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onawah
9th April 2019, 04:23
Let's devote this thread to the other family of sentient creatures that inhabit this planet with us, that we take for granted far too often.
I've always been a horse lover, and it's so great now that they come in so many different sizes! :lol:
"Tiniest, Fuzziest Mini Horse Starts Dancing With Joy
The Dodo
Published on Apr 4, 2019
Martha is a tiny dwarf horse who is shorter than a golden retriever. She was born with a genetic defect that left her legs deformed. Watch as she gets better every day and starts to leap around with so much joy!

You can keep up with Martha and all of her adventures on Instagram, randrranchminis: https://thedo.do/randr. You can learn more about R and R Ranch by visiting their website: https://www.randrranchminis.com/."
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Sophocles
9th April 2019, 08:34
Thanks for this lovely thread. I think it's so cute when animals become friends across species. Here's a documentary about it.

Animal Odd Couples [Full Documentary] | Wild Things (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_BvB0182xag)

_BvB0182xag


YT DESCRIPTION: Biologist Liz Bonnin explores why some of the most bizarre and surprising animals pair up with each other and with us. She scours the globe in search of the most extraordinary and cute animal relationships, investigating why such odd couples sometimes form. From dogs mothering baby tigers and polar bears befriending huskies, to buffaloes bonding with grown men and lions behaving like our brothers.

Liz will discover how oxytocin, the love hormone, plays a vital part in bringing the oddest animals together. The biological need to mother can shake up the natural order to such an extent that we see cats mothering ducklings and deer adopting dogs as their own young. There’s even the rhino and the sheep that love spending time with each other so much that they become ill if they are separated.

onawah
11th April 2019, 04:10
A Wild Canadian Lynx And A Cameraman Develop An Amazing Relationship
CBC
Published on Feb 27, 2018
'It was the best day of my life.' Sam Ellis spent 76 days with Mad Max in the Yukon wilderness.
Subscribe: http://bit.ly/CBC-Subscribe
Watch More Shows: http://bit.ly/CBC-MoreShows
From the creators of the acclaimed series WILD CANADA, comes a new five-part series to celebrate Canada’s 150th. The Wild Canadian Year presents Canada’s extraordinary wildlife through the lens of the country’s four dramatic seasons. Watch new digital stories online every two weeks all year.
Visit The Wild Canadian Year for more stories: http://www.cbc.ca/wildcanadianyear/

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Denise/Dizi
11th April 2019, 05:14
:heart: LOVE THIS IDEA! Thank you onawah

onawah
13th April 2019, 20:44
The foot of a gecko
From: Planet Earth Phenomenon

https://media.loupak.fun/soubory/obrazky_n/_zajimavosti/1215/6198.jpg
"The interactions between the gecko's feet and the climbing surface are stronger than simple surface area effects. On its feet, the gecko has many microscopic hairs, or setae (singular seta), that increase the Van der Waals forces between its feet and the surface. These setae are fibrous structural proteins that protrude from the epidermis, which is made of β-keratin, the basic building block of human skin.
The feet of geckos have a number of specializations. Their surfaces can adhere to any type of material with the exception of Teflon (PTFE). This phenomenon can be explained with three elements:

Foot structure
Structure of the material to which the foot adheres
The ability to adhere to a surface and become a part of it."

onawah
17th April 2019, 05:05
Deer Lives With Family :lol:
Uzoo
Published on Jan 6, 2009

"Barbie the deer has made herself at home in this farmhouse in Scotland."fYCGPCQQ-48

Dillie the Deer: Love on Tiny Hooves
National Geographic
Published on Mar 20, 2014

"In summer 2004, veterinarian Melanie Butera received an unexpected patient: a blind, dying fawn named Dillie. Butera and her husband nursed Dillie to health. Now, Dillie—who snacks on lollipops and has her own bedroom in their house in Canal Fulton, Ohio—is a daily source of comfort and love to her adoptive family."
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Episodic videos about a protector of wild deer on this channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCS1laInfxZinUnFIPZW-Tpg
Such as:
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AriG
17th April 2019, 14:15
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oj0Iz9ZsDAc

Indian ringneck parakeets! If my cats wouldn’t hurt them, I’d have a pair today! What a fun way to start the day!

onawah
18th April 2019, 03:21
Justin Beaver
Loves Building Dams In His House

The Dodo
Published on Aug 1, 2018
Rescue Beaver Loves Building Dams In His House
"This professional wildlife rehabber lets a baby beaver build dams in the house and swim in the tub 5 times a day."
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Denise/Dizi
18th April 2019, 05:09
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ePREI8Qqi0Y

AriG
18th April 2019, 19:46
So I have seven goats and one sheep? How does that happen? Not quite sure, but it did. And with Gaia as my witness, my goats speak, not unlike the parrot brothers that I loaded earlier.

I have one little girl, a Nigerian dwarf dwarf ( only weighs 45 pounds and stands 19" high at the withers) who speaks the words " Mommy, Daddy, I love you, whatcha doin? Hmmm and hungry. She also refers to the other goats as "them". There is a lot more vocabulary but I won't bore you - way Middle Earth, but this thread is exactly that, innit?

Thing is? They're psychic. They KNOW when I am attempting to record them and suddenly start playing the role of livestock. I am thinking about doing a hidden camera. You honestly would not believe it.

But this thread has me thinking (seriously) - Omnivores! I am one. And I have a super dilemma about it (ref Michael Pollan). We have never slaughtered our animals and would never ever think of consuming them. We are attached. The only time we had to slaughter was when an Opossum decimated our chicken flock. Took 50% of the birds and left them alive. We had no choice but to put them out of their misery. There was no recovery from that. We haven't eaten chicken since. In fact, any meat, is usually just an ingredient these days. Would rather not have it at all, but with my Hashimotos situation, I need some pure protein to survive. Beans are the enemy to my condition, and eggs, well, they can't be every meal... I only eat about 1000 calories per day intentionally, but there must be some variety. Most of my protein is fish related, with occasional Bison. But surely, they in their foreign environment must have the ability to communicate as do the animals on this thread?

I despise the fact that we, as sentient, thoughtful, creative and loving beings are compelled to consume other beings for optimal health. Whatever designed us, put a flaw in the system.

I wonder if all other omnivores/carnivores would stop killing each other (lions and gazelles for example) if the top of the food chain (we) stopped eating flesh? Would the food chain fear disappear? Would the "lion lie down with the lamb" And Yes, it WAS lion, definitely not wolf.

I am sure my comments are not where this thread was intended to go. So sorry about that. Just feel compelled to share my angst. Thanks for listening :)

Akasha
18th April 2019, 20:18
I was going to share the following video on the All Things Vegan thread, but given that animals are magical, I felt maybe it would serve more purpose on this thread. Anyone still subjecting these magical creatures to this level of existance through their lifestyle choices has an obligation, I repeat, an obligation to watch this film. Yes, it is graphic. Yes, it is brutal. No, it is not acceptable. Be the change. Go vegan.



LQRAfJyEsko

AriG
18th April 2019, 20:29
I was going to share the following video on the All Things Vegan thread, but given that animals are magical, I felt maybe it would serve more purpose on this thread. Anyone still subjecting these magical creatures to this level of existance through their lifestyle choices has an obligation, I repeat, an obligation to watch this film. Yes, it is graphic. Yes, it is brutal. No, it is not acceptable. Be the change. Go vegan.



LQRAfJyEsko

I love everything about your post. I love your Avatar! But I cannot watch the video. I need to eat pure protein to survive ( the only animal based protein I have eaten in the last two weeks is pickled Herring). And its not that great! Its a great source of Omega 3, but its kind of nasty. Have to choke it down with Horseradish. And that definitely opens the third eye (or nostril). LOL.

Akasha
18th April 2019, 20:47
I was going to share the following video on the All Things Vegan thread, but given that animals are magical, I felt maybe it would serve more purpose on this thread. Anyone still subjecting these magical creatures to this level of existance through their lifestyle choices has an obligation, I repeat, an obligation to watch this film. Yes, it is graphic. Yes, it is brutal. No, it is not acceptable. Be the change. Go vegan.



LQRAfJyEsko

I love everything about your post. I love your Avatar! But I cannot watch the video. I need to eat pure protein to survive ( the only animal based protein I have eaten in the last two weeks is pickled Herring). And its not that great! Its a great source of Omega 3, but its kind of nasty. Have to choke it down with Horseradish. And that definitely opens the third eye (or nostril). LOL.

Hi AriG. I don't want to go off topic on this thread so I would ask you to join me in conversation on the dietary subject you raised over on the All Things Vegan thread. Unfortunately I have to crash now though. Hopefully see you soon there (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?83021-All-Things-Vegan-&p=1287157&viewfull=1#post1287157). :)

Patient
18th April 2019, 21:19
I was going to share the following video on the All Things Vegan thread, but given that animals are magical, I felt maybe it would serve more purpose on this thread. Anyone still subjecting these magical creatures to this level of existance through their lifestyle choices has an obligation, I repeat, an obligation to watch this film. Yes, it is graphic. Yes, it is brutal. No, it is not acceptable. Be the change. Go vegan.



LQRAfJyEsko

I love everything about your post. I love your Avatar! But I cannot watch the video. I need to eat pure protein to survive ( the only animal based protein I have eaten in the last two weeks is pickled Herring). And its not that great! Its a great source of Omega 3, but its kind of nasty. Have to choke it down with Horseradish. And that definitely opens the third eye (or nostril). LOL.

My heart goes out to you AriG - I hope you find a way through to a better way regarding your health/diet dilemma.

I agree with you about the animals' efforts to communicate. We have a pet pig that calls "Momma" and only uses that sound when communicating to my wife. It is so cute.

I also believe that in some cases the animals can sense when a person is friendly or not. We live in a rural area and we see animals always coming around our place. Owls, Hawks and Ducks always come by and I often feel like they want their presence to be known almost like saying "Hello". Possums, Racoons and Deer and my kids are always so excited when they see an animal come by. My family has always been the "rescue" type and wherever we live feels like a sanctuary for animals.

We also have an amazing cat - whenever a person is sad our cat immediately senses it and she will come over and has actually a few times softly stroked the person's cheek to give comfort - so sweet.

Valerie Villars
18th April 2019, 21:53
Dear God. I am 14 minutes in and I haven't sobbed this much in I don't know how long. Pigs are extremely intelligent. My heart is broken. How can we be so cruel?

AriG
18th April 2019, 23:13
Dear God. I am 14 minutes in and I haven't sobbed this much in I don't know how long. Pigs are extremely intelligent. My heart is broken. How can we be so cruel?

My Dearest Valerie,

I so get where you are. Now let me lighten the load. Do you know what caused my DH and I to stop eating pork? Please dont laugh folks. This is a true story-albeit a socially controlled one. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okja

We cried like little babies! This is why I can’t watch ‘Dominion’ ( although I may have seen it already and blocked out)

Patient
19th April 2019, 00:20
Here is Pigcasso. She paints and her work has been used for many things - even Swatch released a special watch using her design.

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Jasmyne Emmerick
19th April 2019, 01:07
I saw this about a week ago. It was very moving as it includes things I enjoy - travel, bikes and cats

Guy Biking Across the World Picks Up a Stray Kitty by The Dodo

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Bill Ryan
19th April 2019, 01:14
:cat:

The Cat that climbed the Matterhorn

Here's a true story about the highest cat that ever climbed a mountain. Rather than copy it from a web page, I'll tell it from memory as best I recall.

Quite a while back, in 1950, some Italian mountaineers were staying in the famous Hörnli mountain hut, below the Matterhorn in Switzerland, on the Swiss side. (The Matterhorn (4478m / 14,692 ft) is right on the border between Switzerland and Italy.) It's a large hut, and in the summer there's a live-in custodian who maintains the place, provides meals, and so on.

When the Italian mountaineers set off to climb the mountain the next morning, the custodian's cat followed them. It was just 10 months old, little more than a kitten. They tried to shoo it away, but it was insistent. The climbers couldn't do anything to stop it.

Several hours later, the cat reached the summit — exhausted. (Understandably!) The Italian climbers picked it up, put it in a backpack, and then descended down the other side to Italy, which had always been their plan.

Hearing what happened, the custodian demanded his cat back. But it was now in Italy, and had been totally adopted. The climbers refused to return it. It stayed there for the rest of its life, and having departed this world years later, its body is now stuffed and in a glass case where Italian mountaineers gleefully continue to tell the story to this day.

https://cdn.britannica.com/s:700x450/32/75732-004-5A472A67.jpg

:sun:

Jill
19th April 2019, 08:02
Evil parrot :ROFL:

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DeDukshyn
19th April 2019, 15:39
People are starting to think that maybe cats aren't meant to be locked indoors ... a new type of cat is emerging ... The Adventure Cat!

Adventure cats Bolt and Keel actually have their own channel ...
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Another, here:
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EDIT:
And here's Weston and Ellinore ...
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onawah
20th April 2019, 03:28
Short but sweet, and very, very rare...
Captivating footage of a snow leopard and two cubs in China’s high mountains
World Wildlife Fund
Uploaded on Apr 15, 2019

"A camera trap situated in the high mountains of Northwestern China captured stunning footage of a female snow leopard and her two cubs roaming through the snow. These elusive animals usually live above the tree line on steep and rocky peaks, their lustrous pale gray coats allowing them to blend seamlessly into the landscape. Video clips captured by camera traps, like the one seen here, give us a window into the snow leopard's world.

Learn more about snow leopards: https://wwf.to/2v2Lo92" ( <and more photos and videos at that link )
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onawah
21st April 2019, 21:59
Boy and the The Bobcat he Saved from a Forest Fire
Animals Channel
Published on Jan 15, 2019
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onawah
27th April 2019, 04:54
Sweet Elephants! And the Vet is not so bad either...he looks like Superman :)
Evan Shares Heartfelt Encounter with a Gentle Elephant | Evan Goes Wild
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Assignment Asia: Thailand’s elephant whisperer

CGTN
Published on Jan 22, 2018
"The elephant is Thailand’s national symbol, revered throughout history for its strength and intelligence. But as much as they are celebrated, elephants are also among the most abused animals in the country. Over the past four decades, Lek Chailert—known as Thailand’s elephant whisperer—has dedicated her life to rescuing abused Asian elephants and building an emotional connection with them."
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elephantnews
Published on Sep 12, 2017
#Faamai #Lek #Elephant
"Watch this adorable footage of elephants following Lek who is riding her bicycle. See what Faamai does when Lek gets off her bike at Elephant Nature Park. This is the special bond between an elephant and a human who has looked after her since she was born."
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(It's so touching when animals who could so easily and logically be fearful of humans, are instead affectionate and loving. Even possessive! :lol: )

onawah
29th April 2019, 04:19
Human and Gorilla Reunite after 5 years
TVFIRST4YOU
Published on Jun 3, 2012
"Damien and his long lost gorilla companion reunite after 5 years."
60 Minutes Australia. 03/06/2012
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Constance
29th April 2019, 04:35
Human and Gorilla Reunite after 5 years
TVFIRST4YOU
Published on Jun 3, 2012
"Damien and his long lost gorilla companion reunite after 5 years."
60 Minutes Australia. 03/06/2012
nEUlUfhQbNw

One of my favourite videos of all time. Thanks for sharing Onawah :heart:

Constance
29th April 2019, 04:43
We aren't the only ones who like to surf waves :)

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onawah
29th April 2019, 04:48
Here's one of my favorites--crow sledding on roof:

"Crow Uses Plastic Lid to Sled Down Roof Over and Over Again"
Viralno
Published on Feb 2, 2017
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onawah
30th April 2019, 01:47
You won't believe this!
New Horizon
Published on Feb 26, 2014

"Genuine paintings by elephants. In the video you will see Suda the elephant painting for Jessyca. She wished to have Suda the elephant painting her artwork and signing it with her name.

A portion of the proceeds of the sale of this elephant painting by Suda the elephant was donated to the WWF to help prevent poaching and blood ivory.

You too, like Jessyca can make a difference by taking a stand against blood ivory.

For more information on how you can help please visit:
http://ThaiElephantArt.com"

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See slides of another elephant painting here:
https://thaielephantart.com/product/elephant-paintings-banks-creations-two-trees/#sthash.7wTGueCa.dpbs

Constance
1st May 2019, 09:00
A fascinating timelapse video of redworms (Eisenia fetida) through 20 days of vermicomposting. Aprox. 2-3 cm (1inch) thick layers of compost and sawdust were topped with layer of grass clippings. Photos were taken every 10 minutes and video is played at 24 fps.

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Constance
1st May 2019, 21:35
Chito and his rescued pet crocodile

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Shot in the left eye by a cattle farmer after preying on a herd of cows, Chito enlisted the help of several friends to load the massive reptile into his boat, Naming him 'Pocho' (meaning strength), the fisherman says he healed the reptile with medicine, food, and, more importantly, lots of care and attention.

Known as the 'Crocodile Man', Costa Rican animal lover 'Chito' swims, plays and even feeds 'Pocho' the giant crocodile in what is one of the world's most unlikely friendships.

Wading chest-deep through the green water in a 100 sq/m lake in Siquirres, this bizarre and dangerous spectacle draws tourists from around the world.

Calling quietly for his five metre long 'companion' before thrashing around, lifting his tail and head above the water.

'This is a very dangerous routine but Pocho is my friend and we have a good relationship,' says 52-year-old Chito. 'He will look me in the eye and he does not attack me.

'It is too dangerous for anyone else to come in the water. It is only ever the two of us.'

The bizarre friendship began nearly 20 years ago when Chito rescued the 980-pound crocodile after finding him close to death on the shore of the Parismina River, in the Caribbean province of Limsn.

'When I found him in the river after he was dying so I put him in my boat and I brought him into my house,' recalls Chito.

'He was very skinny, weighing only around 150 pounds, so I gave him chicken and fish and medicine for six months to help him recover.'

During the recovery process, Chito stayed by Pocho's side, even sleeping with him at night.

'I just wanted him to feel that someone loved him, that not all humans are bad,' Chito says. 'I love all animals, especially ones that have suffered. It meant a lot of sacrifice. I had to be there every day.'

After Chito felt that Pocho had bonded with him, he started to get closer and closer to the animal.

'After 10 years I started to work with him,' he says. 'At first it was slow, slow and I started to play with him a little, touching him a little bit and then slowly doing more. Then I found that when I called his name he would come over to me.'

Today tourists travel from all over the world to see the unusual spectacle.

'I am happy because I rescued him and he is happy with me because he has everything he needs," says Chito.

Source: Dailymail (https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1206872/Crocodile-crazy-The-man-enjoys-giving-dangerous-companion-cuddle.html)

onawah
4th May 2019, 19:16
Birds are Magical

https://i.pinimg.com/474x/8b/c6/5f/8bc65f0c0be997ee4ad68efc65f4b320--birds-of-prey-dive.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/474x/0e/43/ee/0e43ee379fe200c2bdb88f28d56c3fd1.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/474x/85/a4/e5/85a4e5f57a6e11b8406ab69705ad8485.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/474x/42/da/35/42da352b2a53ffc23018dd40ac89e38a--africans-fish.jpg

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/223843043959266340/

https://i.pinimg.com/474x/c1/8e/23/c18e23c736392f8423f2d055d075dcf7.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/474x/3a/9d/0a/3a9d0a602c4509c96f34ba176f33c454.jpg

https://i.pinimg.com/474x/2e/8f/6a/2e8f6ae58b2a59a14a50b11cab2c3f11.jpg

Not a bird, obviously, but too cute to pass up. https://i.pinimg.com/236x/b0/85/2f/b0852f49f71d832c090fe15ae5a2e7c8--type--theater.jpg

Constance
6th May 2019, 07:00
Rescue dog Luke wakes its owners up to save their baby who had stopped breathing.

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Constance
6th May 2019, 07:13
Kevin Richardson: Lion whisperer.

A Lioness trusts her cubs with Kevin.

