PDA

View Full Version : BARAKA... an amazing and thought-provoking tour de force



Studeo
31st July 2010, 20:34
Many years ago in 1992 I saw a film that changed my outlook on life. I would like to share this with you.

Baraka is an incredible nonverbal film containing images of 24 countries from 6 continents, created by Ron Fricke and Mark Magidson, with music from Michael Stearns and others. The film has no plot, contains no actors and has no script. Instead, high quality 70mm images show some of the best, and worse, parts of nature and human life. Timelapse is used heavily to show everyday life from a different perspective. Baraka is often considered a spiritual film.

Trailer

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wNViNqHmnzM

Download
http://isohunt.com/torrent_details/38824750/Baraka?tab=summary

Anchor
1st August 2010, 09:01
Please can you post summaries when you link to video. I am on a slow link this weekend :(

Studeo
1st August 2010, 09:57
Please can you post summaries when you link to video. I am on a slow link this weekend :(

Ok John. I added a summery. :cool:

noxon medem
1st August 2010, 10:15
I had a similar experience with a film called Koyaanisqatsi

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Koyaanisqatsi

quote wikipedia:

Koyaanisqatsi (English pronunciation: /ˈkɔɪ.ɑːnɪsˈkɑːtsiː/ KOY-ah-nis-KAHT-see), also known as Koyaanisqatsi: Life out of Balance,
is a 1982 film directed by Godfrey Reggio with music composed by Philip Glass and cinematography by Ron Fricke.
..
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=5539613947839465921#
..
The film consists primarily of slow motion and time-lapse photography of cities and many natural landscapes across the United States. The visual tone poem contains neither dialogue nor a vocalized narration: its tone is set by the juxtaposition of images and music. Reggio explains the lack of dialog by stating "it's not for lack of love of the language that these films have no words. It's because, from my point of view, our language is in a state of vast humiliation. It no longer describes the world in which we live."[6] In the Hopi language, the word Koyaanisqatsi means "crazy life, life in turmoil, life out of balance, life disintegrating, a state of life that calls for another way of living".[7] The film is the first in the Qatsi trilogy of films: it is followed by Powaqqatsi (1988) and Naqoyqatsi (2002).
The trilogy depicts different aspects of the relationship between humans, nature, and technology .
..

Studeo
1st August 2010, 10:34
I had a similar experience with a film called Koyaanisqatsi

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Koyaanisqatsi

Thanks noxon. I haven't seen that one.

quote wikipedia:

Koyaanisqatsi (English pronunciation: KOY-ah-nis-KAHT-see), also known as Koyaanisqatsi: Life out of Balance,
is a 1982 film directed by Godfrey Reggio with music composed by Philip Glass and cinematography by Ron Fricke.
..
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=5539613947839465921#
..
The film consists primarily of slow motion and time-lapse photography of cities and many natural landscapes across the United States. The visual tone poem contains neither dialogue nor a vocalized narration: its tone is set by the juxtaposition of images and music. Reggio explains the lack of dialog by stating "it's not for lack of love of the language that these films have no words. It's because, from my point of view, our language is in a state of vast humiliation. It no longer describes the world in which we live."[6] In the Hopi language, the word Koyaanisqatsi means "crazy life, life in turmoil, life out of balance, life disintegrating, a state of life that calls for another way of living".[7] The film is the first in the Qatsi trilogy of films: it is followed by Powaqqatsi (1988) and Naqoyqatsi (2002).
The trilogy depicts different aspects of the relationship between humans, nature, and technology

http://isohunt.com/torrent_details/121130621/Koyaanisqatsi?tab=summary

noxon medem
1st August 2010, 11:31
Have also seen Baraka some years ago.
Very good,and an inspiration to my own work.
The two films have relation in theme and expression.

downloading now, both ...

or maybe to call it
homeloading ..

noxon medem
1st August 2010, 11:53
Thanks for links, nice to have in the library.

Any other films in this category ?

Elandiel BernElve
1st August 2010, 18:59
They both are great!

Baraka is one of my all time favourites, expecially now in HD it is a wonder.

If we would build a vault or library (alexandrian style) to keep record of human history these films should be included.
They tell more than a thousand books without saying a word

Anchor
2nd August 2010, 10:37
Ok John. I added a summery. :cool:

Thanks, the summary was good enough that I realise I have seen it already - Thx

It has Lisa Gerrard singing in it (One of the songs is called - The Host of the Seraphim) - She has the voice of an angel [1].

