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carpediem
17th October 2012, 09:40
Hello,
About 2 weeks ago something unusual happen to us. So we had a black cat really furry , always perring a really nice cat. But in may this year we found our cat dying looking all tired so we took him to the vetenary office, they couldn't do anything so the cat die we berried him near the house in the woods.
ok so now two weeks ago the exact same cat showed up in front of the house, its exactly the same in the he looks the way he plays , in every way.
So we let him in the house and now he is still here and we asked around if someone had a cat missing but no.
We don't really know what to think about it, its strange. so if anyone have an idea we will be happy to hear about it.
And also I mediated a few times just few meters away from the place the cat was burried, I asked for sign , i don't knowwhat to thonk about this .
thank you for taking time to read . ;) peace

ulli
17th October 2012, 09:52
We live in an area in Central America where there are hardly any cats.
People here simply have not yet reached that level, like in the older cultures of Europe and Asia.
So how come a kitten showed up by my door just three months after my 17 year old cat passed away?
Not the same markings, not even the same temperament as the old cat, but it does respond when I call the old cat's name, and it also found the same place to sleep.
I think you are very lucky to have received an exact replica of your old cat. That is such a blessing.

markpierre
17th October 2012, 10:27
We don't really know what to think about it, its strange. so if anyone have an idea we will be happy to hear about it.
And also I mediated a few times just few meters away from the place the cat was burried, I asked for sign , i don't knowwhat to thonk about this .
thank you for taking time to read . ;) peace

What is it that you most enjoy thinking about it, that has you worried that it might not be true?

It's not the same cat if that was a possibility. But it is a sign. You didn't ask for the same cat back, and so you couldn't have it.

Hey, I'm kidding.
But people don't get it that there's phenomena occurring all around them all the time. They don't know how to see it. That story you have is a good one.
Tell it to a lot of people. Even if they dismiss it as nothing, they'll still be thinking and wondering about it.

The Universe does a lot of crazy things to get our attention, swapping cats around is probably an easy one. I think the universe would like it
if we all trusted it a bit more. Asked it more questions. Made more requests. Got more friendly with it.

And by the way; your other cat didn't really leave you either.

avid
17th October 2012, 10:53
I'm not surprised. We had our very poorly old cat put to sleep - the vet came to our house, then took him away. We were absolutely distraught. Two hours later 'our' cat was meowing outside the cat flap, it was a healthy identical clone of our old cat. As the cat had the same unusual markings - we were stunned. My partner ran for cat food. The cat answered to his 'old' name... Then he walked away, never to be seen again. Amazing! We take comfort in the fact that the doppelganger was just there to ease our pain, and to reassure us he was OK....

PHARAOH
17th October 2012, 11:54
Remember, cats have 9 lives. :cool:

Finefeather
17th October 2012, 12:22
Cats have powerful group soul qualities, like most animals, which keeps them in touch of their other 'selves'.
When the call goes out they respond, especially if your are a cat lover.
My one sister seems to collect cats like stamps and they just seem to appear out of nowhere :)
Consider yourself 'taken' by the cat world :)
Love to all
Ray

Kiforall
17th October 2012, 12:47
Remember, cats have 9 lives. :cool:

Nine lives or nine spirits??

Earth Angel
17th October 2012, 13:57
our 17 year old cat died almost 2 years ago and we often feel him jump onto our bed at night and people visiting often think they saw Pumpkin out of the corner of their eye.....he is still with us

spiritwind
17th October 2012, 14:12
That was a great story. Thank you for sharing it. My daughter had a black kitten named Octavious who she absolutely adored. He was from a batch of feral kittens whose mother had died and they were rescued and given to a local veterinarian. My daughter was friends with the vet’s daughter so ended up with one of them. He was very instinctual and adventurous. He got out the door one day and didn’t return. We started searching the whole neighborhood calling him but to no avail. Then my daughter had a dream about him where he was trying to come home and got all excited the next day. He must have got hit by a car that morning near our house (probably trying to come home) and she found him on the side of the road. She thought it was another cat that just looked similar at first and then went back again and identified him as her beloved kitty. She was heartbroken. Never had she cared so much. About a week later she got another black kitten, this time a girl with 6 toes on each front paw. She is not as rambunctious but looks almost identical and does have some of the same personality characteristics but also some of her own unique traits. Her name is Karmine but I call her meanie Karminee.

https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash4/405579_2586011412847_1988538043_n.jpg
Octavious

Simba, my orange striped 9 year old cat definitely has defied death on numerous occasions. My son had a female cat that had kittens during the time I was taking care of her. He had just moved and wanted me to keep her for a few weeks till he got settled in. I kept her out in a little RV because my 2 other cats were not happy. I left the door open one day because of the extreme summer heat and a big orange striped feral cat (probably the father) had come and tried to kill/take them so the mother had hidden them. I went in to check on them later in the day and couldn’t find them. There were a bunch of boxes stacked up in the bathroom so I started moving them all in my attempt to locate the kittens. I found a couple of them but they were barely alive and did not survive. Another day went by (and these were so small their eyes were barely starting to open) and I just couldn’t get it out of my mind so I went back again and moved even more boxes thinking there was no way there was anything there but kept getting this feeling I needed to look. Low and behold there he was, so small and just hanging on by a thread. He had a severe eye infection that was so bad he couldn’t open his eyes and just laid there kind of limp in my hands. I knew if I tried to save him it would take a big effort on my part and that I probably wouldn’t be successful. I decided to go ahead and got him some kitten formula, an eye dropper, and some medicine for his eye. It was touch and go for several weeks with me taking care of him like he was a human infant almost. I don’t think I will ever be the same. It was so humbling to know that at any minute he might be a gonner and several times I didn’t think he would make it. Even my husband has a special place in his heart for this cat unlike anything he has ever experienced before. He has had several more near death experiences since then, being poisoned once, almost losing his eye a few years ago and then getting attacked by a feral cat that nearly killed him, also a few years ago. He has even sailed down the California coast with us in our sailboat (Simba the Sailor!) although I can’t say he enjoyed it that much.