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Bill Ryan
6th May 2019, 13:06
:)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z6munv_kv9E&feature=youtu.be

Constance
7th May 2019, 00:30
Thanks to Rachel (mod) for this find. :sun:

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onawah
7th May 2019, 00:30
These very playful white lion cubs are so beautiful (though I have no idea what their keepers are saying. Anyone speak Portuguese? )

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Bluegreen
7th May 2019, 01:42
I saw this about a week ago. It was very moving as it includes things I enjoy - travel, bikes and cats

Guy Biking Across the World Picks Up a Stray Kitty by The Dodo

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Thank you for posting Jasmyne :)

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DeDukshyn
7th May 2019, 22:09
Birds are Magical
...
https://i.pinimg.com/474x/8b/c6/5f/8bc65f0c0be997ee4ad68efc65f4b320--birds-of-prey-dive.jpg
...

I grew up on lakeshore property in BC, and I still recall the sheer excitement and wonderment and shock as a young boy (maybe 12) when I saw for the first time an Osprey diving from several hundred feet in the air slamming into the lake at a blistering speed. I had never seen an Osprey fishing before and it took me a few moments to even grasp what I was seeing and what was actually happening.

After about 10 or 15 seconds submerged the Osprey's head appeared and he was just sitting there treading water. I had no idea what was going on so I jumped in the fishing boat and drove out in that direction. For some reason I though maybe the bird had gotten hurt. (didn't seem unreasonable when you saw it dive from a few hundred feet at full speed). As the Osprey saw me approaching, he made grand effort to take off from the water but was struggling quite profusely, then I realized it had caught a fish that must have far weighed more than itself and it had no intentions of letting it go. After a few minutes of struggling, the magnificent bird finally flew off with a catch more grand than anything I had ever manged to pull out of that lake.

At the end of the lake where the Osprey had dove the water is fairly shallow 20-30 feet maybe and clear water. There's tons of fish there but the big ones only ever sat at the very bottom. This explained why the Osprey had dove from such an incredible height - he had his eye fixed on one of those big bottom dwellers. :) His time of sitting in the water was (now obvious) him just trying to take some time and subdue the fish so it would stop struggling, so he could fly away properly. I spooked him out of the water a bit prematurely, and the fish was still struggling, making a pretty wobbly flying bird of prey as the fish continued to struggle to break free. :)

This clip explains a little of what I saw that day, but imagine the bird diving from an incredible height to reach down deep into the water ...
7g-15TZ2-T8

onawah
8th May 2019, 04:14
Magical Animal Encounters
The Dodo
May 3, 2019

"Animals make the world magic! Whether friendly encounters with a baby deer, flying geese, baby sea turtles, a whale or even a hug from a loving kangaroo, these magical moments are sure to brighten your day." PcQCvV_3Q8k

CUTE Animals Hugging People
MAI PM
Premiered Jan 17, 2019
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Some really funny clips in this compilation
Funny Animals
Mar 15, 2019
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onawah
10th May 2019, 18:09
Dr. Seuss would be proud...
Dr. Evan Meets One Of The World's Most Fascinating Primates

Animal Planet
May 8, 2019

"Evan spends his 34th birthday meeting some of Sri Lanka's amazing wildlife, including a giant flying squirrel, and the world's only venomous primate, the adorable slender loris."
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Dr. Evan Antin Bonds with an Incredibly Friendly Palawan Bearcat ( the first successfully bred in captivity)
Animal Planet
Published on Apr 12, 2019

"In the Philippines, Evan visits a Butterfly Eco Garden where he gets a once in a life time opportunity to play with a palawan bearcat and give it a physical inspection."
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Big Bad Wolf

Animal Planet
Published on Feb 13, 2019

"Apache was rescued from a small concrete yard, where he was showing aggressive behaviour towards anyone who came near him. After having a painful broken tooth removed, Apache is let out into his new enclosure."
(Watch when his keeper goes into the eclosure with the big bad wolf for the first time. :lol: )

Rcln5QjgvBw

onawah
10th May 2019, 18:15
Animals Reacting to Music

Street Music
Mar 30, 2019
5N_WWNGOVC0

onawah
10th May 2019, 18:24
If you've never seen the story about how Diablo the black leopard became "Spirit", this is a must-see.
The incredible story of how leopard Diabolo became Spirit - Anna Breytenbach, "animal communicator".

Arjan Postma
Published on Nov 19, 2013
"I just want to share this message as much as possible without any commercial intent, personal benefit or whatsoever. All used materials and therefore copyrights do not belong to me. I hope you enjoy discovering and watching this story and skill as much as I did: What if you could talk to animals and have them talk back to you? Anna Breytenbach has dedicated her life to what she calls interspecies communication. She sends detailed messages to animals through pictures and thoughts. She then receives messages of remarkable clarity back from the animals. In this section, Anna transforms a deadly snarling leopard into a relaxed content cat. The amazing story of how leopard Diabolo became Spirit...

I found the source of this amazing documentary here:
http://www.cultureunplugged.com/docum...

This is the first full length documentary film on the art of animal communication. Nominated for Best Long Documentary, Best Director of "Jade Kunlun" Awards of 2012 World Mountain Documentary Festival of Qinghai China.
Director: Craig Foster | Producer: Vyv Simson | Narrator: Swati Thiyagarajan
Genre: Documentary | Produced In: 2012 | Story Teller's Country: South Africa

Here's a link to a more recent documentary explaining a little more about this amazing recovery: http://carteblanche.dstv.com/player/1...

The music I added: Harry Gregson-Williams - Cowboys and Aliens

**********************************************

A NOTE FROM ANIMALSPIRIT (ANNA'S TEAM) - June 2015

We would like to thank Arjan Postma, unknown to us at the time of his upload, for editing the full length documentary entitled “The Animal Communicator” into this short clip and making it available to the YouTube public. This was done independently from us - a generous and selfless action on Arjan’s side.

We would also like to point out that no matter how rich or moving, this short clip is a 13-minute excerpt from a 52-minute production that took over three years to complete, with its own storyline weaving through the entire documentary. It is therefore likely that some topics/questions may remain unanswered for the attentive and interested viewer, topics which may otherwise have been addressed in the full documentary.

“The Animal Communicator” was directed and filmed by the Foster Brothers (www.senseafrica.com) and produced by NHU Africa. The latter and its parent company are sole owners of worldwide rights.

If you’re interested in buying a copy of “The Animal Communicator” DVD (the full documentary), it is intermittently available on http://www.wisdomtonourish.com/index.....

If you would like to know more about the world of animal communication you can visit our resources page on http://www.animalspirit.org "
gvwHHMEDdT0

Bill Ryan
10th May 2019, 19:30
If you've never seen the story about how Diablo the black leopard became "Spirit", this is a must-see.
The incredible story of how leopard Diabolo became Spirit - Anna Breytenbach, "animal communicator".

gvwHHMEDdT0
:bump::bump::bump::bump::bump:

Anyone reading this thread MUST MUST MUST see this short video. It's a story that's nothing short of truly extraordinary.

Valerie Villars
10th May 2019, 21:19
Animals Reacting to Music

Street Music
Mar 30, 2019
5N_WWNGOVC0

Onawah, that is outstanding. When I was going through the worst of my spiritual adventure (it had sublime parts and terrifying parts) I would just drive and drive in the country and would often park at a horse farm called "Summerville" by the side of the road in the early, dew soaked sunshine and play "Elizabethtown" 4Bc0slfWFvw

The horses would come to the fence by the road and their souls and mine would be soothed. It would give me peace to go on. Peace to you.

onawah
11th May 2019, 17:30
Whale Protects Diver From Shark
The Dodo
Published on May 10, 2018
"Whale Saves Woman From Sharks | When a whale swam up to this woman and wouldn't leave her alone, she was freaked out — until she realized he was saving her life. To help Nan with her whale conservation research, you can support the Center for Cetacean Research and Conservation."
NTw8MR67xv8

Rich
12th May 2019, 08:41
https://static.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/crow-rides-eagle-bird-photography-phoo-chan-6.jpg

https://static.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/crow-rides-eagle-bird-photography-phoo-chan-1.jpg

https://static.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/crow-rides-eagle-bird-photography-phoo-chan-5.jpg

https://static.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/crow-rides-eagle-bird-photography-phoo-chan-2.jpg

https://static.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/crow-rides-eagle-bird-photography-phoo-chan-3.jpg

https://www.boredpanda.com/crow-rides-eagle-bird-photography-phoo-chan/?fbclid=IwAR2Zj-Ri33pqCXbyAsxGhkvnUIQ4domn71cOliZtHS46LuzWb2KEr_wU u0M&utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=organic

Constance
12th May 2019, 09:00
A conversation with Koko the gorilla

SNuZ4OE6vCk

Constance
12th May 2019, 09:05
Koko with Robin Williams

GorgFtCqPEs

onawah
12th May 2019, 17:39
Interspecies Communicator Anna Breytenbach ( who spoke with Spirit the black leopard) spoke at Findhorn in 2013

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One of the comments on the youtube page:
"skye
If animals in zoos are unhappy, imagine how animals on animal concentration camps (aka factory farms and slaughterhouses) are feeling, where they are abused and tortured and kept in extremely confined and filthy living conditions. The first step in learning to understand animals is to stop eating them. I wonder how none of these people in the audience are interested in the 150 billion animals that are killed for our food every year, as if they didn't exist at all."

Constance
12th May 2019, 20:24
Ethologist Jonathan Balcombe presents a thoughtful, well researched, insightful, sometimes hilarious (and some times astonishing!) view into the world of fishes.

It really is quite thought-provoking and well worth the watch.

I will never look at fish in quite the same way again.

What A Fish Knows, The Inner Lives of Our Underwater Cousins, Jonathan Balcombe
S0--HgyKg_s

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onawah
12th May 2019, 20:54
Anna Breytenbach - Buddha at the Gas Pump Interview
Published on Mar 26, 2019

Discussion of this interview in the BatGap Community Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/Batga...

Also see https://batgap.com/anna-breytenbach/

"Anna Breytenbach is a South African-based professional animal communicator who has received advanced training through the Assisi International Animal Institute in California, USA. She’s been practicing for 18 years in South Africa, Europe and the USA with both domestic and wild animals.

Born and raised in Cape Town, South Africa, she holds a degree in Psychology, Economics and Marketing from the University of Cape Town. Trained in tracking and mentoring at the Wilderness Awareness School (USA), she also mentors children and adults in nature awareness based on the ways of the Native American and San Bushmen peoples.

Anna is a qualified and experienced master training facilitator, focusing on bringing forth participants’ skills through coaching and mentoring in a practical manner. She consults exclusively with wildlife and offers workshops around southern Africa, occasionally touring Australia, Europe and the USA. Her work includes working with wild dolphins and whales, leading animal communication safaris, interspecies projects at permaculture and organic farms, and giving numerous public talks. Her pro bono work focuses on conservation projects such as elephant management, anti poaching assistance, baboon rehabilitation, whale and dolphin research and predator conservation. She is also the subject of the feature documentary movie "The Animal Communicator" on interspecies communication."n7oEAmp20B0

Constance
13th May 2019, 07:31
This is how a little puffer fish courts his ladies :)

p1PID91sEW8

Constance
13th May 2019, 08:08
Branch manager, assistant Branch manager
40585

Constance
13th May 2019, 19:57
In the Buddha at the gas pump video on post #52 (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?66295-The-Animal-Communicator-Anna-Breytenbach&p=1288135&viewfull=1#post1288135), (muchly appreciated Onawah! :flower:) Anna Breytenbach makes mention of Rupert Sheldrakes experimental work on how dogs and cats know when their owners are coming home.

You can hear Rupert talk about an experiment he did from 41.17 onwards here (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wDGVO5E1u3A), however, the entire video presentation is marvellous and well worth listening to.

wDGVO5E1u3A


Here is the short clip from his presentation - Rupert Sheldrake and Pam Smart's research experiment with Jaytee the dog. You will need to look at the subtitles if you don't speak german :happy dog:

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For more on Sheldrakes experiments with telepathy, you can visit his website here (https://www.sheldrake.org/research/animal-powers/a-dog-that-seems-to-know-when-his-owner-is-coming-home-videotaped-experiments-and-observations).

rgray222
14th May 2019, 00:20
One of the most amazingly clear animal photo/videos ever taken. Open to full screen.

https://imgur.com/ZhRaD3r

DeDukshyn
14th May 2019, 00:27
One of the most amazingly clear animal photo/videos ever taken. Open to full screen.

https://imgur.com/ZhRaD3r

Been seeing that one going around ... ensure to click the fullscreen button for full effect! Anyone know what kind of animal that is?

Ken
14th May 2019, 01:48
One of the most amazingly clear animal photo/videos ever taken. Open to full screen.

https://imgur.com/ZhRaD3r

Been seeing that one going around ... ensure to click the fullscreen button for full effect! Anyone know what kind of animal that is?

Not positive but it looks like a jaguarundi to me!!

Bluegreen
14th May 2019, 13:44
Ketts :inlove:

mx-3S_jfLfc

onawah
14th May 2019, 18:35
512 Year Old Greenland Shark
Wonder World
Published on Dec 19, 2017
Researchers have found an ancient shark in the North Atlantic, believed to be 512 years old, which could be the oldest living vertebrate in the world.

This particular shark, was measured at 18 feet in length and weighed over a tonne.

By measuring the size of the shark, researchers suggest the animal could have been born as early as 1505, making it even older than Shakespeare. "
hz2HBk5sKlc

Constance
14th May 2019, 20:01
Baby penguin being tickled

3wTWWjYTe1I

Constance
14th May 2019, 20:18
The largest no-kill, no-cage animal sanctuary in the United States dedicated to cats and run by a woman who used up her retirement savings and home to fund it. :inlove:


R4u41ysH3eE

Constance
16th May 2019, 08:24
A Voluble Visit with Two Talking Apes

Two bonobo chimpanzees in Iowa are changing how scientists think about the nature of human language.

Kanzi and Panbanisha understand thousands of words. They use sentences, talk on the phone, and they like to gossip. In short, they use language in many of the same ways humans do.

That's not supposed to be possible.

Since the 1950s, linguists including Noam Chomsky have argued that language is unique to humans and requires an innate understanding of grammar.

A Classroom Accident

Savage-Rumbaugh says she discovered that by accident in the 1980s, shortly after Kanzi was born.

At the time, she was at Georgia State University trying to teach words and symbols to Kanzi's adopted mother, Matata. Kanzi was in the classroom, too, but Savage-Rumbaugh wasn't trying to teach him anything.

"Kanzi would just be around," she says. "He would often be on my head, or jumping down from the top of the keyboard into my lap. If we asked Matata to sort objects, [Kanzi] would jump in the middle of them and mess them all up. So he was just a normal kid."

Savage-Rumbaugh suspected that Kanzi recognized a few words. But she says it wasn't clear how much Kanzi really knew until he lost his mother.

Matata was taken away for breeding when Kanzi was 2 years old. At first, he thought his mother was hiding. When he couldn't find her, little Kanzi was bereft.

An Urge to Talk

So he turned to his best friend, Savage-Rumbaugh. Kanzi desperately wanted her help, and he began to ask for it by pointing to symbols on Matata's keyboard.


https://media.npr.org/news/specials/language/lexigram200-8fde802fae8be3938d228a41d15b3936bc00d4c8-s600-c85.jpg
Kanzi and Panbanisha communicate with researchers by pointing to symbols on lexigram panels like this one.
Great Ape Trust

Savage-Rumbaugh says Kanzi used the keyboard more than 300 times on the first day he was separated from Matata. He asked her for food. He asked for affection. He asked for help finding his mom.

At the time, Savage-Rumbaugh was too worried about Kanzi to fully appreciate what he was doing.

But later, she had an epiphany: Whatever language was, it was more than words and sentences. It must have deeper roots in social connections and a shared understanding of the world.

A New Way of Teaching Language

Savage-Rumbaugh made a decision; She would stop trying to teach words and sentences to apes. She would give Kanzi a reason to talk, and something to talk about.

"What I had to do is come up with an environment," she says, "a world that would foster the acquisition of these lexical symbols in Kanzi and a greater understanding of spoken human language."

Savage-Rumbaugh created a world where Kanzi would learn the way human babies do. He and his human friends would eat together and play together. And because bonobos love to travel, Savage-Rumbaugh and Kanzi would hike around their 50-acre home.

"Whenever we talked about a travel destination, we had Kanzi's immediate attention," Savage-Rumbaugh remembers. "And if we showed him a photo, he wanted to hold it, he wanted to ride on our shoulders and hold the photo and look at it all the way to the place."


Kanzi, which means "treasure" in Swahili, was born in 1980. His favorite food is onions and his favorite game is chase.


Before long, Kanzi was doing many of the things humans do with language. He was talking about places and objects that weren't in sight. He was referring to the past and the future. And he was understanding new sentences made up of familiar words.

The Tests

Kanzi and Savage-Rumbaugh often sat beside a somewhat polluted river. Every now and then, a Coke can would float by. Savage-Rumbaugh explained to him that people had thrown the cans in the river. At first, she wasn't sure Kanzi understood.

Then, one day she said, "Kanzi, could you throw your Coke into the river?" Kanzi immediately reached into their backpack, took out the Coke and threw it in the river.

Savage-Rumbaugh concluded that Kanzi must have understood what the words meant when spoken in that order.

But linguists were skeptical. They said the sentence, "Throw the river in the Coke," might have produced the same response. They also said Kanzi might have been reacting to her body language, not her words.

Savage-Rumbaugh was determined to prove that Kanzi really did understand sentences. So she asked him to take a series of scientific language tests.

In one of the tests, which was videotaped, Savage-Rumbaugh wears a welder's mask so Kanzi can't see her face, and she makes no gestures. She asks Kanzi to perform dozens of unlikely tasks, like putting pine needles in the refrigerator. He understands nearly every request.

In these tests, Kanzi was doing what linguists said no ape could do. And later, Kanzi's little sister, Panbanisha, would perform even better in similar tests.

Creative Language

But linguists still weren't satisfied. They pointed out that humans invent metaphors and figures of speech when literal meanings aren't enough.

Savage-Rumbaugh says the bonobos pass this test, as well. For example, Panbanisha once used the symbol for "monster" when referring to a visitor who misbehaved.

Bill Fields, a researcher at the Great Ape Trust and a close friend of Kanzi, recalls another time when Kanzi used language creatively.

Fields says it was during a visit by a Swedish scientist named Par Segerdahl. Kanzi knew that Segerdahl was bringing bread. But Kanzi's keyboard had no symbol for Segerdahl the scientist. So he got the attention of Savage-Rumbaugh's sister, Liz, and began pointing to the symbols for "bread" and "pear," the fruit.

"Liz got it immediately," Fields says. "She says, 'What do you mean Kanzi? Are you talking about Par or pears to eat?' And he pointed over to Par."

Fields says that because Kanzi was raised among humans, he has a powerful desire to communicate with the humans in his world.

"He wants to share," Fields says. "He wants to do things with people. He wants people to know how smart he is. He wants people to know what he can do. And occasionally he'd like to be able to tell people to do things for him that he can't do for himself, like go down to the Dairy Queen and get him an ice cream with chocolate on it."

Fields says they used to do that before Kanzi went on a diet.

Kanzi's Theory of Mind

Kanzi also has developed a skill closely associated with human language, Fields says. It's called theory of mind — and a growing number of researchers believe it is at least as important as grammar.

Theory of mind means recognizing that other people have their own beliefs and desires. It also allows someone to imagine the world from another person's point of view.

Scientists disagree about whether apes have this ability. But Fields has no doubt.

"I'm missing this finger," Fields says, holding up one of his hands. "One time when Kanzi was grooming my hand, when he got to where the missing finger is, he pretended like it was there. And then he used the keyboard, he uttered, 'Hurt?,' as though to say, 'Does it still hurt?' "

Kanzi's sentence contained just one word: hurt. But Fields says the sentence reveals something about the very nature of language: Words depend on the social context that produced them.

