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Old 06-18-2009, 05:08 AM   #1
BROOK
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Default Everything Moon

There are so many ideas about the importance of the moon....
Some think it's actually a large UFO...orbiting the earth. Some think it's inhabited by aliens ....

What are your thoughts about the moon? Why does it have such an effect on our lives...how does it effect our personal lives.

Some people worship it...in songs

Some gaze at it in wonder....


some have great fun with it....



Of all the wonderment of the gazing, singing, and laughter...what do you think the major impact of the moon has on us?...Why have we not gone back there to investigate or colonize it?

Why do we howl at the moon ?


Let's hear some stories about the moon in all aspects....


Last edited by BROOK; 11-11-2009 at 01:39 AM.
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Old 06-18-2009, 05:48 AM   #2
Wormhole
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Default Re: Everything Moon

How to play, "Guess that Moon"

Take a sheet, and cut a hole in it about the size of a basketball.

While two others hold the sheet up, take turns guessing who the person is behind the hole by the shape of their moon.

Requires more then three players.



Best moon story: I will never forget watching kit foxes play on the hay mounds in the full moonlight. I watched them for hours one late summer evening. Everything was silver and covered with dew. It felt electric.

Moon Brew: Drink one glass of water left overnight in the moonlight for extra energy.

Cheers!
Wormhole
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Old 06-18-2009, 06:07 AM   #3
BROOK
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Default Re: Everything Moon

Alright now! Dan go get the bed sheet...I'll get the scissors

Wormhole that is one funny game
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Old 06-18-2009, 06:08 AM   #4
Dantheman62
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Default Re: Everything Moon

bwahahaha, NOT!


The full Moon name for this month is Full Strawberry Moon. The Algonquin tribes knew this Moon as a time to gather ripening strawberries. It is also known as the Rose Moon and the Hot Moon.
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Old 06-18-2009, 06:16 AM   #5
Orion11
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Thumbs up Re: Everything Moon

i love it Brook, great idea!

i dont remeber who said this originally,
but it is perfect.... lol

Quote:
i am a moon child, born under Cancer... Moon children withdraw themselves by instinct whenever they can't answer their own question. ...
i believe the term "MoonChild" traces back to native American roots,
but i may be wrong. lol

Ive got lots of stuff that has to do with Selene/Luna/Moon.

I also go out and study it almost every night it is out. lol

Here she is from my backyard...



Ive got some new ones to that ive gotta upload, that i think are good, ill share em soon if you want.

Thanks Brook, Thanks wormhole,
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Old 06-18-2009, 06:19 AM   #6
BROOK
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Default Re: Everything Moon

On a full Moon...who comes to life?



So, what actually is werewolf or lycanthropy? Is it a fact based on concrete evidences? Is it a myth, fabrication of feeble minds? Is it an exaggeration of some other things? Well, all these questions have been puzzling mankind for last 5 centuries. Though many ingenious hypotheses have been suggested as possible explanations, definite conclusion can't be drawn. Some experts have tried to observe it as purely supernatural phenomena while others have relied on scientific observations. Contradictions and debates still persist and will continue till any single theory solves the jigsaw which seems unlikely considering complexity and diversity of the topic.
Nonetheless, the werewolf phenomenon has not perished yet; recent werewolf sightings are still reported.
The word werewolf is most likely to derive from two old-Saxon words, wer (meaning man) and wolf. Frequently used Greek terms Lycanthropy refers to the transformation process while Lycanthrope, which is in fact synonymous to werewolf, is the afflicted person. The popular definition of werewolf or lycanthrope is a man who transforms himself or being transformed into a wolf under the influence of full moon.
This web site has followed on scientific ideas while explaining possible sources and causes of werewolf legend. Popular and supernatural beliefs has been also mentioned for instant comparison. The site starts with the origin of the legend citing the oldest recorded werewolf encounter. Then, portraits and transformation process have been sketched with a brief depiction of an alleged ritual as per historical documents and literatures. Some recorded French werewolf trials have been referred for understanding the trend of general sentiment towards the phenomena during the middle ages. Most important part of the website is the possible explanations of werewolf phenomenon where scientific explanation of lycanthropy has been discussed in details. Another uniqueness of the site is that some important items and concepts related to werewolf has been illustrated. For further research on this topic please visit the web links or read the recommended books on the reference page.
The site has been developed keeping you in mind. Easy navigational links are always with you wherever you go. Larger font with enough space is for your easy on-screen reading. Moreover, important points are highlighted for quick scanning of the materials. You will also find printer friendly version of each pages.
Some information on this web page has been quoted from the Time-Life Book titled Transformation. You will find details of the book on Reference page.
This site is only the starting point of a long journey. If you like to join in, you are most welcome. Your contributions will definitely enrich this site; all worthy contributions will be updated on readers comments page. Feel free to drop any suggestion, observations or contribution through the feedback form. And don't forget to put up your comments on message board for open discussion.