I think there is a little more going on there with our little furry friends than we know. I know I have learned so much from them and my life is definitely richer from the experience. Hope you don’t mind me sharing.

Arrowwind
17th October 2012, 14:15
Cats are ally animals. Dogs are too but cats have a different vibrational quality that makes them better links to the spirit world. this is why traditionally witches are seen with cats or have cats. Cats are also great meditators, protecting on the inner levels where dogs generally work more on the outer more physical levels... hence you have the guard dog and the meditating cat...

this is not to discredit dogs, for they do quite a bit too... but a dog can be taken over, cats cant generally. Dogs can be possessed.

If you are attracting cats it is becasue they will be of use to you. They are coming to serve you. If one cat departs and another one comes it is a sign that you would do well to keep them and treat them well. If a cat feels disconnected from its human family it will just up and leave never to be seen again, sometimes even resulting in its death, which to the cat is inconsequential for it will soon reincarnate in a better place for it to live its life and purpose.

Earth Angel
17th October 2012, 14:15
oh yes there is definitely more going on with these furry friends

G.Deluca
17th October 2012, 14:26
oh yes there is definitely more going on with these furry friends
ahahah nice pic,it's so true
we fed for 6 months 6 kittens,5 went away, only this little black cat remained,so we adopted him :) he is so sweet and calm,the opposite of our cat ,she seems more like a stray cat
anyway it might be a sign that he is still with you but i don't think it's the same cat

RMorgan
17th October 2012, 15:09
Hey mate,

Probably not the same cat, otherwise he would be a zombie cat and would bite you in the face, just like that one from the Pet Sematary movie. :)

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-qZhw6xgSHFQ/TqDWJGplbRI/AAAAAAAABVM/tFObF6nR2As/s1600/cat.png

Anyway, if I was in your shoes, I would exhume the body of your previously deceased cat, just to be sure.

Jokes apart, cats are pretty strange animals. Mine likes to stare at me when I´m meditating.

Cheers,

Raf.

Kimberley
17th October 2012, 15:30
A true story I wrote in 2002...about a Black Cat.

************

Lessons from a Cat
(A Lesson About Love)
February 2002

I never knew I could learn so much from a cat. But I did.

It was I who showed my daughters how to call the cat that watched us from the edge of the woods. Here kitty, kitty, kitty. I told them to be still and it would come to us. It did. The cat learned that we were friends and spent time in our yard and on our porch. It liked to be near us. It was I who, one spring day, saw the stray cat eating a moth on our porch. It was I who went the next day and bought some cat food, and began putting out food on our porch daily. It was I who, next winter, felt sorry for the “poor” cold cat and let it into our porch room to give it shelter. It was I who bought a liter box, litter and a litter scoop. And, it was I who really did not like cats. I have often said that the cat adopted us, because; I was not willing to accept that I had chosen to care for a cat. I really did not like cats much. But this was a “nice” cat.

Growing up, my dear mother hated cats, my sweet grandmother hated cats. My grandmother was always trying to find ways to keep them from coming into her yard. The words “the only good cat is a dead cat” have rung in my ears all these years. On the other hand, I also grew up loving animals and birds and such. I capture and release all spiders, wasps, flies, and even ants that are found in my house. I try to be careful where I walk so; I do not step on ants. I realize now how influenced I was by others. My first pet was a duck that hatched in an incubator. There were many dogs, ducks, geese, chickens, several fish, a couple of horses, a turtle or two, parrots and parakeets as pets, but never a cat.

I have often struggled with death in relationship to the food chain. Many times I have struggled with holding a squiggly worm in my hand, feeling its life one moment and the next moment feeding it to a duck. Or piercing a worm with a fish hook in hope of catching a fish, only to want to throw the fish back as soon as possible so as not to kill it. I did not like killing the worm or the fish. I still don’t. But I have come to learn that the food chain is necessary. I feel that most Americans have become very disconnected from their roll in the food chain. All we have to do is go to the grocery store and buy some chicken breasts that no longer have feathers or even resemble the once-living creature they came from. The same is true for the sirloin steak that is sliced, small and far removed from the cow that once lived with that piece as part of its whole. I learned long ago to be consciously thankful and not take for granted the life that was once flowing in all the creatures, fruits, vegetables, and grains, that I eat for enjoyment and sustenance. But I was taught that cats are bad and they kill nice birds and cute chipmunks.

Even knowing all of this, I still struggled every time the cat showed up so proudly with a bird or chipmunk or mouse. I hated the cat killing the “cute” whatever it may be. I felt proud on occasion when I would coax the cat to drop the bird and it would fly away. Several times a living but wounded chipmunk was taken from the cat and put in a box with the hope that it would miraculously recover. It never did. In time, I came to be able to walk away and leave the cat with its prey, to do with it as it would. I learned that the cat ate every morsel of birds, only leaving behind a few feathers. For mice it ate all, including the tail, but left behind a sack of innards I suspect was the digestive system. For moles only the head was spared. I could never understand why the cat caught and killed so many chipmunks, only to leave them at my door. People say that cats leave “presents” for “their people”, but why the chipmunks that I like so much? I could have dealt with their death more easily if they had been eaten. It was the needless killing that bothered me the most. But it must have meant something to the cat to leave its presents for me. I learned to accept the nature of the cat that did what it needed to do, and wanted to do, to survive.

I have known many cat lovers in my life. Some say it is best for all to only have house cats. The health of the cat is better, no dead birds, and so on. I think, if I were to ever choose to have a cat as a pet, I would keep it in. But what happens when a stray cat that has learned to survive in the wild adopts you? A cat that is an excellent hunter because it had to be in order to keep living. A cat that loves to bask in the sun and drink from the stream. If one is adopted by such a cat, does one take that freedom away? I could not. I did not. I viewed this cat as a wild cat and fed it as I do other wild creatures. I have befriended squirrels and chipmunks, and put out birdseed for the birds. All of our left over bread is put out for our crow friends. But they are other wise left to fend for themselves. I had the cat grouped in with the wild, because it came from the wild in my view. I have known of others who put out food for stray cats.

