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View Full Version : Two suicides at restaurant featured in Olympics ceremony in the last month



Jenci
18th October 2012, 10:16
The Coq d'Argent restaurant was featured in Olympics opening ceremony with diners seen waving at the Queens helicopter.

The restaurant is built on an ancient burial ground.

A man has committed suicide there by plunging to his death from a height. Last month a woman did the same which brings the total deaths to four at the restaurant from falling from heights.

MSM is suggesting that it is due to the high stressful nature of the City's banking environment.


Anyone fancy going there for dinner? :nono:

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/10/17/article-0-158DB63B000005DC-732_306x423.jpg




The successful 46-year-old took a lift to Sir Terence Conran’s Coq d’Argent at lunchtime and then fell through the atrium within the building.

He landed next to diners who were enjoying lunch at cafes and bars in a shopping complex at the bottom of the building in the City.

Medics reached him within minutes but were unable to save him. He was pronounced dead by a doctor at the scene minutes later.

Mr Lambrechts is thought to have made the short walk to the restaurant from his office at Investec Asset Management in the Square Mile.

Last night neighbours said they were baffled as to why a devoted family man would want to potentially commit suicide.

His wife Adele was too distressed to talk about her loss.

But a neighbour said: ‘He was a really great guy.’

When asked about the reason behind the possible suicide, he said: ‘You never know. He was a random man, unpredictable – you know.’

Mr Lambrechts lived with his wife and three children in a £2million six-bedroom gated home in the upmarket town of Cobham, Surrey.

He took his family on luxury holidays to destinations such as Venice.

The banker’s death last week is the fourth to have occurred at the restaurant and the second in as many months.

In May 2007, City employee Richard Ford, 33, died after he plunged from the terrace onto a bus.

In July 2009 stockbroker Anjool Malde, 24, leapt to his death from the venue holding a glass of champagne after being suspended from his job at Deutsche Bank.

And last month diners watched in horror as businesswoman Rema Begum, 29, took a sip of wine from her glass on the outdoor terrace, before putting her handbag on the floor and then toppling over the edge.

A woman who works in a shop nearby said the restaurant is ‘cursed’ because of the rising number of deaths. ‘It’s become a trademark place to come and commit suicide,’ she said. ‘It’s very sad.’

Coq d’Argent is built on the site of an ancient burial ground where for centuries hundreds of corpses of affluent Londoners were buried in shallow graves.





Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2219345/Why-did-banker-perfect-life-fatal-leap-Fourth-tragedy-City-restaurant.

Ouroboros
18th October 2012, 10:21
Interesting architecture.

Fred Steeves
18th October 2012, 10:22
Anyone fancy going there for dinner? :nono:


Sounds good Jenci, I'll bring my parachute. http://nexus.2012info.ca/forum/images/smilies/newadditions/smile.gif

Jenci
18th October 2012, 10:46
Interesting architecture.


An ariel view of the restaurant


http://www.standard.co.uk/incoming/article8105666.ece/ALTERNATES/w620/05_coq.jpg

nizkri
18th October 2012, 11:04
Looks similar to the vatican, keyhole structure .


Interesting architecture.


An ariel view of the restaurant


http://www.standard.co.uk/incoming/article8105666.ece/ALTERNATES/w620/05_coq.jpg

Flash
18th October 2012, 11:07
I am sorry to these people, to have been under such duress. The restaurant does look strange in my idea.

But life must have been difficult to digest ;)

Jenci
18th October 2012, 11:23
Images from the opening of the Olympics ceremony showing diners at the restaurant waving to the Queen's helicopter

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/09/10/article-2200965-14DAF9AA000005DC-174_468x286.jpg


http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/09/10/article-2200965-14DAFA16000005DC-401_468x286.jpg

Jenci
18th October 2012, 11:32
Maybe it is not a strange coincidence that the restaurant was built on an ancient burial ground. It seems that Sir Terence Conran likes his property purchases to have some history.


