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What Does It Mean ? What does this all mean for the Ground Crew ?

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Old 01-07-2010, 10:57 PM   #1
Anita
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Default Sirius strobing

It is a freezing cold and crystal clear night here up north, the stars really bright. Sirius ( down to the left of Orion) is twinkling extremely bright tonight, red alternating with blue. Anyone else notice? Never seen a star so bright, with such colors - but then again it might just be my eyes...
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Old 01-07-2010, 11:30 PM   #2
Shaynard
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Default Re: Sirius strobing

Odd.. I was actually just commenting on the same thing to a friend.

Where are you located? I am in northern Ontario, Canada.

It certainly does seem unusually vibrant at the moment.

In light, of love
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Old 01-07-2010, 11:45 PM   #3
Dantheman62
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Default Re: Sirius strobing

Stars twinkle because of turbulence in the atmosphere of the Earth. As the atmosphere churns, the light from the star is refracted in different directions. This causes the star's image to change slightly in brightness and position, hence "twinkle." This is one of the reasons the Hubble telescope is so successful: in space, there is no atmosphere to make the stars twinkle, allowing a much better image to be obtained.


Planets do not twinkle the way stars do. In fact, this is a good way of figuring out if a particular object you see in the sky is a planet or a star. The reason is that stars are so far away that they are essentially points of light on the sky, while planets actually have finite size. The size of a planet on the sky in a sense "averages out" the turbulent effects of the atmosphere, presenting a relatively stable image to the eye.

Why do stars change their colour constantly every second? red-blue-red-blue..............

This is because of scintillation ("Twinkling") as the light passes through the atmosphere of the Earth. As the air moves in and out, the starlight is refracted, often different colors in different directions. Because of this "chromatic abberation," stars can appear to change colors when they are twinkling strongly.


http://curious.astro.cornell.edu/que...php?number=114
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Old 01-08-2010, 12:30 AM   #4
5thElement
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Default Re: Sirius strobing

Thanks Dan been wondering this myself.

Just out of curiousity - can this happen when viewing stars through a telescope. During the week of Christmas we were viewing Betelgeuse and it looked like a string of colored lights instead of single light. Very cool I must say (even it was just atmospheric disturbance)

El
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Old 01-08-2010, 01:44 AM   #5
orthodoxymoron
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Default Re: Sirius strobing

I noticed this as well. It's probably always been that way...but why didn't I notice it before? I wonder if there is an intergalactic war going on there. It wouldn't surprise me. Nothing would surprise me now. Sirius is central to a lot of things. I'm just starting to scratch the surface of this Sirius subject. http://projectavalon.net/forum/showt...234#post178234 Focus your research on the Dog-Star. Siriusly.

Namaste

Last edited by orthodoxymoron; 01-08-2010 at 01:50 AM.
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Old 01-08-2010, 03:45 AM   #6
onawah
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Default Re: Sirius strobing

I just saw an amazing video by the young physicist Nassim Haramein beginning at
http://www.google.com/search?q=nassi...ient=firefox-a
It's in 2 parts and 8 hours long, but fascinating.
He shows images of the sun pulsing, among other things. Don't know if this is related to strobing, but could be.
He also showed images of a huge comet-like object twice as large as Jupiter entering into Mercury's orbit, circling the Sun and exiting at top speed, followed by another large body soon after, which happened a few years ago. He thinks it was Nibiru. This was the most amazing thing I've seen in a long time!
I don't know why I haven't heard of this guy before. His demeanor is like that of a typical Indigo, not intellectually dry or egocentric like many scientists, actually very unassuming and entertaining . Everything he said seemed to make sense. He answered many questions about Physics, the Mayan Calendar, ancient civilizations, etc. and has put together a Unified Field Theory which was up for peer review at the time of the video, though I don't know how it went. (If it was correct, no doubt it was trashed by the mainstream physicists...)
The date on the video is 2003, but I don't know if that's when the video was posted or how long it's been online.
If anyone knows more about this, please post here. Thanks.
I would like to hear Kerry and Bill's take on Nassim.
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Old 01-08-2010, 04:07 AM   #7
fossileyesed
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Default Re: Sirius strobing

good day all.
star and night sky photography is my newest hobby.i have a canon power shot 200,12mp,12 times zoom.48 times with video.heres a vid i made a few weeks back of sirius.i quit shaking from coffe about a minute in.it is a most beautiful star.
some stills also

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w7fOO5rhbuc


http://s2.postimage.org/Jp5B0-9cc82d...d86661de71.jpg

my tripod shifted over a few secs on a 10 or 15 second exposer.it shows the twinkle very well with all the color spectrums of sirius.
http://s4.postimage.org/1KWt7S-9cc82...d86661de71.jpg
blown up
http://s3.postimage.org/eZCJ9-9cc82d...d86661de71.jpg


peace.....kent
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Old 01-08-2010, 05:21 AM   #8
Shaynard
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Default Re: Sirius strobing

The video was very nice.. Thank you for sharing.

The pictures unfortunately wouldn't link forum, I will try them again another time.

In light, of love
Shaynard
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Old 01-08-2010, 06:16 AM   #9
fossileyesed
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Default Re: Sirius strobing

thanks shaynard
see if these ones work.sorry bout that

http://www.postimage.org/image.php?v=aV1KUupJ
http://www.postimage.org/image.php?v=TsJp5B0

the stretch
http://www.postimage.org/image.php?v=PqeZCJ9
what the pic before and after that one looked like
i usually take three pics at a time,on a timer
http://www.postimage.org/image.php?v=aV4N29i

peace...kent
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Old 01-08-2010, 08:09 AM   #10
Shaynard
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Default Re: Sirius strobing

Beautiful picture's. Those links worked fine, thank you.

In light, of love
Shaynard
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Old 01-08-2010, 09:26 AM   #11
LightSurfer
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Default Re: Sirius strobing

Quote:
Originally Posted by 5thElement View Post
Thanks Dan been wondering this myself.

Just out of curiousity - can this happen when viewing stars through a telescope. During the week of Christmas we were viewing Betelgeuse and it looked like a string of colored lights instead of single light. Very cool I must say (even it was just atmospheric disturbance)

El
I read somewhere ( think its google sky ??? ) Betelgeuse is actually a Supernova that could explode anytime now!!! ...been staring at Orion for years and years and "Bettlejuice" still looks the same!

LS
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Old 01-08-2010, 11:58 PM   #12
5thElement
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Default Re: Sirius strobing

Quote:
Originally Posted by LightSurfer View Post
I read somewhere ( think its google sky ??? ) Betelgeuse is actually a Supernova that could explode anytime now!!! ...been staring at Orion for years and years and "Bettlejuice" still looks the same!

LS
I thought I had read that somewhere but couldn't find it when I went looking - thanks!

Fossileyesed - awesome pictures. What I saw looked very similar the last photograph on your post. I saw individual lights but I imagine the difference might be explained due to the camera/shutter speed.

Unfortunately, we have only had a peek at the stars lately due to cloudy weather.

El
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Old 01-09-2010, 12:43 AM   #13
fossileyesed
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Default Re: Sirius strobing

heres a pic of most of orion,beetlegeuse and a couple others are pretty colourful
the skys up here have been really clear and i got an awsome veiw from my back deck.been getting the moon real nice to.
http://www.postimage.org/image.php?v=aVok_Lr

http://www.postimage.org/image.php?v=Ts1H9I2J

http://www.postimage.org/image.php?v=Pq11aG_9

peace...kent
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Old 01-09-2010, 09:30 AM   #14
SiriArc
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