At the Great Ape Trust, the bonobos have found ways to extend their social ties with humans — like talking on the phone.

Straddling Two Worlds

Savage-Rumbaugh says that talking on the phone helps Kanzi and Panbanisha cope with their odd status as creatures who socialize with humans, but are not human themselves. (Kanzi can make sounds that mean yes or no, and uses a lexigram keyboard for more complicated phone conversations.)

"They are aware of that, and sometimes it's a sadness because they realize they can't go everywhere we can go and can't do everything that we can do," she says.

The apes can't go back to the wild either. Bonobos in the Congo have been all but wiped out by hunters. And Kanzi and Panbanisha lived with humans for too long to be able to live on their own in the wild.

The apes are straddling two worlds, and Savage-Rumbaugh says they seem to know it. She says both apes like to watch movies that blur the boundaries between humans and apes.

"Kanzi's favorite movies when he was very young were Ice Man and Planet of the Apes," Savage-Rumbaugh says. "I guess his favorite movie of all time is Quest for Fire."

Listen to the radio show or get the complete transcript here (https://www.npr.org/templates/transcript/transcript.php?storyId=5503685)

Source: National Public radio (https://www.npr.org/2006/07/08/5503685/a-voluble-visit-with-two-talking-apes)

onawah
17th May 2019, 05:07
I just finished a very engrossing futuristic novel recently about bonobos and human interactions, and posted a review here:
http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?106544-What-are-you-reading&p=1289016&viewfull=1#post1289016


A Voluble Visit with Two Talking Apes

Two bonobo chimpanzees in Iowa are changing how scientists think about the nature of human language.

Kanzi and Panbanisha understand thousands of words. They use sentences, talk on the phone, and they like to gossip. In short, they use language in many of the same ways humans do.

That's not supposed to be possible.

Valerie Villars
18th May 2019, 18:45
One of the most moving stories I have ever seen.

ifoo34sJgyU

onawah
19th May 2019, 05:22
Snow Leopard Cub Starts Physical Therapy to Help Her Learn to Walk
Animal Planet
Published on Oct 26, 2018

"A new snow leopard born at the Bronx Zoo is discovered to have trouble supporting herself on her back legs, which means she needs a lot of help to get her up and walking."

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(Here she is later, sassy as ever but not so fat, and now able to walk...)

"Snow Leopard Cub on Exhibit | Bronx Zoo

Wildlife Conservation Society
Published on Oct 26, 2017
http://bronxzoo.com
UV4OW1ds9O4


Kevin Richardson in The Story of Cat
CasuallyListening
Published on Aug 12, 2016
Kevin Richardson cut in episode 1 of the documentary: The Story of Cats
Subscribe to Kevin Richardson's official channel here:
https://www.youtube.com/user/LionWhispererTV
eHEeJkkMnhs

onawah
19th May 2019, 06:01
Jessica the Hippo Raised by Human Parents
Animal Planet
Published on Sep 24, 2015

"Jessica may not be a baby hippo anymore, but that doesn't stop her from enjoying a bottle of her favorite tea, sleeping on the porch with the family dog, or eating dinner in the kitchen with her human parents, Tonie and Shirley Joubert."
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Polar Bear Purrs When Cuddling with Her Human Dad
Animal Planet
Published on Oct 6, 2015

"An adult polar bear named Agee has an unusually close bond with Mark Dumas, the man who has hand-raised her since she was a cub. They swim together and cuddle. She even purrs like a cat when he's near."

eiE7GNkr9Uo

Iloveyou
19th May 2019, 06:17
https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/4Pz4U7wKJybOMdBnKunIJw--~A/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjtzbT0xO3c9MTI4MDtoPTk2MA--/https://img.huffingtonpost.com/asset/5cdaa4802100002f00808180.jpeg

Just sayin hello :) no harm done.

Constance
20th May 2019, 23:34
Crows and problem solving :)

cbSu2PXOTOc

The only smart device I enjoy watching :)

NenEdSuL7QU



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Constance
20th May 2019, 23:46
Chickens can identify images and can be trained to count! Pleased to meet you Little Miss Sunshine. :inlove:

Edgars Mission is a fabulous place to visit.


https://vimeo.com/165112004

onawah
21st May 2019, 04:52
Jinjing The Penguin - Swims 5000 Miles Every Year To Visit The Man Who Saved Him
Wonder World
Published on Dec 1, 2017

"This is a story about Jinjing the South American Magellanic Penguin, that swims 5,000 miles each year to be reunited with the man who saved his life.

The rescued Penguin was saved by João Pereira de Souza, a 73 year old part-time fisherman, who lives in an island village just outside Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Joao found the tiny penguin, at his local beach lying on rocks, it was covered in oil, could barely move and was close to death.

Joao cleaned the oil off the penguin's feathers and fed him a daily diet of fish to build his strength. He named the penguin Jin Jing.

Every year the Penguin leaves to the breeding grounds and then returns to Joao.

Thanks for watching

Note: Some say the penguins name is Dindin, but when I was researching this story, I found the Wall Street Journal had both a website article & a video covering the story saying the penguins name is Jinjing."

► Here is Article Link = https://www.wsj.com/articles/beached-in-brazil-a-young-penguin-finds-his-human-soul-mate-1445560828
oks2R4LqWtE

Constance
23rd May 2019, 08:50
Young Gorillas Have Learnt to Dismantle Poachers' Traps in The Wild

https://www.sciencealert.com/images/2018-03/processed/mountain-gorillas_web_1024.jpg




Days after a poacher's trap killed a young mountain gorilla in Rwanda's Volcanoes National Park in 2012, researchers spotted something remarkable: two four-year old gorillas working together to dismantle similar snares in the area.

"This is absolutely the first time that we've seen juveniles doing that ... I don't know of any other reports in the world of juveniles destroying snares," Veronica Vecellio from the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund's Karisoke Research Centre in Rwanda told National Geographic at the time.

"We are the largest database and observer of wild gorillas ... so I would be very surprised if somebody else has seen that."

Thousands of these snares are set up by local bush meat hunters to catch antelopes and other animals for eating, and while they reportedly have no interest in primates, young gorillas are sometimes unintentionally caught up and left to die.

The traps work by tying a noose to a branch of bamboo stalk, and bending it down to the ground, with another stick or rock used to hold the noose in place. The whole thing is obscured by dry leaves and branches.

When an animal comes along and unknowingly moves the anchoring rock or stick, the branch flings back up and tightens the noose around it, holding it in place till the poachers come looking. "If the creature is light enough, it will actually be hoisted into the air," Ker Than wrote for National Geographic.

While adult gorillas are large and strong enough to extract themselves, young gorillas often are not, and if they don't die from being stuck in the trap, they run a very real risk of dying from injuries sustained during their escape, such as dislocated bones and gangrenous cuts.

This is particularly bad news, seeing as the gorillas in this part of the word - a subspecies of the eastern gorilla called Gorilla beringei beringei - are now critically endangered, and the population simply cannot sustain the consistent loss of young gorillas to snares.

Vecellio and her team were searching the park daily for these traps and dismantling them, but in 2012, one of the local trackers spotted one near the Kuryama gorilla clan, which had lost one of its juveniles to a trap just days earlier.

The tracker, John Ndayambaje, went to dismantle the snare, but was given a warning signal by the dominant male of the clan to back off.

"Suddenly two juveniles - Rwema, a male; and Dukore, a female; both about four years old - ran toward the trap," Than reported.

"As Ndayambaje and a few tourists watched, Rwema jumped on the bent tree branch and broke it, while Dukore freed the noose."

The two gorillas then reportedly found another snare, and with the help of another juvenile, managed to dismantle that one too.

The researchers suspect that the confidence and speed with which they destroyed the traps means these young gorillas had learnt how dangerous they were, and had dismantled them before.

While a great solution would be to have the researchers go out and teach more gorillas how to dismantle these traps, Vecellio and her team said it would be unethical to mess with the gorillas' behaviour to that degree.

They just have to hope the juveniles continue to spread their knowledge throughout the clan on their own.

"No we can't teach them," she told National Geographic. "We try as much as we can to not interfere with the gorillas. We don't want to affect their natural behaviour."
Source: Sciencealert (https://www.sciencealert.com/young-gorillas-have-learnt-to-dismantle-poachers-traps-for-the-first-time)

Constance
23rd May 2019, 09:05
I know I have posted this elsewhere but this is worth sharing here. :star:

Daring, resourceful, tenacious, clever - this describes Stoffel the Honey badger. See him in this short video, constantly outwitting Brian Jones, a wildlife conservationist who protects and cares for injured honeybadgers in his park.

I couldn't help but laugh with admiration over Stoffels sheer ingenuity and audacity! :)

"...then he dug up the rocks, he'd rolled them with his back feet to the wall, and neatly piled them up high enough and then he'd get out.."

c36UNSoJenI

Constance
26th May 2019, 10:53
Moritz the Minipig knows the right place for the triangle, the square and the circle :)

xqr-Y_6ckP0

Smarty the minipig, sorting out the plastic from the paper recycling. Now if only I could train the rest of my household to do this as well as Smarty! :bigsmile:

FLr5XmtxEd4

Constance
27th May 2019, 07:39
The Jail Dogs of Gwinnett County. Operation second chance.

Saving the lives of dogs and inmates. :sun:

"...Animals can definitely bring people out and change the way we feel. We watch it every day. You've got guys in here, their whole lives, they've acted tough. They've had to show face, they didn't want someone taking from them, and a dog will get adopted and five or six of us will be in our rooms crying."

"...If they can take people like us, the dregs of society if you will, and instil this in us, then surely, you can instil this in everyone."

This would soften any soul.


9UZQihb86tA

Constance
28th May 2019, 02:47
Andy Casagrande has spent years capturing the most daring underwater shots of sharks in their native habitats.

He says that the best divers in the worlds are sharks.

"...If you remain zen, and realise that everything you have been taught about this animal is essentially a lie, then you can beat it. Not beat the animal, but beat your own mind.
Stay there, remain calm and just understand that you are sharing the same liquid space with this animal that has been around for four dinosaurs, way before you. It's just co-existing."

MaDAViQ_O9U

Constance
29th May 2019, 08:55
The greatest imitator of them all - Lyrebirds imitate other birds and local soundscapes to attract mates. These clever creatures imitate camera shutters, cars starting, car alarms, chainsaws, nail guns, blokes (Aussie men) whistling, drllls - you get the picture :)

mSB71jNq-yQ


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onawah
29th May 2019, 23:39
Laughing Fox
XiCdBFDfUTg

Fox Mom and kits
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DeDukshyn
30th May 2019, 01:54
Didn't notice this posted? ... Bobcat and coyote "siblings"

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onawah
30th May 2019, 06:11
Horse Connection Meditation Calls in 7 Eagles - Follow Along!
ListenToYourHorse
Published on Apr 6, 2019
"Join us as the herd and BodyTalk practitioner and Animal Communicator, Güliz Ünlü, guide you into deeper connection with your body and the horses/animals around you. Follow along and activate/open your energy centers (chakras)... prepare to be amazed at what shows up..."
jAwFu1ujpvk

Constance
30th May 2019, 09:50
Sam Bloom, a mother of three young boys, became suicidal after becoming paraplegic.

Enter a sick baby magpie named Penguin. "I'd whinge to her and tell her everything that was going through my head." In nursing Penguin back to health, Sam Bloom found a purpose.

When Sam Blooms husband Cameron, was asked by the reporter if Penguin had saved Sams life, Cameron replied, "Penguin kind of saved all of us"



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40664

40661

40665




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Constance
30th May 2019, 10:23
Horses who heal

This is the remarkable story of 3 separate individuals who have been touched by the power of Equine Therapy. A former world-class equestrian champion disabled by a stroke, a veteran of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and a teenage boy on the autism spectrum, along with his younger brother, all share their journeys of hope and healing through their work with Therapy Horses.

These miracles are happening at an otherwise typical barn in South Florida known as Healing Horse Therapy Center, and led by a woman whose passion it is to help those in need of healing make the ultimate connection between horse and human.




UnOgqyR9kr8

Constance
31st May 2019, 07:46
Mark Horstman explores genetic and fossil evidence that reveals the majority of the world's birds have Australian ancestors. This compelling research has recently rocked the world of science. It seems that Australia is where bird song began. :note:

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Constance
1st June 2019, 08:22
I'm always so in awe of how our beloved animal companions respond to whatever life brings their way. :heart:

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Constance
1st June 2019, 08:47
This will put a smile on your dial :)

An incredible chance encounter with a family of wild Mountain Gorillas in Uganda.


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onawah
2nd June 2019, 05:48
Some hugs for Avalon
Cute Babies and Pets TV
Jan 12, 2019

"Animals Show Love for Humans"

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Constance
2nd June 2019, 07:25
Hospice Cat Brings Comfort To Veterans At The End Of Their Lives




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There's no shortage of highly-capable medical staff at VA Hospice in Salem, Va. to ensure that dying veterans and their families are cared for and comfortable. But one of the facility's most effective caregivers actually has no formal training.

His name is Tom, and he's a cat.

Palliative care coordinator Dorothy Rizzo rescued the friendly orange tabby from a local animal shelter four years ago, thinking that having a cat around would make vets feel more at home during their final days. But Tom soon proved to be something far more than a feline; he became a source of happiness for folks at a time when that feeling seemed remote.

In those moments when a patient could use a companion, or a vet's family has gathered to bid farewell to their loved one, Tom can often be found strolling into service, offering comfort through gentle interaction.

"Tom has known what to do since the first day he was here," Rizzo told Veterans Affairs news. "There's something about the presence of an animal that has a calming effect. Watching the cat or petting him takes you out of the sad moment you're in."

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During his tenure at the hospital, Tom demonstrated an uncanny sense of knowing when a patient is nearing the end, making sure he's there to snuggle next to them as they take their final breaths. But the cat's comfort is as much for families as it is for the vets themselves.

When World War II veteran Edwin Gehlert passed away at the Salem VA recently, the orange cat was there by his side, sharing the sad moment with serviceman's family. Gehlert's widow Elizabeth told the Richmond Times-Dispatch that, just by being close by, Tom helped shift the mood from mourning the loss of the vet to celebrating his life.

"My husband had a beautiful passing because of that cat," Gehlert said. "I had such joy in my heart."

The VA hospice's resident psychologist, Betty Gillespie, describes how cats like Tom can be the best medicine during times of great sadness.

"Families often feel helpless. You're watching your loved one die and you know you can't save them. Sometimes you can't even talk to them, or wake them up. All you can do is watch and wait," says Gillespie.

Source: The Dodo (https://www.thedodo.com/cat-comforts-dying-vets-810505355.html)

Constance
3rd June 2019, 07:58
Jenny and Shirley are two crippled elephants, reunited after twenty two years. Shirley was kept for more than two decades as a circus animal. They now live together at The Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee. I completely lost it when her former trainer Solomon said, "She (Shirley) won't have to wear her chain anymore"..."She's free at last".

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Akasha
3rd June 2019, 17:30
Brave Beautiful Animals by Sam Garrett:


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AutumnW
3rd June 2019, 21:04
I like rats. Never had one for a pet and don't want them in my house but still, I like them. They're cute. They are 'dirty' because they live near humans. We're the dirty ones really. Anyway, here is a typically human-centric little clip about the horror of finding a rat in your toilet. Seriously? When rats rule the world and people end up in their sanitation system, we deserve all the rat centered ewww...reactions we get.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0t2VPBF6Kp4

Constance
4th June 2019, 00:38
Breaking the stigma




Pet photographer Diane Özdamar has been in love with pet rats as long as she can remember. She’s been photographing these furry companions for years, hoping to break their grotesque stereotype with her cute, playful imagery.

Fancy rats, the most common domesticated species of pet rat, are often compared to small dogs by their owners. This is due to their social and cuddly nature. Highly intelligent, they thrive when living with a friend, so it’s suggested to get two rats of the same sex in order for them to keep each other company. And, contrary to common belief, they are exceptionally clean animals.

Özdamar photographs her own fancy rats, as well as those of her friends’ and others that she’s fostered, making tiny accessories to enhance their personalities. The project began after the photographer began fostering abused and abandoned pet rats. “Finding a home [for] a rat is not an easy task since they suffer from a very bad reputation and I had to make their cute personalities stand out so people would consider adopting them.”


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Photo credits: Diane Ozdamar (https://dianeozdamar.myportfolio.com/fancy-rats)

Iloveyou
4th June 2019, 04:52
Omg, my daughter loved rats when she was 13, 14, she had some in her room and I allowed her to do whatever she wants in her own space as long as she didn‘t burn down the house. I believed in learning from experience. But the poor rats did not look like the above at all :)

https://static.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/travel-photo-contest-national-geographic-2019-149-5cd02b8ed2f2c__700.jpg

Migrating wildebeest leap into the river, frantically trying to reach the banks on the other side. Many survive the journey, but some are eaten by crocodiles.

Whisper
4th June 2019, 23:43
yes they are magical in many ways...I totaly agree....

I grew up with a collie on my side...he looked like Lassie and he was just as smart. He even did sense it more than the people around me, when I was not feeling well or when I was sad. He use to push his nose in my arm then and started to make noises, or jump around in front of me to cheer me up again....and it always worked...:yes4: My best friend ever...I miss him...

https://backtothemovies.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/lassie-cozi-thumb.jpg

Valerie Villars
6th June 2019, 02:45
Milo, the 2 year old skeletal rescue horse. Ever the rebel, incredibly smart and talented. Rescued from death. Another hero.

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Constance
6th June 2019, 10:44
One morning, Ryan and his father went hunting at Eagles nest Wilderness, in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado.
However, Ryan accidentally became separated from his father that morning. That afternoon, a search party with tracker dogs was sent out to find him. Dressed in only summer clothing, the team were concerned because it was easy to die of hypothermia up on the mountainside. The rescue team didn't find Ryan until the next day but when they did, Ryan was alive and well.
Some time, in the middle of the night, two large elk had appeared. They had laid down next to the boy and stayed with him all night.



"He [Ryan] would have been dead if it hadn't of been for the extra heat source of the two big animals laying down beside him"



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Two Elk Save Boy from Hypothermia - It's A Miracle - 6033

Constance
6th June 2019, 10:50
Milo, the 2 year old skeletal rescue horse. Ever the rebel, incredibly smart and talented. Rescued from death. Another hero.



Truly inspiring beautiful Val

:heart:

Constance
7th June 2019, 09:13
This is a sweet story of the bond between a little rooster named Frog, and a young girl named Savannah. Mother and daughter share their story here.




I would usually go to the front yard and wait on the school bus. Frog had kind of followed me to the front yard and I said, "Well, okay, you can follow me, no big deal." On the the third day, he decided he was going to go by himself. Ever since then, he's done it Every. Single. Day."

The interesting thing about Frog is that he correctly anticipates beforehand, the time that the school bus will be arriving and he waits in the front of the house.


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Rooster Meets His Favorite Girl at Her Bus Stop Every Day | The Dodo

Constance
9th June 2019, 06:32
This was an experiment conducted with a crow.

Here you can see that the crow has a causal understanding of water displacement.

Neat hey? ;)


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Constance
9th June 2019, 06:54
It was once thought that humans were the only species who had control over their own breath.

Kanzi, a bonobo, demonstrates at @ 1.42 that he does have control over his own breath.

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Kanzi the Ape Who Has Conversations with Humans | The Oprah Winfrey Show | Oprah Winfrey Network


Koko breath control pdf (http://mperlman.org/pdfs/KokoBreathControl_PerlmanEtAl2012.pdf)

Constance
11th June 2019, 08:04
Maria, a Talouse goose who resides at Echo Park in downtown Los Angeles, waits for her beau every day at the sidewalk, until Dominic, a retired salesman, rides in on his scooter.

The two take a leisurely stroll around the lake. However Maria, is highly possessive and no one is allowed to venture near Dominic. :bigsmile:

When it is time for Dominic to go home, she flies along side him or, he waits until she falls asleep to make his escape. Now that's what I call love! :heart:

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Constance
12th June 2019, 08:06
Turkeys are highly social creatures. They are very family oriented, love to play, are incredibly affectionate and are really good at geography.