He built Guastavino's in Manhatten on the site of a satanic mill




HAVING filled London with huge restaurants, and wowed Paris with his rice-puddings and boiled eggs and soldiers, Sir Terence Conran has now taken on New York - and he hasn't messed about. Sir Terence's idea of fun is to take a disused dark satanic mill and turn it into a trendy brasserie, and the great tiled vault at the Manhattan side of the Queensboro Bridge is a classic Conran 'space'. Vast and industrial, with fabulous views of the river, it's not unlike his Gastrodrome complex in the old warehouses by Tower Bridge.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/4809719/Lunch-in-the-Big-Apple.html


http://luxuryrentalsmanhattan.com/sites/default/files/eupload/guastavinos_nyc.jpg

http://luxuryrentalsmanhattan.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/building_page/eupload/guastavinos.jpg



And he purchased the Great Eastern Hotel in London complete with its own hidden Masonic Temple



The Great Eastern Hotel has now been renamed 'Andaz' by the Hyatt chain, but inside it still has a few original treasures on offer. One amazing aspect of the hotel, beside Liverpool Street Station, is the Masonic Temple which exists at its heart, originally hidden from the public, but now uncovered to allow plebs like your author to see inside, and - amusingly - the local Masonic Lodge to hire it out....

The story which is always repeated, which is a little hard to believe, is that when Terence Conran acquired the Great Eastern, he asked what was behind some big wooden doors. Your author thinks he probably wouldn't have parted with a lot of cash without having someone check out the whole building first, but it all adds to the mystery.

http://www.tiredoflondontiredoflife.com/2011/02/see-masonic-temple-at-great-eastern.html



http://londonist-static.s3.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/new1/15544_masonhallmain.jpg

WHOMADEGOD
18th October 2012, 11:47
Ive eaten there, I was close myself.

christian
18th October 2012, 12:17
Well, people are strange. A man stabbed himself and then set himself on fire in front of the Reichstag a couple of days ago. His name was Marius. The guy Hitler used as a patsy for the Reichstag fire was also a Marius. Conspiracy anyone?

There's a suicide note, not going to be published though. The police says "personal reasons." Apparently he was (about to become) homeless.

http://www.berliner-kurier.de/polizei-prozesse/todesdrama-vorm-reichstag-selbstmord--weil-er-obdachlos-wurde-,7169126,20593628.html (http://www.berliner-kurier.de/polizei-prozesse/todesdrama-vorm-reichstag-selbstmord--weil-er-obdachlos-wurde-,7169126,20593628.html)

Carmody
18th October 2012, 12:21
Interesting architecture.

yes..almost... Mid-east Coptic Egyptian?

I'd expect nothing less from the City Of London.

WhiteFeather
18th October 2012, 14:05
I'm sure they only carry a carnivorous menu at this location. Which leaves me out!

Sammy
18th October 2012, 14:28
Anyone fancy going there for dinner? :nono:


Sounds good Jenci, I'll bring my parachute. http://nexus.2012info.ca/forum/images/smilies/newadditions/smile.gif

just don't bring Santos' parachute

Lettherebelight
18th October 2012, 14:40
What kind of name is that for a restaurant?....srsly...

translates to 'cock money' or 'rooster money'. ...Rooster of Money...(what?)

Snoweagle
18th October 2012, 15:05
Coq d’Argent is built on the site of an ancient burial ground where for centuries hundreds of corpses of affluent Londoners were buried in shallow graves.
How spiritually yummy is that.
Payback is a bitch isn't it.
A restaurant on the edge of the Money Broker belt of London and has been for a thousand years. The affluent rich who had been buried in shallow graves, unable to afford tombs to avoid the marshy ground. Those same corpses in death carrying vengeful regrets at their parting imbued their soul water unto the soil. Water has memory.
Now the new breed of financiers ply their promises conditioned with betrayals on a new generation of wealth seekers though this time the spirits play on home ground, not the sanctity of financial contract. Those venturing with heavy heart and ill intent will nourish the revenge so long ago forgotten.
After the global financial assaults over the last century, maybe we should insist ALL financiers dine there. woohoo

(by the way, since my stroke I DO BELIEVE in spiritual energy and I now know how it works)
So again, payback is a bitch

Sidney
18th October 2012, 16:16
Looks similar to the vatican, keyhole structure .


