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Strat
23rd March 2011, 17:53
I don't like planting in buckets, I like planting right in the ground. Watering plants in buckets somewhat annoys me. I cant use my watering buckets because the soil won't absorb the water quickly, it just pools on the top layer. The most effective way has been using a hose, with a spray nozzle to simulate the rain. The problem with this is that the nozzle sprays a large area, only about 15% of all the water being sprayed out actually lands in the bucket I'm watering. That waste is what annoys me, here's what I built:

http://i668.photobucket.com/albums/vv43/jamesphotobucket3/random/2011-03-22152405.jpg

It's incredibly basic; a can with 4 tubes attached to it. The 2 inner tubes go about half way down the bucket, the outer 2 tubes go almost the entire way to the bottom. I might paint the can white. The sun is always bright here (Florida) and the reflection from the can may be a problem.

I've just started this little experiment. My bucket plants are doing OK (ignore the plant in the background) but they should be better. Watering with this can is weird. When the can is almost empty and the tubes in the can are out of water, it makes a 'slurping' sound, like when you drink out of a straw.

http://i668.photobucket.com/albums/vv43/jamesphotobucket3/random/2011-03-21144530.jpg

str8thinker
24th March 2011, 01:23
Interesting idea. For what it's worth, here's another suggestion that has worked well for me - Don Burke's copper pipe deep irrigator:

http://www.burkesbackyard.com.au/factsheets/Gardening-Tips-Books-Techniques-and-Tools/Drought-Tips/162

http://www.renovateforum.com/archive/index.php/t-77652.html

The article omits to mention that the end of the pipe that you poke into the soil should be cut to a bevel, say 45 degrees, to give it a point which makes it easier to plunge into the soil. This method also breaks through the hydrophobic surface layer and makes sure the roots get the water where they need it. Also ideal for plunging into compost bins to keep the innards well watered. If the soil is too hard, you may need to break it up a little first or add gypsum.

nomadguy
24th March 2011, 03:39
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WIelsCmdTA8&feature=related

"OJO"

Or

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zHilE1ukkjY

MargueriteBee
24th March 2011, 05:48
Cool. Thanks.