I was taught to hate cats. But I was taught to love all other living creatures. From time to time during my life I have known a “nice” cat or two. There is a difference you know. But even so, cats are aloof and come and go as they please. Cats have not allowed themselves to be at the mercy of their keepers, as dogs do. But I was taught that dogs are good and cats are bad. Why is independence considered a fault and dependence a virtue? I know that not all consider this to be true, but that is part of the message I received in being taught to hate cats.

The cat that adopted my family and me was a “nice” cat. It thrived on attention, but I often did not respond. It followed my daughters to the school bus. It was happy to go down the slide in the arms of a little girl, or sled down a hill in tandem with a child, or even alone after being placed on the sledding tube and gently or not so gently pushed. It was a nice cat. But even my daughters would yell at the top of their lungs, pleading with the cat to release a chipmunk in its mouth. I had passed on to my daughters what I had been taught, to sometimes hate cats. But I also told them that the cats’ hunting was just what cats do, especially this wild cat. I tried to justify and explain. However, they knew that I had trouble with the cat.

One day the cat came home limping with a wound on its leg. We took him to the vet, who prescribed antibiotic pills, and some de-worm pills too. Oh great, worms. But the shocker was the news that, according to the law, if a cat does not have documentation of rabies shots and has been possibly bitten, the cat must be kept in quarantine for six months!!! The other option was euthanasia. What choice did I really have? Kill the “nice” cat that was loved by my daughters and tolerated by me? No way. During the quarantine I even let the cat in the main part of the house for a while. I bought a second litter box for in the house. The cat seemed to be in heaven. He got more attention and could hang out with the girls. But I did not like the cat on my bed or couch. I thought of ticks and worms and who knows what else was lurking on or in the cat. I stopped the “in our house” venture for the cat after the quarantine was over and it was allowed to go back outside again. I did not like the cat in the house, but I did feel badly taking away his apparent happiness living inside the house. He still had his own porch room and slept there most nights all year long. He always had food and water and even a few catnip mice the girls had insisted to buy for him from time to time.

But still I talked to people trying to find a home for the cat, and one day had an offer from a friend, who knew of someone, who wanted a cat that fit the description of “our” cat. I talked to my daughters. Neither of them wanted to give the cat away. I knew that the people who were interested in the cat would keep it indoors. I did not think the cat would be happy only indoors, even though it had spent six months in our house. I told the girls that I really did not like having the cat. My daughter of 3 1/2 would not agree. So the cat remained on our property and ate on our porch and took shelter from the cold in his room. I even turned up the heat a bit on really cold nights.


For the next two and a half years I tolerated the cat. I fed it. I cleaned up after it. And made sure to find someone to give it food when we were away. The girls had named him “Panther”, because he was a totally black cat. I called him “Cat”. I started to just throw the chipmunk “presents” into the woods, instead of burying them one by one. I had learned to accept that a cat is a cat. A cat is a predator. Are humans not predators too? I learned to walk away from the cat with the still living bird in its mouth, and let the cat enjoy his catch. I am sure he was grateful to the bird and me. I never stopped struggling with the thought of what creepy crawly dirty things the cat might have on or in its body. Pregnant women are advised to not clean litter boxes. What else about cats did I not know? I really did not want to know. I was doing the best I would allow myself to do for a cat, a from the wild cat. I tripped over it many times a day. It followed me often. In time, I started to be sure to give it a pat or two. I still would rather not have had a cat. In all fairness I am not in any hurry to have a dog as a pet either.

About a month ago I noticed that the cat was getting skinny and he was drinking a lot of water. Then I noticed he was not too steady on his hind feet. I knew the cat was sick, and I knew the cat was going to die. I talked to my husband who, too, had a love-hate relationship with the cat. I told him that I did not want to take the cat to a vet and spend money for tests and such. This was a stray cat that we fed and let sleep on our porch for shelter. I wanted to just let nature take its course. This was a cat that adopted us. A cat that deserved to live in the wild as it had been doing for years. This was a cat that I had agreed to allow to be part of our lives, but there were limits. I had been taught to hate cats. Even now I would not choose to go find a cat to be a pet, at least I do not think I would. I was tolerating the cat.

For two weeks, in late January, the cat was growing weaker each day. We let him into the house to lie by the fire at the feet of the girls. I removed him from my bed several times and placed him back by the fire. It was a very cold few weeks. The time of year that death is in the air. I knew the cat was going to die. I did not want to have a suffering cat and had decided if suffering became apparent I would take it to get a “shot” at the vet. He did not appear to suffer for long. On a Tuesday morning I found him on his bed in his room, not able to get up. He was trying to move but it was not working very well. He meowed at me one last time. I checked on him a half hour later and he was breathing, I patted him and tried to see if he wanted a drink. He was not moving at all. I checked back one last time before I had to head out of the house. He made one last attempt to move and his head and front paws were hanging over the side of his cat bed. I patted him and told him that is was ok to go. I patted him and said “good bye Panther” we will miss you. I knew he would not be alive when I came back two hours later. He was not.

When I returned it was apparent that he never moved again. I saw the life was gone and I touched his body. I called my husband and told him the news. He was sad too. He asked me how I knew he would be dead when I got home. I told him I just knew. There are things that I know I know, and this was one of those times. I am struck by how strong my knowing had been about that cat. I am struck that I knew he was dying and that I was the witness to his last few hours. For the past few weeks I kept thinking about how the cat had taught me to accept his true nature in regard to life and killing. I treated him as I treated the wounded chipmunks he left over the years. I kept them safe and warm. I checked in on them periodically and let nature take its course. I treated the cat, as I want to be treated. I took no heroic measures to prolong his life, but I would have ended any suffering if it had become apparent. I miss you cat!

I moved the cats’ head and paws back onto its bed and cleaned up the room. I took the liter box, the litter scoop, and the food bowls and put them in the trash. I vacuumed up the room and took all the remaining cat food out to feed to our crow friends. The cats’ body lay in its bed waiting to be seen by my daughters. They needed to be able to say good-bye. They patted him one last time. My youngest daughter cried again and I finally cried for the first time that day. It was not the last time I cried. I did love you cat. I did the best I could.

