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InTheBackground
14th May 2012, 01:59
This is a really interesting letter that evidently was sent to hiphopisread.com anonymously. I picked it up from another site and thought I would share here. I don't know anything about the validity of it, but it really is a fascinating read, and it feels true.

UPDATE: MOZART HAS VERY KINDLY BROKEN UP THE LONG PARAGRAPHS FOR US IN POST#3 BELOW, TO MAKE IT EASIER ON THE EYES. :)

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hello,

After more than 20 years, I've finally decided to tell the world what I witnessed in 1991, which I believe was one of the biggest turning point in popular music, and ultimately American society. I have struggled for a long time weighing the pros and cons of making this story public as I was reluctant to implicate the individuals who were present that day. So I've simply decided to leave out names and all the details that may risk my personal well being and that of those who were, like me, dragged into something they weren't ready for.

Between the late 80's and early 90’s, I was what you may call a “decision maker” with one of the more established company in the music industry. I came from Europe in the early 80’s and quickly established myself in the business. The industry was different back then. Since technology and media weren’t accessible to people like they are today, the industry had more control over the public and had the means to influence them anyway it wanted. This may explain why in early 1991, I was invited to attend a closed door meeting with a small group of music business insiders to discuss rap music’s new direction. Little did I know that we would be asked to participate in one of the most unethical and destructive business practice I’ve ever seen.

The meeting was held at a private residence on the outskirts of Los Angeles. I remember about 25 to 30 people being there, most of them familiar faces. Speaking to those I knew, we joked about the theme of the meeting as many of us did not care for rap music and failed to see the purpose of being invited to a private gathering to discuss its future. Among the attendees was a small group of unfamiliar faces who stayed to themselves and made no attempt to socialize beyond their circle. Based on their behavior and formal appearances, they didn't seem to be in our industry. Our casual chatter was interrupted when we were asked to sign a confidentiality agreement preventing us from publicly discussing the information presented during the meeting. Needless to say, this intrigued and in some cases disturbed many of us. The agreement was only a page long but very clear on the matter and consequences which stated that violating the terms would result in job termination. We asked several people what this meeting was about and the reason for such secrecy but couldn't find anyone who had answers for us. A few people refused to sign and walked out. No one stopped them. I was tempted to follow but curiosity got the best of me. A man who was part of the “unfamiliar” group collected the agreements from us.

Quickly after the meeting began, one of my industry colleagues (who shall remain nameless like everyone else) thanked us for attending. He then gave the floor to a man who only introduced himself by first name and gave no further details about his personal background. I think he was the owner of the residence but it was never confirmed. He briefly praised all of us for the success we had achieved in our industry and congratulated us for being selected as part of this small group of “decision makers”. At this point I begin to feel slightly uncomfortable at the strangeness of this gathering. The subject quickly changed as the speaker went on to tell us that the respective companies we represented had invested in a very profitable industry which could become even more rewarding with our active involvement. He explained that the companies we work for had invested millions into the building of privately owned prisons and that our positions of influence in the music industry would actually impact the profitability of these investments. I remember many of us in the group immediately looking at each other in confusion. At the time, I didn’t know what a private prison was but I wasn't the only one. Sure enough, someone asked what these prisons were and what any of this had to do with us. We were told that these prisons were built by privately owned companies who received funding from the government based on the number of inmates. The more inmates, the more money the government would pay these prisons. It was also made clear to us that since these prisons are privately owned, as they become publicly traded, we’d be able to buy shares. Most of us were taken back by this. Again, a couple of people asked what this had to do with us. At this point, my industry colleague who had first opened the meeting took the floor again and answered our questions. He told us that since our employers had become silent investors in this prison business, it was now in their interest to make sure that these prisons remained filled. Our job would be to help make this happen by marketing music which promotes criminal behavior, rap being the music of choice. He assured us that this would be a great situation for us because rap music was becoming an increasingly profitable market for our companies, and as employee, we’d also be able to buy personal stocks in these prisons. Immediately, silence came over the room. You could have heard a pin drop. I remember looking around to make sure I wasn't dreaming and saw half of the people with dropped jaws. My daze was interrupted when someone shouted, “Is this a f****** joke?” At this point things became chaotic. Two of the men who were part of the “unfamiliar” group grabbed the man who shouted out and attempted to remove him from the house. A few of us, myself included, tried to intervene. One of them pulled out a gun and we all backed off. They separated us from the crowd and all four of us were escorted outside. My industry colleague who had opened the meeting earlier hurried out to meet us and reminded us that we had signed agreement and would suffer the consequences of speaking about this publicly or even with those who attended the meeting. I asked him why he was involved with something this corrupt and he replied that it was bigger than the music business and nothing we’d want to challenge without risking consequences. We all protested and as he walked back into the house I remember word for word the last thing he said, “It’s out of my hands now. Remember you signed an agreement.” He then closed the door behind him. The men rushed us to our cars and actually watched until we drove off.

