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gripreaper
20th April 2012, 04:59
That's one heck of a lot of money.

http://demonocracy.info/infographics/usa/derivatives/bank_exposure.html

Now, what is a derivative? It's an insurance "bet" on the underlying "instrument" performance, or the lack thereof, severely leveraged. A 2% move in either direction can take down the entire ponzi scheme.

Although the schematic shows 228 Trillion in derivatives, the true number could be closer to 700 Trillion to 1 QUADRILLION.

Mozart
20th April 2012, 05:17
Gripreaper ~


Thanks for the link to these amazing graphics of the astounding numbers of electronic dollars out there. I recall seeing them in another site and I saved them to my computer as pics, then showed them to people.


With the mass arrests -- they BETTER HAPPEN -- we definitely must ban derivatives and related financial functions that use hyper-leveraging to destroy real economies in favor of the usury/interest-based fake economies.


~Mozart

GlassSteagallfan
20th April 2012, 15:52
With the mass arrests -- they BETTER HAPPEN -- we definitely must ban derivatives and related financial functions that use hyper-leveraging to destroy real economies in favor of the usury/interest-based fake economies.

Ban gambling? Are you nuts?

Gambling is legal and always will be, BUT...

You can seperate gambling banking from commercial banking. Thats what we had until the repeal of the Glass-Steagall Act in 1999.

Quick update on Glass Steagall:
http://larouchepac.com/node/18426

onawah
20th April 2012, 16:24
Where did anyone say gambling should be banned?
But now that you have raised the subject, I will say, being the child of a compulsive gambler, I believe gambling should be banned for many reasons including the unwholesome environment it creates (drugs, prostitution, organized crime) and the fact that it preys on addicts.

update: Or were you just being facetious?

Mozart
20th April 2012, 16:26
You can seperate gambling banking from commercial banking. Thats what we had until the repeal of the Glass-Steagall Act in 1999.




Yes, that's what I'm talking about -- a re-creation of the Glass-Steagall Act ... but implemented world-wide, not just in the US and within the Common Law framework, not the color-of-law framework.