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DevilPigeon
22nd September 2012, 10:27
I'm not posting this looking for technical answers necessarily, more as an observation really...

I've had my current wireless router for approx 2 years, it's a high-speed model with 3 aerials at the back. Since I've had it, it's performed admirably, certainly paid for itself in performance terms. What I'm trying to say is that I'm happy with it :) .

It's situated by some other equipment (Virgin STB, cable modem, PS3, NAS drive), and since I've had it all 3 aerials have been set as perpendicular to the ground from all viewpoints (ie straight up). [They are all able to be angled quite flexibly in most directions]

My broadband package is "up to 50Mb/s", and I consistently get ~30-40Mb/s. I'm happy with this.

All of a sudden, since yesterday and without any changes to location etc, I'm getting very low download speeds (~100kb/s!!!), as well as mediocre local network speeds (ie the router setting page). I've narrowed it down to the wireless on the router, as Netflix still works fine on my hard-wired PS3. To confirm this, moving all 3 aerials to 45 degrees in 2 planes (looking straight on at the router, and from the side) gets me back to my expected download speeds.

I just find it odd that this should happen all of a sudden, and I'm thinking towards maybe (possible?) changes to the earth's magnetic field, or something external at least, have caused this...???

Sabrina
22nd September 2012, 10:37
I'm getting similar with what is supposedly a good router, fast broadband and good PCs - better get our telepathy up to speed ....

Major solar flares as well.

Mind you, some say we got off planet help with the creation of internet in the first place? They can fix it :)...

pugwash84
22nd September 2012, 10:38
maybe someone hacked into your router and is using the wireless, like the neighbours or something.

DevilPigeon
22nd September 2012, 10:59
maybe someone hacked into your router and is using the wireless, like the neighbours or something.

I've set it up with PSK2 security, and there are no devices that I don't know about on the DHCP client list...

It's a purely physical issue with the aerials, which when I swivel them to a different position cure the issue.

§=[Post Update]=§


I'm getting similar with what is supposedly a good router, fast broadband and good PCs - better get our telepathy up to speed ....

Major solar flares as well.

Mind you, some say we got off planet help with the creation of internet in the first place? They can fix it :)...

Yes, good point, solar flares I hadn't thought about...

It seems to be some subtle change in the surrounding environment that has affected the signal...

GK76
22nd September 2012, 11:29
Try switching your wireless channel - there's a lot of wireless routers out there and only a handful of channels which will lead to major interference if you are in a built-up area. If the router is set to automatically assign a channel, change it to a static channel ASAP. This may take a few attempts as you can't possibly take into account all other neighbours' channels and their 'up' times.

DevilPigeon
22nd September 2012, 11:42
Try switching your wireless channel - there's a lot of wireless routers out there and only a handful of channels which will lead to major interference if you are in a built-up area. If the router is set to automatically assign a channel, change it to a static channel ASAP. This may take a few attempts as you can't possibly take into account all other neighbours' channels and their 'up' times.

That was what I wanted to try first, but there are millions of pages (well, a lot!) of settings in the router, and I couldn't find where this would be... Considering at the time each page was taking ~30 seconds to load, I quickly got bored of that idea :p

Moving the aerials has worked anyway, I might try finding that setting at some point.

Edit: Found the setting (eventually ;))

Nick Matkin
22nd September 2012, 11:49
@DevilPigeon - You seem to have logically investigated and concluded that it's probably the wireless router. As others have said, maybe a neighbour is either using your broadband connection if you have not secured it properly. Nevertheless, this is unlikely to reduce your seed all the time, and probably wouldn't be noticeable anyway.

Perhaps a neighbour has one on same "channel", though not sure how much that will effect your (or their) speed. I guess you have tried the trick of unplugging and switching off PC/modem/router for a minute? Sometimes things get locked up for no apparent reason. If no other obvious changes have occurred in/around your house, it could just be faulty. Any recent lightning the area? That's a killer for modems connected to overhead phone lines.

As an RF engineer, I know solar flares get blamed for all sorts of nonsense. Unless you communicate on HF radio (radio hams, short-wave listeners, military, etc.) you won't notice 99 percent of flares. Very occasional they knock out the odd satellite, but not usually anything more than that - until we get The Big One! (Due any day now - and has been for years - if you believe stuff on the web!) And anyway, a solar flare big enough to affect wi-fi modems (amongst other stuff) or a significant change in the earth's magnetic field would be noticed by everyone with a computer/internet/mains electricity/telephone...

DevilPigeon
22nd September 2012, 12:02
@DevilPigeon - You seem to have logically investigated and concluded that it's probably the wireless router. As others have said, maybe a neighbour is either using your broadband connection if you have not secured it properly. Nevertheless, this is unlikely to reduce your seed all the time, and probably wouldn't be noticeable anyway.

Perhaps a neighbour has one on same "channel", though not sure how much that will effect your (or their) speed. I guess you have tried the trick of unplugging and switching off PC/modem/router for a minute? Sometimes things get locked up for no apparent reason. If no other obvious changes have occurred in/around your house, it could just be faulty. Any recent lightning the area? That's a killer for modems connected to overhead phone lines.

As an RF engineer, I know solar flares get blamed for all sorts of nonsense. Unless you communicate on HF radio (radio hams, short-wave listeners, military, etc.) you won't notice 99 percent of flares. Very occasional they knock out the odd satellite, but not usually anything more than that - until we get The Big One! (Due any day now - and has been for years - if you believe stuff on the web!) And anyway, a solar flare big enough to affect wi-fi modems (amongst other stuff) or a significant change in the earth's magnetic field would be noticed by everyone with a computer/internet/mains electricity/telephone...