A million things were going through my mind as I drove away and I eventually decided to pull over and park on a side street in order to collect my thoughts. I replayed everything in my mind repeatedly and it all seemed very surreal to me. I was angry with myself for not having taken a more active role in questioning what had been presented to us. I'd like to believe the shock of it all is what suspended my better nature. After what seemed like an eternity, I was able to calm myself enough to make it home. I didn't talk or call anyone that night. The next day back at the office, I was visibly out of it but blamed it on being under the weather. No one else in my department had been invited to the meeting and I felt a sense of guilt for not being able to share what I had witnessed. I thought about contacting the 3 others who wear kicked out of the house but I didn't remember their names and thought that tracking them down would probably bring unwanted attention. I considered speaking out publicly at the risk of losing my job but I realized I’d probably be jeopardizing more than my job and I wasn't willing to risk anything happening to my family. I thought about those men with guns and wondered who they were? I had been told that this was bigger than the music business and all I could do was let my imagination run free. There were no answers and no one to talk to. I tried to do a little bit of research on private prisons but didn’t uncover anything about the music business’ involvement. However, the information I did find confirmed how dangerous this prison business really was. Days turned into weeks and weeks into months. Eventually, it was as if the meeting had never taken place. It all seemed surreal. I became more reclusive and stopped going to any industry events unless professionally obligated to do so. On two occasions, I found myself attending the same function as my former colleague. Both times, our eyes met but nothing more was exchanged.

As the months passed, rap music had definitely changed direction. I was never a fan of it but even I could tell the difference. Rap acts that talked about politics or harmless fun were quickly fading away as gangster rap started dominating the airwaves. Only a few months had passed since the meeting but I suspect that the ideas presented that day had been successfully implemented. It was as if the order has been given to all major label executives. The music was climbing the charts and most companies when more than happy to capitalize on it. Each one was churning out their very own gangster rap acts on an assembly line. Everyone bought into it, consumers included. Violence and drug use became a central theme in most rap music. I spoke to a few of my peers in the industry to get their opinions on the new trend but was told repeatedly that it was all about supply and demand. Sadly many of them even expressed that the music reinforced their prejudice of minorities.

I officially quit the music business in 1993 but my heart had already left months before. I broke ties with the majority of my peers and removed myself from this thing I had once loved. I took some time off, returned to Europe for a few years, settled out of state, and lived a “quiet” life away from the world of entertainment. As the years passed, I managed to keep my secret, fearful of sharing it with the wrong person but also a little ashamed of not having had the balls to blow the whistle. But as rap got worse, my guilt grew. Fortunately, in the late 90’s, having the internet as a resource which wasn't at my disposal in the early days made it easier for me to investigate what is now labeled the prison industrial complex. Now that I have a greater understanding of how private prisons operate, things make much more sense than they ever have. I see how the criminalization of rap music played a big part in promoting racial stereotypes and misguided so many impressionable young minds into adopting these glorified criminal behaviors which often lead to incarceration. Twenty years of guilt is a heavy load to carry but the least I can do now is to share my story, hoping that fans of rap music realize how they’ve been used for the past 2 decades. Although I plan on remaining anonymous for obvious reasons, my goal now is to get this information out to as many people as possible. Please help me spread the word. Hopefully, others who attended the meeting back in 1991 will be inspired by this and tell their own stories. Most importantly, if only one life has been touched by my story, I pray it makes the weight of my guilt a little more tolerable.

Thank you.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Lost Soul
14th May 2012, 03:52
Jon Peniel's Children of the Law of One and The Lost Trachings of Atlantis discusses the media's programming of society. They teach the viewer or listener what to think and how to respond and how to behave. Scribd has his book on line for free. I liked it so much I bought it.

Mozart
14th May 2012, 03:58
I started to read it, but, sheesh, those paragraphs are HUGE and hard to read ... not your fault, InTheBackground, so since it's a paste from elsewhere, I took the liberty of creating paragraphs to make it much more readable.

May I suggest that you (InTheBackground) put in a little edit on the top of the OP to let people know that the OP will have been broken up into much-smaller paragraphs?

~Mozart


This is a really interesting letter that evidently was sent to hiphopisread.com anonymously. I picked it up from another site and thought I would share here. I don't know anything about the validity of it, but it really is a fascinating read, and it feels true.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hello,

After more than 20 years, I've finally decided to tell the world what I witnessed in 1991, which I believe was one of the biggest turning point in popular music, and ultimately American society.

