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View Full Version : Schools are Prisons (All parents should watch this)



jackovesk
10th January 2012, 18:40
Jan 8, 2012


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_8RulhBVzbk&feature=player_embedded

baddbob
10th January 2012, 19:18
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ogmtAQlp9HI&feature=player_embedded

Lettherebelight
10th January 2012, 19:49
I would love to watch it, but I can't see the link on my iPad...do you have another link?

My spiritual master said that modern schools are slaughterhouses because they teach nothing of the science of self realisation.

marique3652
10th January 2012, 20:10
This is an awesome video. It made me think about an article I just read about the trend in schools to label children as hyperactive and then urge the parents to medicate their children with Ritalin. That is so wrong in so many instances and on so many layers. I am going to post the article in a minute. It is called Ritalin Kills and it is a real eye opener, and definitely relates well with the trouble with education and this video.

alienHunter
10th January 2012, 20:12
That's what parents are for...to gently introduce their children to a greater reality.

sunnyrap
10th January 2012, 20:29
I researched who wrote our textbooks when my son was in the 5th grade (8 yrs ago, now) because his 'social studies' textbook so blatantly advocated a one-world-market it triggered a red flag in me. I learned that the PhD in Education-author was a frequent lecturer also on the payroll of the Department of Defense. This of course triggered more personal research and led to my discovery of Bill and Kerry and more. Ever after I staunchly defended my son when he didn't want to do ridiculous, mind-numbing homework or read meme-saturated literature. I challenged all teachers to prove the wisdom/efficacy of their curriculums (most moaned it was teach this drivel or be fired--many were actually aware of the issues but felt powerless to ffight it). So... I advised my son to never believe something just because it was in print, or vomited out the mouth of a so-called 'expert'. I further advised him to do just enough to flow through the system untagged while discounting anything he 'learned' until he could verify it with his own experience or independent research. We managed to get him through school with a B average even so. I think I raised a very healthy independent thinker...

BlueGem
10th January 2012, 20:50
I'm not really aware of the education system in the US, but I will look into it a bit now. That video was pretty shocking to me, how wrong things were on multiple levels...

Rantaak
10th January 2012, 21:36
Having undergone the terrors of the education system in America, I can say with certainty that the allegations in this video are right on the mark. The narrator adapts a fairly dreary tone, which is appropriate for the fate of the majority. I will say, however, that I am thankful for having undergone this system as it has forced me in many ways to observe the problems and the traps of mind that pervade the world as a whole. I was beaten, ostracized, marginalized, humiliated, threatened, conspired against, laughed at, and thus unsuccessfully indoctrinated. Having survived this system with my individuality and dignity intact, I feel that I am much better off than many of my former peers. Academically, this wasn't very difficult as I always knew what the teachers wanted from me, though I was incredibly miserable throughout the entire process. Though I say that many of these things "happened to me," I now understand that I chose to undergo those circumstances knowing that I would come out of it the way that I did. I mean, here we all are. Fellow Avalonians are generally intelligent, well-educated (real education, not sequentialized conformist education), and energetically pure. We should be thankful for the gifts our lives have given us in relation to our understanding of the world and where we stand in relation to it.

Personally, I kind of avoided a moderate portion of this by dropping out of the education system when I was 16. However, by combined pressure of my parents as well as the internal drive to learn more about a specific area of science (additionally acquiring the college-life "experience"), I got my G.E.D (high-school diploma equivalent) and went straight to college, where I got a 4-year degree in only two years. Now I have a piece of paper that says I'm a scientist of Game Development, as well as a wealth of mathematical, logical, and informational theoretic knowledge that I have integrated into my psyche and thus my understanding of daily life. Most people won't have the privilege of being able to pull this off, as a very large sum of money was required to allow me to do this without becoming encumbered by a single dollar of debt. Which brings me to another subject that I will touch on briefly.

