old 09-15-2008, 07:34 PM   #7
khepran
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Default Re: A simple beginners's guide to food storage

Goddess Isis, can you please elaborate on this part of your post:
"and in the case of the grains and beans, with nitrogen" How do I
introduce the nitrogen in the storage container? Thanks again,
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Old 09-15-2008, 08:16 PM   #8
Kusala
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Default Re: A simple beginners's guide to food storage

Thanks so much Isis for the vital information. I'm skilled at growing, but not in storing long term. Visions of my grandmother's root cellar are coming back to me.
Peace and light to you and your family.

Remember what you are preparing for.
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Old 09-15-2008, 09:01 PM   #9
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Default Re: A simple beginners's guide to food storage

Thankyou for the information.Much appreciated.
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Old 09-15-2008, 09:30 PM   #10
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Default Re: A simple beginners's guide to food storage

good looks OP. Better to be over zealous on amounts then under. Thanks for the time saved.
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Old 09-16-2008, 12:23 AM   #11
ISIS
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Default Re: A simple beginners's guide to food storage

Hello KhepramI'm glad you found the information you were looking* for.You wanted to know about the oxygen absorbers,,I have pasted this page from Happy Hovel Foods....below, and you can see that oxygen absorbers come in small packages, and are very affordable...If however, you want to do it with an oxygen unit, well than that is a differest story and you will need to know how to use it...\I use the packages myself.....I hope this helps you, and others on this Post..Good luck to all of youFOOD STORAGE PLANS*** FOODS IN BUCKETS*** FOODS IN CANS & CASES*** ORGANICSALPINEAIRE GOURMET RESERVES*** FRESH CANNED BUTTER & CHEESE*** SEED PACKAGES & BOOKSPRESERVING WATER & EGGS*** OUR OWN HANDBOOK/CATALOG*** GRAIN MILLS & FLAKERS*** LINKS*** SUPPORTERSHOME*** INTERVIEWS*** CANNING VIDEOS--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Happy Hovel Storable FoodsBooks, Canners, Pressure Cookers & MiscellaneousBe aware. Be prepared. It's good insurance for you and your family, it is not doom & gloom.* It is just common sense in these uncertain times.--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Here is our list of the most popular books, canners, pressure cookers and miscellaneous items. All prices are subject to change - please email us for the current prices and shipping quotes.--------------------------------------------------------------------------------Code Books, Canners, Pressure Cookers, and Miscellaneous Price Weight ****** HH183 Natural Meals in Minutes $14.50 2 HH184 Country Beans $14.50 2 HH185 Cookin' With Home Storage $16.50 2 HH202 Amazing Wheat Book $15.50 2 HH255 Cookin' With Bean and Rice $12.50 1 HH256 Cookin' With Powdered Milk $9.50 1 HH186 Quick Wholesome Foods DVD $29.50 1 HH539 Oxygen Absorbers 500cc - 100/pack $15.00 2 HH189 Real Salt Box (25 lb) $58.21 25 HH191 SAF Instant Yeast (20 packs) $50.24 22 HH192 Sprouting Triple Kit $38.21 3 HH193 Sprouting Mix $9.70 5 HH194 6 Gallon Bucket with Lid $8.95 3 HH195 Gamma Seal Lid - White, $7.99 2 HH196 Lid Remover $12.13 1 HH197 Oxygen Absorbers Z300 - 100/pack $14.91 2 HH198 All American Canner-10.5 Qt $282.50 15 HH199 All American Canner-15.5 Qt $302.50 20 HH530 Chef's Design Pressure Cooker - 4.5 Liter $83.50 14 HH200 Chef's Design Pressure Cooker - 6 Liter $93.50 14 HH201 Chef's Design Pressure Cooker - 8.5 Liter $103.50 16 HH203 Five Piece Pasta Set $69.75 10 HH297 Imperia Noodle Machine $49.75 6 HH204*Pasta Drying Rack********** $14.95*7*
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Old 09-16-2008, 12:46 AM   #12
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Even if you just store a little, just think of how much better off you'll be. Even if you have the funds to store just a couple months of food, you will be able to ride out the initial wave of mass hysteria and panic. Not that more isn't better, but some (like me!) can only afford to pick up a couple of 50lb bags of rice and some canned goods at Sam's Club. Something is better than nothing, "be prepared" the boy scouts say
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Old 09-16-2008, 01:16 AM   #13
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Default Re: A simple beginners's guide to food storage

Aye, Telefrog, put a 'buffer zone' between yourself and panic. Thanks for the good info Isis, I did not realize the amounts for a years time! I need to do more shopping....

Love and Light to all
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Old 09-16-2008, 01:34 AM   #14
JesterTerrestrial
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Default Re: A simple beginners's guide to food storage

hey...great post. Thank you so much. Keep up the good work. Check out my market thread (if u have a min). This is the kind of info that we should be organizing into a handbook or guide for people to hand out at markets.

again, thanks.

JT
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Old 09-16-2008, 02:03 AM   #15
Dantheman62
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Wow! and I mean wow that's alot of info which saves alot of people alot of time and besides storing all the beans and grains and so on canning is another way to be prepared because you can can alot of stuff! Thanks to ISIS! nice job.
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Old 09-16-2008, 12:56 PM   #16
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Thank you!
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Old 09-16-2008, 06:04 PM   #17
QueenOfLeon
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Default Re: A simple beginners's guide to food storage

There are videos all over you tube regarding this. Just do a search
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Old 09-18-2008, 07:18 PM   #18
Emman
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Default Re: A simple beginners's guide to food storage

I have been stocking up on supplies for the last couple months.

I have a portable water filter pump that enables the user to drink water from rivers or streams. It's a really popular device that campers and hikers use. The filter is good for 500 gallons.