Why did I buy into the story to dislike cats? What else do I hate? Why did I keep my distance from the cat? Why would I not allow myself to really love the cat? I am full of love. I realize now it was because I was taught to hate cats. I do not blame those that taught me to hate cats. I was so struck to learn and understand that we are all taught to hate. Hate is not the true nature of man or animals. My true nature was leaking out with the care I did allow myself to give, but I held back. I believed the story I was told, programmed to believe. People hate a lot of different things and I now see so clearly how hate is passed down through words and actions. War is about hate that is passed down and taught. People are taught to hate cats. People are taught to hate white skin, black skin, yellow skin, red skin, and Americans. I will try to never hold back my love again. I will try to never teach hate again; I did not realize until now that I was. I will try to teach only love; I thought I was. I will try to live only love. I thought I was teaching love, but I was not always acting in it. I feel that I have mostly been a good example of living in love, but I know that my daughters have learned a little about hate because of things I said about my learned dislike of the cat and its’ killing. I do give myself credit knowing that as I was learning to accept the true nature of the cat, to hunt, to kill, to survive, to love, that I shared my learning with my daughters. I am now sharing with them and with you my re-affirmed lesson to live in love, not hate, and not just tolerance. Understand that hate is not any ones true nature; but it is learned. Let yourself recognize hate and tolerance, and try to understand were it came from. But most importantly, let yourself love and don’t hold back!

Thank you cat for sharing your love with my family and me. Thank you cat for all the lessons you have taught me. I miss you Panther!


A follow up….

We adopted Tiger and Bodacious (Bow) as kittens from our local animal shelter. It turns out that the brother and sister kittens were born on the year anniversary of Panthers death. My youngest daughter still cries from time to time because she still misses Panther. We have also been helping our local animal shelter by providing foster care to cats. Our first care went to Bell, a young female cat, that needed us to have her spayed and recover from the surgery in our care. Then we took care of Maddie and Melody, two 5-week-old kittens, until they were old enough to be put up for permanent adoption. Last spring we took care of Elly, a pregnant cat, in our foster care room and watched her 6 kittens be born May 27th 2004. We kept one of her kittens, Boots. So now we have three cats in the family.

2007 update

Two years ago we brought a yellow lab into our lives, her name is Jamaica. She and the 3 cats are very good friends.
We have had 31 foster kittens and 5 adult female foster cats spend time with us up until now.

2012 update

We did cat foster care for about 6 years and probably had about 75 kittens total spend time at our home.

Kiforall
17th October 2012, 15:41
I've never really clicked with cats, there has been the odd one that I felt needed me at work (Vets) but dogs seem to require more help than cats do.
Domestication of these 'feral' spirits must affect their DNA more than is understood.
Horses seem to be the same, they seem to struggle with dealing with human emotion and are much more affected than cats.
If you kick a cat ( not saying that is what I do to cats lol ) they have the freedom to disappear and find someone else, because dogs and horses are more captive they have no escape mechanism other than using behavioural issues to deal with it.

spiritwind
17th October 2012, 16:42
A true story I wrote in 2002...about a Black Cat.

************

Lessons from a Cat
(A Lesson About Love)
February 2002

I never knew I could learn so much from a cat. But I did.

It was I who showed my daughters how to call the cat that watched us from the edge of the woods. Here kitty, kitty, kitty. I told them to be still and it would come to us. It did. The cat learned that we were friends and spent time in our yard and on our porch. It liked to be near us. It was I who, one spring day, saw the stray cat eating a moth on our porch. It was I who went the next day and bought some cat food, and began putting out food on our porch daily. It was I who, next winter, felt sorry for the “poor” cold cat and let it into our porch room to give it shelter. It was I who bought a liter box, litter and a litter scoop. And, it was I who really did not like cats. I have often said that the cat adopted us, because; I was not willing to accept that I had chosen to care for a cat. I really did not like cats much. But this was a “nice” cat.

Growing up, my dear mother hated cats, my sweet grandmother hated cats. My grandmother was always trying to find ways to keep them from coming into her yard. The words “the only good cat is a dead cat” have rung in my ears all these years. On the other hand, I also grew up loving animals and birds and such. I capture and release all spiders, wasps, flies, and even ants that are found in my house. I try to be careful where I walk so; I do not step on ants. I realize now how influenced I was by others. My first pet was a duck that hatched in an incubator. There were many dogs, ducks, geese, chickens, several fish, a couple of horses, a turtle or two, parrots and parakeets as pets, but never a cat.

I have often struggled with death in relationship to the food chain. Many times I have struggled with holding a squiggly worm in my hand, feeling its life one moment and the next moment feeding it to a duck. Or piercing a worm with a fish hook in hope of catching a fish, only to want to throw the fish back as soon as possible so as not to kill it. I did not like killing the worm or the fish. I still don’t. But I have come to learn that the food chain is necessary. I feel that most Americans have become very disconnected from their roll in the food chain. All we have to do is go to the grocery store and buy some chicken breasts that no longer have feathers or even resemble the once-living creature they came from. The same is true for the sirloin steak that is sliced, small and far removed from the cow that once lived with that piece as part of its whole. I learned long ago to be consciously thankful and not take for granted the life that was once flowing in all the creatures, fruits, vegetables, and grains, that I eat for enjoyment and sustenance. But I was taught that cats are bad and they kill nice birds and cute chipmunks.

Even knowing all of this, I still struggled every time the cat showed up so proudly with a bird or chipmunk or mouse. I hated the cat killing the “cute” whatever it may be. I felt proud on occasion when I would coax the cat to drop the bird and it would fly away. Several times a living but wounded chipmunk was taken from the cat and put in a box with the hope that it would miraculously recover. It never did. In time, I came to be able to walk away and leave the cat with its prey, to do with it as it would. I learned that the cat ate every morsel of birds, only leaving behind a few feathers. For mice it ate all, including the tail, but left behind a sack of innards I suspect was the digestive system. For moles only the head was spared. I could never understand why the cat caught and killed so many chipmunks, only to leave them at my door. People say that cats leave “presents” for “their people”, but why the chipmunks that I like so much? I could have dealt with their death more easily if they had been eaten. It was the needless killing that bothered me the most. But it must have meant something to the cat to leave its presents for me. I learned to accept the nature of the cat that did what it needed to do, and wanted to do, to survive.

