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Sidney
6th May 2012, 18:55
OK had not smoked for over 20 years until I became targeted and started up again just from the stress. I am so absolutely disgusted with myself, I tore up the remaining smokes I had this morning and I want to stop that nasty habit cold turkey. If anyone would like to join me, it would make it easier, but if you don't smoke or don't wish to quit, I am asking for prayers, positive vibes, and emotional support from my fellow like-minded soul friends here at avalon.:smokin::washing::high5:

RMorgan
6th May 2012, 19:01
Hey mate,

I quit smoking about one year ago, with the help of electronic cigarettes. They´re really awesome, because you have a sensation very similar to smoking and you can reduce the nicotine level gradually.

Besides, electronic cigarettes don´t have smoke, just vapor, which doesn´t damage your health.

For those who hate the nicotine abstinence feelings, it´s a damn good solution.

Good luck! If you need any advice about electronic cigarettes, just drop me a PM.

Cheers,

Raf.

r3divory
6th May 2012, 19:03
I am one that wants to quit. Been smoking since I was 16 and am now 39. Most of my family on my mother's side have passed away from cancer and I was born with cancer. Lots of prayer and good vibes healed me from that though. Thanks to the powers that be. Every-time I have tried to quit someone is buying me cigarettes. I guess I'm not easy to deal with. I live with my 74 year old dad who smokes, along with my husband. Also have a 6 year old and 3 year old to contend with. If I can learn of a way to get everything out of my head so that I could actually meditate to release stress I know this would have a much better impact than to light up a death stick. Plus it would save lots of money that I could put to better use for healthier eating and increasing silver supply.

Ernie Nemeth
6th May 2012, 19:07
Hey Starchild111,

I really want to quit as well but I am not ready. I had three bad habits and I've recently given up two of them. I'm saving smoking for when I can honestly say I've got the other two beat.
At least another two months.

So I can only offer my support and since you've asked I will light a candle for you and hold you in my thoughts. You can do it. You're already half way there - you did not say you would try to quit!

We can do anything we set our minds to.

Here's giving you the mental key to override your programming and to remember in your weakest moments what you said above:
I am so absolutely disgusted with myself...and I want to stop that nasty habit cold turkey!

Consider it a done deal.
Ernie

OnyxKnight
6th May 2012, 19:12
Starchild, it all comes down to willpower.

My mother has always been a strong-willed woman. When I managed to get her convinced to actually even consider it doing it, and explained to her its all in the mind, she just took a stare at the cigarette box for some 15 minutes. Then the other day the same. Each time she had an urge. She eventually didn't need to face the monster anymore. She had beaten it with her mind.

Just show strong willpower. You can get out of any type of addiction.

greybeard
6th May 2012, 19:13
I have stopped several times and though I smoke now I can again if I want to.
This is what I do.
No big deal-- stopping for ever to much for the habit part of the mind.
I just say "I wont have one just now"
Prior to that I have run out of smokes-- I do roll ups and cigars they are easier to stop as there are no chemicals.
If your on normal packs of cigarettes-- try going on to roll ups first to wean yourself of the chemicals.

Hope this helps
Chris

Midnight Rambler
6th May 2012, 19:16
I quit about a week ago. Just do it and never smoke again.... that is my strategy. No outside aid just free will.

Eram
6th May 2012, 19:24
Hi starchild111,

I'm so sorry you started smoking again.
I know how it feels to restart a habit when you thought you where free of it. Makes you feel like you let yourself down, doesn't it?

I have good news though.
It's a way to quit nasty unhealthy habits with an awareness that Bashar is happily to explain ;)

hxMIfXaN1Gs

I used this video to quit my drinking which I have been doing for 20 years.
I just quit and it felt like the most liberating and easy thing to do. I just had very few moments that were difficult and I used this method from Bashar and made the craving go away like mist in the morning sun.

I hope it's something you can use.

best wishes!

Waky

X post edit X

There's another thing that is useful too: instead of looking at the things why you want to quit smoking, you can make a list of benefits of quitting smoking, like: better health, no more spending money on it, breath improves etc etc.

Every time you feel a craving, you can use this list to feel joy of all the things that are waiting for you now you are quitting.

I understand that this doesn't work for everyone, but for me it did the trick.

Midnight Rambler
6th May 2012, 20:27
[snip...]
Here's giving you the mental key to override your programming and to remember in your weakest moments what you said above:
I am so absolutely disgusted with myself...and I want to stop that nasty habit cold turkey!

Consider it a done deal.
Ernie

I have a mantra for the difficult moments when I have the urge to light up. It's self fulfilling and it works very well for me. I keep repeating to myself: I am a non-smoker, I am a non-smoker.