I have struggled for a long time weighing the pros and cons of making this story public as I was reluctant to implicate the individuals who were present that day. So I've simply decided to leave out names and all the details that may risk my personal well being and that of those who were, like me, dragged into something they weren't ready for.

Between the late 80's and early 90’s, I was what you may call a “decision maker” with one of the more established company in the music industry. I came from Europe in the early 80’s and quickly established myself in the business. The industry was different back then.

Since technology and media weren’t accessible to people like they are today, the industry had more control over the public and had the means to influence them anyway it wanted. This may explain why in early 1991, I was invited to attend a closed door meeting with a small group of music business insiders to discuss rap music’s new direction.

Little did I know that we would be asked to participate in one of the most unethical and destructive business practice I’ve ever seen.

The meeting was held at a private residence on the outskirts of Los Angeles. I remember about 25 to 30 people being there, most of them familiar faces. Speaking to those I knew, we joked about the theme of the meeting as many of us did not care for rap music and failed to see the purpose of being invited to a private gathering to discuss its future.

Among the attendees was a small group of unfamiliar faces who stayed to themselves and made no attempt to socialize beyond their circle. Based on their behavior and formal appearances, they didn't seem to be in our industry. Our casual chatter was interrupted when we were asked to sign a confidentiality agreement preventing us from publicly discussing the information presented during the meeting.

Needless to say, this intrigued and in some cases disturbed many of us. The agreement was only a page long but very clear on the matter and consequences which stated that violating the terms would result in job termination. We asked several people what this meeting was about and the reason for such secrecy but couldn't find anyone who had answers for us.

A few people refused to sign and walked out. No one stopped them. I was tempted to follow but curiosity got the best of me. A man who was part of the “unfamiliar” group collected the agreements from us.

Quickly after the meeting began, one of my industry colleagues (who shall remain nameless like everyone else) thanked us for attending. He then gave the floor to a man who only introduced himself by first name and gave no further details about his personal background. I think he was the owner of the residence but it was never confirmed.

He briefly praised all of us for the success we had achieved in our industry and congratulated us for being selected as part of this small group of “decision makers”. At this point I begin to feel slightly uncomfortable at the strangeness of this gathering. The subject quickly changed as the speaker went on to tell us that the respective companies we represented had invested in a very profitable industry which could become even more rewarding with our active involvement.

He explained that the companies we work for had invested millions into the building of privately owned prisons and that our positions of influence in the music industry would actually impact the profitability of these investments. I remember many of us in the group immediately looking at each other in confusion.

At the time, I didn’t know what a private prison was but I wasn't the only one. Sure enough, someone asked what these prisons were and what any of this had to do with us. We were told that these prisons were built by privately owned companies who received funding from the government based on the number of inmates. The more inmates, the more money the government would pay these prisons.

It was also made clear to us that since these prisons are privately owned, as they become publicly traded, we’d be able to buy shares. Most of us were taken back by this. Again, a couple of people asked what this had to do with us. At this point, my industry colleague who had first opened the meeting took the floor again and answered our questions.

He told us that since our employers had become silent investors in this prison business, it was now in their interest to make sure that these prisons remained filled. Our job would be to help make this happen by marketing music which promotes criminal behavior, rap being the music of choice. He assured us that this would be a great situation for us because rap music was becoming an increasingly profitable market for our companies, and as employee, we’d also be able to buy personal stocks in these prisons.

Immediately, silence came over the room. You could have heard a pin drop. I remember looking around to make sure I wasn't dreaming and saw half of the people with dropped jaws. My daze was interrupted when someone shouted, “Is this a f****** joke?”

At this point things became chaotic. Two of the men who were part of the “unfamiliar” group grabbed the man who shouted out and attempted to remove him from the house. A few of us, myself included, tried to intervene. One of them pulled out a gun and we all backed off. They separated us from the crowd and all four of us were escorted outside.

My industry colleague who had opened the meeting earlier hurried out to meet us and reminded us that we had signed agreement and would suffer the consequences of speaking about this publicly or even with those who attended the meeting. I asked him why he was involved with something this corrupt and he replied that it was bigger than the music business and nothing we’d want to challenge without risking consequences.

We all protested and as he walked back into the house I remember word for word the last thing he said, “It’s out of my hands now. Remember you signed an agreement.” He then closed the door behind him. The men rushed us to our cars and actually watched until we drove off.

A million things were going through my mind as I drove away and I eventually decided to pull over and park on a side street in order to collect my thoughts. I replayed everything in my mind repeatedly and it all seemed very surreal to me.

I was angry with myself for not having taken a more active role in questioning what had been presented to us. I'd like to believe the shock of it all is what suspended my better nature. After what seemed like an eternity, I was able to calm myself enough to make it home. I didn't talk or call anyone that night.