Good education does exist for people who have the ability to sift through the sewage and find the diamonds, but it is extremely costly and therefore limited to a relatively small group of individuals. Wealth has become generational. Elementary school, middle school, and high school were all about hammering away at peoples' skulls to progressively weaken their resolve of individuality and understanding of how true nature actually operates. Our textbooks are riddled with lies, very much like our religious tomes. Only some of us became strong from withstanding this process (maybe one in five-hundred people), and it is only because when faced with absurdity we felt no other alternative than to remember who we really are.

alienHunter
10th January 2012, 23:16
Hi Rantaak,

I'm curious...in your opinion can those 1 in 500 be identified?

Wind
10th January 2012, 23:20
Schools are terrible places for spiritual and sensitive ones... Life is your greatest teacher.

meeradas
11th January 2012, 00:38
here's an article to ponder:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/jan/09/texas-police-schools

Rantaak
11th January 2012, 00:45
Hi Rantaak,

I'm curious...in your opinion can those 1 in 500 be identified?

HahahahAHhahaHA!.... Well...

Yes. To the discerning eye. Look for a maniacal grin or highly pronounced smile wrinkles. Or if you're particularly attuned, you should be able to feel a peculiar aura about these people. Chakras are clean and flowing, heart chakra is open. If the person is surrounded by others who are not attuned, you will notice that these people have a tendency to stare intently at the person in question. If you are fortunate enough to hear one laugh, you will notice that the sound of their laughter bears close semblance to a vibrating crystal. That's all I can say for now.

wolf_rt
11th January 2012, 01:25
The second video here is really telling...

Thankfully i was able to tune most of my indoctrination out... did some really nice drawings in maths class!
My teachers were just relieved that i didn't take part in the class by asking 'disruptive' questions...lol
I only had one teacher who was able to counter my 'disruptive' questions.. by admitting they didn't know and would attempt to find out... what a breath of fresh air.
I only had one teacher who actually respected the kids... he had to teach the 'dead s***s', as he was likely the only one who could... you should have seen the enthusiasm these so called troubled kids had for learning, when it was presented with respect for each individual!
By grade 10, i pretty much came and went at will... Thankfully we don't have a truant system like in America here in Aus.

ahamkara
11th January 2012, 04:32
Well, I teach 5th grade, and although I understand where this video is coming from, it is NOT my class. A) There are NO textbooks in my school. I have a "Language Arts" textbook that I do not use. We are currently doing a fantastic novel study, with lots of questioning, discussion and reflective writing. I do NOT criticize the content or opinion of my student's essays - they are free to express themselves. I DO teach technique and require skill in HOW they present their ideas. Math is is very hands on and again,allows for quite a bit of freedom. I created my own science curriculum and use a variety of sources, including the internet. Students are given a framework and create their own investigations around key concepts. We do walk from place to place, but our class has a climate of respect and playfulness. Students often work on art, writing or projects during the day and if you walked in, it would NOT feel like a prison. I welcome parents into my classroom and often have parents sitting with small groups leading discussion or helping with projects. I am not your standard teacher, true, but there are many, many teachers like me, who respect children and are here to help them become unique, thinking individuals. Small dandelions grow in even the meanest downtown streets. Don't be so judgmental about EVERYONE in the system. Although the public education system WAS designed to create conformity, there are teachers working within the system to quietly promote thinking and freedom.

ahamkara
11th January 2012, 04:37
B) Many of the conditions described in this video are societal conditions - not unique to public schools. Schools reflect society.
C) I have worked in high poverty schools, and without public education, many of these students would have NO regular meals, NO healthy interaction with adults (lots of disfunction in poverty - a fact, not an opinion), and having met many of their parents, I can tell you they would learn NOTHING if education was left to the home. Nothing is perfect, but you would be surprised at the number of caring people who work with children who come from brutally UNCARING backgrounds. Give them some credit, and be kind unless you have put in time on the other side of the fence.

wolf_rt
11th January 2012, 05:28
While i appreciate that not all teachers are out to crush the will of there students, what caring teachers can do inside a uncaring system is very limited.
The progress that good teachers make, is quickly undone the next year when the students are placed back in the hands off an embittered, uncaring and unthinking teacher (who are also a product of the system, i'm sure NOBODY sets out on a teaching career who hates children, and only plans to do it for the money)

The entire concept of schooling as it is today was a product of the industrial revolution, indoctrination was ALWAYS its primary goal.