Last edited by BROOK; 06-19-2009 at 12:45 AM.
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Old 06-18-2009, 06:22 AM   #7
Dantheman62
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Default Re: Everything Moon

During the Middle Ages, many believed that the Moon caused madness, a superstition still reflected in our word lunacy.
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Old 06-18-2009, 06:22 AM   #8
Wormhole
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Default Re: Everything Moon

I find the whole idea of the moon having been "placed" in it's particular orbit to be fascinating. The concept that this environmentally conducive relationship between earth and moon was not an accident seems compelling. I am also fascinated by the idea that the moon was a "made" object. There is something archaic in me that this resonates with, though I have not a stitch of reasoning to say why on any other level then conceptual fantasy.

The Leer interviews have a bit on this subject. I can only hope that there is more evidence to view one day.

The moon however has always been a deeply powerful object of the feminine, today and since the first stone figures were unearthed in caves. The story of the sacred feminine and the moon is truly beautiful...

Peace of Mind,
Worm
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Old 06-18-2009, 06:33 AM   #9
Orion11
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Default Re: Everything Moon

here is one from June 14~ During Daylight~
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Old 06-18-2009, 06:33 AM   #10
Orion11
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Default Re: Everything Moon

double post, sorry.

Last edited by Orion11; 06-18-2009 at 06:36 AM.
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Old 06-18-2009, 06:34 AM   #11
BROOK
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Default Re: Everything Moon

Why have we not been back?...and are there actually ruins there?

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Old 06-18-2009, 06:35 AM   #12
Wormhole
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Default Re: Everything Moon

Beautiful. Pictures, I mean.

Interesting Video, Brook. There is soo much that is questionable.
Orion, Have you ever seen anything interesting in those pictures of yours?

Peace of Mind,
Worm

Last edited by Wormhole; 06-18-2009 at 06:43 AM.
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Old 06-18-2009, 06:36 AM   #13
BROOK
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Default Re: Everything Moon

Ditto...great pics Orion
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Old 06-18-2009, 06:37 AM   #14
Orion11
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Default Re: Everything Moon

yes there are ruins there,
ancient,
and modern.
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Old 06-18-2009, 06:39 AM   #15
Orion11
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Default Re: Everything Moon

thanks!
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Old 06-18-2009, 06:46 AM   #16
Wormhole
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Default Re: Everything Moon

Nice cat.
What is your analysis of the ruins you've seen?
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Old 06-18-2009, 06:52 AM   #17
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Default Re: Everything Moon

Just dated today....

U.S. Shoots for the Moon, This Time to Stay



By Jeffrey Kluger Thursday, Jun. 18, 2009


The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter or LRO (top) and the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite or LCROSS (lower) are scheduled to be launched together aboard an Atlas 5 rocket on a mission to the moon.

