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View Full Version : Japanese Supertanker damaged in the Strait of Hormuz



Lucrum
29th July 2010, 13:48
FROM BBC

An investigation has been launched into the unexplained damage suffered by a Japanese oil tanker in the Strait of Hormuz near Oman.

The M Star was damaged on Wednesday while travelling from Qatar to Japan.

Port officials in Fujairah in the United Arab Emirates say the ship was involved in a collision. However, the boat's owners Mitsui OSK believe their vessel may have been attacked.

Early reports that the ship was struck by a freak wave have been dismissed.

Read more here.... (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-10803239)


Fairly odd the damage in the hull of that ship, anyone that makes any sense out of what you can see in the picture and read in the article?

John Parslow
29th July 2010, 16:02
Hello Lucrum

Perhaps it was a gigantic whale wreaking some revenge towards the Japanese Whaling industry. One up for Whales I say ...

Love and peace. JP :cool:

Humble Janitor
29th July 2010, 20:25
I have a hunch that the U.S and Israel are going to use this to justify attacking Iran.

Just a hunch. I'm not sure where the Japanese stand but I imagine they can't be too happy either.

SpoonMan
30th July 2010, 05:59
The first few stories I read ranged everywhere from freak wave to an earthquake released gas and the ship ignited a small pocket. A bit weird, definitely the truth is being hidden.

Lucrum
30th July 2010, 07:22
Either hidden, or they honestly don't know what hit them.

Some sort of kinetic energy weapon maybe? Then I mean without a shell, just the energy...maybe transfered by very low frequency soundwaves to physically bend the hull of that ship. The squared shape of the dent in the hull seems to me to be caused by how the structure of the hull is built, which seems to be in similar sized rectangles in a grid. I don't know too much about large ship engineering, but I would guess it helps towards impacts not breaching a hole in the structure by distributing the energy evenly around the impact point.

Well, who knows for sure...ey? :)