One other benefit is that I am proud of not smoking and not disgusted with myself :)

StarDust
6th May 2012, 20:45
Here is part 2 from Bashar:

JqR4HAyzE3E

Bryn ap Gwilym
6th May 2012, 21:19
starchild111

Hi,

Good luck with your quit.

I went Froozen Rooster (cold turkey) just over 12 weeks ago & now class my self as a non smoker. I can't stand the smell of it & people who smoke stink to high heaven.

To keep myself focused I trawled the web & came across a few sites that played a huge part in my quit.

Hope these will help you & anyone else.
Note; The material in these sites touch on & go deeper than folk are taught. Its as if Nicotine was designed to trap the mind & soul.

NicotineAddiction 101
http://whyquit.com/whyquit/linksaaddiction.html

Stop Smoking Recovery Timetable
http://whyquit.com/whyquit/a_benefits_time_table.html

Nicotine Withdrawal Symptoms & Recovery
http://www.quitsmokingsupport.com/withdrawal1.htm#index6

Here is a main No Smoking forum.
Even though I didn't join the comments left there helped heeps, plus there are a few who quit the same time as myself. So reading what they have to say was & is a bonus
http://forum.nosmokingday.org.uk/

cloud9
6th May 2012, 21:33
I quit smoking some years back using nicotine patches, it was so easy to do that I was amazed. What I did was to "try" the patches while thinking: "if it works it's great and if it doesn't, I'll try again". Well, it worked, I put a patch on and the first 3 days I smoked as usual but I wasn't concerned about the amount of nicotine I was receiving or anything, the fourth day around 6 pm I realized I hadn't smoked any cigarretes and I didn't have any cravings at all.

The next few days were amazing, I had a sense of freedom as never before, I even saw a man smoking outside and I just wanted to tell him how I did it but I didn't talked to him.
After three or so years I started going out with my today husband, he didn't tell me he was a smoker and when we got married and I came lo live in his house I discovered that he bought cigarettes by the carton and left them everywhere, on every table, drawer, etc., also his son and friends smoked so it was very easy to start having just a puff and after a few days a whole cigarette... so I started again.

My husband was finally able to quit a few months back using patches but I couldn't.... he bought some cheap chinese patches from ebay and they didn't work for me.

For the last week I have been using patches again and I have reduced the amount of cigarettes a lot but still smoking... today I've had 2 cigarettes but I can see the light at the end of the tunnel, cravings are diminishing and I feel good. The only downside of quitting was the weight gain, I'm a very petite woman and I gained more than 40 pounds, it was terrible but this time I feel more prepared to handle it.

I would never try cold turkey, I don't think I have the guts to do it that way...

Rantaak
6th May 2012, 21:43
I f***ing love smoking and laugh at all of the people who guilt themselves into not reaping its many benefits. Tobacco is my ally. I will continue smoking until I die, and then I will still smoke.

Do as you will. The choice is yours to laugh or cringe at social stigma.

http://a2.ec-images.myspacecdn.com/images02/6/0c8154eccb084ccd8d178de478067784/l.gif

sirdipswitch
6th May 2012, 21:53
I like smoking because it coats your lungs so the bad stuff don't stick. chuckle chuckle. Besides that, Reptilians are alergic to tobaco, and garlic, so do a bunch of both. hee hee hee hee hee chuckle chuckle.

love and peace
sirdipswitch

¤=[Post Update]=¤

oops... so Ido a bunch

¤=[Post Update]=¤

Helps keep Snobs away too

frances
7th May 2012, 00:13
I stopped smoking due to health reasons. Started taking the nicotine lozengers incase of a relapse. Became addicted to lozengers instead of cigarettes. Bottom line, nicotine is more addictive than heroin. Cigarettes are not addictive, nicotine is. Frances.

Sidney
7th May 2012, 03:20
Thank you soooooo much everybody, loads of info, and many thanks for the support!!Its been 24 hours, and I am not really craving, I am just really BITCHY. LOL Of course I would have to quit smoking not just during a full moon, but a SUPER full MOON. Where do I come up with these stupid ideas????? Yes, I am laughing, sort of. lol

That said, I really do like to smoke, thats the problem, but I really don't know why I like it so much, because it makes my mouth and hair and everything else smell like s**t, for the money, I could have a pretty nice vacation in a year, its not exactly feminine or attractive, and my kids hate it. I am hell bent on quitting though, so I am just going to do this one day at a time. I will track my progress here, so I have something to look forward to, like I can say, hey I made it another day. Baby steps. I am very thankful to be able to come here for support. :grouphug:

huyi82
7th May 2012, 12:08
take one step at a time, i also find that stressful situations causes me to light up all the time so try to avoid them or try to get your mind busy on something else, it's not easy that's one thing, i smoke 40 in a week and i want to cut down my intake but that will never happen. :(