The next day back at the office, I was visibly out of it but blamed it on being under the weather. No one else in my department had been invited to the meeting and I felt a sense of guilt for not being able to share what I had witnessed. I thought about contacting the 3 others who wear kicked out of the house but I didn't remember their names and thought that tracking them down would probably bring unwanted attention.

I considered speaking out publicly at the risk of losing my job but I realized I’d probably be jeopardizing more than my job and I wasn't willing to risk anything happening to my family. I thought about those men with guns and wondered who they were? I had been told that this was bigger than the music business and all I could do was let my imagination run free.

There were no answers and no one to talk to. I tried to do a little bit of research on private prisons but didn’t uncover anything about the music business’ involvement. However, the information I did find confirmed how dangerous this prison business really was. Days turned into weeks and weeks into months.

Eventually, it was as if the meeting had never taken place. It all seemed surreal. I became more reclusive and stopped going to any industry events unless professionally obligated to do so. On two occasions, I found myself attending the same function as my former colleague. Both times, our eyes met but nothing more was exchanged.

As the months passed, rap music had definitely changed direction. I was never a fan of it but even I could tell the difference. Rap acts that talked about politics or harmless fun were quickly fading away as gangster rap started dominating the airwaves.

Only a few months had passed since the meeting but I suspect that the ideas presented that day had been successfully implemented. It was as if the order has been given to all major label executives. The music was climbing the charts and most companies when more than happy to capitalize on it.

Each one was churning out their very own gangster rap acts on an assembly line. Everyone bought into it, consumers included. Violence and drug use became a central theme in most rap music. I spoke to a few of my peers in the industry to get their opinions on the new trend but was told repeatedly that it was all about supply and demand. Sadly many of them even expressed that the music reinforced their prejudice of minorities.

I officially quit the music business in 1993 but my heart had already left months before. I broke ties with the majority of my peers and removed myself from this thing I had once loved. I took some time off, returned to Europe for a few years, settled out of state, and lived a “quiet” life away from the world of entertainment.

As the years passed, I managed to keep my secret, fearful of sharing it with the wrong person but also a little ashamed of not having had the balls to blow the whistle. But as rap got worse, my guilt grew. Fortunately, in the late 90’s, having the internet as a resource which wasn't at my disposal in the early days made it easier for me to investigate what is now labeled the prison industrial complex.

Now that I have a greater understanding of how private prisons operate, things make much more sense than they ever have. I see how the criminalization of rap music played a big part in promoting racial stereotypes and misguided so many impressionable young minds into adopting these glorified criminal behaviors which often lead to incarceration.

Twenty years of guilt is a heavy load to carry but the least I can do now is to share my story, hoping that fans of rap music realize how they’ve been used for the past 2 decades. Although I plan on remaining anonymous for obvious reasons, my goal now is to get this information out to as many people as possible.

Please help me spread the word. Hopefully, others who attended the meeting back in 1991 will be inspired by this and tell their own stories. Most importantly, if only one life has been touched by my story, I pray it makes the weight of my guilt a little more tolerable.

Thank you.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

DNA
14th May 2012, 04:05
I'm not buying this. Something in the narrative

math330
14th May 2012, 07:18
Not 100% sure how I feel about this one, thanks for posting.

I've been aware of private prisons for some time now, and can also see how profit drives people to do things like this. I can't recall which movie it was in now - but remember the judge in the US caught taking backhand payments for sending kids to prison for minor offences?
Maybe the hiphop part of the story is true, there was (and is) a lot of music promoting gangster at the time but remember that NWA were already upsetting parents in '88 - and Ice-T, Just Ice, Schooly-D etc etc had been pushing illegal activity even before that. Maybe the prison industry saw this and decided to use it to their gain, maybe not

Good documentary on the prisons:
QXH3DlW3vMs

Ernie Nemeth
14th May 2012, 07:54
Not 100% sure how I feel about this one, thanks for posting.

I've been aware of private prisons for some time now, and can also see how profit drives people to do things like this. I can't recall which movie it was in now - but remember the judge in the US caught taking backhand payments for sending kids to prison for minor offences?
Maybe the hiphop part of the story is true, there was (and is) a lot of music promoting gangster at the time but remember that NWA were already upsetting parents in '88 - and Ice-T, Just Ice, Schooly-D etc etc had been pushing illegal activity even before that. Maybe the prison industry saw this and decided to use it to their gain, maybe not

Good documentary on the prisons:
QXH3DlW3vMs

A board that posts "Today's closing stock price"?
A riot leads to charges laid against the inmates, resulting in longer sentences - that's "money in the bank" for shareholders.