Albert was rescued from a slaughterhouse. Albert loves people and he loves being cuddled.



Reasons to love turkeys (https://www.onegreenplanet.org/animalsandnature/reasons-to-love-turkeys/)


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Turkeys are sensitive animals who have good and bad moods. You can tell what mood the male is in by the color of his throat and head. When a male is excited, his head turns blue and when a tom is about to get into a fight, his head turns red. Imagine if humans had this trait!


Albert the Turkey loves a cuddle :bearhug:

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Albert the Turkey getting a hug, London the Shepard gets nothing

Kryztian
16th June 2019, 23:36
Six minutes of three playful baby bears on a hammock.

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Bill Ryan
17th June 2019, 17:49
We truly don't want to have a bunch of cat videos on here! But this one really is rather special.

The stirring music was composed specially for the action. :)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8-1F-CokXNU

Star Tsar
19th June 2019, 10:56
A rather interesting question...


Lowell Observatory

Michael West | Can Animals See The Stars?

Published 18th June 2019

Human beings have always watched the skies, so it’s not surprising that astronomy is the oldest of all sciences. But what about other animals, can they see the stars too? Or are they indifferent to the charms of the night sky? In this talk, Dr. Michael West will present evidence that some animals use the stars to hunt or to migrate, while others lack the visual acuity to be stargazers.

Michael West is Deputy Director for Science at Lowell Observatory. He received his PhD in astronomy from Yale University and held research, teaching and leadership positions on four continents before coming to Flagstaff in 2015. He’s disappointed that, as far as he can tell, his dog has no interest in the stars.

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Rosemarie
19th June 2019, 19:31
Some days you just want to be left alone.

Kryztian
19th June 2019, 20:15
The amazingly colorful and graceful blanket octopus, as photographed by divers near off Romblon Island, Philippines.

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DeDukshyn
22nd June 2019, 00:52
Haha! This cat ...

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We truly don't want to have a bunch of cat videos on here! ...

Or do we ... ?

Well we do have the old cat meme thread to potentially revive ... :)

Constance
22nd June 2019, 09:32
That was totally worth it! ^^^^:bigsmile:

And now for a change of pace.

My favourite funny dog video...

I know that this doesn't exactly fit the theme of animals are magical but it never fails to make me laugh.

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Ultimate Dog Tease

Kryztian
22nd June 2019, 14:50
New Zealand Now Recognizes ALL Animals As Sentient Beings!
by: Sophie McAdam Posted on June 3, 2015

http://s24990.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/owl.jpg

New Zealand has just set a great example to the world by recognizing what animal lovers have known forever- that our furry friends are as sentient as we are, and (obviously, dur) they have feelings just like we do. It’s a theme we have covered time and again here at True Activist, but this landmark ruling by NZ is the first time this shift in perception and policy has been extended to all animals, not just chimpanzees, orangutans, or dolphins.

The Animal Welfare Amendment Bill, passed last month, aims to make it easier to prosecute people in animal cruelty cases, as well as banning animal testing and research.

Animal rights activists have celebrated the decision. “To say that animals are sentient is to state explicitly that they can experience both positive and negative emotions, including pain and distress,” said Dr Virginia Williams, chair of the National Animal Ethics Advisory Committee. “The explicitness is what is new and marks another step along the animal welfare journey.”


* * * * * * * * * *

Article continues here : http://www.trueactivist.com/new-zealand-now-recognizes-all-animals-as-sentient-beings/?fbclid=IwAR2jJmK8aocAOHce99Jk00Y13OL_WSa5OxSLxsv1 4cwoihK9DpYsqS8-tgY

Article is from 2015 so New Zealand has had this law for 4 years. I wonder when the rest of the world will catch on.

Constance
23rd June 2019, 09:08
Rainbow lorikeets eating meat leaves bird experts astonished

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The behaviour of a population of rainbow lorikeets who frequent a backyard feeding station on a property north of Brisbane has left bird experts baffled.

The lorikeets are eating meat and Griffith University's Professor Darryl Jones is shocked.

Professor Jones, who is researching the impact of backyard feeding on bird populations, said lorikeets usually eat nectar and pollen which they obtain from native plants and shrubs.

"I have researched what birds feed on all around the world," Professor Jones said.

"I'm up to date with all the kinds of crazy things that birds are eating all over Australia.

"To see a lorikeet eating meat astonishes me completely. I have never heard of such a thing before."

Do you have any photos of rainbow lorikeets eating meat?

For years, Bill, who owns the Elimbah property, has put out pets mince for magpies, currawongs and kookaburras.

He also puts out seed for vegetarian birds like galahs, king parrots and the lorikeets.

He feeds about a dozen birds each day and knows they are spoilt for choice when it comes to food.

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Bill's property is home to native trees and shrubs, and there is untouched forest nearby.

He is happy to offer a few scoops of mince and seed to the birds that come in for a free feed.

It was about seven years ago when Bill first noticed the lorikeets eating meat, and they have been eating it ever since.

"At first they went for the seed but then they started chasing the other birds away from the meat, which surprised me," he said.

Professor surprised lorikeets are defending meat

Professor Jones said the availability of food on the property made the lorikeet's decision to eat meat mystifying.

"It makes no sense at all," he said.

"It makes me wonder very strongly that these particular birds, the individuals in the picture, are probably needing some protein.

"But the birds look extremely healthy in those pictures."

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He said lorikeets always get around in pairs and tend to be nasty with other bird species when it comes to food.

He said it is not surprising that the lorikeets are chasing magpies and kookaburras away from the meat.

"What is unusual is that the food that they're defending is actually meat," Professor Jones said.

"That's the strange part about it.

"Maybe the lorikeets saw what the other birds were eating and simply decided to try it and liked it.

"It's extremely unusual."

Professor Jones believed that lorikeets eating meat had never been documented before.

"If it was a genuine idea that lorikeets would eat meat I'm sure it would've come up by now," he said.

He said the lorikeet population had increased dramatically in south-east Queensland in the past decade.

What once was a common species has now become the most abundant bird in the south east.

Professor Jones said people tend to plant native, nectar-bearing plants in their gardens and local councils do the same in their parks, which provides ample food for lorikeets and other birds.

He said lorikeets are also being fed by thousands of Queenslanders in backyard feeders.

"I would very much like to know if people who put out meat for other birds are getting lorikeets coming and eating it as well," he said.

Wildlife carer says she is 'horrified'

Licensed wildlife carer Fran Sanders has been looking after native animals and birds in Brisbane for 25 years.

She has never seen lorikeets eating meat or heard of them doing it.

"I'm absolutely amazed and horrified," Ms Sanders said.

She has assisted hundreds of people who backyard feed mince to carnivores like butcher birds and magpies and kookaburras.

"I've never heard any of them talk about lorikeets coming down and eating mince," she said.

"I know when people are backyard feeding, lots of birds will come down and eat because it's easy.

"Like us I suppose they get a little bit of a lazy streak and they come down and it saves them hunting or finding food.

"They will eat things that aren't really their food."

Of the lorikeets eating meat at Elimbah, Ms Sanders has no answers.

"Whether it's just a habit they've started because it's there and they've found it, I don't know," she said.

"They're not meat eaters, that's for sure.

"It's incredible, I'm just so stunned."

Ms Sanders said although people enjoy backyard feeding birds, they need to be careful with the food they put out.

She said birds do not naturally eat seeds, which can damage their tongues, preventing them from naturally feeding on pollen and nectar.

"And meat like pets mince can cause fatty liver disease in carnivorous birds."

Source: ABC News Australia (https://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-03-23/rainbow-lorikeets-eating-meat-baffles-bird-experts/6337984)

Constance
25th June 2019, 09:48
This is improvisation at its finest. :sun:

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An orangutan at a zoo in Thailand wasn't too impressed with her sleeping quarters - so she decided to do something about it.

Nemo, who is 14-years-old, was captured on video using a blanket to create a hammock in which she could sleep.

She expertly ties the ends of the blanket around the bars of her enclosure, leaving just enough slack to create a comfortable hammock.

In the wild, orangutans sleep among the tree tops and make their nests using foliage folded carefully together.

Nest building has an important social function among orangutans, as knowledge of how to construct them is passed down from mother to baby.

It takes an orangutan until the age of three to be able to construct its own nest, and is a sign that it's ready to leave their mothers.


Source: The telegraph (https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/thailand/12068438/Orangutan-uses-her-blanket-to-make-a-hammock-to-sleep-in-at-night.html)

Bill Ryan
25th June 2019, 10:56
An orangutan at a zoo in Thailand wasn't too impressed with her sleeping quarters - so she decided to do something about it.

Nemo, who is 14-years-old, was captured on video using a blanket to create a hammock in which she could sleep.


http://wafflesatnoon.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/Orangutan-Fishing.jpg

The photo was published in the 2008 book Thinkers of the Jungle: The Orangutan Report (http://www.amazon.com/Thinkers-Jungle-Gerd-Schuster/dp/0841602859/kkamrani-20)by Schuster, Smits, and Ullal. The description of the photograph reads:
…a male orangutan, clinging precariously to overhanging branches, flails the water with a pole, trying desperately to spear a passing fish…The extraordinary image, a world exclusive, was taken in Borneo on the island of Kaja… This individual had seen locals fishing with spears on the Gohong River. Although the method required too much skill for him to master, he was later able to improvise by using the pole to catch fish already trapped in the locals’ fishing lines.

Constance
26th June 2019, 09:21
Meet Ingo and Poldi: Tiny rescued owl and dog are madly in love



Tanja Brandt is a German photographer who has dedicated her career towards photographing animals and wildlife.

In one of her most recent projects, Brandt shot photographs of a highly unlikely pair of friends – Ingo, the Belgian shepherd; and Poldi (Napoleon), the one-year-old owlet.

Brandt describes the relationship between Ingo and Poldi as somewhat of a ‘protector-protected’ relationship. Ingo is a guardian for Poldi, whom Brandt states “doesn’t know how to live free”.

Poldi didn’t hatch until two days after his six brothers and sisters, and has always been very vulnerable due to his size. Ingo, on the other hand, comes from a family of strong and oftentimes ruthless police dogs.

Ingo is very protective over the year-old owlet, and their bond is as strong off-camera as it appears in Tanja’s photographs.

“They respect each other and they can read each other.”

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Even though Ingo is physically stronger and protective over him, it is clear that the Poldi also takes care of his canine companion. Their friendship is ultimately mutual – they love and care for one another – and this is clear in Brandt’s photographs.

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To see the rest of these beautiful photos, visit www.whitewolfpack.com (http://www.whitewolfpack.com/2016/08/meet-ingo-and-poldi-tiny-rescued-owl.html)
Credit: Tanja Brandt

Constance
27th June 2019, 09:19
Little Tyke: The Lioness who was vegetarian

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At four years old, the mature African lioness weighed 352 pounds. Her body stretched 10 feet 4 inches long and could run 40 miles per hour. Her skull, highly adapted to killing and eating prey, possessed short powerful jaws. Normally, African lions eat gnus, zebras, gazelles, impalas, and giraffes. This particular big cat, in her prime and perfect health, chose a more gentle way of life, vegetarian!

A Violent Birth

Georges and Margaret Westbeau, standing outside the thick steel bars of the cage, watched nervously. Inside, a vicious, raging beast baring razor claws and glistening fangs, roared. Flinging herself at the couple, who watched from barely three feet away, her suffering amber eyes defied their presence.
Always, in the past, this lioness destroyed her offspring as soon as they were born. Four times in the last seven years, her powerful jaws had crushed her newborn cubs, furiously throwing them against her cage's bars where they tumbled, lifeless.
Denying the normal instincts of motherhood, what possessed this lioness? Her life mocked its former freedom. She lived a caged animal, taken from the wild and tortured by those who captured her. Did she feel that by destroying her cubs they would be spared the humiliation that she endured?
Suddenly, the newborn cub came flying towards the people anxiously watching. Georges quickly grabbed the cub through the bars before it could be killed. Its right front leg dangled helplessly from its mother's brutal jaws. In the face of such fury the only thing the human could say was, 'You poor little tike'.
The Westbeaus took the three-pound 'Little Tyke' to their Hidden Valley Ranch near Seattle and there it joined the menagerie of other animals including horses, cattle, and chickens. Curious peacocks lined the housetop, kittens peered through a picket fence, and two terriers danced with joy for the new addition to the household.
Drinking bottles of warm milk, Little Tyke began the long road to recovery.

Mysterious reaction

With the advice of experts the Westbeaus began weaning Little Tyke onto solid food at three months. Leaving only a favorite doll, they removed most of her rubber toys, replacing them with bones from freshly slaughtered beef. They carried the small cub to the bones. Unexpectedly, she violently threw up!
Experts told them in no uncertain terms that lions couldn't live without meat. In the wild, lions ate only flesh - eleven pounds a day for an adult female. Alarmed at Little Tyke's strange behavior, they wondered at how they could introduce meat into her diet? In the meantime, they continued feeding Little Tyke baby cereal mixed with milk.
A well meaning friend suggested mixing beef blood with milk, in increasing proportions. Given milk containing ten drops of blood, Little Tyke would have nothing to do with it. They mixed in five drops of blood, and hid that bottle. As she sucked on the plain milk they quickly switched bottles. Again she refused it. In desperation they added one drop of blood to a full bottle of milk, but Little Tyke refused this bottle as well, and they could only stare in amazement.
Another friend suggested putting plain milk in one hand, and milk mixed with hamburger in the palm of the other hand. Little Tyke readily licked the milk from one hand, but when Georges changed hands, she immediately turned away. Sensing her distress, Georges wiped his hands on a nearby towel and picked her up. Hissing in fear and cringing away, she looked sick from the danger-smell of meat on his hand. She only settled down when given a fresh bottle of milk held in washed hands.

Thousand-dollar reward

At nine months old and weighing sixty-five pounds, Little Tyke had the splints and bandages on her leg taken off for the last time. She slowly learned to depend on the healed leg, and mingled with other animals on the ranch.
Since the ranch didn't earn enough income to make ends meet, the Westbeaus ran a small cold storage plant in town. Little Tyke came with them when they went to work and word got around about this vegetarian lioness. When she was four years old, the Westbeaus advertised a thousand dollar reward for anyone who could devise a method tricking Little Tyke into eating meat. Numerous plans met with failure since Little Tyke refused to have anything to do with flesh.

The answer

The caretakers of this gentle animal sought out animal experts, always asking them about diet. Finally, one young visitor set their mind at ease. With serious eyes he turned to them and asked, 'Don't you read your Bible? Read Genisis 1:30, and you will get your answer.' At his first opportunity Georges read in astonishment, 'And to every beast of the earth, and to every fowl of the air, and to everything that creepeth upon the earth, wherein there is life, I have given every green herb for meat: and it was so.' At that point, after four years, the Westbeaus finally stopped worrying.

Little Tyke's meals

A typical meal consisted of various grains, chosen for their protein, calcium, fats, and roughage. Margaret always cooked a few days' supply ahead of time. At feeding time, a double handful of the cooked grains along with one-half gallon of milk with two eggs, supplied Little Tyke a delicious meal. She had one condition before eating. Her favorite rubber doll had to be right next to her!


Little Tyke with Becky

For teeth and gums, the Westbeaus supplied rubber boots, since she refused bones. They attracted her to the boots by sprinkling them with perfume. One boot lasted almost a month.
Little Tyke had many close animal friends. Her favorites were Pinky (a kitten), Imp (another kitten), Becky (a lamb) and Baby (a fawn). Her favorite and closest friend, however, was Becky, who preferred Little Tyke's company to any of the other animals.

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National publicity

You Asked For It, the popular television show hosted by Art Baker, once featured Little Tyke. The producers wanted a scene with chickens, which didn't bother Georges since Little Tyke roamed easily among chickens at Hidden Valley Ranch. When the film crew brought the chickens in, they turned out to be four little day-old chicks!

Slurp of the tongue

Little Tyke's only previous experience with new chicks had been with a hen and her chicks who had wandered onto the lawns around their home on the ranch. Georges thought nothing of it until he saw Little Tyke acting peculiarly, slinking into the house, and looking guilty with lips tightly closed over obviously open jaws. He called 'Tyke! What have you got?' Instantly her mouth opened and a little chick popped out, unharmed. Flapping it's little down-covered wings, it almost flew back to its upset mother. Apparently Little Tyke had affectionately licked the tiny chick, as she was prone to do when, with one huge slurp of the tongue, the little chick had popped into her mouth, and she hadn't known how to fondle it further!

With the amazed camera crew filming, Little Tyke strode over to the chicks, hesitated long enough to lick the chicks carefully and gently with the very tip of her tongue, and moved away with a yawn. A moment later she came back to lie down among the chicks. They immediately made their way into the long silky hair at the base of her great neck where they peered out from the shelter of their great protector.
Another scene saw a new kitten, after an introduction, walk over to Little Tyke's huge foreleg and sit down. Little Tyke crooked one paw around the tiny creature and cuddled it closer.

In front of cameras, Art Baker picked up the Bible and read: 'The wolf and the lamb shall feed together, and the lion shall eat straw like the bullock.'
Mail poured into the producers, making this episode one of the most popular in the show's history.

Little Tyke's death

Unfortunately, while spending three weeks in Hollywood for the show, Little Tyke contracted virus pneumonia, a disease that took her life a few weeks later. The sudden change in climate may have been a contributing factor. She succumbed quietly in her sleep, retiring early after watching television.

Inspiring to this day

Her life is over, but her teachings live on. Of the many lessons she taught, not the least is that love removes fear and savagery. Little Tyke reflected the love and care shown to her after the first few moments of her precarious birth.

Thousands saw photographs of her lying with her lamb friend, Becky, inspiring many to see the world a fresh way: two such diverse natures enjoying each other's love! One eminent attorney kept a huge enlargement of this photograph in his office, and pointed to it as he counciled couples on the verge of divorce.

Scientific dilemma

Science is at a loss when it comes to Little Tyke. Felines are the strictest of carnivores. Without flesh she should have developed blindness, as well as dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), a degenerative disease that turns heart muscles flabby and limits their ability to pump blood. This is because her diet didn't contain an adequate source of the amino acid, taurine.

Little known in the 1950's, subsequent research at UC Davis in 1976 proved that taurine is an essential nutrient for felines, the lack of which would cause degeneration of the retina. later research implicated inadequate taurine levels in dilated cardiomyopathy as well. For cats with DCM, if the disease has not progressed too far, administering taurine causes an almost miraculous recovery. Formerly, cats lived only a few days to weeks after diagnose.

Taurine is non-existent in natural non-animal sources. It is present in minute amounts in milk and eggs. Little Tyke could have gotten her taurine requirement from milk, if she drank 500 gallons per day, or from eggs, if she ate more than 4000 per day. How did Little Tyke get taurine?

Challenge

Perhaps even more important, why did Little Tyke disown her species' instincts? Little Tyke is a curiosity to the public, aberation to zoologists, anomaly to scientists, and an inspiration to idealists.

Little Tyke wasn't alone. A photograph taken at Allahabad, India in 1936 shows another awesome lioness.

In Autobiography of a Yogi, Paramahansa Yogananda wrote:
...Our group left the peaceful hermitage to greet a near-by swami, Krishnananda, a handsome monk with rosy cheeks and impressive shoulders. Reclining near him was a tame lioness. Succumbing to the monk's spiritual charm - not, I am sure, to his powerful physique! - the jungle animal refuses all meat in favor of rice and milk. The swami has taught the tawny-haired beast to utter "Aum" in a deep, attractive growl - a cat devotee!