WhiteFeather
7th May 2012, 12:45
You may want to try this. Its natural. A friend at the healthstore told me about this. Im going to try it when im ready. Not ready yet though.
Do some research on this when you get a chance. Resonates with me.

http://www.livestrong.com/article/167139-lobelia-liquid-herb-remedies/

http://www.good-herbal-health.com/natural-remedies/quit-smoking/why-lobelia-is-used-to-quit-smoking.php

jorr lundstrom
7th May 2012, 13:04
No, absolutely not. Why should anyone quit using a sacred herb?

After 48 years smoking I still love it and it has not become a

habit, yet. LOL


All is well


Jorr 2.0

Bryn ap Gwilym
7th May 2012, 13:41
No, absolutely not. Why should anyone quit using a sacred herb?

After 48 years smoking I still love it and it has not become a

habit, yet. LOL


All is well


Jorr 2.0

Aye, It would seem that Mr Clemens would agree with you.


Giving up smoking is the easiest thing in the world. I know because I've done it thousands of times.
Mark Twain

grannyfranny100
7th May 2012, 13:42
A couple pf comments. I am a smoker that has tried lots of things. It isn't just a matter of will power. Many people have excellent will power and self discipline in other areas of their lives. They shouldn't berate themselves because they lack will power or are perceived of lacking will power and thus are put in a loser category by others.

A nurse once told me that she has seen many older people with a life time nicotine addiction who quit and then drop dead of a heart attack in six months to a year. I surmise that they did not develop new coping skills as they forced themselves to quit. Same may be true for people who return to smoking in stressful times. So be kind to yourself as you pursue this smoke free goal.

As a typically shunned smoker, I have found many interesting people in the enclaves where smokers must gather between planes, etc. They are certainly more interesting people than the holier than thou types who feign coughs twenty feet away just to appear politically/socially correct. Smokers are quite a target for people who can't find any way to "fight" pollution from their cars, the food available, household cleaning products, their too loud car stereos and even the greed of some wealthy people who can never get enough money.

I believe that the difficulties about smoking are because we have not resolved the underlying causes of the addiction....yet. It is not just a habit but is an opportunity to gain more insight into ourselves. I suspect that when we reach that "aha" moment and reach a new sense of self, the smoking disappears. Apparently we also are an opportunity for that subset of smug, arrogant non smokers to come to terms with their own issues and develop a more compassionate attitude towards others. So be proud that you are on your pathway and may be indirectly helping others with their issues. Take pride in that as you struggle to gain freedom from nicotine.

Earth Angel
7th May 2012, 14:17
both of my daughters quit smoking using Laser Therapy.........one hour, one time and they were done........it cost them about $300 but that included a month worth of supplements to help with detoxing the system as well.......they were a bit emotional for the first couple of days but that was it........the minute we were done we used the McDonalds test (apparently after McDonalds the one daughter just always HAD to have a cigarette) and she had no craving at all..... hope this helps.
Sending you love and strength.......you did it before you can do it again.

ps and without laser treatment she has since given up McDonalds! yeah!!!!

Sidney
7th May 2012, 15:02
I like smoking because it coats your lungs so the bad stuff don't stick. chuckle chuckle. Besides that, Reptilians are alergic to tobaco, and garlic, so do a bunch of both. hee hee hee hee hee chuckle chuckle.

love and peace
sirdipswitch

¤=[Post Update]=¤

oops... so Ido a bunch

¤=[Post Update]=¤

Helps keep Snobs away too

LOL, I can't stand a snob either.

Sidney
7th May 2012, 18:52
No, absolutely not. Why should anyone quit using a sacred herb?

After 48 years smoking I still love it and it has not become a

habit, yet. LOL


All is well


Jorr 2.0

I remember priding myself for following through with quitting smoking on new years. (EVERY YEAR) LOL Now that is shameful.

pilotsimone
7th May 2012, 20:15
deleted post

pilotsimone
7th May 2012, 21:25
grannyfanny100's recent post on this thread was excellent. So, I wanted to share something I read recently that really opened my eyes about addiction...


In addiction treatment, our focus in the past has often been on treating the addict as a sick person and looking at how this sick person can become a healthy person, make his story better, and develop an ego that is less prone to succumbing to addictive cravings and obsession. Yet, many people who have been in recovery programs for years still identify themselves as addicts and therefore still identify themselves as sick people.