I have known many cat lovers in my life. Some say it is best for all to only have house cats. The health of the cat is better, no dead birds, and so on. I think, if I were to ever choose to have a cat as a pet, I would keep it in. But what happens when a stray cat that has learned to survive in the wild adopts you? A cat that is an excellent hunter because it had to be in order to keep living. A cat that loves to bask in the sun and drink from the stream. If one is adopted by such a cat, does one take that freedom away? I could not. I did not. I viewed this cat as a wild cat and fed it as I do other wild creatures. I have befriended squirrels and chipmunks, and put out birdseed for the birds. All of our left over bread is put out for our crow friends. But they are other wise left to fend for themselves. I had the cat grouped in with the wild, because it came from the wild in my view. I have known of others who put out food for stray cats.

I was taught to hate cats. But I was taught to love all other living creatures. From time to time during my life I have known a “nice” cat or two. There is a difference you know. But even so, cats are aloof and come and go as they please. Cats have not allowed themselves to be at the mercy of their keepers, as dogs do. But I was taught that dogs are good and cats are bad. Why is independence considered a fault and dependence a virtue? I know that not all consider this to be true, but that is part of the message I received in being taught to hate cats.

The cat that adopted my family and me was a “nice” cat. It thrived on attention, but I often did not respond. It followed my daughters to the school bus. It was happy to go down the slide in the arms of a little girl, or sled down a hill in tandem with a child, or even alone after being placed on the sledding tube and gently or not so gently pushed. It was a nice cat. But even my daughters would yell at the top of their lungs, pleading with the cat to release a chipmunk in its mouth. I had passed on to my daughters what I had been taught, to sometimes hate cats. But I also told them that the cats’ hunting was just what cats do, especially this wild cat. I tried to justify and explain. However, they knew that I had trouble with the cat.

One day the cat came home limping with a wound on its leg. We took him to the vet, who prescribed antibiotic pills, and some de-worm pills too. Oh great, worms. But the shocker was the news that, according to the law, if a cat does not have documentation of rabies shots and has been possibly bitten, the cat must be kept in quarantine for six months!!! The other option was euthanasia. What choice did I really have? Kill the “nice” cat that was loved by my daughters and tolerated by me? No way. During the quarantine I even let the cat in the main part of the house for a while. I bought a second litter box for in the house. The cat seemed to be in heaven. He got more attention and could hang out with the girls. But I did not like the cat on my bed or couch. I thought of ticks and worms and who knows what else was lurking on or in the cat. I stopped the “in our house” venture for the cat after the quarantine was over and it was allowed to go back outside again. I did not like the cat in the house, but I did feel badly taking away his apparent happiness living inside the house. He still had his own porch room and slept there most nights all year long. He always had food and water and even a few catnip mice the girls had insisted to buy for him from time to time.

But still I talked to people trying to find a home for the cat, and one day had an offer from a friend, who knew of someone, who wanted a cat that fit the description of “our” cat. I talked to my daughters. Neither of them wanted to give the cat away. I knew that the people who were interested in the cat would keep it indoors. I did not think the cat would be happy only indoors, even though it had spent six months in our house. I told the girls that I really did not like having the cat. My daughter of 3 1/2 would not agree. So the cat remained on our property and ate on our porch and took shelter from the cold in his room. I even turned up the heat a bit on really cold nights.


For the next two and a half years I tolerated the cat. I fed it. I cleaned up after it. And made sure to find someone to give it food when we were away. The girls had named him “Panther”, because he was a totally black cat. I called him “Cat”. I started to just throw the chipmunk “presents” into the woods, instead of burying them one by one. I had learned to accept that a cat is a cat. A cat is a predator. Are humans not predators too? I learned to walk away from the cat with the still living bird in its mouth, and let the cat enjoy his catch. I am sure he was grateful to the bird and me. I never stopped struggling with the thought of what creepy crawly dirty things the cat might have on or in its body. Pregnant women are advised to not clean litter boxes. What else about cats did I not know? I really did not want to know. I was doing the best I would allow myself to do for a cat, a from the wild cat. I tripped over it many times a day. It followed me often. In time, I started to be sure to give it a pat or two. I still would rather not have had a cat. In all fairness I am not in any hurry to have a dog as a pet either.

About a month ago I noticed that the cat was getting skinny and he was drinking a lot of water. Then I noticed he was not too steady on his hind feet. I knew the cat was sick, and I knew the cat was going to die. I talked to my husband who, too, had a love-hate relationship with the cat. I told him that I did not want to take the cat to a vet and spend money for tests and such. This was a stray cat that we fed and let sleep on our porch for shelter. I wanted to just let nature take its course. This was a cat that adopted us. A cat that deserved to live in the wild as it had been doing for years. This was a cat that I had agreed to allow to be part of our lives, but there were limits. I had been taught to hate cats. Even now I would not choose to go find a cat to be a pet, at least I do not think I would. I was tolerating the cat.

For two weeks, in late January, the cat was growing weaker each day. We let him into the house to lie by the fire at the feet of the girls. I removed him from my bed several times and placed him back by the fire. It was a very cold few weeks. The time of year that death is in the air. I knew the cat was going to die. I did not want to have a suffering cat and had decided if suffering became apparent I would take it to get a “shot” at the vet. He did not appear to suffer for long. On a Tuesday morning I found him on his bed in his room, not able to get up. He was trying to move but it was not working very well. He meowed at me one last time. I checked on him a half hour later and he was breathing, I patted him and tried to see if he wanted a drink. He was not moving at all. I checked back one last time before I had to head out of the house. He made one last attempt to move and his head and front paws were hanging over the side of his cat bed. I patted him and told him that is was ok to go. I patted him and said “good bye Panther” we will miss you. I knew he would not be alive when I came back two hours later. He was not.