While schools may be a 'product of society' that does not make them good. ALL institutions set up (or regulated) by the government, play a part in promoting and continuing the very problems that create such a hideous societal mess in the first place... Schools aren't even the first stop... The medical institution takes that prize.

Do you really believe the 'poor' were worse off before the industrial revolution? without any education?

How many kids get to the end of there schooling without being able to read and write or do simple maths? Quite a lot, as i'm sure you're well aware.
How long does it take to teach these skills??? In most cases, nobody has tried.

TargeT
11th January 2012, 07:04
My experience in southern oregon & Utah schools was exactly depicted in that video, that wasn't so long ago.... I haven't seen any changes in my daughters schooling, this is a bit exagerative,, as those who are willing and able to accel in this syst can & do... I made it through just fine... It was clearly a game and I treated it that way.... But any level of negative indoctrination should be discouraged, so don't think I'm endorsing this system.

Lettherebelight
11th January 2012, 08:10
While i appreciate that not all teachers are out to crush the will of there students, what caring teachers can do inside a uncaring system is very limited.
The progress that good teachers make, is quickly undone the next year when the students are placed back in the hands off an embittered, uncaring and unthinking teacher (who are also a product of the system, i'm sure NOBODY sets out on a teaching career who hates children, and only plans to do it for the money)

The entire concept of schooling as it is today was a product of the industrial revolution, indoctrination was ALWAYS its primary goal.

While schools may be a 'product of society' that does not make them good. ALL institutions set up (or regulated) by the government, play a part in promoting and continuing the very problems that create such a hideous societal mess in the first place... Schools aren't even the first stop... The medical institution takes that prize.

Do you really believe the 'poor' were worse off before the industrial revolution? without any education?

How many kids get to the end of there schooling without being able to read and write or do simple maths? Quite a lot, as i'm sure you're well aware.
How long does it take to teach these skills??? In most cases, nobody has tried.

What a great analysis, wolf.

I too, teach in primary education, and fully agree with you. There is a trend for change, but it is definitely not enough, at this point, to turn the tide.

wolf_rt
12th January 2012, 12:59
I found some recent news stories linked on Cryptogon (http://cryptogon.com/) that are relevant:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/jan/09/texas-police-schools
"The charge on the police docket was "disrupting class". But that's not how 12-year-old Sarah Bustamantes saw her arrest for spraying two bursts of perfume on her neck in class because other children were bullying her with taunts of "you smell"."
"In 2010, the police gave close to 300,000 "Class C misdemeanour" tickets to children as young as six in Texas for offences in and out of school, which result in fines, community service and even prison time."
"In one notorious instance in California, a school security officer broke the arm of a girl he was arresting for failing to clear up crumbs after dropping cake in the school canteen."

http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2012/01/11/parents-furious-over-apparent-use-of-scream-rooms-inside-middletown-conn-elementary-school/
"Parents in a Connecticut suburb are outraged over disturbing disciplinary actions at a local elementary school. They claim students are being locked in unsupervised “scream rooms,” where some children have harmed themselves, reports CBS 2’s Hazel Sanchez."
“My daughter is telling me that there’s kids being taken out in ambulances, by stretcher,”

Alekahn
13th January 2012, 03:41
For some relevant historical perspective on the American education system, John Taylor Gatto has been a unique voice for many years critically analyzing public education,
and speaking of the 'underground history' of mass compulsory schooling and it's (esoteric) Prussian roots.

9hf2uhrszlo

Alekahn
13th January 2012, 04:04
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