Interesting architecture.


An ariel view of the restaurant


http://www.standard.co.uk/incoming/article8105666.ece/ALTERNATES/w620/05_coq.jpg

18766



Ariel view of the Vatican. Obviously the restaraunt is vatican inspired.

Cartomancer
18th October 2012, 16:26
This Building points to Avebury Circle!!!!!!The design of this building is screaming 'Trinity, Trinity, Trinity.' Here we see a line showing the relationship between the restaurant and the London Center Stone at 666' exactly. The London Center Stone is the Roman Axis Mundi of London. The hexagon of Baalbek Points to this axis. Baalbek was the Roman Imperial Axis. This building is very close at this scale to being at the axis.


18772

18773

18774





Here is a movie I made about some amazing associations between London and Baalbek. It inlcludes information about the Hellfire club, Crowley, Dashwood, The Stone of Destiny and more!

YWh1K9LqPLg

Lettherebelight
18th October 2012, 17:21
http://www.examiner.com/images/blog/wysiwyg/image/Crop-circle-Milk-Hill-2009.jpg

It reminds me of the top part of the 'sextant crop circle' that occurred in 2009 on Milk Hill....

....at Avebury!!

Rahkyt
18th October 2012, 18:42
Never a good idea to build on an accumulation of dead folks energy signatures. They need to put some of those safety net things where people like to jump at. Sheesh. Talk about ruining other folks days.

Great find, Cartomancer! Some more facts:


Coq d’Argent puns both on the address - No.1 Poultry - and the site’s heritage: the
new building is the work of the distinguished architect, Sir James Stirling, and
occupies the site of the former Mappin & Webb jewellers next to the Bank of
England.

Since 1998 Coq d’Argent has been one of London’s favourite places for grand
celebrations, corporate dining and business meetings. This elegant restaurant offers
true distinction and style for all occasions.

Re the building that is there now (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No_1_Poultry):


While construction was underway, a major archaeological dig was undertaken by the Museum of London archeological service MOLAS, directed by Peter Rowsome. This excavation made several significant discoveries, including a wooden drain along the main Roman road. Using dendrochronology, this was dated to the year AD 47, suggesting this may be the date of the founding of Roman Londinium.

From the archeological research at the site and the book written by the primary Archaeologist (http://books.google.ca/books/about/Roman_London_and_the_Walbrook_Stream_Cro.html?id=G MU4KQEACAAJ&redir_esc=y) regarding the dig:


The site of 1 Poultry, excavated in the 1990s, is located near the Bank of England in the heart of the City of London. It lay immediately west of the point where the main east-west road through Roman London bridged the Walbrook stream and proved to be one of the most significant archaeological sites ever excavated in the City, with an unparalleled sequence of buildings, roads and open spaces. A timber drain of AD 47 beneath the main road is the earliest, securely dated structure yet known from Londinium and a pottery shop destroyed in the Boudican revolt gives a snapshot of life in AD 60/61. A 2nd-century AD writing tablet preserves the only evidence for the sale of a slave found in Britain to date, while the 3rd- and 4th-century buildings on the site provide a rare demonstration of the continuities and changes that occurred in Roman urban life. The key sequence from 1 Poultry provides the majority of the evidence but is augmented by findings from Docklands Light Railway sites at Bucklersbury, Lothbury and Lombard Street and other work at 72-75 Cheapside, 76-80 Cheapside, 36-37 King Street and Mansion House. Together, the sites provide a comprehensive record of the development of Londinium over the entire Roman period.