40945


40946

Source: www.vegetarismus.ch (https://www.vegetarismus.ch/vegepet/tyke.htm)

Kryztian
27th June 2019, 15:25
Frostbitten Russian cat first to get four TITANIUM prosthetic paws
23 Jun, 2019 11:45
https://www.rt.com/viral/462510-cat-4-prosthetic-paws/

https://cdni.rt.com/files/2019.06/article/5d109d01dda4c8d96f8b45cb.jpg

An unprecedented series of operations in Russia’s Siberia gave new life and four new limbs to an amputee cat, making it the first of its kind to walk on all four prosthetic paws.

The cat named Redhead was found over a year ago in Russia’s Novosibirsk, suffering from severe frostbites.

I6bgoDvgt3Y

“His ears and four paws were frostbitten,” veterinarian Sergei Gorshkov said, adding that all four of the animal’s paws had to be amputated.

After rehabilitation, the vets started to prepare Redhead for a series of operations to enable it to walk again.

“We were preparing for around a year because there was no such case in the world when a cat has all four prostheses,” Gorshkov noted.

Redhead underwent all of the surgeries, and he’s now happily skipping on four brand-new titanium paws, as footage shows. The cat now has a second chance at having a full life, and has even been using its new paws to defend itself against other cats.

Bill Ryan
27th June 2019, 15:50
Frostbitten Russian cat first to get four TITANIUM prosthetic paws[/SIZE]


Ah. That reminds me of this. :)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Z-uO5TPQfM

Rosemarie
28th June 2019, 17:53
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K83BKNxgg7w

Sorry Bill. Another cat video ..... with a catch

Kryztian
29th June 2019, 01:25
Dragon Lizard Caught Playing Leaf Guitar In Indonesia
https://www.boredpanda.com/dragon-lizard-playing-leaf-guitar-aditya-permana-indonesia/?fbclid=IwAR0nj_VV4v6HLePBKYopuvh-iRipsH1Ns6DsYfGnunWPATUBdIX8CyV8VfA&utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=organic

https://i.imgur.com/GyJ3QpY.jpg

Aditya Permana, a professional photographer in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, recently captured this once-in-a-lifetime photo of a forest dragon lizard that looks like it’s playing a guitar!

The photographer insisted that he did not manipulate the lizard, telling the Dailymail that he “did not directly photograph the lizard at first, until the lizards feel calm and comfortable around me. I noticed it looked like it was playing."

https://i.imgur.com/XjqWN0a.jpg

Iancorgi
29th June 2019, 02:11
Animals are magical indeed but sometimes they need help. Six baby elephants rescued from a mud pit in Kao Yai National Park - Thailand:

uAUx4xou9Bg

Constance
2nd July 2019, 10:32
Animals that self-medicate

Many animal species have created their own pharmacies from ingredients that commonly occur in nature.

Birds, bees, lizards, elephants, and chimpanzees all share a survival trait: They self-medicate. These animals eat things that make them feel better, or prevent disease, or kill parasites like flatworms, bacteria, and viruses, or just to aid in digestion. Even creatures with brains the size of pinheads somehow know to ingest certain plants or use them in unusual ways when they need them.

40978
In an effort to self-medicate, a bonobo female selects stem of a M. fulvum plant for stripping. Image courtesy of LuiKotale Bonobo Project, copyright Max Koelbl.

Anyone who has seen a dog eat grass during a walk has witnessed self-medication. The dog probably has an upset stomach or a parasite. The grass helps them vomit up the problem or eliminate it with the feces.

The science of animal self-medication is called zoopharmacognosy, derived from the roots zoo (“animal”), pharma (“drug”), and gnosy (“knowing”). It’s not clear how much knowing or learning is involved, but many animals seem to have evolved an innate ability to detect the therapeutic constituents in plants. Although the evidence is entirely circumstantial, the examples are plentiful. The practice is spreading across the animal kingdom in sometimes surprising ways.

Neighborhood Pharmacy

A wide range of animals self-prescribe the plants around them when they need a remedy.

• Bears, deer, elk, and various carnivores, as well as great apes, are known to consume medicinal plants apparently to self-medicate.
• Some lizards are believed to respond to a bite by a venomous snake by eating a certain root to counter the venom.
• Baboons in Ethiopia eat the leaves of a plant to combat the flatworms that cause schistosomiasis.
• Fruit flies lay eggs in plants containing high ethanol levels when they detect parasitoid wasps, a way of protecting their offspring.
• Red and green macaws, along with many animals, eat clay to aid digestion and kill bacteria.
• Female woolly spider monkeys in Brazil add plants to their diet to increase or decrease their fertility.
• Pregnant lemurs in Madagascar nibble on tamarind and fig leaves and bark to aid in milk production, kill parasites, and increase the chances of a successful birth.
• Pregnant elephants in Kenya eat the leaves of some trees to induce delivery.

Most studies of animal self-medication, however, are in the great apes. In the 1960s, the Japanese anthropologist Toshisada Nishida observed chimpanzees in Tanzania eating aspella leaves, which had no nutritional value. Harvard primatologist Richard Wrangham saw the same behavior at Jane Goodall’s Gombe reserve, where chimps were swallowing leaves whole. Other scientists noted the same in other chimp colonies. Without chewing, the animals weren’t getting much nutritional benefit. So why do it?

In 1996, biologist Michael Huffman suggested the chimps were self-medicating. Huffman, an American who has worked for years in Japan at the Primate Research Institute at Kyoto University, first saw a parasite-ridden, constipated chimpanzee in Tanzania chew on the leaves of a noxious plant it would normally avoid. By the next day, the chimpanzee was completely recovered

The plants had bristly leaves, rough to the touch. Huffman theorized the chimps were swallowing the plants to take advantage of that roughness, using the leaves and stems to scour their intestines and rid themselves of parasites. Other researchers observed the same practice among other apes across Africa.

Huffman established widely used criteria for judging when an animal is self-medicating. First, the plant eaten cannot be a regular part of the animal’s diet; it is used as medicine not food. Second, the plant must provide little or no nutritional value to the animal. Third, the plant must be consumed during those times of year—for example, the rainy season—when parasites are most likely to cause infections. Fourth, other animals in the group don’t participate (2, 3). If the activity meets these standards, it is safe to assume the animal is self-medicating, Huffman says. Researchers have observed the practice in 25 regions involving 40 different plants.


The rest of the article continued here (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4267359/#b1)

Constance
2nd July 2019, 10:41
Will the lion sees grass for the first time

3bK5OiSMVAU

DeDukshyn
2nd July 2019, 15:24
AuZ0znvhyeE


Moose have a hard time getting their salt requirements for an animal their size, just on a regular moose diet. They are always seen licking the roads and parked vehicles (coated in de-icing salt) in the winter in Canada - they get it any way they can.

They have learned and developed a rather ingenious way of meeting their salt requirements by noticing that water plants have a higher concentration of salt, and learning to dive into the water and forage the bottom of a lake. This is not instinct or intrinsic behaviour, in fact moose have to be taught to go in the water and how to swim by their mothers -- it is wholly a taught behaviour that is passed down from generation to generation.

So if you ever see a moose diving in a lake to forage the bottom, its mama taught it how to do that. :)

Hervé
2nd July 2019, 17:36
Scientists left ‘speechless’ by young Arctic fox’s amazing journey from Norway to Canada (https://www.rt.com/news/463211-arctic-fox-intercontinental-journey/)

RT
Published time: 2 Jul, 2019 14:31
Edited time: 2 Jul, 2019 15:53
Get short URL (https://on.rt.com/9xez)


https://cdni.rt.com/files/2019.07/article/5d1b68bedda4c881138b4583.jpg
© Universal Images Group Editorial/ FILE PHOTO


Despite its tender age, an Arctic fox has made headlines, broken records and baffled scientists who tracked its blistering 2,176-mile trek from Norway’s Svalbard islands to Canada in a mere 76 days.

While 15-year-old Cori ‘Coco’ Gauff’s Wimbledon win over Venus Williams was undoubtedly impressive, this one-year-old Arctic fox may have made the most impressive athletic debut of the year, occasionally clocking nearly 100 miles a day during its epic intercontinental journey.



https://media.giphy.com/media/Q67UV1IkG36cGlz1dd/giphy.gif
via GIPHY (https://giphy.com/gifs/Q67UV1IkG36cGlz1dd)

Equipped with a GPS tracking band by the Norwegian Polar Institute, researchers were already impressed when the fox reached Greenland 21 days after its release on March 26, 2018. But the little critter was only getting started, eventually crossing into Canada’s Ellesmere less than two months later. With an astounding average pace of 28.5 miles per day, no fox has ever been recorded traveling that far, that fast before.
“The fox’s journey has left scientists speechless,” reported Greenland’s Sermitsiaq newspaper.

“We couldn’t believe our eyes at first. We thought perhaps it was dead, or had been carried there on a boat, but there were no boats in the area. We were quite thunderstruck,” Eva Fuglei of the Polar Institute told local media in Norway.

https://cdni.rt.com/files/2019.07/article/5d1b6870fc7e93c51d8b4594.jpg

Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus) looking for food, near the Eqi glacier, north of Ilulissat in West Greenland. © Universal Images Group Editorial/ FILE PHOTO


Fuglei was working with Arnaud Tarroux from the Norwegian Institute for Nature Research (NINA) to learn more about how the species survives throughout different seasons, particularly during winter when food is scarce. Upon arrival in Canada, the fox will likely skip Tim Hortons and stick to a diet consisting mostly of the plentiful local lemmings.

Unfortunately, the polar institute’s transmitter proved less rugged than the exceptional creature and broke in February… meaning we may never know for sure what it gets up to in Canada.


========================================


Illegal furry immigrant last seen on Axel Heiberg Island....

Constance
2nd July 2019, 19:31
Scientists left ‘speechless’ by young Arctic fox’s amazing journey from Norway to Canada (https://www.rt.com/news/463211-arctic-fox-intercontinental-journey/)

RT
Published time: 2 Jul, 2019 14:31
Edited time: 2 Jul, 2019 15:53
Get short URL (https://on.rt.com/9xez)


https://cdni.rt.com/files/2019.07/article/5d1b68bedda4c881138b4583.jpg
© Universal Images Group Editorial/ FILE PHOTO


Despite its tender age, an Arctic fox has made headlines, broken records and baffled scientists who tracked its blistering 2,176-mile trek from Norway’s Svalbard islands to Canada in a mere 76 days.

While 15-year-old Cori ‘Coco’ Gauff’s Wimbledon win over Venus Williams was undoubtedly impressive, this one-year-old Arctic fox may have made the most impressive athletic debut of the year, occasionally clocking nearly 100 miles a day during its epic intercontinental journey.



https://media.giphy.com/media/Q67UV1IkG36cGlz1dd/giphy.gif
via GIPHY (https://giphy.com/gifs/Q67UV1IkG36cGlz1dd)

Equipped with a GPS tracking band by the Norwegian Polar Institute, researchers were already impressed when the fox reached Greenland 21 days after its release on March 26, 2018. But the little critter was only getting started, eventually crossing into Canada’s Ellesmere less than two months later. With an astounding average pace of 28.5 miles per day, no fox has ever been recorded traveling that far, that fast before.
“The fox’s journey has left scientists speechless,” reported Greenland’s Sermitsiaq newspaper.

“We couldn’t believe our eyes at first. We thought perhaps it was dead, or had been carried there on a boat, but there were no boats in the area. We were quite thunderstruck,” Eva Fuglei of the Polar Institute told local media in Norway.

https://cdni.rt.com/files/2019.07/article/5d1b6870fc7e93c51d8b4594.jpg

Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus) looking for food, near the Eqi glacier, north of Ilulissat in West Greenland. © Universal Images Group Editorial/ FILE PHOTO


Fuglei was working with Arnaud Tarroux from the Norwegian Institute for Nature Research (NINA) to learn more about how the species survives throughout different seasons, particularly during winter when food is scarce. Upon arrival in Canada, the fox will likely skip Tim Hortons and stick to a diet consisting mostly of the plentiful local lemmings.

Unfortunately, the polar institute’s transmitter proved less rugged than the exceptional creature and broke in February… meaning we may never know for sure what it gets up to in Canada.


========================================


Illegal furry immigrant last seen on Axel Heiberg Island....

Astonishing Hervé! Thank you so much for sharing :heart:

Constance
3rd July 2019, 07:57
Our family dog.

She is a rescue dog and we have had her since she was a tiny puppy.

From what the adoption agency has told us and from what we can gather, she is a mixture of Shar pei, Kelpie and at least two other breeds.

Our family dog and my son love each other to bits. However, she has been difficult to train because she is by nature, a very boisterous, stubborn and extremely strong creature.

A little while ago now, I was taking her for a walk with my village neighbour when a rabbit caught her attention. Because I was busy chatting and I was not paying attention to what she was paying attention to, she made a dash for the rabbit with me still attached to the lead. She just about pulled my arm out of its socket! My shoulder is still recovering! :bigsmile:

Our dog is very food centric. (As most dogs are) Last week, to my sons delight and amazement, he accidentally discovered that he could train her to do anything with an organic corn chip. One lousy corn chip. We had tried everything to train her, plying her with all kinds of treats, getting the neighbours involved in trying to make her behave and spending a considerable amount of time and money on dog training books and how-to videos.

My son made the happy discovery after he had accidentally dropped the aforementioned chip on the floor; she had gobbled it up and then had sat there obediently waiting for more!

We can now get her to 'stay' and 'wait'. Even if my son disappears around a corner, she will wait until he says,"Good girl." We can now get her to 'heel' and 'come' when we ask her to.

This is our dog, who steals my sons bread off the kitchen countertop, who steals cleaning rags out of open containers and socks from drawers and who we then have to comically chase around the house; who jumps like a kangaroo and wrestles you to the ground if you go outside to clean up all the torn letters that she has stolen from the letter box, who opens the door to the outside world and forgets to close the door behind her (letting in all kinds of bugs and birds);who eats animal scats with gusto (rabbit, kangaroo, wallaby, fox), who sticks her paws and nose into my mitre saw to retrieve a sliver of wood whilst I am still working on the machine, and who will never let us bathe her because she is allergic to water.

:happy dog:

Constance
4th July 2019, 06:53
How Dogs Can Sniff Out Diabetes and Cancer

Our pet canines can be trained to detect diseases in people—and they're amazingly good at it.

THE FORCE IS strong in Jedi.

The black Labrador retriever recently detected a drop in blood sugar in 7-year-old Luke Nuttall, who has Type 1 diabetes. His glucose monitor didn't pick it up, but Jedi did—and woke up Luke's mother, Dorrie Nuttall, as he was trained.

The California family's amazing story, which went viral on Facebook, made NatGeo's own Nicole Werbeck wonder, “How do dogs use their noses to detect human disease?”

Weird Animal Question of the Week sniffed out some answers.

Nose Pros

Dog schnozzes are incredibly sensitive and quite complicated, which makes them excellent at smelling bombs, drugs, and even animal poop, which can help with conservation.


https://pmdvod.nationalgeographic.com/NG_Video/737/219/140616-k2-dog-training__412893.mp4

TEACHING DOGS TO SAVE LIVES
Teaching Dogs to Save Lives June 16, 2014—With their keen sense of smell, dogs are an ideal companion for military and law enforcement officials looking to sniff out explosives or drugs.

And numerous studies have shown man's best friend can detect various cancers, including prostate cancer, colorectal cancer and melanoma.

Exactly what they are smelling—in other words what cancer and diabetes smell like—is not yet known, says Cindy Otto, founder and director of the University of Pennsylvania’s Penn Vet Working Dog Center.

But there's evidence that diabetic alert dogs, or DADs, smell a volatile chemical compound released throughout the bodies of diabetics. Chemists have not yet singled out the exact compound.

Since these helper dogs work with people, they get service-dog training on top of their medical-detection training—kind of like special agents.

41001

During training, diabetic alert dogs are rewarded whenever they sniff the scent of low blood sugar, provided by patient saliva samples. That way they’ll focus on that scent to the exclusion of the many other scents they’ll pick up on the job. (Related: "Detection Dogs: Learning to Pass the Sniff Test.") (https://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/04/130407/detection-dogs-learning-to-pass-the-sniff-test/)

Other Penn Vet dogs, who are trained to detect ovarian cancer, work only with blood samples in a lab environment.

Omidog!

When she was in grad school studying cancer detection, Maureen Maurer of Asisstance Dogs of Hawaii thought the dogs that already serve the disabled could be trained to do double duty as infection-alert dogs.

Many of Maurer’s clients have spinal cord injuries and can’t feel the pain that alerts most people to urinary tracts infections, which can turn life threatening if untreated.

Maurer co-authored a recent study (https://academic.oup.com/ofid/article/3/2/ofw051/2399288) that showed dogs can detect bacteria in urine samples with nearly 100 percent accuracy, even in samples diluted to 0.1 percent. (Related "The Healing Power of Dogs.") (https://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2012/12/121221-comfort-dogs-newtown-tragedy-animal-therapy/)

One dog even alerted a visitor that she had a urinary tract infection, which a test confirmed.

A second study conducted in hospitals, in which dogs were asked to detect bacteria in urine samples, is showing “promising results,” Maurer says.

Man's Best Helper

Stories like Luke and Jedi’s often increase interest in medical-alert dogs, and Otto recommends checking with Diabetes Alert Dog Alliance or Assistance Dogs International for reliable help in finding one.



https://pmdvod.nationalgeographic.com/NG_Video/145/211/151111-news-k9s-for-warriors-vin_ds1502001-232__586868.mp4

How Rescue Dogs Are Helping Veterans With PTSD November 11, 2015—Rescue dogs are literally saving the lives of veterans struggling with PTSD.

She certainly understands, medically and emotionally, why they’re in demand.

“Right now my dog is sitting in my lap,” she says, and if she herself was in need of a DAD, “I’d like that much better than a glucose monitor.”

Source: National Geographic (https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/03/160319-dogs-diabetes-health-cancer-animals-science/)

Ally S.
4th July 2019, 07:05
Constance, we have a diabetes service dog for my 9 year old son. She's amazing and a great help to us. My son has type 1 diabetes for almost 3 years now and we've had our dog for 1 year. I'd post a picture of her but I don't know how. The place were we got her from is amazing and they also train service dogs for the blind and wheelchair bound people. They train animals without force and violence and are really top notch!

Constance
4th July 2019, 08:31
Constance, we have a diabetes service dog for my 9 year old son. She's amazing and a great help to us. My son has type 1 diabetes for almost 3 years now and we've had our dog for 1 year. I'd post a picture of her but I don't know how. The place were we got her from is amazing and they also train service dogs for the blind and wheelchair bound people. They train animals without force and violence and are really top notch!

Wow! :happy dog:

Ally S., it is so great to hear from you. :flower: Thank you so much for sharing :heart:

It is so very very heartening to hear that your diabetes service dog has been of such great help to your son and your family.

We would love to see a photo of your beloved dog.

I have sent you a PM for instructions on how to post a picture but then I also realised that there may be others too who want to know and so here is a link for How to post images to your computer (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?11918-How-to-post-images-from-your-computer) :heart:

Constance
7th July 2019, 07:16
Dying Man’s Final Wish To See His Dog Again Is Moment People Will Never Forget

Families. They really do come in all shapes and sizes. What would we do without our beloved animal companions? :heart:

41024

A Cedar Rapids homeless man’s dying last wish was to see his dog, Yurtie, one last time. It was a simple request, but one that meant the world to Kevin McClain in his final days.

People involved with the man’s last wish describe it as something they’ll never forget. Yurtie used to live with 57 year old Kelvin in his car. Unfortunately, Kevin became ill with lung cancer.

In this photo, Kevin holds Yurtie during their final reunion on May 11 at the Dennis & Donna Oldorf Hospice House of Mercy.


Volunteers and Cedar Rapids Animal Care and Control described Yurt as inconsolable when he was brought to the shelter. Kevin died a few days after this meeting, and Yurtie how lives with a new family.

Source: Reshareworthy.com (https://www.reshareworthy.com/kevin-mcclains-final-wish-to-see-yurt/)

Constance
7th July 2019, 07:20
"The heart of the problem is that there is no value put on wildness..."