I've done a bit of tweaking, and I'm now getting closer to 50Mb/s which is nice...! :thumb: All I did was change the 'channel width' setting from '20MHz' to 'Auto 20/40MHz'. I can't pretend I know what that means, but seeing that the 'Auto' setting wasn't selected generally means that it's not an optimised setting...

I also noticed that (upon rebooting) it has set itself to channel 2 (it's set to automatically use the 'best' channel) from its' previous setting of channel 11. I might just well manually leave it at channel 2.

Cjay
22nd September 2012, 13:44
The keyboard on my laptop died. The repair technician didn't say much as he spread hundreds of parts all over the table. After re-assembling the laptop, everything worked except the wifi. I thought, "oh no, he's going to have to dismantle it again." He said, "reset the modem." I said "but everything else that uses the wifi is working perfectly." He smiled and repeated, "reset the modem." It didn't make sense to me at the time but I did as he suggested. Problem solved.

The One
22nd September 2012, 15:09
last night my sky wireless router went a bit mad.Could this have had something to do with meteor shower.

Could be co-incidental mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

Selene
22nd September 2012, 16:41
Thereís an absolutely wonderful FREE program you can download called ĎinSSIDerí that will show you Ė in a simple graphic Ė all the other wireless systems within range of yours, their IDís, what channel(s) they are using, and their relative strength compared to your own system.

Get inSSider here: http://www.metageek.net/products/inssider/

I was completely shocked to discover there are now 36 competing wireless routers within range of my own, compared to only about five a year ago. I didnít know I even had 36 people living that close to me!

Give it a go. It might explain a lot. At minimum, it will allow you to choose a channel that relatively few others near you are using. A simple shift to get your bandwidth slightly off-center the rest will help, if nothing else can be done.

I suspect that bandwidths, in general, are simply becoming massively overloaded now, and some field effects are setting in. But Iím no techie Ė thatís as much as I know - or can guess.

Hope this helps.

Cheers,

Selene

Doctor
22nd September 2012, 17:00
Everything we use, everything, is designed to fail eventually. This is to get the consumer to keep buying the product or product from that company. They want your money, man.

Poly Hedra
22nd September 2012, 17:09
I could also be that the router might need a firmware update. After about 2 years the router might to be updated. That's what we were told when our router started getting really slow.

Mike Gorman
22nd September 2012, 18:21
Personally i do not hold with wireless routers, it is just too subject to interference-I go for wired Ethernet cable links every time-solid as a rock

Tangri
22nd September 2012, 18:53
I'm not posting this looking for technical answers necessarily, more as an observation really...

I've had my current wireless router for approx 2 years, it's a high-speed model with 3 aerials at the back. Since I've had it, it's performed admirably, certainly paid for itself in performance terms. What I'm trying to say is that I'm happy with it :) .

It's situated by some other equipment (Virgin STB, cable modem, PS3, NAS drive), and since I've had it all 3 aerials have been set as perpendicular to the ground from all viewpoints (ie straight up). [They are all able to be angled quite flexibly in most directions]

My broadband package is "up to 50Mb/s", and I consistently get ~30-40Mb/s. I'm happy with this.

All of a sudden, since yesterday and without any changes to location etc, I'm getting very low download speeds (~100kb/s!!!), as well as mediocre local network speeds (ie the router setting page). I've narrowed it down to the wireless on the router, as Netflix still works fine on my hard-wired PS3. To confirm this, moving all 3 aerials to 45 degrees in 2 planes (looking straight on at the router, and from the side) gets me back to my expected download speeds.

I just find it odd that this should happen all of a sudden, and I'm thinking towards maybe (possible?) changes to the earth's magnetic field, or something external at least, have caused this...???

Check your automatic updates . Some programs can use upload from your computer before offering an update. Also check your recent usage history.

Paul
22nd September 2012, 19:38
Give it a go. It might explain a lot. At minimum, it will allow you to choose a channel that relatively few others near you are using. A simple shift to get your bandwidth slightly off-center the rest will help, if nothing else can be done.

I suspect that bandwidths, in general, are simply becoming massively overloaded now, and some field effects are setting in. But Iím no techie Ė thatís as much as I know - or can guess.
I'd agree - one of two things likely going on here - either a neighbor has added a device that is overloading one of the WiFi channels, or else your wireless router is getting weak.

Try changing channels, as you mentioned you started doing, either blindly (there are only a handful to try) or using the sort of program Selene suggests to see which channels have the least competition.

If none of the channels work as well as they had in the past, your router could have gotten "weaker". WiFi, cable modems and Ethernet ports, all of which have to convert analog signals (whether over a wire or through the air) to digital signals are some of the components I find have to be replaced most often, sometimes every few years. They just start to go bad. Usually it's not a total and sudden failure, but rather an increase in errors which shows up as a reduced bandwidth and needing to be reset more often.

DevilPigeon
22nd September 2012, 19:59
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Thanks for the replies guys, I'm happy with it now. Just seemed odd that a couple of days ago it was fine, and yesterday it wasn't. As Paul and Selene say, it was probably a contention issue with the channel, probably combined with a less-than-optimal aerial alignment in the first place. That inSSIDer software looks useful too.

ps there are no further firmware updates for my model anyway