This creates a culture of sickness in which addicts relegate themselves to second class citizenhood. One is made to feel "sick" and made to feel that he belongs with other "sick people" who are not like other "normal" people in the world. This creates a separation in our society between addicts and non-addicts. It is a division that is becoming less and less helpful in the treatment of addiction. We tend to think of addiction as "their" problem, the "others," the sick people.

If you look around, however, most people in the general population struggle with one addiction or the other. Some are addicted to substances like drugs or alcohol and others are addicted to more socially acceptable things like shopping, working, romantic love, pornography, sexually acting out in unhealthy ways, money, sweets, gambling, praise, fame, or attention. The list of substances and activities to which one can be addicted is endless.

When viewed this way, we (all humans) are in this together. Recovery from addiction is an endeavor in which all of humanity ought to be interested. We are not islands onto ourselves. Whatever affects one of us, affects all of us including our families, our communities, and in fact our world.

So even if one is not addicted himself, he may live with or know someone who is addicted or he may be affected in some other way by addiction, including dealing with the rising health care costs and crime associated with addiction.

Focusing Too Much on the Particular Substance Rather than the Underlying Mechanism of Addiction Itself:

We have been focusing on divisions too much in recovery paradigms. We have divided ourselves off from one another. Heroin addicts go to this program. Shopping addicts go to this other meeting. Those with eating and sexual obsessions divide themselves off into separate factions.

This separation comes from focusing on the content of one's addiction (i.e., the particular substance or activity) rather than the underlying mechanism behind addiction (seeking, clinging, running or escaping present uncomfortable feelings).

The underlying mechanism in addiction is really the belief in thought itself. More pointedly, it is an addiction to objects. Thoughts create the sense of separate objects in our lives. The main separate object is "me." And as long as this "me" sees itself as separate, it will look to other, separate objects for fulfillment and contentment, always reaching for something else, something more, some object (whether it be a person, place, thing, drug, relationship, etc).

This constant grasping comes from a misperception regarding who we really are. In this sense of separation, we cannot help but grasp after something else because the separation itself makes us feel incomplete. This incompleteness or sense of lack is precisely what causes all the grasping.

So until we get to the root issue, we are very likely to just move from object to object, content to content, not seeing and releasing ourselves from the underlying mechanism that runs the addictive cycle.

When our focus is on content, we tend to substitute the content. We tend to move from object to object. For example, if we get clean and sober from drugs, we may find ourselves obsessing on relationships or tobacco or something else. We have switched the object (i.e., the content). We have not treated the underlying sense of separation.

Even if we free ourselves from addiction to the various substances in our lives, our dependency may then move to other, more hidden forms of addiction. We may become addicted to self-improvement, spiritual awakening, or recovery itself. Yes! Addiction is that insidious.

Source (http://kiloby.com/recovery.php?offset=0&writingid=290)

pugwash84
7th May 2012, 21:40
electronic cig is the best for me :) really has helped xxx

Fred Steeves
7th May 2012, 22:13
Hi there starchild111, I've quit dozens of times over the last 30 years, and we(me and cigarettes) have gradually come to an 'understanding'. My daily life during the non-smoking phases is tolerable, provided I maintain tolerence a plenty for those around me who choose to continue smoking. Works well.:)

Best of luck!
Fred

grannyfranny100
8th May 2012, 10:00
Pilotsimone

What a valuable post. I will read and reread your post because it contains valuable clues. Thank you for sharing your wisdom.

Granny Franny

Neptun
8th May 2012, 12:00
I quit smoking for around 4 years ago.

My technique is based on reverse psychology.

Every 1st in a month I would stop smoking for as long as I could take it. I didn't smoke for 3 days, other times 20 days. I was always allowed to smoke, BUT if I smoked, I had to smoke every day till the next 1st. in the month. It made me hate smoking, because I felt forced to do it.

I think it is a nice way to stop smoking. Feeling forced to smoke is somehow motivating.

Smoking breaks our willpower and by doing this technique I noticed it was getting more and more easy to stop smoking for longer and longer periods of time. The cravings are not as bad either.

As a non smoker, I sometimes get a need for a cigarette, the need will grow over days and I will think about cigarettes daily. That is when it is time to purchase 20 cigarettes and I have to smoke all of them. I will notice, if it feels good for my body, what it doesn't.

I get a need for a cigarette every 6-12 months.