O7kbTaMoJRE
Strong women, wild horses

Bill Ryan
7th July 2019, 20:30
:)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nGeKSiCQkPw

Constance
7th July 2019, 20:52
z2BgjH_CtIA
Bizkit the Sleep Walking Dog


Needs a helmet does our Bizkit!

uyg6SB0SzlY

Constance
8th July 2019, 07:32
Ferocious Cat Battles the Mailman Through the Mail Slot :)

kn3ymQB4iqQ

YoYoYo
8th July 2019, 10:49
A duck and a dog become close friends in a large family of other dogs and ducks.

lqnxP_2zyDc

Rosemarie
8th July 2019, 11:20
My kind of parenting ......:o
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KHBe0jT6S3U

rgray222
9th July 2019, 01:04
Let me introduce you to Lily. She is a rescue dog that I took home two years ago. We found her in a high kill shelter with one day left before she was going to be put down. All they could tell me was that she was an owner surrender and was not well cared for and she had been extremely abused. She was three at the time.

Lily and I have been on a journey for the past two years. The first day I brought her home she bit my son's girlfriend on the face when she tried to give Lily a hug. Nothing too serious but it was startling to everyone. Lily simply did not trust anyone and hated men. It took her a week to learn how to eat from a bowl. I believe she was never properly fed and she had to find food where and whenever it was available. The trash was fair game and unattended food was manna from heaven. Whenever we had dinner and took our plates to the kitchen she would jump on a chair and bound onto the table and eat whatever she would find in an instant. Trying to take food away from here was comparable to going to have your fingers amputated.

My theory with Lily was (and still is) that if I poured as much love into her I would eventually start getting some in return. Lily and I are now inseparable, we walk every day for about two miles, she follows me around the house and won't leave my side when I am home. She no longer wants to kill friends and family when they come to the door, she is actually happy to have visitors. Oddly enough she has always loved young children, I believe for two reasons, they are non-threatening and they drop food (lol).

She has started to trusted people in general and other dogs but it took a full year and she still has a long way to go. I am not sure who got the better end of the deal, Lily or me but it makes little difference. I never realized that I had so much more love to give. Yes, Lily and I have made concessions to accommodate each other and I am sure that our relationship will continue to evolve as time goes on but allowing this little creature into my life was one of the best decisions I ever made.

Meet Lily

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/1hrVNqqqFov5LmSt3wrrWC54xGmtlqbhKzr1W2kXm4_cpVD_qe XLq8kIUBZj12Fy0OcK94wdfzcF77cMvcMEDU0ST1GsS-e7SepbpDdF5NdpVnQiV8SKvlM0ApxUibSo-jY0_3cr-3_XYJmweQgkYTt1i2Oj5xhBMawAEvOpQ39MYgb_9ErBUQjpCMM YX35Ln4s1Z2tvnFQjhGlHzrBoMtxtFyxelUOz0uK3x0uIVJVLh VqGSGL7Zvcf7toWMEyAWN7QM6MwWmmV8q6Rip-Naa7lzS8npjIqP6se4o1zzunQlH3G59k0K0t-Hijyib1P6OQAJV2DurJkboOHF_8IqQVreplI5OxwAE9sMbnTsk bFE7l0jzy3kPGQ4r4vfWur82kDc9Cv59F6sdEp1eunJEce9JcJ oNhyt2bbbFb5ryap8m-2clExwSvvVOooGWsc2v_6Z54FlOWPPYulRMyM4EYpmjiPzag15 FVl29XLnqQ9tE9JxrI7qrCfEontnYHknRSnjUzDe0ki-gKVpRUfJE_XVMoEar7U73g5No-27P1g7e3he5ADqicvFgK4zDHJy3r2OwncrrDexHhJg7DXb_Aa1 T0T1ALbQVb2rPSeGLURDwL3cVWFZqYSRcDY9ygat8byR-78OkgTQZBx88rLXPhh6q0j-fko=w1597-h898-no
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/EPEfsyG6xrOmAI_kzMp8hmP59LBnS5EN9tzV37lVwPbrRwwbDd btbb7zWDz_vslx5wi6SvzCIVIX7_RiVIO6_JrdRM65j062HZcL ocVtP2UAbCcOx3QvNBBFVJoC_cXzyP1O2ZPo9FBiLDBGKNgQnV Dl9kTNmwUoLaY93gFdKJwAHo_dgMbv6INwA9LkBy-WQcudAxJCFFlRGhhNr_QzWDHXkPau3P8bFZ11koD8X1Wat3nYW puEEWyuBfVuaI38e0aFjE4IDkIz7y9hyPC6dsfdKPAL9QqM7Bx bqwGlL6q4blllaINyqmwfmvTZFxZful8cdSghyA_CQlIblJ2Jr Z-gTCYIiVQMrrPF6bsDhwJqLD7ZTjPSG7lAvd58nlPZNBVZi0YiB O3MKFGBurm0lgqnpz2eo_5mjNibuXBpRK5DEng4WLQ8ltdPYi0 6LNIRZfdCZXQ-_4p6XCaGpcFsPnbnhe98qp_gn1eA2kam4NtKVO-GHcbyUrSqT3nzqPuJfWdZTGvO-QMnuVetKpQjEXij2sAZNUKVKlIEVAJj9K7f3O9_7e3fjJsRVCC IfPsRjvMBqJE5J-8p3PVLsF4s0H84jKsJmtnzAyl-anW5Ua1Xczvp98kwASDUN1yyyUuRT0lrZorRaW3L69Jk-3jZ19zAUdoHz2Ar=w1597-h898-no
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Constance
9th July 2019, 01:44
rgray222 OMG - Just two years under your wing and the transformation! Wow!!:sun:

Thank you so so much for sharing your incredibly beautiful and heartwarming story with us.

I live to hear stories such as yours and Lily's.

What a heart stopper your Lily is. :heart:


Let me introduce you to Lily. She is a rescue dog that I took home two years ago. We found her in a high kill shelter with one day left before she was going to be put down. All they could tell me was that she was an owner surrender and was not well cared for and she had been extremely abused. She was three at the time.

Lily and I have been on a journey for the past two years. The first day I brought her home she bit my son's girlfriend on the face when she tried to give Lily a hug. Nothing too serious but it was startling to everyone. Lily simply did not trust anyone and hated men. It took her a week to learn how to eat from a bowl. I believe she was never properly fed and she had to find food where and whenever it was available. The trash was fair game and unattended food was manna from heaven. Whenever we had dinner and took our plates to the kitchen she would jump on a chair and bound onto the table and eat whatever she would find in an instant. Trying to take food away from here was comparable to going to have your fingers amputated.

My theory with Lily was (and still is) that if I poured as much love into her I would eventually start getting some in return. Lily and I are now inseparable, we walk every day for about two miles, she follows me around the house and won't leave my side when I am home. She no longer wants to kill friends and family when they come to the door, she is actually happy to have visitors. Oddly enough she has always loved young children, I believe for two reasons, they are non-threatening and they drop food (lol).

She has started to trusted people in general and other dogs but it took a full year and she still has a long way to go. I am not sure who got the better end of the deal, Lily or me but it makes little difference. I never realized that I had so much more love to give. Yes, Lily and I have made concessions to accommodate each other and I am sure that our relationship will continue to evolve as time goes on but allowing this little creature into my life was one of the best decisions I ever made.

Rosemarie
9th July 2019, 03:37
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I-ovzUNno7g

Who doesn’t love panda bears ?

AutumnW
9th July 2019, 04:05
This has likely been posted here but if not...singing beagle. Plays piano too.

Qj_FCM7THDI

Constance
9th July 2019, 08:58
The Animal Odd Couple:star::star::star:

Tara and Bella had been close for years. But no one really knew how close until recently.
A few months ago Bella suffered a spinal cord injury. She couldn't move her legs, couldn't even wag her tail.

For three weeks the dog lay motionless up in the sanctuary office and for three weeks, the elephant held vigil.

2700 acres to roam free and Tara just stood in the corner.

cBtFTF2ii7U

Constance
10th July 2019, 09:11
Could we speak the language of dolphins?
| Denise Herzing


Transcript




Well, now we're going to the Bahamas to meet a remarkable group of dolphins that I've been working with in the wild for the last 28 years. Now I'm interested in dolphins because of their large brains and what they might be doing with all that brainpower in the wild. And we know they use some of that brainpower for just living complicated lives, but what do we really know about dolphin intelligence? Well, we know a few things. We know that their brain-to-body ratio, which is a physical measure of intelligence, is second only to humans.

Cognitively, they can understand artificially-created languages. And they pass self-awareness tests in mirrors. And in some parts of the world, they use tools, like sponges to hunt fish. But there's one big question left: do they have a language, and if so, what are they talking about?

So decades ago, not years ago, I set out to find a place in the world where I could observe dolphins underwater to try to crack the code of their communication system. Now in most parts of the world, the water's pretty murky, so it's very hard to observe animals underwater, but I found a community of dolphins that live in these beautiful, clear, shallow sandbanks of the Bahamas which are just east of Florida.

And they spend their daytime resting and socializing in the safety of the shallows, but at night, they go off the edge and hunt in deep water. Now, it's not a bad place to be a researcher, either. So we go out for about five months every summer in a 20-meter catamaran, and we live, sleep and work at sea for weeks at a time. My main tool is an underwater video with a hydrophone, which is an underwater microphone, and this is so I can correlate sound and behavior. And most of our work's pretty non-invasive.

We try to follow dolphin etiquette while we're in the water, since we're actually observing them physically in the water. Now, Atlantic spotted dolphins are a really nice species to work with for a couple of reasons. They're born without spots, and they get spots with age, and they go through pretty distinct developmental phases, so that's fun to track their behavior. And by about the age of 15, they're fully spotted black and white. Now the mother you see here is Mugsy. She's 35 years old in this shot, but dolphins can actually live into their early 50s. And like all the dolphins in our community, we photographed Mugsy and tracked her little spots and nicks in her dorsal fin, and also the unique spot patterns as she matured over time.

Now, young dolphins learn a lot as they're growing up, and they use their teenage years to practice social skills, and at about the age of nine, the females become sexually mature, so they can get pregnant, and the males mature quite a bit later, at around 15 years of age. And dolphins are very promiscuous, and so we have to determine who the fathers are, so we do paternity tests by collecting fecal material out of the water and extracting DNA. So what that means is, after 28 years, we are tracking three generations, including grandmothers and grandfathers.

Now, dolphins are natural acousticians. They make sounds 10 times as high and hear sounds 10 times as high as we do. But they have other communication signals they use. They have good vision, so they use body postures to communicate. They have taste, not smell. And they have touch. And sound can actually be felt in the water, because the acoustic impedance of tissue and water's about the same. So dolphins can buzz and tickle each other at a distance.

Now, we do know some things about how sounds are used with certain behaviors. Now, the signature whistle is a whistle that's specific to an individual dolphin, and it's like a name. (Dolphin whistling noises) And this is the best-studied sound, because it's easy to measure, really, and you'd find this whistle when mothers and calves are reuniting, for example. Another well studied sound are echolocation clicks. This is the dolphin's sonar. (Dolphin echolocation noises) And they use these clicks to hunt and feed. But they can also tightly pack these clicks together into buzzes and use them socially. For example, males will stimulate a female during a courtship chase. You know, I've been buzzed in the water. (Laughter) Don't tell anyone. It's a secret. And you can really feel the sound. That was my point with that. (Laughter)

So dolphins are also political animals, so they have to resolve conflicts. (Dolphin noises) And they use these burst-pulsed sounds as well as their head-to-head behaviors when they're fighting. And these are very unstudied sounds because they're hard to measure. Now this is some video of a typical dolphin fight. (Dolphin noises) So you're going to see two groups, and you're going to see the head-to-head posturing, some open mouths, lots of squawking. There's a bubble. And basically, one of these groups will kind of back off and everything will resolve fine, and it doesn't really escalate into violence too much.

Now, in the Bahamas, we also have resident bottlenose that interact socially with the spotted dolphins. For example, they babysit each other's calves. The males have dominance displays that they use when they're chasing each other's females. And the two species actually form temporary alliances when they're chasing sharks away. And one of the mechanisms they use to communicate their coordination is synchrony. They synchronize their sounds and their body postures to look bigger and sound stronger. (Dolphins noises) Now, these are bottlenose dolphins, and you'll see them starting to synchronize their behavior and their sounds. (Dolphin noises) You see, they're synchronizing with their partner as well as the other dyad. I wish I was that coordinated.

Now, it's important to remember that you're only hearing the human-audible parts of dolphin sounds, and dolphins make ultrasonic sounds, and we use special equipment in the water to collect these sounds. Now, researchers have actually measured whistle complexity using information theory, and whistles rate very high relative to even human languages. But burst-pulsed sounds is a bit of a mystery.

Now, these are three spectragrams. Two are human words, and one is a dolphin vocalizing. So just take a guess in your mind which one is the dolphin. Now, it turns out burst-pulsed sounds actually look a bit like human phonemes.

Now, one way to crack the code is to interpret these signals and figure out what they mean, but it's a difficult job, and we actually don't have a Rosetta Stone yet. But a second way to crack the code is to develop some technology, an interface to do two-way communication, and that's what we've been trying to do in the Bahamas and in real time. Now, scientists have used keyboard interfaces to try to bridge the gap with species including chimpanzees and dolphins. This underwater keyboard in Orlando, Florida, at the Epcot Center, was actually the most sophisticated ever two-way interface designed for humans and dolphins to work together under the water and exchange information.

So we wanted to develop an interface like this in the Bahamas, but in a more natural setting. And one of the reasons we thought we could do this is because the dolphins were starting to show us a lot of mutual curiosity. They were spontaneously mimicking our vocalizations and our postures, and they were also inviting us into dolphin games.

Now, dolphins are social mammals, so they love to play, and one of their favorite games is to drag seaweed, or sargassum in this case, around. And they're very adept. They like to drag it and drop it from appendage to appendage. Now in this footage, the adult is Caroh. She's 25 years old here, and this is her newborn, Cobalt, and he's just learning how to play this game. (Dolphin noises) She's kind of teasing him and taunting him. He really wants that sargassum.

Now, when dolphins solicit humans for this game, they'll often sink vertically in the water, and they'll have a little sargassum on their flipper, and they'll sort of nudge it and drop it sometimes on the bottom and let us go get it, and then we'll have a little seaweed keep away game. But when we don't dive down and get it, they'll bring it to the surface and they'll sort of wave it in front of us on their tail and drop it for us like they do their calves, and then we'll pick it up and have a game.

And so we started thinking, well, wouldn't it be neat to build some technology that would allow the dolphins to request these things in real time, their favorite toys? So the original vision was to have a keyboard hanging from the boat attached to a computer, and the divers and dolphins would activate the keys on the keypad and happily exchange information and request toys from each other.

But we quickly found out that dolphins simply were not going to hang around the boat using a keyboard. They've got better things to do in the wild. They might do it in captivity, but in the wild --

So we built a portable keyboard that we could push through the water, and we labeled four objects they like to play with, the scarf, rope, sargassum, and also had a bow ride, which is a fun activity for a dolphin. (Whistle) And that's the scarf whistle, which is also associated with a visual symbol. And these are artificially created whistles. They're outside the dolphin's normal repertoire, but they're easily mimicked by the dolphins. And I spent four years with my colleagues Adam Pack and Fabienne Delfour, working out in the field with this keyboard using it with each other to do requests for toys while the dolphins were watching. And the dolphins could get in on the game. They could point at the visual object, or they could mimic the whistle.

Now this is video of a session. The diver here has a rope toy, and I'm on the keyboard on the left, and I've just played the rope key, and that's the request for the toy from the human. So I've got the rope, I'm diving down, and I'm basically trying to get the dolphin's attention, because they're kind of like little kids. You have to keep their attention. I'm going to drop the rope, see if they come over. Here they come, and then they're going to pick up the rope and drag it around as a toy. Now, I'm at the keyboard on the left, and this is actually the first time that we tried this. I'm going to try to request this toy, the rope toy, from the dolphins using the rope sound. Let's see if they might actually understand what that means. (Whistle) That's the rope whistle. Up come the dolphins, and drop off the rope, yay. Wow. (Applause) So this is only once. We don't know for sure if they really understand the function of the whistles. Okay, so here's a second toy in the water. This is a scarf toy, and I'm trying to lead the dolphin over to the keyboard to show her the visual and the acoustic signal. Now this dolphin, we call her "the scarf thief," because over the years she's absconded with about 12 scarves. In fact, we think she has a boutique somewhere in the Bahamas. So I'm reaching over. She's got the scarf on her right side. And we try to not touch the animals too much, we really don't want to over-habituate them. And I'm trying to lead her back to the keyboard. And the diver there is going to activate the scarf sound to request the scarf. So I try to give her the scarf. Whoops. Almost lost it. But this is the moment where everything becomes possible. The dolphin's at the keyboard. You've got full attention. And this sometimes went on for hours.

And I wanted to share this video with you not to show you any big breakthroughs, because they haven't happened yet, but to show you the level of intention and focus that these dolphins have, and interest in the system. And because of this, we really decided we needed some more sophisticated technology. So we joined forces with Georgia Tech, with Thad Starner's wearable computing group, to build us an underwater wearable computer that we're calling CHAT. [CHAT: Cetacean Hearing And Telemetry] Now, instead of pushing a keyboard through the water, the diver's wearing the complete system, and it's acoustic only, so basically the diver activates the sounds on a keypad on the forearm, the sounds go out through an underwater speaker, if a dolphin mimics the whistle or a human plays the whistle, the sounds come in and are localized by two hydrophones. The computer can localize who requested the toy if there's a word match. And the real power of the system is in the real-time sound recognition, so we can respond to the dolphins quickly and accurately. And we're at prototype stage, but this is how we hope it will play out. So Diver A and Diver B both have a wearable computer and the dolphin hears the whistle as a whistle, the diver hears the whistle as a whistle in the water, but also as a word through bone conduction. So Diver A plays the scarf whistle or Diver B plays the sargassum whistle to request a toy from whoever has it. What we hope will happen is that the dolphin mimics the whistle, and if Diver A has the sargassum, if that's the sound that was played and requested, then the diver will give the sargassum to the requesting dolphin and they'll swim away happily into the sunset playing sargassum for forever. Now, how far can this kind of communication go? Well, CHAT is designed specifically to empower the dolphins to request things from us. It's designed to really be two-way.

Now, will they learn to mimic the whistles functionally? We hope so and we think so. But as we decode their natural sounds, we're also planning to put those back into the computerized system. For example, right now we can put their own signature whistles in the computer and request to interact with a specific dolphin. Likewise, we can create our own whistles, our own whistle names, and let the dolphins request specific divers to interact with. Now it may be that all our mobile technology will actually be the same technology that helps us communicate with another species down the road.

In the case of a dolphin, you know, it's a species that, well, they're probably close to our intelligence in many ways and we might not be able to admit that right now, but they live in quite a different environment, and you still have to bridge the gap with the sensory systems. I mean, imagine what it would be like to really understand the mind of another intelligent species on the planet. Thank you.
(Applause)

CQ5dRyyHwfM

Constance
10th July 2019, 10:17
Thanks to Deux Corbeaux (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?107542-Dance-dance-dance-....&p=1302951&viewfull=1#post1302951) for sharing this delightful video of Snowball! :sun:

Meet Snowball the dancing cockatoo. He has had 4 million views on youtube. Staggering really. When Snowball hit the email inbox of two neuroscientists at the Neurosciences institute of San Diego, this dancing bird helped to redefine avian intelligence. :sun:

"...How can a small brain like this do what a chimpanzee can't?"

Vgp6gP2kUm0
Snowball on the CBS Sunday Morning News Show

Constance
10th July 2019, 10:27
On every working week day, my Ava waits for our mail man John to arrive - rain, hail or shine.

41090

As soon as she hears his motor bike approaching, there is a mad dash to the door for John.

