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Gridkeeper
20th August 2010, 14:19
Here are a couple of new moon films which I'd like to share with you all. Filmed through a telescope from earth.

Close Moon 2010 Filmed from Earth

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Close Moon Clavius 2010

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Helvetic
20th August 2010, 14:55
Excellent Gridkeeper, thanks for sharing! Keep up the good work.

Best,
Helvetic

saint_chris
20th August 2010, 15:20
can you tell me wot telescope there were taken from

Carmody
20th August 2010, 15:32
That's John Walson (sp?), who has posted many a video of 'near earth orbital objects' that seem to be of immense size. I believe his scope is not over 12". (Newtonian(?), and fork mounted, motorized, obviously)

This means that one can buy a 36" scope and a tracking system (about $5k over the base price, it has to be adapted) and gain considerably greater clarity. by a factor of about 10x. which is huge. however, atmospheric limits and control (vibration and fine control of motion) of the scope become the limits, not the optical resolution of the scope itself.

Also, for moon shots and high clarity, ie no specular fringing, an uncoated mirror is used for moon shots, as the light gathering is high enough. The moon is generally bathed in light in the given areas that one might be attempting to look at...so the zero coating mirror blank with perfect polishing is the way to go. Double the resolution, is the case, with no coatings.

John is using coated systems and his set up is not premium, but he is attempting the right things, with respect to disclosure and exploration, whereas others are just out looking at distant nebulae and such.

http://www.telescope.com/control/category/~category_id=tbdt

Daft Ada
20th August 2010, 21:11
Excellent vids thanks for sharing that, it's frustrating though as it's just enough out of focus and range to be able to see ET changing the wheel on his moon buggy :-)

Gridkeeper
20th August 2010, 21:29
can you tell me wot telescope there were taken from

HI, they were taken through a 12 inch Meade telescope.