When I returned it was apparent that he never moved again. I saw the life was gone and I touched his body. I called my husband and told him the news. He was sad too. He asked me how I knew he would be dead when I got home. I told him I just knew. There are things that I know I know, and this was one of those times. I am struck by how strong my knowing had been about that cat. I am struck that I knew he was dying and that I was the witness to his last few hours. For the past few weeks I kept thinking about how the cat had taught me to accept his true nature in regard to life and killing. I treated him as I treated the wounded chipmunks he left over the years. I kept them safe and warm. I checked in on them periodically and let nature take its course. I treated the cat, as I want to be treated. I took no heroic measures to prolong his life, but I would have ended any suffering if it had become apparent. I miss you cat!

I moved the cats’ head and paws back onto its bed and cleaned up the room. I took the liter box, the litter scoop, and the food bowls and put them in the trash. I vacuumed up the room and took all the remaining cat food out to feed to our crow friends. The cats’ body lay in its bed waiting to be seen by my daughters. They needed to be able to say good-bye. They patted him one last time. My youngest daughter cried again and I finally cried for the first time that day. It was not the last time I cried. I did love you cat. I did the best I could.

Why did I buy into the story to dislike cats? What else do I hate? Why did I keep my distance from the cat? Why would I not allow myself to really love the cat? I am full of love. I realize now it was because I was taught to hate cats. I do not blame those that taught me to hate cats. I was so struck to learn and understand that we are all taught to hate. Hate is not the true nature of man or animals. My true nature was leaking out with the care I did allow myself to give, but I held back. I believed the story I was told, programmed to believe. People hate a lot of different things and I now see so clearly how hate is passed down through words and actions. War is about hate that is passed down and taught. People are taught to hate cats. People are taught to hate white skin, black skin, yellow skin, red skin, and Americans. I will try to never hold back my love again. I will try to never teach hate again; I did not realize until now that I was. I will try to teach only love; I thought I was. I will try to live only love. I thought I was teaching love, but I was not always acting in it. I feel that I have mostly been a good example of living in love, but I know that my daughters have learned a little about hate because of things I said about my learned dislike of the cat and its’ killing. I do give myself credit knowing that as I was learning to accept the true nature of the cat, to hunt, to kill, to survive, to love, that I shared my learning with my daughters. I am now sharing with them and with you my re-affirmed lesson to live in love, not hate, and not just tolerance. Understand that hate is not any ones true nature; but it is learned. Let yourself recognize hate and tolerance, and try to understand were it came from. But most importantly, let yourself love and don’t hold back!

Thank you cat for sharing your love with my family and me. Thank you cat for all the lessons you have taught me. I miss you Panther!


A follow up….

We adopted Tiger and Bodacious (Bow) as kittens from our local animal shelter. It turns out that the brother and sister kittens were born on the year anniversary of Panthers death. My youngest daughter still cries from time to time because she still misses Panther. We have also been helping our local animal shelter by providing foster care to cats. Our first care went to Bell, a young female cat, that needed us to have her spayed and recover from the surgery in our care. Then we took care of Maddie and Melody, two 5-week-old kittens, until they were old enough to be put up for permanent adoption. Last spring we took care of Elly, a pregnant cat, in our foster care room and watched her 6 kittens be born May 27th 2004. We kept one of her kittens, Boots. So now we have three cats in the family.

2007 update

Two years ago we brought a yellow lab into our lives, her name is Jamaica. She and the 3 cats are very good friends.
We have had 31 foster kittens and 5 adult female foster cats spend time with us up until now.

2012 update

We did cat foster care for about 6 years and probably had about 75 kittens total spend time at our home.

Thank you so much for that incredible story. It captures in great detail what magic can happen even when we struggle against it. The magic of love. Your story made me cry, but it was a happy cry : )

I often call our pets little furry bundles of love. I now have 3 chickens who give me wonderful eggs and eat slugs and give more entertainment than you can imagine.

Black Panther
17th October 2012, 17:47
Yesterday I saw two black cats walking outside,
and I immediately looked up the spiritual meaning.

From WHATS-YOUR-SIGN.COM:
[/URL][url]http://www.whats-your-sign.com/cat-animal-symbolism.html (http://www.whats-your-sign.com/cat-animal-symbolism.html)

"In Western tradition, black cats have been associated with witchcraft.
This is due to black being associated with supposed perils of the night,
and the cat is associated with transformation just as the veil of night
shifts our perception of reality."

And of course because of my Avatar's picture and name
I had to read the posts in this thread :cool:

Lettherebelight
17th October 2012, 18:07
Thanks for sharing your cat story, Kimberly. We learn so much from our brothers and sisters in animal boidies. Your story has really helped me. I have three cats too, I sometimes wonder how this has happened! two of them are all black, and Mr Fluffy is black and white...

I agree with Arrowind, what a great point about them being inward focussed and meditative. They also communicate by blinking at you. they remind me of owls in so many ways, except they have fur instead of feathers. someone posted a very amazing video of a cat playing with an owl...anyone got it?

found it...Iqmba7npY8g

Arrowwind
17th October 2012, 23:17
I've never really clicked with cats, there has been the odd one that I felt needed me at work (Vets) but dogs seem to require more help than cats do.
Domestication of these 'feral' spirits must affect their DNA more than is understood.
Horses seem to be the same, they seem to struggle with dealing with human emotion and are much more affected than cats.
If you kick a cat ( not saying that is what I do to cats lol ) they have the freedom to disappear and find someone else, because dogs and horses are more captive they have no escape mechanism other than using behavioural issues to deal with it.