Ava has a love affair with John. If John takes a day off, Ava senses it. She mopes around the house like some star-crossed lover. :bigsmile:

I am yet to capture her on video. I offer this instead. :dog:

a5Vl2OGxc-E

Valerie Villars
10th July 2019, 12:16
Thanks to Deux Corbeaux (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?107542-Dance-dance-dance-....&p=1302951&viewfull=1#post1302951) for sharing this delightful video of Snowball! :sun:

Meet Snowball the dancing cockatoo. He has had 4 million views on youtube. Staggering really. When Snowball hit the email inbox of two neuroscientists at the Neurosciences institute of San Diego, this dancing bird helped to redefine avian intelligence. :sun:

"...How can a small brain like this do what a chimpanzee can't?"

Vgp6gP2kUm0
Snowball on the CBS Sunday Morning News Show

Our macaw, Lulu, also dances to the beat. She had the installers of our stereo system in stitches because she was head banging to heavy metal. From many long hours of observation on our front porch, Lulu's favorite music is the blues.

Rosemarie
14th July 2019, 04:07
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a9aQz3jUMtU

Manta ray asks for help.
Footage shows Freckles the manta ray approaching the divers off the Ningaloo Coast of Western Australia , and showing them that it has fish hooks caught under its eye.

“ Clear illustration that these animals have intelligence , trust and strong association with folks who treat them with respect “ said photographer Monty Halls

Constance
15th July 2019, 05:24
One of my favourite pastimes is to watch baby magpies at play.:dancing:

The antics! :)




EV4qZ_lgStw
Magpie Hangs Upside Down

Iloveyou
15th July 2019, 07:00
https://media.diepresse.com/images/uploads_1320/b/6/4/105316/bdt04_1563015500894774.jpg


Put me down! Do you hear me! Right now!



https://media.diepresse.com/images/uploads_1320/b/6/4/105316/TOPSHOT-BULLFIGHTING-ESP-SAN-FERMIN_1562587340216885_v0_h.jpg


Got em!

Franny
15th July 2019, 07:15
Meet Snowball the dancing cockatoo. He has had 4 million views on youtube. Staggering really. When Snowball hit the email inbox of two neuroscientists at the Neurosciences institute of San Diego, this dancing bird helped to redefine avian intelligence.

"...How can a small brain like this do what a chimpanzee can't?"


At about 3:40 one of the scientists says you would never see a dog, cat or chimp dancing to music and you cannot train them because they don't have the right kind of brain to do it. You can, if you can find the video. In a video of a street in Brazil (I think) music starts playing and a dog walking along the street suddenly starts bobbing his head and hips to the beat of the music as he continues dancing his way along the street. Still much to learn about animals.

Constance
15th July 2019, 07:45
Meet Snowball the dancing cockatoo. He has had 4 million views on youtube. Staggering really. When Snowball hit the email inbox of two neuroscientists at the Neurosciences institute of San Diego, this dancing bird helped to redefine avian intelligence.

"...How can a small brain like this do what a chimpanzee can't?"


At about 3:40 one of the scientists says you would never see a dog, cat or chimp dancing to music and you cannot train them because they don't have the right kind of brain to do it. You can, if you can find the video. In a video of a street in Brazil (I think) music starts playing and a dog walking along the street suddenly starts bobbing his head and hips to the beat of the music as he continues dancing his way along the street. Still much to learn about animals.

You are so spot on Franny, there is so much that we still don't know about animals.:bowing:

I was trying to find the video I thought you might be referring to when I found this.

i8ZW94SWchE

Constance
16th July 2019, 09:08
Jokgu the chicken on the keyboard. Apparently it isn't only parrots that like music. :star:

cFYxRp9K9L4
Chicken Plays Operatic Aria on Piano Keyboard

Franny
16th July 2019, 21:06
You are so spot on Franny, there is so much that we still don't know about animals.:bowing:

I was trying to find the video I thought you might be referring to when I found this.

i8ZW94SWchE

That one had me smiling too but it's not the one I'm thinking of :) I can't seem to find it either.

Bill Ryan
16th July 2019, 22:26
From https://globalanimal.org/2011/08/19/the-cleverness-of-the-apes-gallery.

An astonishing report, which I never knew till now. My emphasis added below. :)

https://www.globalanimal.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/Ape-Masters-Language.jpg

Koko, a lowland gorilla born in 1971, is currently the most language-proficient nonhuman, according to the Gorilla Foundation, which teaches ASL [American Sign Language] to gorillas.

The gorilla has a vocabulary of more than a thousand signs, understands about 2,000 words of spoken English, and initiates most conversations with people, according to the foundation’s website.

Her IQ is between 70 and 95 on a human scale — 100 is considered a “normal” human IQ.

Valerie Villars
17th July 2019, 00:18
I wonder what their emotional intelligence is.

Constance
17th July 2019, 00:24
I wonder what their emotional intelligence is.

Have you ever seen this beautiful Val?

It is Koko watching a sad movie

EWxCM6llL60

and here she is again mourning the loss of her kitten.

CQCOHUXmEZg

Ken
17th July 2019, 00:52
I wonder what their emotional intelligence is.

Have you ever seen this beautiful Val?

...here she is... ...mourning the loss of her kitten.

CQCOHUXmEZg

Heartbreaking.. Such a beautiful soul :( :heart:

Caliban
17th July 2019, 02:09
We lost the great Koko about a year ago. One envisions her romping with Robin Williams through the endless celestial fields.

Constance
17th July 2019, 10:25
This is remarkable. A wild Orangutan knows instinctively how to use a handsaw.

She blitzes me in the handsawing department!:bigsmile:

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Robot Orangutan Vs Wild Orangutan Sawing Duel

Constance
17th July 2019, 10:49
Over 50 years ago, a small group of snow monkeys began to bathe together and this has become a tradition. Apparently, these are the only monkeys in Japan who soak in the hot springs. You will see the monkeys doing their thing at the Jigokudani monkey park. :heart:

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Snow monkeys soak in hot springs of Japan

Rosemarie
18th July 2019, 02:35
Two old friends reunited. :heart:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lF8em4uPdCg

Cara
18th July 2019, 06:44
I needed some peace today, and found some in this. Wild horses in the Chernobyl exclusion zone:

vnL8ha3qrs0

amor
18th July 2019, 20:04
I recently had taken in, incrementally, two cats, who then became pregnant. I continued to feed them and one produced seven kittens which I never let outside being fearful for their safety. The second female cat was huge one day and flat the next. I continued to feed her as well until one week when she brought me three weaned kittens in three days. I will only say, that it was an ordeal trying to keep a carpeted floor away from ten rambunctious kitties. I knew I had to get them adopted, otherwise they would starve and/or be prey for other creatures. I surrendered them to the local animal rescue service of the county who found homes for them. In the process, which is a long story, I discovered the cats capacity for love and my own love reactivated by their presence. My discovery, which is the point I wish to make is: LIFE IS SACRED AND LIFE IS LOVE. By extension, anyone who disregards the needs of others when they can help, especially the animals against whom human ways appear to be stacked, is criminal and in violation of the laws of Heaven.

About the film "Dominion," I have watched films like it before; because of my recent experience, I cannot bear to watch another one like it. For years, I have not touched meat other than precooked chicken, fish and eggs; and I realize that a solution as to how to get protein remains for me. The evil treatment of chickens needs to be forcibly halted. If we must eat protein in this form, then it is best to forego the stage of animal existence and do it technologically. If we succeed at this, human hunger will be well on its way to cessation. We must also succeed in creating plants which provide protein for large and small animals. According to the story of the Garden of Eden created by the Annunaki, all the animals ate plants. We must reverse the evil which has taken over this planet. Surprise, surprise, war will end.

After my experience with the cats involving telepathic communication and sharing the feelings of the cats, I KNOW that we are all the same beings coming from the same WELL OF EXISTENCE IN CREATION, and both the good and evil that we dispense will return to us in some form, either now or in a future experience of existence. The love that we broadcast now is to improve the existence of the whole.

Constance
19th July 2019, 01:19
Esther the wonderpig opens doors in more ways than one.

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Esther the Wonder Pig Opens Doors


Cornelius the Turkey and Esther are great friends but Turkeys being social creatures - Cornelius also wants his fair share of attention! :)

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Jealous Turkey Needs Attention

Rosemarie
19th July 2019, 20:34
Tlaxcala, Mexico and its fireflies show. Go to youtube to see other amazing videos of this spectacle.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z7VZlaHWR1s

Ken
19th July 2019, 20:53
Lovely.. thank you, Rosemarie. I so love fireflies..

Here's another.. :flower:

k72jGJTC_3o

Bill Ryan
20th July 2019, 16:04
Not only Koko, the gorilla who learned to recognize 2,000 words (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?106567-Animals-are-Magical&p=1304646&viewfull=1#post1304646). Here's Kanzi (https://www.globalanimal.org/2011/08/19/the-cleverness-of-the-apes-gallery/), a genius bonobo chimpanzee.

http://projectavalon.net/Kanzi.jpg

Kanzi, born in 1980, is “the world’s undisputed ape-language superstar,” according to the website of the Great Ape Trust (http://www.greatapetrust.org), a research facility in Iowa that studies ape language and intelligence.

That’s because he was the first ape to acquire language as children do: by being exposed to it.

Kanzi is also the first ape to show receptive understanding of spoken English and excels in research using novel sentences—phrases that require the learning of specific responses.

Read more about Kanzi here: an amazing story. :sun:


http://greatapetrust.org/kanzi-an-ape-of-genius-part-1

Constance
20th July 2019, 21:55
Bill shared this earlier on A campfire chat with the moderators :) (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?107828-A-campfire-chat-with-the-moderators--&p=1305412&viewfull=1#post1305412)

but it is so good, I just had to share it here. :cat::cat::cat:

1SmgLtg1Izw

Bill Ryan
20th July 2019, 22:04
Bill shared this earlier on A campfire chat with the moderators :) (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?107828-A-campfire-chat-with-the-moderators--&p=1305412&viewfull=1#post1305412)

but it is so good, I just had to share it here. :cat::cat::cat:

1SmgLtg1Izw

What gets me every time is the sneeze at 0:38. :bigsmile:

:focus:

avid
20th July 2019, 22:11
I love pussy cats, but tonight, after cleaning up after my neighbour’s stretchy relaxing sofa cat visitation, hysterical nasal trauma, non-stop sneezing - deffo not cat - must be something it was hunting earlier....😉

Bill Ryan
20th July 2019, 22:24
More about highly intelligent great apes, from https://globalanimal.org/2011/08/19/the-cleverness-of-the-apes-gallery.

This is Azy, an orangutan, selecting a symbol for "apple" after being shown a slice of apple by a researcher at the Think Tank facility at Washington, D.C.'s National Zoo in 1996.

http://projectavalon.net/Azy.jpg

“Not only does Azy communicate his thoughts with abstract keyboard symbols, he also demonstrates a ‘theory of mind’ (understanding another individual’s perspective) and makes logical, thoughtful choices that show a mental flexibility some chimpanzees lack,” according to National Geographic magazine.

As part of the facility’s Orangutan Language Project, orangutans, rewarded with food, learn to use a symbol-based language presented on a computer monitor.

The zoo’s “dictionary” has about 70 abstract symbols, all of which have no visual relation to the object they represent. There are seven categories of symbols: food, proper names of people, verbs, adjectives, Arabic numbers, nonfood objects, and proper names of orangutans.

Franny
21st July 2019, 03:49
Friends play with a car tire in pasture - wonderful!

EouCfyOhjRs

Rosemarie
21st July 2019, 04:21
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EWXJJ6TbGYUWent looking for this video I saw a couple of months ago. A sheep got stuck on a tire. It was so funny, poor thing.
The other sheep looking at their friend like “ what the heck “:confused:

Constance
21st July 2019, 10:47
The platypus might be the most unusual animal on the planet.

41180





It has webbed feet like a frog
A bill like a duck
Venom like a snake
and lays eggs like a bird!

They are a secretive animal spending most of their life underwater or underground. It wasn't until the 1880's that it first was confirmed that they were egg laying mammals because the male platypus can deliver a sting that creates weeks of pain and swelling. Ouch!

You'll find them all along the east coast of Australia - From the tropical rainforests to the icy remote Tasmanian wilderness.

The only other animal that is remotely related to the platypus is the echidna.

btUGDQXMoqY
Platypus - The World's Strangest Animal (Nature Documentary)

Ken
21st July 2019, 16:46
The platypus might be the most unusual animal on the planet.

41180





It has webbed feet like a frog
A bill like a duck
Venom like a snake
and lays eggs like a bird!

They are a secretive animal spending most of their life underwater or underground. It wasn't until the 1880's that it first was confirmed that they were egg laying mammals because the male platypus can deliver a sting that creates weeks of pain and swelling. Ouch!

You'll find them all along the east coast of Australia - From the tropical rainforests to the icy remote Tasmanian wilderness.

The only other animal that is remotely related to the platypus is the echidna.

btUGDQXMoqY
Platypus - The World's Strangest Animal (Nature Documentary)

I SO wanted a pet platypus when I was a child!!! :clapping:

YoYoYo
21st July 2019, 19:23
The Cat Behaviour Channel (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAUBL56KoKmPaRXo-N0VBHg)



Chatzi is a 6month old Bengal boy. This is part one of a series of feline cat behaviour films looking in detail into his introduction to a house with another Bengal cat called Freya and a Mixed Breed Moggy called Teego



https://youtu.be/H_mgXHAMDZI

H_mgXHAMDZI

Rosemarie
22nd July 2019, 01:54
My favorite animal ever. This is the story of the Elephant Whisperer and his herd of elephants in Thula Thula.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K7mli4LnN0s

Constance
22nd July 2019, 06:21
Ernesto the meerkat has been bitten by a cobra.

Incredibly, he survives. Such is the miracle of life and nature. :star:

6ZMU1GViRg4
Ernesto, the snake-bitten meerkat's miraculous story - Planet Earth Live - BBC One

YoYoYo
23rd July 2019, 22:33
I was going to show the sequel to the previous cat behavioural video in which Chatzi and Teego start to play.

But this older video is better, featuring Teego as a kitten, when he was the upstart and intruder


The Cat Behaviour Channel (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAUBL56KoKmPaRXo-N0VBHg)

This is a little film about Freya the 6 year old Bengal cat, and Teego, an 11 week old kitten meeting for the first time.

Freya has always been a little bit timid



https://youtu.be/EhRuG0D-WsU

EhRuG0D-WsU

Constance
24th July 2019, 10:14
The Secret Life of Pigeons

41199



Sky rats, sewer eagles, gutter falcons, these are some of the unflattering names given to pigeons but here in this documentary, you may well have a change of heart.

Pigeons thrive in every city and in every town. They are exceptional navigators. Ancient civilisations worshipped them - to the sumerians they were the messengers to the gods, to the greeks and romans, they were the symbols of fertility.

Pigeons can distinguish facial features, remember a persons gait and recognise friend from foe.

Pigeons are gentle and smart and have complex social relationships. Their hearing and vision are both excellent. Ingrid Newkirk


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The Secret Life of Pigeons

Kryztian
24th July 2019, 22:04
I have been feeding pigeons, thousands of them for years. But there was one, a beautiful bird, pure white with light grey tips on its wings; that one was different. It was a female. I had only to wish and call her and she would come flying to me.
I loved that pigeon as a man loves a women, and she loved me. As long as I had her, there was a purpose to my life.
- - - - - Nikola Tesla

Nikola Tesla was a wonderfully eccentric man when he wasn’t busy discovering new inventions. One of his many oddities was his fascination – okay, let’s call it an obsession – with pigeons.

Always dressed impeccably, Tesla nonetheless could be occasionally found standing in Bryant Park, arms outstretched, bird feed at his feet, and covered in pigeons. He was a sight to behold, and passersby chuckled at the idea of the great scientist enamored of what most would agree are not the cleanest or most appealing of birds (some would go so far as to call them “rats with wings”). But here he was…mingling with the feisty foul just steps from his scientific laboratory.

On other occasions Tesla would wander the streets of New York City, head down, gazing intently, on the alert for the injured pigeon who mistook the windowed glass of the slowly rising skyscrapers of New York for a passageway (or a possible mate, one might imagine). Rushing to any bird he observed, Tesla gently lifted his new-found charge and brought it back to his hotel room to nurse it back to health.

Such an odd paradox was this man. Desperately germophobic to the point of avoiding human contact, here he is covered in bird feathers…and worse. And when he took ill and couldn’t tend to his rounds he would order his assistants to go out looking in his stead. Giving them careful instructions on where to look and how to handle the birds, they were to bring them back and care for them if Tesla could not.

One particular white pigeon became a personal friend when Tesla was most in need of friendship. One day the pigeon showed up on his windowsill looking, to Tesla at least, forlorn. Tesla knew the pigeon had come to tell him it was dying.

In the end, both the pigeon and Tesla died alone.

From: http://www.davidjkent-writer.com/2012/06/09/nikola-tesla-and-the-white-pigeon/

Constance
25th July 2019, 10:51
How naked mole rats conquered pain—and what it could mean for us
By Elizabeth Pennisi Oct. 11, 2016


41218




Although it has a face—and body—that only a mother could love, the naked mole rat has a lot to offer biomedical science. It lives 10 times longer than a mouse, almost never gets cancer (https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2013/06/why-naked-mole-rats-dont-get-cancer), and doesn’t feel pain from injury and inflammation. Now, researchers say they’ve figured out how the rodents keep this pain away.

“It’s an amazing result,” says Harold Zakon, an evolutionary neurobiologist at the University of Texas, Austin, who was not involved with the work. “This study points us to important areas … that might be targeted to reduce this type of pain.”

Naked mole rats are just plain weird. They live almost totally underground in colonies (https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2006/04/mole-rat-caste-lives-good-life)structured like honey bee hives, with hundreds of workers servicing a single queen and her few consorts. To survive, they dig kilometers of tunnels in search of large underground tubers for food. It’s such a tough life that—to conserve energy—this member of the rodent family gave up regulating its temperature, and they are able to thrive in a low-oxygen, high–carbon dioxide environment that would suffocate or be very painful to humans.

“They might as well be from another planet,” says Thomas Park, a neuroscientist at the University of Illinois, Chicago.



Read the rest of this article here at sciencemag.org (https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/10/how-naked-mole-rats-conquered-pain-and-what-it-could-mean-us)

Caliban
26th July 2019, 04:03
How naked mole rats conquered pain—and what it could mean for us
By Elizabeth Pennisi Oct. 11, 2016





Isn't it interesting how instead of just marveling at how fascinating these creatures are, they go right into "what it could mean for us."

WHAT IT COULD MEAN FOR US.

Doesn't that just about sum it all up ?

Constance
26th July 2019, 05:20
How naked mole rats conquered pain—and what it could mean for us
By Elizabeth Pennisi Oct. 11, 2016





Isn't it interesting how instead of just marveling at how fascinating these creatures are, they go right into "what it could mean for us."

WHAT IT COULD MEAN FOR US.

Doesn't that just about sum it all up ?

Thank you for your astute observations there Caliban. :bowing:

It is so very telling. Many in the scientific community have little to no conscious awareness of the true nature of earths creatures or our true relationship to them.

You reminded me of this quote:

From caring comes courage - Lao Tzu

Constance
26th July 2019, 10:43
The beauty of pollination

:star:Took my breath away. Stunning. Gorgeous. Glorious. You need to watch this on a big screen to fully appreciate this visual feast. :star:





xHkq1edcbk4

Star Tsar
26th July 2019, 17:04
Sinuous Asperoteuthis Mangoldae Squid Filmed Alive for First Time

GUIMTL2Pf1g

Rosemarie
26th July 2019, 21:33
The best Orphanage in the world. The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust in Kenya. I have been following it for years. It operates the most successful orphan elephant and rescue operation in the world.
There is a book written by Dame Daphne Sheldrick called Love, Life and Elephants : An African Love Story than I recommend to all.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KpLfv6Gmvo8

Constance
27th July 2019, 08:27
There is an extraordinarily beautiful and touching moment in this video when Ima, a wild male gorilla who lives in the safety of the Batéké Plateau National Park, takes Victoria's hat and places it on his own noble and gentle head. :star:

_X57lHbQP6k
Heart-warming moment Damian Aspinall's wife Victoria is accepted by wild gorillas OFFICIAL VIDEO

YoYoYo
27th July 2019, 23:41
Dog and a cow best friends:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nILifZaBfos
nILifZaBfos


** Double Feature **

Also just in, a Wild Fox And A Dog Met In The Woods... This one has it's own theme tune YouTube link (https://youtu.be/2NCDx5ZZ3FE)

Cara
31st July 2019, 16:19
Speaking of cows, here are some musical concerts for cows. Who is entertaining whom?