The Mappin & Webb (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mappin_%26_Webb) connection:


John Newton Mappin started an electroplating and cutlery firm which by 1868 was called Mappin & Webb. The firm was started with his brother-in-law George Webb. The firm prospered but the old family firm of Mappin Bros. had started to decline, as by 1863 the firm was reported as only employing 200 in a local trade review. By the 1880s the Mappin Bros. firm had been sold to a Belfast jeweller, and then sold to Goldsmiths & Silversmiths Co. of London. But in contrast Mappin and Webb run by Newton Mappin was thriving with a large showroom on Norfolk street, displaying the Silverware and electroplate. By 1897 the company was granted a Royal Warrant. Today Mappin & Webb is silversmith to both Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II and to the Prince of Wales Prince Charles. In 1899 the Sculptor Charles Sargeant Jagger was apprenticed to the firm as a metal engraver. Newton Mappin bought the family firm back in 1903.

The company's premises at No 1 Poultry in London were famously demolished in 1994 by developer Peter Palumbo. It was replaced by a controversial building designed by architect James Stirling.

Reading the history, it seems that the Mappins were intriguing. Direct connections to the royals, the family had Knight lineage (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_Frederick_Mappin,_1st_Baronet), they worked in metals, the family left the nation a technical school and an art gallery (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mappin_Art_Gallery). Potential alchemist leanings I'd suspect, definite connection to the deeper strains of secret societies in GB in the mid to late 1800s.


For most of its history the complex was known as the Sheffield City Museum and Mappin Art Gallery. The museum contained Sheffield's archaeology, natural history, decorative art and social history collections.

Since its founding, the gallery has apparently been concerned with the archaeology of the region, perhaps at the insistence of the founder. The research of the nearby Sheffield University is notable for its centres for Aegean and Historical archaeology. Cartomancer, they also have a center for geoarchaeology (http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/archaeology/research/geoarchaeology). :)

So there are circumstantial connections between the site, paranormal activity and potential alchemical work, as well as the potential of having been in the past a gathering place - and perhaps a marker - for individuals interested in such things.

Am I reaching? LOL

Jenci
18th October 2012, 19:02
Great historical information, thanks Cartomancer and Rahkyt.


and this from 1998 by a restaurant critic...


This article was first published in August 1998

SIR Terence Conran strikes again at No 1 Poultry, the building above Bank Underground station commissioned by Lord Palumbo and built by the late Sir James Stirling and Michael Wilford and Partners to replace the Grade II listed buildings which originally housed the headquarters of Mappin and Webb. Central to the first scheme designed by Mies van der Rohe, for which planning permission was not granted, was a garden square. The Stirling design holds on to the notion of "a lung in the City" with a roof garden and terraces which now benefit customers of Conran' s COQ D'ARGENT.

The evening we visited there were problems with the lighting of the garden and terraces, so their visual impact was much reduced. What we did experience was a sort of wind-tunnel effect whereby, on an otherwise still night, diners in the restaurant had to pull their jackets closely round them as a stiff breeze cavorted through the room. Wait-ers closed the glass doors to the terrace leaving the diners outside shivering in the dark. But, no doubt, such typical teething problems will soon be sorted out.

It is without question a dramatic location, made the more so by precipitous drops into the six-storey central well and bizarre protrusions beyond the building's edge that give the feeling of walking the plank. In the copious publicity Sir Terence is quoted as saying that he feels sure City workers will automatically think of Coq d'Argent as the place to celebrate a great deal. It might also serve a function in darker times.

In the low-ceilinged, rather sombre dining room, where stone-effect cladding provides one worryingly hollow, insubstantial wall, the food takes on a hotel quality which may also be connected with the CV of chef Stephen Goodlad who has worked at The Dorchester and Grosvenor House. "Very Ramada Inn," said my companion as he tackled his roast pork with a piece of crackling that he claimed was closer in spirit to a toenail than to roasted skin.

Studying at length the restaurant's logo, which resembles a silver mark with images of first a cock, then the initials of the restaurant name, then an egg with the old lion stamp, he read it as "Don't count your chickens before they are hatched". Of course, I knew it was just Sir Tel's enchanting love of puns as in coq=poultry, d'argent=stirling (Sir James). Get it?