I dont think that cats fully domesticate. Although they will agree to certain rules, like the litter box and being inside,it is only because to them it makes sense. Try and teach a cat anything it does not already agree with for that matter. In a pinch they will whip up a dinner without going to the store or begging or stealing someone elses food. They are surviviers much better than most dogs who would be hard pressed to find a wild meal. They are independent spirits that are adverse to dicipline and that agree to live with you as long as you agree to get along with them and see things their way most of the time. Punishing them is not worth it, especially if you like a fresh carpet and your furniture in one piece for revenge is the name of the game with them. they like to have the last say in most matters

DeDukshyn
17th October 2012, 23:36
I've never really clicked with cats, there has been the odd one that I felt needed me at work (Vets) but dogs seem to require more help than cats do.
Domestication of these 'feral' spirits must affect their DNA more than is understood.
Horses seem to be the same, they seem to struggle with dealing with human emotion and are much more affected than cats.
If you kick a cat ( not saying that is what I do to cats lol ) they have the freedom to disappear and find someone else, because dogs and horses are more captive they have no escape mechanism other than using behavioural issues to deal with it.

Cats aren't really "domesticated" as much as horses or dogs are. It's more just like they have a mutually beneficial relationship with humans -- they are actually very independent animals , but they are wicked good opportunists ;)

I saw a documentary once that analyzed a cat's voice, both wild cats, and ones who had "owners". There was a distinct difference in the sounds these two groups would make while "purring" -- the "owned" cat expressed a different range of frequencies than the wild ones. It was also found that the extra sound information triggers emotional responses in humans - similar to that of a baby crying.

Cat's "use" humans as a survival tool because 1) They can, and 2) We have bred some of their natural skills out and so they had to do something to ensure continuity of their species ;)

Many current breeds of cats are perfectly capable of being wild animals if they are raised for it. Anyone who owns "farm cats" knows this. At the same time many of the fancier breeds wouldn't have a hope in hell of surviving on their own without human help.

Another Bob had a very cool cat story he posted on the "Here and Now" thread. I doubt I'll be able to find it but I'll give a quick look.

¤=[Post Update]=¤



I've never really clicked with cats, there has been the odd one that I felt needed me at work (Vets) but dogs seem to require more help than cats do.
Domestication of these 'feral' spirits must affect their DNA more than is understood.
Horses seem to be the same, they seem to struggle with dealing with human emotion and are much more affected than cats.
If you kick a cat ( not saying that is what I do to cats lol ) they have the freedom to disappear and find someone else, because dogs and horses are more captive they have no escape mechanism other than using behavioural issues to deal with it.

I dont think that cats fully domesticate. Although they will agree to certain rules, like the litter box and being inside,it is only because to them it makes sense. Try and teach a cat anything it does not already agree with for that matter. In a pinch they will whip up a dinner without going to the store or begging or stealing someone elses food. They are surviviers much better than most dogs who would be hard pressed to find a wild meal. They are independent spirits that are adverse to dicipline and that agree to live with you as long as you agree to get along with them and see things their way most of the time. Punishing them is not worth it, especially if you like a fresh carpet and your furniture in one piece for revenge is the name of the game with them. they like to have the last say in most matters



Sync ... my thoughts exactly -- didn't even see your post ;)

Earth Angel
19th October 2012, 00:25
since this is a cat thread, can I ask if anyone knows what would cause two cats to start drooling a smelly sticky clear substance?? I saw the older cat do this first, she is 14 so I thought infected tooth or something, but two days later the 2 year old started......I asked my friend who works for a vet and they missed the point and said tooth decay, cancer, blah blah.......not two cats at the same time so far apart in age......I thought perhaps some kind of cat flu ?? funny my mom just told me the other day that peoples colds can make cats very sick.....no one in the house is sick though.......any thoughts?? both are eating fine (older one was down for a day or two) and I put colloidal silver on their food tonight and they loved it and ate well.

thanks cat lovers!

another bob
19th October 2012, 00:31
JUBILATE AGNO
(excerpt)
Christopher Smart
1763


For I will consider my Cat Jeoffry.

For he is the servant of the Living God duly and daily serving him.

For at the first glance of the glory of God in the East he worships
in his way.

For this is done by wreathing his body seven times round with elegant
quickness.

For then he leaps up to catch the musk, which is the blessing of God
upon his prayer.

For he rolls upon prank to work it in.

For having done duty and received blessing he begins to consider
himself.

For this he performs in ten degrees.

For first he looks upon his forepaws to see if they are clean.

For secondly he kicks up behind to clear away there.

For thirdly he works it upon stretch with the forepaws extended.

For fourthly he sharpens his paws by wood.

For fifthly he washes himself.

For sixthly he rolls upon wash.

For seventhly he fleas himself, that he may not be interrupted upon
the beat.

For eighthly he rubs himself against a post.

For ninthly he looks up for his instructions.

For tenthly he goes in quest of food.

For having consider'd God and himself he will consider his neighbour.

For if he meets another cat he will kiss her in kindness.

For when he takes his prey he plays with it to give it a chance.

For one mouse in seven escapes by his dallying.

For when his day's work is done his business more properly begins.

For he keeps the Lord's watch in the night against the adversary.

For he counteracts the powers of darkness by his electrical skin and
glaring eyes.

For he counteracts the Devil, who is death, by brisking about the
life.

For in his morning orisons he loves the sun and the sun loves him.

For he is of the tribe of Tiger.

For the Cherub Cat is a term of the Angel Tiger.

For he has the subtlety and hissing of a serpent, which in goodness
he suppresses.

For he will not do destruction, if he is well-fed, neither will he
spit without provocation.

For he purrs in thankfulness, when God tells him he's a good Cat.

For he is an instrument for the children to learn benevolence upon.

For every house is incomplete without him and a blessing is lacking
in the spirit.

For the Lord commanded Moses concerning the cats at the departure of
the Children of Israel from Egypt.

For every family had one cat at least in the bag.

For the English Cats are the best in Europe.

For he is the cleanest in the use of his forepaws of any quadruped.

For the dexterity of his defence is an instance of the love of God to
him exceedingly.

For he is the quickest to his mark of any creature.

For he is tenacious of his point.

For he is a mixture of gravity and waggery.

For he knows that God is his Saviour.

For there is nothing sweeter than his peace when at rest.

For there is nothing brisker than his life when in motion.

For he is of the Lord's poor and so indeed is he called by
benevolence perpetually--

Poor Jeoffry! poor Jeoffry! the rat has bit thy throat.