Say this for the U.S. space program: we may have spent the last 40 years mostly ignoring the moon, but when we go back, we go back with a bang. Later today — if weather conditions and hardware permit — NASA will launch its much-anticipated and deeply imaginative Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), the first American spacecraft of any kind to make a lunar trip since 1999. Not only will LRO help us study the moon in greater detail than ever before, it should also give us our first look at the six Apollo landing sites since we abandoned the historic campgrounds two generations ago.

In the last few years, the moon has once again become the hot place to go. Three countries with little spacefaring history — Japan, China and India — have all sent probes moonward since 2007, and China in particular has made it clear it plans to return, first with more robot ships, then with astronauts. (See a photo survey of the world's most competitive space programs.)
In 2004, the U.S. restarted its own lunar program, when former President George W. Bush announced a new commitment to have astronauts back on the moon by 2020 and on Mars in the years after. There was surely some political motivation in Bush's election-year proposal, but it was followed up by hard-headed planning and real NASA action. With the shuttles scheduled to be mothballed by 2010, the space agency has committed itself to building and flying a lunar-capable manned ship by 2015, and though the Obama Administration is currently reconsidering the entire lunar program, so far it's still on track. The goal is to station astronauts on the moon for months, not days, to conduct lunar studies and as training for later attempts to live on Mars. As NASA knew in the 1950s, however, before you can send humans to the moon, you need to send robotic scouts. And that's where the LRO gets involved. (Video: First broadcast from the moon.)
The 13-ft.-long, two-ton spacecraft is not designed for a landing, but rather will settle into a low lunar orbit just 30 miles (48 km) above the surface, or about half the altitude at which the Apollos flew. The ship will be fairly stuffed with scientific instruments, one of the most important — if least sexy sounding — of which will be its laser altimeter. The altimeter will bounce laser beams off the lunar surface and, by measuring the speed at which they reflect back up, calculate the moon's topography to within inches. That's critical since long-term lunar stays require finding not only hospitable places to land, but hospitable places to establish a home.
We're going to measure the topography with the level of detail civil engineers need when they're building a building," says Jim Garvin, one of the lead developers of the LRO and the chief scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, which will run the mission. Just as important for choosing where to homestead is knowing the local weather — or at least the local temperature. Nobody pretends that the moon will be a thermally comfortable place to live, but few people realize just how punishing its climate extremes are — a torch-like 250 degrees F (120 C) during the day and a paralyzing -382 F (-230 C) at night. What's more, says Garvin, "The moon goes through this dance every 28 days." Those kinds of cycling extremes can be murder on hardware, and until we know more about the hot-cold rhythm we can't build properly to withstand it.
Easily the most exciting piece of hardware aboard the ship, however — for lay lunarphiles at least — will be the camera. Even the best reconnaissance photography before the Apollo visits missed things, which is why Apollo 11's landing almost came to grief when Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin found themselves piloting their lander over an unexpected boulder field just seconds before touchdown. That's less likely to happen this time, thanks to a camera that can visualize objects as small as a few feet across. What's more, since the LRO will be in a polar orbit instead of an equatorial one — or, vertical rather than horizontal — the moon's 28-day rotation will eventually carry virtually every spot on the surface beneath the camera's lens. "The moon will essentially walk around underneath the orbiter," says Garvin. "With the detail we get in the photographs, every picture will be like a mini-landing." That includes photos of the Apollo sites, all half dozen of which should have their portraits snapped. If NASA gets lucky, Garvin believes the first such images could be in hand by the 40th anniversary of Apollo 11, on July 20.
For all of LRO's versatility, one thing it can't do with much precision is look for water. That's a problem, since astronauts living on the surface will need plenty of the stuff, and bringing it all with them is out of the question. (A single pint of water weighs about a pound, and every pound you fly to the moon costs about $50,000.) LRO, however, will not be traveling alone. Launched on the same booster will be another entire spacecraft known as the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS).
Shortly after the paired ships enter space, LCROSS will separate from LRO and embark on its own trajectory toward the moon. LCROSS will lag behind, spending four months in a sweeping orbit that will carry it around both the Earth and the moon; throughout its flight, it will remain attached to its upper stage rocket, separating from it only during its final approach to the moon. The rocket stage will then speed ahead, aiming for a deliberate crash in one of several craters in the south lunar pole in which the LRO's sensors will have detected signs of water ice. The collision will send a debris plume as high as 6.2 miles (10 km) into space and the LCROSS itself, trailing four minutes behind, will fly through it. As it does, its instruments will analyze the chemistry of the plume, looking particularly for water ice, hydrocarbons and other organics that will break down as they are exposed to their first flashes of sunlight in billions of years. Shortly after that, LCROSS too will complete its suicide plunge, smashing into the ground just miles from the first impact site.
It will take about a year before the surviving LRO completes its more leisurely mission, and then another decade at least before humans are once again treading the lunar soil. LRO and LCROSS should play a big part in bringing that eventual return a little closer — and making it a lot safer.