In Canada our conservative government has increased its funding of "super prisons", quietly building prisons in Toronto (that I personally know of because I refused to be involved in the building of it), and other provinces and stiffening the laws regarding "mandatory" prison terms. Three pot plants now gets you an automatic 6 month term for first offense. Nice, eh? And very lucrative. Many businesses make large profits off of the increased funding of prisons, both during the construction phase and then the maintenance and staffing phase. We now have posters around the city and even TV ads about becoming a "corrections officer" - touted as a good job with a stable future.

Inthebackground's expose is not very hard to believe. In fact, it is almost certain that such a scenario - a meeting behind closed doors to detail questionable means to increase inmate populations - probably happens quite often, even today. I could think of a few ways to increase inmate numbers just off the top of my head, and I'm not trained in business, economics, psychology or psychiatry. Nor am I a psychopath.

Absolutely disgusting tactics all around. What ever happened to rehabilitation?

Fukc 'em all, souless, tactless, immoral bastards, one and all!

andrewgreen
14th May 2012, 08:40
Thanks, you have done the right thing finally. One more piece to the puzzle. I knew private prisons could not be a good thing but it never clicked in my head exactly why. The people who own them have financial interests in everything else so are actively using their influence to create crime and profit from it. Another reason behind our backward laws for drugs.

Airwooz
14th May 2012, 09:05
au0AkGyJmhc

Nah.............I dont think so

TigaHawk
14th May 2012, 11:04
"i dont want to comprimise my safety by revealing specifics, but there were 25-30 people in the room with me, i was one of 4 that was escorted out, and i left the buisness in 1993!"

:rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:


p.s - Rap like this definately encourages violence and crime, and isnt people trying to express their feelings/emotions alongside music, right?


Hilltop Hoods - Speaking in Tongues

http://vimeo.com/41123684

Another war another martyr revered,
Passed the fear from their fathers then it’s lasting for years,
Bullets don’t discriminate the skin colour they pierce,
We speak the same language brother; love, laughter and tears,
Refugees trading death for a prison,
While some base a set of opinions on race, sex or religion,
C’mon, enough day to day stress of just living,
Without giving a **** if they’re hated just cause you’re different,
Let’s do it under the name of the love that became lost,
Dress it up how you want, we’re cut from the same cloth,
Scars of hate, frowns stitched to our faces,
Can’t escape the cage we forge, we’ve got bars to break,
For those living every bit of the struggle,
Given to hustle trying to figure how they fit in the puzzle,
Cause right now we’re in pieces and peace is the people as one,
Till then we’re treated like we’re speaking in tongues so here we come


CHORUS
I am, you are, we are one,
We’re two sides of the same coin, we drink from the sun,
We be the left hand, right hand, right man?
But sometimes it seems like we’re speaking in tongues so let me speak on the drum,
I am, you are, we are one,
We’re two sides of the same coin, we drink from the sun,
We be the left hand, right hand, right man?
But sometimes it seems like we’re speaking in tongues so let me speak on the drum



Media is teaching the young, debate about belief in the one,
Can make an eight-year soldier fall asleep with a gun,
While tax mans hands deep in your funds, raping your ones,
Money tight like we tweaking the drums it’s like we speaking in tongues,
But no book burnings or church sermons,
I surf currents, my words burn like a dirt furnace,
Confusion leads and anguish sells,
But this music succeeds where even language fails,
To convey free honest expression,
It’s a problem trying to get people to acknowledge progression,
My goal is to leave a lasting iconic impression,
Controlling crowds like demonic possession and ain’t no time to invest in,
Biting the hand that created the platform,
Attaching pseudo patriotic crap to a rap song,
Hoods and 2na try to unify the people as one,
And yet we’re treated like we’re speaking in tongues so here we come,


CHORUS


I would never,
Hate someone for the way they display love for someone else,
(And if you do)
The blame comes from the weight of the way that you see yourself,
Take some of the weight off your plate by taking the hate away,
And then maybe you’ll make your way to start loving yourself
Fear’s a cancer logic is a countermeasure,
A property that you can’t count or measure,
I got a problem with people who got a problem with,
The way that other people wanna live – that’s their prerogative,
They’re mad at how you love, where your prayers are going,
Their anger’s like a drug, they’re mad at where you from,
But **** a redneck checking if your visa’s valid,
They act like pigs and chickens I’m sick of Ceaser salad,
So we seize the mallet, and we swing on the ignorant,
Can’t speak our language? Then we’ll see if you can sing in it,
Hoods and 2na try to unify the people as one,
And yet we’re treated like we’re speaking in tongues so here we come

CHORUS

They pick me up just to pull me down,
March to different drums, come from all around,
It’s like we’re speaking in tongues,
It’s like we’re speaking in tongues,
They pick me up just to pull me down,
March to different drums, come from all around,
It’s like we’re speaking in tongues,
It’s like we’re speaking in tongues

CHORUS

Iceberg
14th May 2012, 11:48
The biggest and most powerful weapon for mind control is music. All music industries are owned by PTB not only for turning us in criminals but to brainwash us all. To change the way how we think, to disempower us, to feel stressed or euforic all time , but the worst thing is changing our frequency of mind and heart. No wonder why music is prohibited in religious books.