John..

[1] no that is not an exaggeration !!!

AlkaMyst
19th January 2011, 19:20
:wave: Hello Everyone,

This is a somewhat old documentary (1992) but none the less a great one, this is one of my favorites in my collection so I hope you guys enjoy it.



Named after a Sufi word that translates roughly as “breath of life” or “blessing,” Baraka is Ron Fricke’s impressive follow-up to Godfrey Reggio’s non-verbal documentary film Koyaanisqatsi. Fricke was cinematographer and collaborator on Reggio’s film, and for Baraka he struck out on his own to polish and expand the photographic techniques used on Koyaanisqatsi.

The result is a tour-de-force in 70mm: a cinematic “guided meditation” (Fricke’s own description) shot in 24 countries on six continents over a 14-month period that unites religious ritual, the phenomena of nature, and man’s own destructive powers into a web of moving images.

Fricke’s camera ranges, in meditative slow motion or bewildering time-lapse, over the Church of the Holy Sepulcher in Jerusalem, the Ryoan-Ji temple in Kyoto, Lake Natron in Tanzania, burning oil fields in Kuwait, the smoldering precipice of an active volcano, a busy subway terminal, tribal celebrations of the Masai in Kenya, chanting monks in the Dip Tse Chok Ling monastery…and on and on, through locales across the globe. To execute the film’s time-lapse sequences, Fricke had a special camera built that combined time-lapse photography with perfectly controlled movements. (Barnes & Noble)


Click Here to Watch!!! (http://theavalonfiles.com/stream/Baraka/index.html)

Blessings to All,
AlkaMyst

Richard
19th January 2011, 19:28
Thanks! Baraka is one of the most stunningly beautiful films ever made.
I have watched it countless times just to relax and refocus.
I highly recommend it!

yaksuit
19th January 2011, 19:35
One of my favorite scenes from Baraka.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YG9P7JWtxhw

Beth
19th January 2011, 19:47
bump to merge

AlkaMyst
19th January 2011, 21:02
Thanks! Baraka is one of the most stunningly beautiful films ever made.
I have watched it countless times just to relax and refocus.
I highly recommend it!

My pleasure........I have to agree!, amongst my top 10 ever :)



One of my favorite scenes from Baraka.

Isn't that just amazing to watch......look at how peaceful that monkey seems, if only us humans could be at such peace! :love:

The One
18th September 2011, 19:38
Even though this as been discussed before i am posting this again with the full documentary

Simply Brilliant.

Named after a Sufi word that translates roughly as breath of life or blessing, Baraka is Ron Fricke’s impressive follow-up to Godfrey Reggio’s non-verbal documentary film Koyaanisqatsi. Fricke was cinematographer and collaborator on Reggio’s film, and for Baraka he struck out on his own to polish and expand the photographic techniques used on Koyaanisqatsi.

The result is a tour-de-force in 70mm: a cinematic guided meditation (Fricke’s own description) shot in 24 countries on six continents over a 14-month period that unites religious ritual, the phenomena of nature, and man’s own destructive powers into a web of moving images.

Fricke’s camera ranges, in meditative slow motion or bewildering time-lapse, over the Church of the Holy Sepulcher in Jerusalem, the Ryoan-Ji temple in Kyoto, Lake Natron in Tanzania, burning oil fields in Kuwait, the smoldering precipice of an active volcano, a busy subway terminal, tribal celebrations of the Masai in Kenya, chanting monks in the Dip Tse Chok Ling monastery…and on and on, through locales across the globe. To execute the film’s time-lapse sequences, Fricke had a special camera built that combined time-lapse photography with perfectly controlled movements.



http://vimeo.com/13256686

Lettherebelight
18th September 2011, 20:37
Thank you, The One, so much, for sharing this spectacular film. I have not seen it before.

Wow...amazing. The simplicity and expertise in film technique allows one the space to enter and experience the scenes for themselves.

Hare Krsna! :)

Sierra
18th September 2011, 22:42
Thank you The One. Wow. That was amazing.

Last Sunday, I was at Mt. Shasta, at a mountain Tibetan stupa, built by Bhutanese Tibetan Buddhists. It was for an all day memorial for one of the lineage, whom I never met, but heard much of. Off the freeway, winding road, dirt road, gravel road, park, walk up a hill covered in humming bees and wildflowers, flanked by the most perfect trees, quiet, sunny, blue skies, an awning covering many pillows and chairs, maybe 20 - 25 people, two of the lineage leading us in the ceremonies.