_2raNqztPX0

Constance
31st July 2019, 21:18
Thanks to YoYoYo for this lovable and hilarious article on You must Laugh at least once a day (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?74551-You-must-laugh-at-least-once-a-day&p=1307859&viewfull=1#post1307859) :happythumbsup:

Guy Makes Tiny Hats For The Toad Who Hangs Out On His Porch

He shows up every night to try on a different one.

One night over the summer, Chris Newsome noticed a little toad sitting on his porch.

He didn't think much of it, until it happened again and again.

"The same toad would come to my porch every night," Newsome told The Dodo.

Newsome loved seeing his little toad buddy, and wanted to do something special for him - so he made him a hat.

"I decided to enter the world of toad millinery and help the little guy out," Newsome wrote in a post on Imgur. "Foam paper seemed like a toad-friendly material."

Newsome fashioned a little pink top hat for his toad friend and presented it to him
.. but something was still missing. Newsome went back to the drawing board ...


... and found a way to make the hat even more fabulous.

41287



For the rest of the article and photos www.thedodo.com (https://www.thedodo.com/toad-wears-hats-2309507460.html)

Constance
4th August 2019, 02:53
I had NO idea that so many bumblebees existed in the world but I am glad that they do :sun:


41303

Constance
9th August 2019, 08:21
Wild Orangutans Learn to Wash with Soap


41342


She quietly helps herself to a bar of soap and carries her find in her mouth back to the forest.

40 years ago rescued Orangutans released into Borneo forests learned to use soap by watching local people washing in the river.

But remarkably, these Orangutans who are washing themselves were born in the wild. So the idea has spread among the wild population.

bzx5zBNz_9A
Wild Orangutans Learn to Wash with Soap

Constance
9th August 2019, 08:59
White Ravens


These rare white ravens were spotted at Qualicum Beach on Vancouver Island in 2010. Has anyone spotted one of these more recently?


zdaY2I1vSpc
White Ravens Sighted on Vancouver Island

Bill Ryan
20th August 2019, 20:30
In post #19 (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?106567-Animals-are-Magical&p=1287408&viewfull=1#post1287408), I told the astonishing story of the Cat that climbed the Matterhorn.

Here's the Dog that climbed Baruntse. No-one's ever heard of that, but it's in the Nepal Himalayas and is 23,389 ft high. That's quite something.

The previous canine altitude record had been a mere 19,462 ft. I speculated here (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?93672-Another-vicarious-adventure-and-another-Avalon-Cairn--for-the-Wawa-Grande-this-time-&p=1265895&viewfull=1#post1265895) whether my own high altitude dog, Mara (who's been to 14,500 ft many times with zero problems) could beat that. I was pretty certain she could. I'd even checked out 20,000 ft mountains in Ecuador and Peru where she and I might be able to break the record together. I'd entertained the idea quite seriously.

But now, we have no chance. :) The new world record dog (as of 18 November 2018) is called Mera — not Mara! — also a female. After her successful ascent, she was renamed Bara, after the mountain. (Close!)

The story is recounted here...


https://outsideonline.com/2390456/first-dog-ascent-baruntse-nepal

And here's Mera/Bara secured on a fixed rope with a running (loose) karabiner as she padded through the snow:

https://www.outsideonline.com/sites/default/files/styles/width_1200/public/2019/03/04/mera-sending-it_h.jpg

Here she is having a well-deserved nap in a tent...

https://www.outsideonline.com/sites/default/files/styles/img_850-width_flex-height/public/2019/02/20/meru-in-tent.jpg

... and here she is, top dog, on the summit. :sun:

https://www.outsideonline.com/sites/default/files/styles/img_850-width_flex-height/public/2019/02/20/baruntese-summit-with-dog.jpg

Hervé
2nd September 2019, 11:17
https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/1149060188013551619/bcEo2hrz_bigger.jpg (https://twitter.com/Melski1) 🔅 (https://twitter.com/Melski1)🔅⚘Mel⚘ (https://twitter.com/Melski1)🔅 (https://twitter.com/Melski1)🔅‏ @Melski1 (https://twitter.com/Melski1)

A lioness and her cub were crossing the Savanna but the heat was excessive and the cub had difficulty walking An elephant realized that the cub would die and carried him in his trunk to a pool of water walking beside his mother And we call them wild animals Take a lesson


https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EDa-kDiWwAEfoaT.jpg

6:11 PM - 1 Sep 2019

Cara
12th October 2019, 13:29
This is a combination of wondrous and strange... it’s really quite incredible how the individuals become part of a seemingly single whole:

B24dkXHoxkw

wondering
12th October 2019, 15:53
Cara, Thanks! Seeing this always thrills me. Once I saw a flock like this and was listening to a piece of classical music - they were in synch! and I’ve never forgotten it. Probably 35 years ago! Diane

Cara
13th October 2019, 07:38
Fox finds trampoline

1183103317892837376

:llama:

Cara
16th October 2019, 10:16
Well, I’m not sure the animal is so magical here but the man is certainly demonstrating his magic. Quite astonishing!

CQKKten87o8

rogparan
19th October 2019, 14:51
Dolphins, chimpanzees, and crows all use tools to help accomplish tasks.

Now, pigs have joined the club (https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2019/10/first-tool-use-pigs-visayan-endangered/)

koXmR2pSp9Q

onawah
20th October 2019, 06:45
Ever hug a porcupine? This little guy makes you want to; the sounds he makes are so endearing.
cILZ_cB3_so

Rosemarie
24th October 2019, 13:45
Meet the Birdman.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RKVgvpas9oc

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZJSmFjAEEiI

There is a series from PBS called EarthFLights
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ihh1xBXwt_0

rgray222
29th October 2019, 01:37
Check out these 17 rare colored animals (https://cheezburger.com/7128837/17-rare-colored-animals-that-are-simply-gorgeous?utm_source=pinterest&utm_medium=ichc&utm_campaign=111518)

https://i.chzbgr.com/full/9235499008/h18479A5D/green-sea-turtle

onawah
30th October 2019, 16:48
The Smartest Horse That Ever Lived - A True Story
Oct 24, 2019
4pACXxtbvVA

Mr.Write
31st October 2019, 10:08
Sometimes I watch my dog dream; it’s incredible.

Cara
2nd November 2019, 06:02
The cockatoo perpetual motion machine :clapping:

1189881390277517313

onawah
7th November 2019, 01:04
Dog Learning to Talk By Using a Custom Soundboard to Speak
By Hilary Shenfeld November 04, 2019
https://people.com/pets/dog-learning-to-talk-by-using-a-custom-soundboard-to-speak-im-in-constant-amazement/
(Video at the link)

Stella the dog's owner, a speech-language pathologist, says the canine already knows 29 words and can form phrases."I'm in Constant Amazement"

"Many dog parents already know their pets communicate with them, but what EXACTLY are they trying to say?

A speech-language pathologist with an 18-month-old dog is working to find out, and she’s already discovered that her dog Stella can literally tell her things — like she’s tired after playing and now would like a nap, or that instead of playing at this moment she would prefer to eat, and that she would like to go outside, specifically to the park.

It’s all possible through the use of an adaptive device Christina Hunger, 26, devised to help Stella communicate not only words but her thoughts and feelings too. When the Catahoula/Blue Heeler mix wants to “talk,” she steps on buttons corresponding with words Hunger recorded and programmed into the device.

And Stella is already putting her language skills to work. One day, the pup was whining at the front door and started pacing back and forth. Hunger assumed that she needed to go outside. Instead, Stella walked to her device and tapped out, “Want,” “Jake” “Come” then stood in front of the door until Hunger’s fiancé, Jake, came home a few minutes later and then Stella immediately pressed “Happy” and rolled over for a belly rub.

'I’m in constant amazement and shock,' Hunger tells PEOPLE. 'Every day she says something cooler than she said the day before.Last night, right before this video was taken, I accidentally said “ball” on Stella’s device while I was actually reaching for a different word. But, Stella took this very seriously! She picked up her ball, dropped it on her device, and said “Good” (Translation: Good idea, Mom!)
I started recording right after she said “Good” and caught the rest of her thought: “Happy ball want outside!”
'Like all AAC users, Stella thrives when we talk to her using her device and say words that she loves. She never needs to know it was on accident!'
A post shared by Christina Hunger, MA, CCC-SLP (@hunger4words) on Oct 30, 2019

Hunger, who works in San Diego with 1- and 2-year-old children, many of whom also use adaptive devices that help them communicate, began teaching Stella words when the canine was about 8 weeks old. The 50-pound dog now knows at least 29 words and can combine up to five words to make a phrase or sentence.Hunger loves knowing Stella’s thoughts, and the dog seems pleased as well. When Stella first learned to communicate the word “walk,” she acted excited and used it repeatedly. 'I didn’t realize how much she was waiting to say it,' Hunger says.Stella uses language differently when she’s in a heightened state versus when she’s calm!

'Today when she heard some noises outside and wanted to go investigate, I told her we were staying inside.
Stella responded by saying, “Look” 9 TIMES IN A ROW, then “Come outside.”
She was clearly in a more frantic state, and her language use matched that.
We all sound differently than normal when we’re in distress, Stella included!
I’m impressed that Stella is communicating with language during her more heightened states, not just when she’s calm and in a quiet space.
This shows me that words are becoming more automatic for her to use.
It’s similar to when a toddler starts using language to express himself during times of frustration instead of only crying.
That happens when it’s easy for the toddler to say words, not when he’s still learning and it takes a lot of focus to talk.'
A post shared by Christina Hunger, MA, CCC-SLP (@hunger4words) on Nov 1, 2019

'Another favorite is “beach.” 'She loves saying ‘beach. She was so happy and still says it very often.'

Hunger plans to continue teaching Stella new words and wants to teach other dogs how to “speak” as well.

'I think how important dogs are to their humans,' Hunger says. 'I just imagine how much deeper the bond will be.' "

Bill Ryan
8th November 2019, 15:13
Kudos to RunningDeer (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/member.php?10697-RunningDeer)/Paula, who found these and had posted them here (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?30405-Here-and-Now...What-s-Happening&p=1322228&viewfull=1#post1322228).

:flower:

Wild Elephants salute the men who rescued their baby elephant from a ditch:
lEDHRh8gfm8
Elephant herd saves Baby Elephant from Drowning:
D-Yb3Fqjx4U

Cara
9th November 2019, 05:32
Beluga whale plays with rugby ball :star:

1192555429127237640

onawah
9th November 2019, 06:05
I think there is something just inherently goofy about Belugas. :lol:

Franny
9th November 2019, 08:11
And something pretty wonderful about Belugas, that was just lovely. Thank you.

Whisper
9th November 2019, 18:20
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3KjK26jahwk



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TN-pwblNxU4

onawah
9th November 2019, 20:31
It's funny, when I first saw that video a few days ago, I had just finished one of my shell creations, a big one which I named "Beluga Barge". It has a whale tail on one end (part of a sand dollar) and a head of a laughing Beluga on the other (two little shells glued together, with a shell tongue in the middle, and two little beady bead eyes), with another little shell creature sitting on top of some shell structures comprising the "barge", taking a ride.
I will kind of hate to part with that one, but my work is going to be featured in my first ever art show the end of this month, and it will be interesting to see how my creations are received. Wish I had a camera so I could post a photo here.

Beluga whale plays with rugby ball :star:


https://i.ytimg.com/vi/djlz4lH-cto/hqdefault.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/YqsQX.jpg
https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR2FcEKJkdaAd8KyL2-K6wGO15DftzapSvW4YaxsZ55eKfi8wjZZg&s

onawah
10th November 2019, 05:58
More belugas in the news
Maple The Beluga Whale Takes Part In A Scientific Study
Oct 30, 2019

Animal Planet

"Researchers are conducting a study to try and help them understand the beluga whale's metabolism, and Maple the energetic whale is the first to participate in the study.

Stream Full Episodes of The Aquarium:
https://www.animalplanet.com/tv-shows... "
A-KfxFWzqf4

Star Tsar
11th November 2019, 11:33
RT

'Superhero' Cat Saves Infant In Bogota

Published 10th November 2019

Astonishing CCTV footage from a home in Bogota shows the moment where a cat appears to save a baby from crawling down a steep flight of stairs.

"The cat that has been part of our family practically since birth, we have been here for a month, a month and a few days and he has become familiar with my children, [he] is two months older than my son," said the father rescued toddler Jesid Leon on Friday.

The cat, named Gatubela, after the justice league character, translates as 'Catwoman,' lived up to its superhero status, by leaping up from the sofa as the child, Samuel Leon, approaches the stairs.

Gatubela appears to pull the child back and hold's it's paws up to stop the child getting closer to the staircase.

91XDEHvjpdo

onawah
13th November 2019, 22:55
This lively little budgie has been taking his vitamins :lol:
kUUmU-WZtLk

RlF5SwQePFA

onawah
14th November 2019, 20:31
One more vid of Kiwi the budgie who has a vocabulary of 50 words
11/11/17
Kiwi and Pixel the Parakeets

"Kiwi has a vocabulary probably exceeding 50 words. Here in this video, he says 37 unique words and sounds that we have taught him over the last couple years. See below for those words as they appear in order.

hey bird
hey siri
tell me about
pixel parrot
good
good birds
/cough
alexa set bedroom
baby bird
kiwi
cute baby bird
cute baby chicken
birds
chick
/laugh
pixel parakeet
are you a pixel
birbs
get me
/kiss
this is birdphone
no kitty that's
/ring
what a cute baby bird
yeah
cute little baby bird"
J0u7Rl82Nvk
My mother kept parakeets while I was growing up. They are such cheerful, affectionate little souls.
I didn't realize how attached I could get to one though until I was much older.
I mourned for weeks after the last one I had died...

Cara
15th November 2019, 05:05
Hugs of all kinds :hug:

1195016219721633793

Kryztian
15th November 2019, 17:51
Capybaras, the world's largest rodent. Distant cousins on the guinea pig.

PFzzNw5x3kU

onawah
17th November 2019, 19:23
Painted Wood Turtle

https://scontent-lga3-1.cdninstagram.com/vp/2ace3e63749966e9304eaa915f212282/5E67776F/t51.2885-15/e35/66685571_2847585758591224_5358948342310967291_n.jp g?_nc_ht=scontent-lga3-1.cdninstagram.com&_nc_cat=104&ig_cache_key=MjEwMjczNjM2ODMxMTYzODMwNg%3D%3D.2
Apolonis APHRODISIA
486623658863404
( I tried to insert the video here:
https://www.facebook.com/apolonis.aphrodisia/videos/486623658863404/?t=14
...of Apolonis Aphrodisia, but did something wrong. Mod help please? Thanks

From Planet Earth Phenomena


[Mod note: looks like you manage to do it as shown above :clapping: ]

ariel70
17th November 2019, 20:22
An animal communicator talks to the black panther Spirit/Diablo

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G6r7q9_akX4

Bill Ryan
17th November 2019, 21:05
An animal communicator talks to the black panther Spirit/Diablo

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G6r7q9_akX4
:bump:

This is a most astonishing story, absolutely out of the ordinary by any standards. And very, very moving. :flower:

There's a marvelous thread about Anna Breytenbach's work here. Highly recommended.


The Animal Communicator - Anna Breytenbach (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?66295-The-Animal-Communicator-Anna-Breytenbach)

:focus:

Bill Ryan
21st November 2019, 09:01
https://bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-50496781

Owner reunited with cat found 1,200 miles from Portland home

https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/660/cpsprodpb/1503C/production/_109767068_2444ea29-3ae4-45bc-8f97-ba89fd9fbb3c.jpg
Sasha had been missing for five years

A man in the US state of Oregon has been reunited with his missing cat after it was discovered on the streets some 1,200 miles (1,900km) away.

The black cat, named Sasha, was recently found in the city of Santa Fe, New Mexico, five years after disappearing from its Portland home.

The Santa Fe Animal Shelter said it was able to locate the owner by scanning Sasha's microchip.

The cat was flown back to Portland this week and returned to his owner.

Viktor Usov said he originally reported his pet as missing five years ago and had lost hope of seeing him again.

"I couldn't believe it," he told the animal shelter. "We thought the worst, but when we received the call, we were so thankful Sasha was alive and well."

Details of how the cat made it to Santa Fe are unknown, but Mr Usov believes that his friendly pet "hitched a ride" with someone.

"I guess I want to think he was on a great American adventure," he said.

https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/624/cpsprodpb/1774C/production/_109767069_c34a2d78-e273-418e-a838-aeef740f3075.jpg
Murad Kirdar (right) reunites Sasha and Viktor Usov

Murad Kirdar, a public relations officer at the Santa Fe shelter, said the story highlighted the importance of microchipping pets.

"A simple microchip, which is the size of a grain of rice and is implanted under the pet's skin, helped us find the guardian of this missing cat," he said in a statement.

A microchip is the only form of pet identification that is "permanent, with a unique number that cannot fall off, be altered, or be removed", he added.

https://news.files.bbci.co.uk/include/idt2/assets/8df31689-82fb-408a-8e15-d7c1ae4cadc5_wide_fallback

American Airlines flew Sasha and Mr Kirdar back to Portland on Tuesday so the owner and cat could be reunited. Spokesman Curtis Blessing told the BBC the airline was "honoured" to be part of the reunion.

"We're glad to have provided a happy ending to Sasha's long journey," he said.

onawah
24th November 2019, 01:30
Snow leopards ( so gorgeous, and so imperiled) in the news always capture my attention. At the beginning of this video, and more starting halfway through...
11/21/19
Real Wild

"An exciting series that goes behind the scenes at a highly popular zoo and brings the public closer to the animals and its zookeepers. Set in 70 acres of Dublin’s Phoenix Park, The Zoo welcomes nearly a million visitors a year, and is home to more than 600 exotic animals."
3gz1GNkSrH8

Bill Ryan
25th November 2019, 09:51
This is quite something else. 58 million views, quite rightly, too. (Alex Honnold (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?104825-Joe-Rogan-with-Alex-Honnold-the-greatest-athletic-achievement-of-all-time), be inspired! :bigsmile: )


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RG9TMn1FJzc

Anka
25th November 2019, 13:51
If you would like to know more about the world of animal communication you can visit our resources page on http://www.animalspirit.org "
gvwHHMEDdT0[/QUOTE]


Thanks for the whole Thread and for this Post. I bookmarked everything and I will follow with love!

I would now die of happiness to be able to embrace this spirit!:bearhug:

Cara
4th December 2019, 05:52
Some fisherman free a whale shark from a rope:

1201625085812961280

onawah
8th December 2019, 06:09
Photographer captures incredible encounter with a herd of elephants
12/5/19
(Imagine a huge wild male elephant coming this close! )

Newsflare

"This was the moment wildlife enthusiast Ewan Wilson got up close and personal with a herd of giant elephants while retrieving a camera trap in the bush.

This once in a lifetime opportunity happened on November 24, while Wilson was getting footage of the elephants happily grazing when they decided it was the perfect time to investigate the truck.

Ewan told Newsflare “These incredible mammals decided to spare our lives that day. They had every right to crush me and flip the vehicle but they didn't.

"Despite having such a young calf in the herd the alphas kept us alive.

"Please do not replicate or recreate this event in the wild. I never go out looking for these interactions as the risks involved are not worth the outcome." "

H_A9HrXBYdI