Lost Soul
14th May 2012, 12:23
The issue of rehabilitation was raised. Recedevism is over 90%. Most criminals do their time and when released, return to a life of crime. Most of the time they get away with it too. They know the penalty is small and that the rewards can be high. Certainly some criminals change their ways, but it comes from an internal desire to change and not because society tries to correct them. with the poor state of the world economy, there is little to offer for an honest man yet alone a man whose background is tainted with jail or prison time. Combine that with a pop culture that glorifies criminals and there's no incentive to go straight. Working is for chumps is the attitude that many criminals and welfare minded individuals have.

In San Francisco, there was an incident where middle class whites from affluent families (parents are doctors, lawyers, executives) in their early twenties attacked a Yale singing group. The attackers shouted their zip code as a sort of turf identity. That type of gangsta behavior mimics the kids from the projects who walk into a theater and shout their district/pro-jects (not projects) as a challenge to fight or shoot it out with the guys from another district or pro-ject. Society spirals down the tube as it became fashionable to behave like a ghetto goblin.

It takes a lot not to be a follower and to stand out from a crowd. Peer pressure to conform is immense, especially for teenagers who are trying to gain acceptance. The media by making it seem cool to be a criminal plays a large part in the decay of society.

MariaDine
14th May 2012, 12:56
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-vcKRo6MpY5Y/T1fK2CLP8eI/AAAAAAAAAQ0/sdwVXPq21EQ/s1600/ESCOLA.jpg

A MAP FROM THE REALITY IN BRASIL -

FROM LEFT TO RIGHT
PUBLIC SCHOOLS - BLUE
PRIVATE SCHOOLS - RED
PRISONS - BLACK

Thank you.

wynderer
14th May 2012, 13:27
the Rockefeller Drug laws in NY State are totally racially biased -- most prisons [at the present time] in the USA are filled w/African-American men, w/more & more Mexicans & others from south of the border

don't forget the ones for children -- they are in your neighborhoods -- maybe out in the woods somewhere like one around here

kcbc2010
14th May 2012, 14:18
The issue of rehabilitation was raised. Recedevism is over 90%. Most criminals do their time and when released, return to a life of crime. Most of the time they get away with it too. They know the penalty is small and that the rewards can be high. Certainly some criminals change their ways, but it comes from an internal desire to change and not because society tries to correct them. with the poor state of the world economy, there is little to offer for an honest man yet alone a man whose background is tainted with jail or prison time. Combine that with a pop culture that glorifies criminals and there's no incentive to go straight. Working is for chumps is the attitude that many criminals and welfare minded individuals have.

In San Francisco, there was an incident where middle class whites from affluent families (parents are doctors, lawyers, executives) in their early twenties attacked a Yale singing group. The attackers shouted their zip code as a sort of turf identity. That type of gangsta behavior mimics the kids from the projects who walk into a theater and shout their district/pro-jects (not projects) as a challenge to fight or shoot it out with the guys from another district or pro-ject. Society spirals down the tube as it became fashionable to behave like a ghetto goblin.

It takes a lot not to be a follower and to stand out from a crowd. Peer pressure to conform is immense, especially for teenagers who are trying to gain acceptance. The media by making it seem cool to be a criminal plays a large part in the decay of society.

Also, society has made it really hard for criminals to get their 2nd chance. Employers don't want to hire a felon, so the felon is stuck in dead-end jobs - if he/she gets a job (on the books, not under the table). People don't want to live next to a felon, so there's the stigma that comes with being a "former-X" and trying to hide "certain facts" from your neighbors, so they will accept you into the community. Then, for certain types of crimes, a "criminal" isn't allowed in a school or around kids w/o supervision by an adult. And, of course, the internet is there to remind people of their neighbor's crimes (if there's one to be found) and let people know if they are living near a sex offender/criminal.

Society has made it okay to demonize former criminals because (as one author I read put it) they are the only people in Western society that you can call "bad" and berate w/o having the politically correct police all over you for judging people. And, since TPTB want to be seen as "tough on crime" there's not an incentive for society to try to rehabilitate people because they need to show they are doing something about crime, so their "results" are sitting in jail for minor charges (in the US).