There was a smoke offering, a food offering, prayer, music, perambulations ... and it was all for the suffering of the world. To bring peace to the world. I spent the day wrestling with the concept of world. The whole entire world. Every single one in the world. All of us. Every single being, whether human or not. A prayer that covers all that? How? How can I begin to see that wide?

Thank you :). You answered my question.

Sierra

58andfixed
19th September 2011, 01:30
An absolutely essential video to re-view at least every year.

There are few that use no words to evoke contemplation of our commonalities, and express the idea artfully, with such beauty & grace.

One of my most often suggested videos.

- 58

Morgaine
19th September 2011, 06:42
Thank you for posting! I love this film...the Balinese Monkey Chant is one of my favourite scenes ever..simply amazing.
This film is so beautiful and so clever.

ViralSpiral
19th September 2011, 07:12
That was incredible! Like staring into a fire, remembering....

Thank you!



Bookmarked!

Ineffable Hitchhiker
19th September 2011, 07:51
Even though this as been discussed before i am posting this again with the full documentary


Yep, I had seen a clip on here somewhere and watched the series on youtube (not easy to find, mind you)
It is absolutely stunning, and I agree with Lettherebelight...



Wow...amazing. The simplicity and expertise in film technique allows one the space to enter and experience the scenes for themselves.



Thank you so much for a chance to view the complete movie in one go.
I have now watched it a coupe of times and have sent it to many people.

meeradas
19th September 2011, 08:53
Gratitude.

Anchor
19th September 2011, 10:58
Great film!

Seriously get the DVD (or a quality download) and watch it again, with a headset, no distractions, and simply become the moment.

We are beautiful people, despite the trouble we have caused and can cause.

We are going to get there - we are.

Samsara
19th September 2011, 11:46
Baraka is one of my favourite film ... it is to be watched as a meditation.

Ron Fricke has another film coming out - Samsara ;) --- it's premier was at the Toronto's International Film Festival on Sept. 11 - http://http://tiff.net/filmsandschedules/tiff/2011/samsara

I can't wait to see it.

RMorgan
19th September 2011, 15:04
This movie is amazing indeed! You also should check out the QATSI trilogy, which is amazingly beautiful, specially with Philip Glass soundtracks.

Here is the link to their official website:

http://www.koyaanisqatsi.org/

You can find the three movies, Koyaanisqatsi: Life Out of Balance, Powaqqatsi: Life in Transformation and Naqoyqatsi: Life as War on torrents websites or amazon.

Cheers,

Raf.

Catsquotl
6th May 2012, 14:01
I just saw it this morning... ehm.. I don't think I got it.

To me the film although beautifull in the way its shot did not leave me in a medetative state. stirs up (in me anyway) a feeling of the stupidity of man and its search to worship something outside itself...
Making the burning of chick beaks as meaningless as prayer, derwishing or kissing some stone..

With Love
Eelco

Jill
6th May 2012, 17:13
Samsara has just been released and judging from the testimonials its an amazing film to follow Baraka. I think they mentioned it would be in DVD form in several months too. Here's a trailer:

http://barakasamsara.com/

Melinda
6th May 2012, 21:33
Thank you for posting the video link. There is some really beautiful, transporting footage in the film. I love the segment with the Japanese Snow Monkey; the way he is softly closing his eyes. Perhaps he's just sleepy, but it's as though he is meditating. Even if that's a projection on my part, I love to be reminded of our fellow animals in moments of found peace or contemplation. We have more in common with them than sometimes we remember. Given that there are no Snow Monkeys in my locality it's a treat to see them relaxing in the wild, and filmed so beautifully.

Chip
31st May 2016, 18:20
Bump for importance

Bill Ryan
31st May 2016, 18:20
:bump:

This (BARAKA) came up in the mods conversation just now. Every human being should see this. (And maybe some who are not human, as well.) :)

It's beautifully made, and also kind of hard to watch in some places. To say it's thought-provoking may be an understatement. Highly recommended.

Carmody
31st May 2016, 18:37
I've seen bits of it and the whole of it, in total number of views, well over 600 times. Probably closer to 1,000 views. Thinking on it.....ok, maybe 1500.

I used it as a self-hypnotic trigger component.

HX-6x1MuoLA

RunningDeer
31st May 2016, 18:39
Baraka Trailer
ZSfFHxyYJJA

Baraka
19uks0YagCY