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SilentFeathers
8th October 2012, 16:14
Wow, they could really use this technology to deceive and or scare the hell out of people!


A palm-sized Japanese satellite in orbit around Earth will flash a Morse code message that will be visible around the world from next month, the mission commander said.

Researchers hope the satellite, measuring 10 centimetres cubed and launched from the International Space Station on Friday, will become the first orbiter to transmit an LED message across the night sky.

"There is no practical aim to this, but it is a fun experiment that everybody can join,"

Observers, ideally with binoculars, will be able to see flashes of light - green in the northern hemisphere, where people will see the "front" of the satellite, and red in the southern hemisphere, where the "back" will be visible.

Morse code uses a series of dots and dashes to represent letters of the alphabet and is commonly understood across the world as a way of transmitting pieces of text.

http://www.smh.com.au/technology/sci-tech/minisatellite-to-flash-code-from-space-20121008-278dy.html#ixzz28insvIQd

http://images.smh.com.au/2012/10/08/3696756/art-morse-620x349.jpg

Sidney
8th October 2012, 16:21
Now every time someone reports a UFO they can say "oh its the morse code satellite". LOL

Ilie Pandia
8th October 2012, 16:23
Ah... the Morse code image in the article is misleading :)

One would actually see flashes of lights and not lines and dots projected in the sky. That would require (in my estimation) much more power than the small satellite can deliver.

I cannot see a LED flashing a mile away... let alone in orbit... but perhaps they have many LEDs and they are the "super bright type" so who knows... something may actually be visible... though I am skeptic :biggrin:

I am thinking of the flickering light that you can barely see from the air planes and I understand that's quite a powerful light!! So how much of a show could this small satellite put on?

I doubt would scare anyone...

SilentFeathers
8th October 2012, 16:26
Ah... the Morse code image in the article is misleading :)

One would actually see flashes of lights and not lines and dots projected in the sky. That would require (in my estimation) much more power than the small satellite can deliver.

I cannot see a LED flashing a mile away... let alone in orbit... but perhaps they have may LEDs and they the "super bright ones" so who know something may actually be visible... though I am skeptic :biggrin:

I am thinking of the flickering light that you can barely see from the air planes and I understand that's quite a powerful light!! So how much of a show could this small satellite put on?

I doubt would scare anyone...

If they use this thing to project images of a UFO/Alien invasion I bet there would be a couple of terrified people! LOL!

ADDED: There is probably a lot more to this story than they are saying in the article; I also doubt if this is all being done from 1 satellite the size of a cell phone......they think people will believe anything, sadly they are right.

"This is only a test" IMO and involves more than a scientist from Japan...

Paul
8th October 2012, 16:34
I cannot see a LED flashing a mile away...
You could see my flashlight from a mile away:

http://s4ecfca5724160.img.gostorego.com/802754/cdn/media/s4/ec/fc/a5/72/41/60/1.jpg

It's a single LED, a good LED, in a good reflector.

Granted, an LED light would be hard to see from 242 miles away (its orbit), unless it has quite a bit more fire power. The article does recommend using binoculars.

And agreed ... only with time lapse techniques or very long open shutter times would one see such a dot-dash pattern spread across the sky. However short of using something such as an animated gif, it would be difficult to convey this otherwise on a web page.

Ilie Pandia
8th October 2012, 16:41
Now that you mention time lapse, the people in the photo are blurry, so it may be long exposure shot.

Your flash light I could see from orbit? That satellite must be more than 98% some energy storage device then :biggrin:

Tony
8th October 2012, 16:41
..-. ..- -. -. -.-- - . .. -. . ..

Funny thing is........they have stopped teaching morse code!

OBwan
8th October 2012, 16:53
The below video has numbers in the sky. I could not decode the message.


BQWKhZ4WkU0

SilentFeathers
8th October 2012, 16:55
The photo I posted in the OP I'm sure is some photo-shopped creation for an example of what the image may look like next month...(possibly)

Paul
8th October 2012, 17:04
Your flash light I could see from orbit? That satellite must be more than 98% some energy storage device then :biggrin:

I doubt you could see my flashlight from orbit, without a good telescope :biggrin:

Airplane flashing lights are omnidirectional, so require more power for the same brightness at any point.

This satellite apparently will only turn on over select locations (Japan and some cities) and will only last a few days. It no doubt only shines toward earth.

(I'm thinking Ilie is seeing Free Energy devices where they might not be :biggrin:)

Referee
8th October 2012, 18:14
The below video has numbers in the sky. I could not decode the message.


BQWKhZ4WkU0

Digital Skywriters I believe it is PI.

SilentFeathers
9th October 2012, 00:03
..-. ..- -. -. -.-- - . .. -. . ..

Funny thing is........they have stopped teaching morse code!

Hmmmmm???? Perhaps not,


Rover Leaves Tracks in Morse Code

NASA's Curiosity rover took its first test stroll Wednesday Aug. 22, 2012, and beamed back pictures of its accomplishment in the form of track marks in the Martian soil. Careful inspection of the tracks reveals a unique, repeating pattern, which the rover can use as a visual reference to drive more accurately in barren terrain. The pattern is Morse code for JPL, the abbreviation for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., where the rover was designed and built, and the mission is managed.
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/news/msl20120829f.html

http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/682453main_MainMorseCode_pia16093-673.jpg

eni-al
9th October 2012, 00:10
That's some pretty powerful LED's for such a small device. Will have to keep a watch for it when it comes up and hopefully no bad weather.

Maia Gabrial
9th October 2012, 17:39
That was an amazing video, OBwan. I wonder what their message was....?