There's two sides to the problem. There's the cultural problem of "everyone wants to be a gangsta", but then there's also the problem that the criminal justice system has strict laws like "3 strikes" and "minimum sentencing" guidelines that judges have to follow. There's no leeway for making independent sentence recommendations. So, you end up with the guy who's selling marijuana getting the same sentence as someone who's selling heroin.

aceninja
14th May 2012, 14:44
Don't worry my friend, technology also allows independent artists to gain exposure with the antidote to that problem... http://niqueloverhodes.bandcamp.com/track/love-heals-all-ft-gerard-brooks?permalink

NOTE: That link is only active for about 14 hours and it automatically deactivates. I wanted to share that particular track because it should be getting played on the radio soon as the album is being released by a talented artist. I can't find a youtube link because its so new but I happen to see it on another site for now.

Ernie Nemeth
14th May 2012, 14:59
Excellent thread!
Many of societies problems stem from how we treat the marginalized of whatever description.

Thanks all. Have learned a lot.
Great rap songs too.

I hear a certain sentiment, though, that seems rampant in our society. We bewail those in authority for not dealing with the problem in the correct or proper manner.
If we are sovereign, if we truly believe in freedom, not liberty but freedom, then we must deal with this problem ourselves. I took on my little part in my little neck of the woods (hoods). I stood up for peace and non-violence and a drug-free environment. I even rehabilitated one soul, who is now my mate (and believe me it wasn't pretty, or fun). I preached at the local pub. Had a bit of a rep. And eventually I could walk in any area, at any time of the day or nite without fear. Yes, I took my knocks - I was even accosted in front of my apartment door once. But the elders heard about it and the young hood was set straight.
I'm not tooting my own horn. I merely want to point out what one person can do. Not everyone can do it but there are those who could step up - you know who you are. I find alchohol plays a big role in the daily problems in the projects (and the boardroom and everywhere else - forget about so-called "gateway" drugs). First one goes out and gets drunk, then they get stupid...

aceninja
14th May 2012, 14:59
Unfortunately, people still buy into gangster rap but it is a minority of people now. I think the new agenda is mind numbing happy pop music while the world crashes and burns around us. I think the tone is now "forget about your problems, ignore what's in your face". However there are unintended consequences which causes me to believe these people aren't as all-knowing as they want us to believe. Here it is: A large prison population that already distrusts their government (or that didn't already does now), becomes more educated about how screwed up the world is when he/she has years and years to just sit and think. IF anything you should keep people busy. This would work if the number of people in jail were small, but because our population is SO LARGE now, people are starting to care about ex-cons finding jobs, and actually looking into what they actually did to get jailed. Most people in jail aren't even murderers, but they are victims of the illegal drug trade. Pushers think they are predators, but in the end they are prey as well because just as those one hit wonder rapper come and go, new pushers are introduced to keep the archetypes filled. It's almost like looking at a college campus after graduation - you see new faces fill the same archetypal roles and the process continues.

A growing prison population, increasingly draconian laws, and introducing "thought-crimes" as felonies is all a recipe for something the establishment doesn't want. The inherent greed behind the control is the weakness and downfall of this group and even if they manage to out-gun the rest of the world (unlikely) they will destroy themselves like they currently are doing. There is no honor among those people, they sell their own people out. They sell themselves out.

Like in the "zombie apocalypse" the most advanced weapons are still no match for hordes and hordes of walking targets. Now what if those targets are already armed and as intelligent as you are? You have no hope and this whole thing is a mass orgy of destruction meant to feed some vampiric entity that feeds on such energies. It kind of reminds me of when people made blood sacrifices to gods. What if that blood is substituted for the energy it represents? While we talk about negatively charged wedge issues in the media and everything else, we are voluntarily feeding that entity and making it stronger as we make ourselves weaker.

MMA_Fan
14th May 2012, 15:19
Spoons don't make you obese, and music does not make you commit crimes.

To blame a genre of music is a misdirect. There was sociological problems before the first record player was ever created and it's in correlation with poverty.
If you want to see why prison figures have gone up in America you would be best off looking into cannabis legislation.

Asyloth
14th May 2012, 15:26
Here's a doc I've posted as a thread on Avalon already:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-iDq0Tdja4A

"The music industry exposed".

Peace of Mind
14th May 2012, 15:41
A few years ago, on separate occasions I was told (Face to face) by 2 big time entertainment attorneys (Liebowitz and Badell) that Rapp music and Rock is no longer about building… but destroying. They said this with a straight face and figure telling me wasn’t going to bring them any problems....wow, what arrogance.

This industry is run by the wicket, the selfish and the sellouts. I vowed that one day I will use its powers against itself…that day is soon approaching.

Peace

divine_moments_of_truth
14th May 2012, 17:46
I'm not buying this. Something in the narrative

There's been many stories even movies that deal with big labe music producers taking advantage of their artists (especially African-American artists). I don't doubt this story for a second.