Start the countdown now till the 1st of June and look forward to stop smoking as long as you can.

wynderer
8th May 2012, 13:11
Hi Neptun -- good to see you posting again

i've been told that Reptilians can't abide the smell & taste of tobacco -- & our Native Americans do use Tobacco in some sacred ceremonies....

Neptun
8th May 2012, 13:32
wynderer,

Thank you. I have been away because I felt people are not ready for this kind of knowledge or motivated to seek true freedom. Then I will rather focus on my own freedom.

My reptilian friend and mentor that I saw (95% sure) shape-shift with one of his eyes, when we had a little argument with me, told me stuff like, he couldn't stand the smell of humans and they stink terrible, he also had an issue with me smoking cigarettes. He would say that if I smoked cigarettes, I was confirming, that I had no willpower and could not do something big because of it. He taught me to be stronger and take action regarding business.

He said stuff like "Maybe I should sell you to a cult. You are pathetic and weak" haha (reptilian humor)

It was quite funny to let a reptilian help me with my problems. It was like having a Klingon psychologist(Star Trek).
He constantly said things like"You will die soon" that made me not care any more.

Reptilians really can't stand weakness and unfocused sheep. He would get pissed off, if I compared dragons with humans.

One day he made a mind trick on me because I challenged him regarding manipulation. I laughed at him and said he could not manipulate me.

We spend most of the day together and when I came back I got totally scared and felt like the Devil him self was in the room. I grabbed a Bible(I'm not Christian) and was in so much fear.

I told him about it and he laughed like(I told you so).

He has been a good friend to me and helped me allot. I motivated him to go against NWO and he made some signs, that he wanted to put up on a bridge over a highway. Then people on a daily basis every time they drive to work subconsciously notice the signs with empowering words. Maybe he is on to something with this technique?

It is interesting to compare experiences if there is a pattern here.

He is nihilistic and said past, future and now is all the same and he is like speaking to someone very old and yet he could pretend to be like anyone else.

I did make him feel happiness what was a new feeling to him. We were sitting together outside and he enjoyed the moment. I think, it is because he also could be himself without me being judgmental.

I think he is also an energy vampire and probably a more pure reptilian.

I believe, we can get many reptilians on our side, when they see we are not taking it anymore with the NWO.

Maybe the tobacco is used in the ceremonies because they believe it works against evil spirits etc. and because their intent is strong it will make it work?

The danish queen is a heavy smoker of cigarettes and she is most likely a reptilian:
http://www.karenwest.dk/blog/wp-content/0701_queen_margrethe_ii_fame.jpg

Sidney
8th May 2012, 13:53
A couple pf comments. I am a smoker that has tried lots of things. It isn't just a matter of will power. Many people have excellent will power and self discipline in other areas of their lives. They shouldn't berate themselves because they lack will power or are perceived of lacking will power and thus are put in a loser category by others.

A nurse once told me that she has seen many older people with a life time nicotine addiction who quit and then drop dead of a heart attack in six months to a year. I surmise that they did not develop new coping skills as they forced themselves to quit. Same may be true for people who return to smoking in stressful times. So be kind to yourself as you pursue this smoke free goal.

As a typically shunned smoker, I have found many interesting people in the enclaves where smokers must gather between planes, etc. They are certainly more interesting people than the holier than thou types who feign coughs twenty feet away just to appear politically/socially correct. Smokers are quite a target for people who can't find any way to "fight" pollution from their cars, the food available, household cleaning products, their too loud car stereos and even the greed of some wealthy people who can never get enough money.

I believe that the difficulties about smoking are because we have not resolved the underlying causes of the addiction....yet. It is not just a habit but is an opportunity to gain more insight into ourselves. I suspect that when we reach that "aha" moment and reach a new sense of self, the smoking disappears. Apparently we also are an opportunity for that subset of smug, arrogant non smokers to come to terms with their own issues and develop a more compassionate attitude towards others. So be proud that you are on your pathway and may be indirectly helping others with their issues. Take pride in that as you struggle to gain freedom from nicotine.

Grannyfranny100- I love your post. You are so right about how those holier than thou are so quick to judge and look down upon those who "seem" to be below them. It seems everybody wants to judge somebody.

Sidney
8th May 2012, 14:05
grannyfanny100's recent post on this thread was excellent. So, I wanted to share something I read recently that really opened my eyes about addiction...


In addiction treatment, our focus in the past has often been on treating the addict as a sick person and looking at how this sick person can become a healthy person, make his story better, and develop an ego that is less prone to succumbing to addictive cravings and obsession. Yet, many people who have been in recovery programs for years still identify themselves as addicts and therefore still identify themselves as sick people.