For food I have purchased vegetables and dinners that are freeze dried and stored in #10 cans. I have a year supply for one person of vegetables (corn, sweet peas, and green beans). I have a six-month supply for one person of dinner entrees ranging from spaghetti to seafood chowder. Just add a little water to one serving and a meal is had. All in all my family of four has a supply of food at 3 meals a day to last for at least four to six months, which includes other food in our pantry.

We also have a 72-hour emergency kit that is meant for ten people, which we purchased after a big storm hit our area a couple years ago and left the region powerless for several days. For a family of four such as mine, that would be good for a week. This kit has all the basic emergency neccessities such as first aid kit, emergency food rations, emergency water packs, survival blankets, crank radio, crank flashlights, water proof matches, etc., and even the two buckets all of this comes in can be used as emergency porta potty with chemicals.

All of these supplies I have purchased at www.thereadystore.com. Great site to check out. Normally, they send out product within a few days, but because of demand it takes 4-6 weeks to get your goods. I ordered my food supplies back in July and in took about 4-5 weeks to get it. But, now we're fairly set if there is a disruption lasting for a few months. The water filter was a top priority for us. We live next to a river so at least we can drink out of it if we have to with the water filter/purifier.

All these things above cost about $1000.

Other things:

We have a dog and just bought a couple extra large bags of his dog food to last probably several months. Dog food didn't occur to me until recently.

I also pulled out almost $3000 cash from my savings account to have on hand for emergency in the home in the event that banks and ATMs become inaccessible. I'll be pulling out more cash in the coming days ahead.

I am going to be stocking up on gasoline a little. I think I'll to head Schucks and pick up several gas containers and fill them up with gas to store in my garage. I figure I should store at least enough gas to fill up the gas tank a couple times.

We will be making a big Costco run to stock up on basic neccessities such as toliet paper, soap, medicines, and all other stuff that we take for granted.

This is our prep. I just wanted to share what we're doing.

Best of luck to all here.

In the coming days we'll need to hold on to the pole.
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Old 09-19-2008, 01:47 AM   #19
Shellie
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Default Re: A simple beginners's guide to food storage

DO YOUR RESEARCH.

That list is NOT optimal. One of the most important things left off are FATS and vitamin-rich carbs and fiber (fruits and veggies).

First of all, fats: most cooking oil (olive, soy, corn) will go rancid once opened within a year. Stick with small bottles of cooking oil to prevent oxygenation (you should do this anyway with your olive oils to keep the all the good stuff from falling apart). For long term use, it is recommended to store Crisco-type veggie shortenings. Their shelf lives are about 3 years. I know a lot of health conscious people will freak at that suggestion, but that is the truth. Store your oils in the dark.

Peanut butter: contains "canola" or "rapeseed" oil. Will go rancid very quickly.

Flours: Just WHAT are you going to do with all that flour and no yeast? Bread requires both a high quality bread flour and yeast, so don't waste your money on cheap all-purpose flour. Get something you can use. Cheap all-purpose flour is good for making tortillas. (Or, use a tortilla mix). Flour, shortening, water, salt- that's all it is. It is also a LOT easier to make than loaf breads. Also, store smaller quantities of this to keep out the bugs.

Fruits and veggies: there may be a lot of energy and protein in beans and rice, but after a while your body will deteriorate from lack of variety and other nutrients (can anyone say scurvy?). Fruits can be bought canned or dried, and veggies can be canned or grown easily. Don't neglect these.

POTATOES. Lots of energy, lots of minerals, easy to grow, can be eaten raw. Awesome. Plant some onions if you can (but plant them in a tray or pot otherwise they will take over your yard).

Packing: Pack in small boxes. We use both cardboard office file boxes as well as those large blue plastic Rubbermaid totes. Try to distribute your supplies between each box. Watch expiration dates, and pack accordingly. Mark the outside of each box with the date. Try to follow this rule: don't open a new box until the old one is finished. This will prevent you from eating the "favorites" and then getting stuck for months with stuff you feel so-so about. Small boxes are great in case you have to bug out- instead of deciding whether or not you should use that last bit of car space on a 50-pound bag of rice or a 25-pound bag of beans, you can more easily carry and throw in a few boxes with weeks of balanced meals. Your health is one of the most important things to take care of in a survival situation!

Don't forget martial law. FEMA is authorized to seize all food supplies. Put stuff under the sofa, in the walls, in the back of the linen closet, dig a hole in the yard, in the boxsprings of your bed... be creative.
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Old 09-19-2008, 02:01 AM   #20
Shellie
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Default Re: A simple beginners's guide to food storage

Oh.. and powdered milk. Add a little bit of tea, coffee, cocoa, and jell-o to your list for comfort items.
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Old 10-04-2008, 05:19 AM   #21
peaceandlove
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Wink Re: A simple beginners's guide to food storage

On this Site you can download:

Army Survival Manual ~ 277 pages

http://projectavalon.net/us_army_survival_manual.pdf


Patrick Kelly Free Energy Guide ~ 1776 pages (interesting number of pages)
How to boil water, build wind generators, solar panels and more.

http://www.projectavalon.net/Patrick...ergy_Guide.pdf


Also: Survival & Self-Reliance Studies Institute ~ Mega amounts of info.
Goods to have to Barter with, 100 Essential Items, Outdoor Survival, you name it.
Many links on this website.

http://www.ssrsi.org/index.htm

With Peace and Love in Mind

Last edited by peaceandlove; 10-09-2008 at 06:16 AM.
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Old 10-05-2008, 03:16 PM   #22
ISIS
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Default Re: A simple beginners's guide to food storage

This thread is growing with awesome info

Thanks everyone , lets keep it going with more new info...

every bit helps.......

To all of us....ISIS

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