TargeT
14th May 2012, 19:24
I'm not buying this. Something in the narrative

There's been many stories even movies that deal with big labe music producers taking advantage of their artists (especially African-American artists). I don't doubt this story for a second.

I'd need to see a bit of corroborating evidence.. I could see this being true but won't "buy it" just by this one "story".

it would make sense, but it seems a bit too neat.

Maia Gabrial
15th May 2012, 18:35
I just don't understand stupid greed and what people are willing to do for it. This story is very believeable. I thank this anonymous guy for daring to speak it... I plan to spread it around through my sources....

When I finished reading this, I got an instaneous vision that I wanted to share with everyone. Remember all those religious arts depicting Hell with naked people in torment? I saw something like that in this vision, but the naked people were the ones who knowingly committed atrocities against their fellow humanity in the name of money, power and lust. It was hard NOT seeing their agony....
I'm not a religious person, but this got my attention....

If anyone could help me remember the name of this particular company that's into everything imaginable, privately owned prisons are one of them. It's spooky that no one has been keeping track of this company either.
So, I'm thinking that the fithy rich are not satisfied with all their money and so they need to build more and more prisons for more inmates. Hence, NDAA and all the unConstitutional laws.... It seems like there's a law for every situation that would ensure a prison term for anyone....at least, that's THEIR plan. I hope all these greedy bast*rds are among the mass arrests...

Maia Gabrial
16th May 2012, 16:02
I think the company's name was Serco.... There's a youtube video on it...

Whiskey_Mystic
16th May 2012, 16:29
Not 100% sure how I feel about this one, thanks for posting.

I've been aware of private prisons for some time now, and can also see how profit drives people to do things like this. I can't recall which movie it was in now - but remember the judge in the US caught taking backhand payments for sending kids to prison for minor offences?

This was a story on either 60 minutes or 20/20. I can't remember if it was Nevada or Utah, but a judge was caught giving long imprisonment to teenagers for minor infractions because he was on the take. I remember it shook me up. The parents would cooperate with the court at first, believing a slight brush with the law would help put their kid on the right track. Then their child would be taken from them for years for trivial infractions.

Sophocles
3rd November 2014, 15:58
Wise Intelligent of Poor Righteous Teachers talks about the deliberate effort to silence positive Hip Hop and the subsequent effect on the Black Community

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Here is some of what he said:

«Hip Hop changing from positive to negative was not a consequence of history, it was not a circumstance of history, it was nothing that just happened on its own. It had nothing to do with the changing of the times, it had everything to do with the fact that there are people in this particular society who wants to see us exactly where we are. And we can not let that point allude us. These are the facts, how do we know?

1967, Kerner Commission report on urban disorder. When black people said «Yo! We are tired of this system. This system is oppressing us.» So we rebelled against the system, we burned things. We had enough. He did his little report on what caused these riots. What caused these riots? He said it was young children who started these riots and what was motivating them was a high self esteem and an enhanced racial pride. He said the majority of the rioters were high school drop outs, but they had a higher political orientation than their peers who did not drop out. And they saw the system as their enemy so they attacked it in the right circumstance.

Fast forward to 1992. Same thing. Number 1 record on the radio was «Fight the Power» (by Public Enemy), Rodney King gets beaten before the world. The black youth rebelled against the system. Again. And what primed them? Positive hip hop. Fight the Power, X Clan, Brand Nubian. You had these groups out here who were politically orienting black kids in the right direction. Giving them the proper promptes they needed so that they can respond properly to oppression.

In 1967 he saw that the self esteem was fueling this, so to not make that happen again he flooded the airways with black exploitation movies; ****** Charlie and the Return of ****** Charlie. These were movies, hip hop did not start calling people niggers. We had Shaft etc. But these black exploitation movies brought down the self esteem and the racial pride so that the kids will not rebel against the system of oppression. Then came 1992. We used our money to see Farrakhan speak as opposed to go into a strip club.

I believe it was J T the Bigga Figga who said that the label executives came to him and said «Yo, brother, we need you to talk about guns and whores.» That happens. I have been in those meetings. The artist Young Buck has a song on his album that talks about police terrorism. The label said absolutely not, you can not put that record on the album because it might create an atmosphere that might put police officers lives in danger. So they took the record off but they let him keep the other 14 songs on the album that talked about killing black youth.

So this is what we are dealing with, not a circumstance or consequence of history. The environment that we are embedded in puts us in a situation where we feel we have to manouver and play the game and water our message down. But they intentionally shifted the paradigm to get us exactly where we are right now. Right now we are feeding the prison industrial complex. Our kids are going to prison because they are promoting these records daily. Its cool to go to jail now, they glorifying these things.»

And here is Paris talking about how the Hoover administration sabotaged the Black Panther Party (whos purpose was to instil self esteem and respect into the black community):

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