This creates a culture of sickness in which addicts relegate themselves to second class citizenhood. One is made to feel "sick" and made to feel that he belongs with other "sick people" who are not like other "normal" people in the world. This creates a separation in our society between addicts and non-addicts. It is a division that is becoming less and less helpful in the treatment of addiction. We tend to think of addiction as "their" problem, the "others," the sick people.

If you look around, however, most people in the general population struggle with one addiction or the other. Some are addicted to substances like drugs or alcohol and others are addicted to more socially acceptable things like shopping, working, romantic love, pornography, sexually acting out in unhealthy ways, money, sweets, gambling, praise, fame, or attention. The list of substances and activities to which one can be addicted is endless.

When viewed this way, we (all humans) are in this together. Recovery from addiction is an endeavor in which all of humanity ought to be interested. We are not islands onto ourselves. Whatever affects one of us, affects all of us including our families, our communities, and in fact our world.

So even if one is not addicted himself, he may live with or know someone who is addicted or he may be affected in some other way by addiction, including dealing with the rising health care costs and crime associated with addiction.

Focusing Too Much on the Particular Substance Rather than the Underlying Mechanism of Addiction Itself:

We have been focusing on divisions too much in recovery paradigms. We have divided ourselves off from one another. Heroin addicts go to this program. Shopping addicts go to this other meeting. Those with eating and sexual obsessions divide themselves off into separate factions.

This separation comes from focusing on the content of one's addiction (i.e., the particular substance or activity) rather than the underlying mechanism behind addiction (seeking, clinging, running or escaping present uncomfortable feelings).

The underlying mechanism in addiction is really the belief in thought itself. More pointedly, it is an addiction to objects. Thoughts create the sense of separate objects in our lives. The main separate object is "me." And as long as this "me" sees itself as separate, it will look to other, separate objects for fulfillment and contentment, always reaching for something else, something more, some object (whether it be a person, place, thing, drug, relationship, etc).

This constant grasping comes from a misperception regarding who we really are. In this sense of separation, we cannot help but grasp after something else because the separation itself makes us feel incomplete. This incompleteness or sense of lack is precisely what causes all the grasping.

So until we get to the root issue, we are very likely to just move from object to object, content to content, not seeing and releasing ourselves from the underlying mechanism that runs the addictive cycle.

When our focus is on content, we tend to substitute the content. We tend to move from object to object. For example, if we get clean and sober from drugs, we may find ourselves obsessing on relationships or tobacco or something else. We have switched the object (i.e., the content). We have not treated the underlying sense of separation.

Even if we free ourselves from addiction to the various substances in our lives, our dependency may then move to other, more hidden forms of addiction. We may become addicted to self-improvement, spiritual awakening, or recovery itself. Yes! Addiction is that insidious.

Source (http://kiloby.com/recovery.php?offset=0&writingid=290)

If you look around, however, most people in the general population struggle with one addiction or the other. Some are addicted to substances like drugs or alcohol and others are addicted to more socially acceptable things like shopping, working, romantic love, pornography, sexually acting out in unhealthy ways, money, sweets, gambling, praise, fame, or attention. The list of substances and activities to which one can be addicted is endless.

Thank you so much for that!! It reminds me of the books of Melodie Beattie, the author of the "Co-dependant no more" books.

My mother was/is severely co dependant. She bitches and moans and judges everyone for their imperfections,habits,addictions etc. Yet she has terrible OCD, is a shop a holic, is obsessed with weight and superficial appearance, and is addicted to dieting. I can't stand a snob, OR a hypocrite, and the world is full of both.
I have been guilty of maintaining bad habits just to spite her, but in the end its not hurting her just me.

BTW 2 full days so far, smoke free.

Camilo
8th May 2012, 14:13
I've seen people trying to quit smoking using hipnotherapy, the patch, etc, but the only ones that were successfull , were the ones that quited cold turkey.

Sidney
8th May 2012, 14:24
I've seen people trying to quit smoking using hipnotherapy, the patch, etc, but the only ones that were successfull , were the ones that quited cold turkey.

A couple years ago, my husband and I got hypnotized , and it cost up total 400 bucks. 2 weeks later we were both smoking again.

The difference this time, is, this is the first time that I really have the DESIRE to be a non smoker. I never really wanted to quit the other times that I tried.