Last edited by BROOK; 06-18-2009 at 06:55 AM.
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Old 06-18-2009, 07:04 AM   #18
BROOK
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Default Re: Everything Moon

Next Full Moon dates 2009
Year Month Day Time Day of week
2009 Jan 11 03:28 Sun
2009 Feb 9 14:51 Mon
2009 Mar 11 02:40 Wed
2009 Apr 9 14:58 Thu
2009 May 9 04:03 Sat
2009 Jun 7 18:13 Sun
2009 Jul 7 09:23 Tue
2009 Aug 6 00:57 Thu
2009 Sept 4 16:05 Fri
2009 Oct 4 06:11 Sun
2009 Nov 2 19:15 Mon
2009 Dec 2 07:33 Wed
2009 Dec 31 19:15 Thu

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Old 06-18-2009, 07:23 AM   #19
BROOK
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Default Re: Everything Moon

Dancing in the Moonlight....

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Old 06-18-2009, 07:25 AM   #20
BROOK
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Default Re: Everything Moon

YouTube - the REAL reason why they haven't been back to the Moon



This is a really good small version of a good dvd I have...well put together
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Old 06-18-2009, 08:14 AM   #21
judykott
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Default Re: Everything Moon

I just posted a lot of moon pictures and information on the 777 thread Xmen for those of you who do not make it there except once in a blue moon, here is the link
http://projectavalon.net/forum/showt...d=1#post145876



There are pictures and information on sundogs , halos , circumzenithal arcs and other phenomenon as well.
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Old 06-18-2009, 09:31 AM   #22
Luminari
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Cool Re: Everything Moon

This is a fascinating lecture with heaps of Moon anomalies.
Have you guys seen this one?

Extraterrestrial Archaeology by David Hatcher Childress

http://www.livevideo.com/video/Consp...ress-extr.aspx

http://www.livevideo.com/video/Consp...ress-extr.aspx

http://www.livevideo.com/video/Consp...ress-extr.aspx

http://www.livevideo.com/video/Consp...ress-extr.aspx

or download the whole thing here.
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Old 06-18-2009, 02:48 PM   #23
BROOK
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Default Re: Everything Moon

Good video Luminari

Very interesting and informative
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Old 06-18-2009, 02:49 PM   #24
BROOK
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Default Re: Everything Moon

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Old 06-18-2009, 03:08 PM   #25
BROOK
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Default Re: Everything Moon

This takes me back.....Moonchild by King Crimson


Call her moonchild
Dancing in the shallows of a river
Lovely moonchild
Dreaming in the shadow
Of the willow.

Talking to the trees of the
Cobweb strange
Sleeping on the steps of a fountain
Waving silver wands to the
Night-birds song
Waiting for the sun on the mountain.

Shes a moonchild
Gathering the flowers in a garden.
Lovely moonchild
Drifting on the echoes of the hours.

Sailing on the wind
In a milk white gown
Dropping circle stones on a sun dial
Playing hide and seek
With the ghosts of dawn
Waiting for a smile from a sun child.
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