For I bless the name of the Lord Jesus that Jeoffry is better.

For the divine spirit comes about his body to sustain it in complete
cat.

For his tongue is exceeding pure so that it has in purity what it
wants in music.

For he is docile and can learn certain things.

For he can set up with gravity which is patience upon approbation.

For he can fetch and carry, which is patience in employment.

For he can jump over a stick which is patience upon proof positive.

For he can spraggle upon waggle at the word of command.

For he can jump from an eminence into his master's bosom.

For he can catch the cork and toss it again.

For he is hated by the hypocrite and miser.

For the former is afraid of detection.

For the latter refuses the charge.

For he camels his back to bear the first notion of business.

For he is good to think on, if a man would express himself neatly.

For he made a great figure in Egypt for his signal services.

For he killed the Ichneumon-rat very pernicious by land.

For his ears are so acute that they sting again.

For from this proceeds the passing quickness of his attention.

For by stroking of him I have found out electricity.

For I perceived God's light about him both wax and fire.

For the Electrical fire is the spiritual substance, which God sends
from heaven to sustain the bodies both of man and beast.

For God has blessed him in the variety of his movements.

For, tho he cannot fly, he is an excellent clamberer.

For his motions upon the face of the earth are more than any other
quadruped.

For he can tread to all the measures upon the music.

For he can swim for life.

For he can creep.

DeDukshyn
19th October 2012, 02:26
since this is a cat thread, can I ask if anyone knows what would cause two cats to start drooling a smelly sticky clear substance?? I saw the older cat do this first, she is 14 so I thought infected tooth or something, but two days later the 2 year old started......I asked my friend who works for a vet and they missed the point and said tooth decay, cancer, blah blah.......not two cats at the same time so far apart in age......I thought perhaps some kind of cat flu ?? funny my mom just told me the other day that peoples colds can make cats very sick.....no one in the house is sick though.......any thoughts?? both are eating fine (older one was down for a day or two) and I put colloidal silver on their food tonight and they loved it and ate well.

thanks cat lovers!

Cats can catch illnesses that have similar symptoms to human colds -- I have had enough cats in my life to know this, they will get runny noses a bit, sneeze and get miserable. Likely just a virus or fungus infection. It should clear up; cats have good immune systems.

161803398
19th October 2012, 03:41
I was with a friend who was buying a sail boat and the seller told a story about some people whose cat fell overboard on the way to Tonga. They weren't able to find it to rescue it. Anyway, they sailed on to Tonga and the next boat that came in a day later had the cat with them. They'd woken up in the middle of the night while at sea and heard a cat meowing. They were a bit shocked when they went outside and found a cat swimming in the ocean.

Earth Angel
19th October 2012, 14:50
thanks !.....hope you are right , they seem a bit better today



since this is a cat thread, can I ask if anyone knows what would cause two cats to start drooling a smelly sticky clear substance?? I saw the older cat do this first, she is 14 so I thought infected tooth or something, but two days later the 2 year old started......I asked my friend who works for a vet and they missed the point and said tooth decay, cancer, blah blah.......not two cats at the same time so far apart in age......I thought perhaps some kind of cat flu ?? funny my mom just told me the other day that peoples colds can make cats very sick.....no one in the house is sick though.......any thoughts?? both are eating fine (older one was down for a day or two) and I put colloidal silver on their food tonight and they loved it and ate well.

thanks cat lovers!

Cats can catch illnesses that have similar symptoms to human colds -- I have had enough cats in my life to know this, they will get runny noses a bit, sneeze and get miserable. Likely just a virus or fungus infection. It should clear up; cats have good immune systems.

DeDukshyn
19th October 2012, 15:28
I was with a friend who was buying a sail boat and the seller told a story about some people whose cat fell overboard on the way to Tonga. They weren't able to find it to rescue it. Anyway, they sailed on to Tonga and the next boat that came in a day later had the cat with them. They'd woken up in the middle of the night while at sea and heard a cat meowing. They were a bit shocked when they went outside and found a cat swimming in the ocean.

We had a cat that went missing for about a week. The cat ended up being returned by a stranger to the gas station that my parents were managing a the time, in town about 10 miles from the house. When inquired about how they got our cat they said they found it in their yard soaking wet, kept it for a few days thinking they would try to find the owner. It turns out that friends of our neighbours visits them and their son recognized it as our cat, having seen it from our neighbours yard, and said that he knew my parents managed the gas station - so that is how the family who found it got it returned to us.

We asked were they lived and it turns out they lived on the same lake us -- but across on the other side - about a mile of water between us - and they found it soaking wet ... could the cat have swam across the lake? He was a good swimmer for a cat and not afraid of the water, but still ... weird story.

huyi82
19th October 2012, 20:12
Hello,
About 2 weeks ago something unusual happen to us. So we had a black cat really furry , always perring a really nice cat. But in may this year we found our cat dying looking all tired so we took him to the vetenary office, they couldn't do anything so the cat die we berried him near the house in the woods.
ok so now two weeks ago the exact same cat showed up in front of the house, its exactly the same in the he looks the way he plays , in every way.
So we let him in the house and now he is still here and we asked around if someone had a cat missing but no.
We don't really know what to think about it, its strange. so if anyone have an idea we will be happy to hear about it.
And also I mediated a few times just few meters away from the place the cat was burried, I asked for sign , i don't knowwhat to thonk about this .
thank you for taking time to read . ;) peace

your previous cat who died "sent" the new cat to you just to help you with grief, a lot of pet psychics that i read about say this, that is why your new cat looks like your old cat.




If you are attracting cats it is becasue they will be of use to you. They are coming to serve you. If one cat departs and another one comes it is a sign that you would do well to keep them and treat them well. If a cat feels disconnected from its human family it will just up and leave never to be seen again, sometimes even resulting in its death, which to the cat is inconsequential for it will soon reincarnate in a better place for it to live its life and purpose.

i've owned cats pretty much throughout all of my life so this would explain this, i have a very strong connection to cats i don't know why.