Sidney
8th May 2012, 23:51
Day 3- Had a major craving, was triggered by a family member, and I chanted in my head, I will not smoke, I will not smoke, while I hurriedly grabbed a basket of clean laundry and proceeded to get it folded in record time. By then the craving subsided. Whew- That was a major victory for me, because, the last time I quit, the same sort of trigger had me out the door to the gas station instantly, to cave and buy some.:cheer2::cheer2::couch2:

Sidney
9th May 2012, 03:33
Omg i would love to have a smoke right about now. lol

SKIBADABOMSKI
9th May 2012, 03:48
GGTS
Atomizer 901 Low Resistance
30ml Strawberry mint 24mg.
Ultra Fire 1200 mAh 3.7V Battery & charger

No more craving. Seriously take the e-cig. Thats the answer.

Or just quit whining and quit. Those who talk about it and are happily interested in everyone's view to them quitting will never seriously quit. P/T quitting is actually more harmful.

Those that secretly do it will be doing it for themselves and will quit forever and don't need any applause.

Sidney
9th May 2012, 04:00
You know i have absolutely no support at home i am stressed out and i came here for suppprt and utilizing this space for a place to vent because i thought it was safe to do that here. Instead I am going to take a break from the forum all together until my craving and bitchiness subside. My apologies for my moods.

SKIBADABOMSKI
9th May 2012, 04:21
You have had lots of support here.
Loads of advice and lots of different remedies offered to you.
And you have vented.

You should be buzzing. I'm only tickling your vent bone. Can't all be roses and wishes.

:p

Bryn ap Gwilym
9th May 2012, 09:20
You know i have absplutely no support at home i am stressed out and i came here for suppprt and utilizing this space for a place to vent because i thought it was safe to do that here. i guess i was wrong.

Hi,

You do have support here girl & you are doing a fine job with your quit.

Its not going to be easy, but it does get a lot better within a short period of time. Your cravings should start to ease a bit now.

I found at first when ever I got a craving I would either have a jewing gum, brush me teeth or use mouth wash.


Within ...

20 minutes
Your blood pressure, pulse rate, and the temperature of your hands and feet will all return to normal.
8 hours
Remaining nicotine in your bloodstream will have fallen to 6.25% of normal peak daily levels, a 93.25% reduction.
12 hours
Your blood oxygen level will have increased to normal and carbon monoxide levels will have dropped to normal.
24 hours
Anxieties peak in intensity and within two weeks should return to near pre-cessation levels.
48 hours
Damaged nerve endings have started to regrow and your sense of smell and taste are beginning to return to normal. Cessation anger and irritability peaks.
72 hours
Your entire body will test 100% nicotine-free and over 90% of all nicotine metabolites (the chemicals it breaks down into) will now have passed from your body via your urine. Symptoms of chemical withdrawal have peaked in intensity, including restlessness. The number of cue induced crave episodes experienced during any quitting day will peak for the "average" ex-user. Lung bronchial tubes leading to air sacs (alveoli) are beginning to relax in recovering smokers. Breathing is becoming easier and the lungs functional abilities are starting to increase.
5 - 8 days
The "average" ex-smoker will encounter an "average" of three cue induced crave episodes per day. Although we may not be "average" and although serious cessation time distortion can make minutes feel like hours, it is unlikely that any single episode will last longer than 3 minutes. Keep a clock handy and time them.
10 days
10 days - The "average ex-user is down to encountering less than two crave episodes per day, each less than 3 minutes.
10 days to 2 weeks
Recovery has likely progressed to the point where your addiction is no longer doing the talking. Blood circulation in our gums and teeth are now similar to that of a non-user.
2 to 4 weeks
Cessation related anger, anxiety, difficulty concentrating, impatience, insomnia, restlessness and depression have ended. If still experiencing any of these symptoms get seen and evaluated by your physician.
21 days
Brain acetylcholine receptor counts up-regulated in response to nicotine's presence have now down-regulated and receptor binding has returned to levels seen in the brains of non-smokers.
2 weeks to 3 months
Your heart attack risk has started to drop. Your lung function is beginning to improve.
3 weeks to 3 months
Your circulation has substantially improved. Walking has become easier. Your chronic cough, if any, has likely disappeared.
1 to 9 months
Any smoking related sinus congestion, fatigue or shortness of breath have decreased. Cilia have regrown in your lungs thereby increasing their ability to handle mucus, keep your lungs clean, and reduce infections. Your body's overall energy has increased.
1 year
Your excess risk of coronary heart disease, heart attack and stroke has dropped to less than half that of a smoker.
5 to 15 years
Your risk of stroke has declined to that of a non-smoker.
10 years
Your risk of being diagnosed with lung cancer is between 30% and 50% of that for a continuing smoker (2005 study). Risk of death from lung cancer has declined by almost half if you were an average smoker (one pack per day). Your risk of pancreatic cancer has declined to that of a never-smoker (2011 study), while risk of cancer of the mouth, throat and esophagus has also declined. Your risk of developing diabetes is now similar to that of a never-smoker (2012 study).
13 years
Your risk of smoking induced tooth loss has declined to that of a never-smoker (2006 study).
15 years
Your risk of coronary heart disease is now that of a person who has never smoked.
20 years
Female excess risk of death from all smoking related causes, including lung disease and cancer, has now reduced to that of a never-smoker (2008 study). Risk of pancreatic cancer reduced to that of a never-smoker (2011 study).

Source (http://whyquit.com/whyquit/a_benefits_time_table.html)

Neptun
9th May 2012, 11:22
Omg i would love to have a smoke right about now. lol
If you used my method you could :)

GoodETxSG
9th May 2012, 13:12
I wish I could get my wife to QUIT! My 8 year old daughter tells her every time she lights up on the porch... "Mom, that 6 more minutes off of your life"... then poof another Menthol coud of smoke goes into the air.

I also know plenty of people in AA or Alanon... it has helped a lot of people but has ALL, every single one of the halmarks of a cult. That part really spooks me. But where else are Drug Addicts and Alchololics to go?

What real tools are out there to help people stop smoking? Hypnosis? I know addiction is in the mind and the brains chemistry. You woud think we would have a non religious treatment for it by now.

The Orange Papers Hidden history of Alcoholics Anonymous
http://www.orange-papers.org/ - AA Cult (Sorry for those of you who are in it... I have had famiily and friends that were and ARE in it and as a former cult investigator when I was right out of college Religion/Psych Major I developed some worries about these groups)... "Probe Ministries"

I think I just heard a can of worms open... :tape2:

dddanieljjjamesss
9th May 2012, 13:26
you could at least smoke american spirits until you feel you don't need them anymore
at least you won't be filling yourself with non-natural chemicals

bodhii71
9th May 2012, 13:26
I'm in my second week of non-smoking. This is probably the 12th time I've attempted to quit.
I feel angry, unbalanced, impatient, irritable... back to my normal self, JK.
I'm using patches, but plan to ween from them next week.
Wish me luck and willpower, I could use some good vibes!

huyi82
9th May 2012, 20:09
Day 3- Had a major craving, was triggered by a family member, and I chanted in my head, I will not smoke, I will not smoke, while I hurriedly grabbed a basket of clean laundry and proceeded to get it folded in record time. By then the craving subsided. Whew- That was a major victory for me, because, the last time I quit, the same sort of trigger had me out the door to the gas station instantly, to cave and buy some.:cheer2::cheer2::couch2:

LOL i know that feeling, especially when you are under pressure, it's overwhelming sometimes.

huyi82
9th May 2012, 20:14
You know i have absolutely no support at home i am stressed out and i came here for suppprt and utilizing this space for a place to vent because i thought it was safe to do that here. Instead I am going to take a break from the forum all together until my craving and bitchiness subside. My apologies for my moods.

don't let the stress get to you, like people have said on here they have offered their support as much as they can, don't give up! (if it makes you feel better i caved in a brought another pack of cigs today couldn't help myself) LOL

Sidney
9th May 2012, 20:25
You know i have absolutely no support at home i am stressed out and i came here for suppprt and utilizing this space for a place to vent because i thought it was safe to do that here. Instead I am going to take a break from the forum all together until my craving and bitchiness subside. My apologies for my moods.

don't let the stress get to you, like people have said on here they have offered their support as much as they can, don't give up! (if it makes you feel better i caved in a brought another pack of cigs today couldn't help myself) LOL

Thank you huyi82- Wow, im sorry you caved. I didn't cave, but OMG the mood swings are bad.. I need to just shut myself in the bathroom and stay there for a couple weeks. I would if i could. LOL

Rantaak
9th May 2012, 21:51
Yeah, when I stop smoking the holy plant I start to hear peoples thoughts in my head and hallucinate vividly.

math330
10th May 2012, 08:12
Apologies if this method has already been suggested.

Was a smoker from 18-36, though only weed 18-27. I tried cold-turkey (ergh), patches (ergh) and the 'Easy Way' book. Easy Way worked a little but I began smoking again. Then my friend told me about a medication he was using called Champix. It's not for everyone and side effects seem to vary a lot but I went from 30 a day to nothing in a couple of weeks. It's a medication that plays with the nicotine receptors in the brain so I understand people's reluctance to take it. I suffered awful constipation combined with terrible wind, and sometimes went a little dizzy. It sounds bad when I actually write that but that was 2 years ago and I'm still a non-smoker now, as is my father who was smoking 30+ a day for 25 years and didn't want to quit.