I shall go back in the daytime to try again.

Coq d'Argent
1 Poultry, EC3R 8EJ


http://www.standard.co.uk/goingout/restaurants/coq-dargent-7431744.html

norman
19th October 2012, 18:57
Maybe it is not a strange coincidence that the restaurant was built on an ancient burial ground. It seems that Sir Terence Conran likes his property purchases to have some history.


He built Guastavino's in Manhatten on the site of a satanic mill



And he purchased the Great Eastern Hotel in London complete with its own hidden Masonic Temple



The Great Eastern Hotel has now been renamed 'Andaz' by the Hyatt chain, but inside it still has a few original treasures on offer. One amazing aspect of the hotel, beside Liverpool Street Station, is the Masonic Temple which exists at its heart, originally hidden from the public, but now uncovered to allow plebs like your author to see inside, and - amusingly - the local Masonic Lodge to hire it out....

The story which is always repeated, which is a little hard to believe, is that when Terence Conran acquired the Great Eastern, he asked what was behind some big wooden doors. Your author thinks he probably wouldn't have parted with a lot of cash without having someone check out the whole building first, but it all adds to the mystery.





http://londonist-static.s3.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/new1/15544_masonhallmain.jpg

When I see photos of places like this, it really creeps me out.


Outing Jimmy Saville is one thing, outing these creeps is something else again.

I may not be around when the time comes, but I hope "times change" and 'society' puts an end to all this too.

mosquito
20th October 2012, 04:46
What kind of name is that for a restaurant?....srsly...

translates to 'cock money' or 'rooster money'. ...Rooster of Money...(what?)

Silver cock actually.

Rahkyt
21st October 2012, 17:54
Symbol Meanings of the Rooster

Most cultures embrace the Rooster as a solar symbol, and a sign of illumination, with the exception of the Nordic and Celtic cultures. Celtic and Norse lore describe the Rooster as a creature of the Underworld. Specifically, the cock served as a messenger of the Underworld, screeching out warnings in danger, and calling out for the souls of the fallen in battle. For more Celtic animal symbol meanings click here.

A summary of symbol meanings for the Rooster include:

Pride
Honesty
Courage
Vigilance
Arrogance
Strength
Watchfulness
Flamboyance

The ancient Greeks believed the Rooster rose to attention and saluted the sun every morning with a hearty cry, symbolizing victory over night. As such, the Rooster was considered a solar emblem to the Greeks, and was adopted as a sacred sign to the god Apollo as well as Zeus, Persephone and Attis.

In Christianity the Rooster is noted for crowing three times after Peter denied Christ. As such, it became a symbol for Christ’s passion. Later, the Rooster would signify the repentance of the saint and religious vigilance as well as resurrection. To this day the Rooster seen on a weathervane is steeped in symbolic meanings that deal with watchful vigilance against evil, as weathervanes are commonly seen atop churches.

One of the twelve signs of the Chinese zodiac, the Rooster is a Chinese symbol of honesty, as well as physical and moral fortitude. It is of the yang attribute and signifies fortune, luck, fidelity, protection as well as bossiness. For other Chinese animal symbol meanings click here.

Roosters are considered sacred symbols in Japan, and are permitted to run free amongst the Shinto temples. This is partially due to the Rooster calling Shinto followers to prayer with its morning crow at dawn.

Symbolic Meaning of Silver (http://www.symbolic-meanings.com/2007/11/01/symbolism-of-silver/)

Prime symbolism of silver deals with the moon and as such it is an attribute of feminine energy.

Chaldeans referenced silver by the female name of Nanna.

Rosicrucian alchemists attributed silver to the goddesses Artemis (Greek).

Renaissance alchemists divined with silver using Diana’s (Roman) personification.

Arabic alchemists invoked the feminine name of Manat when working with silver as an alchemical symbol.

Some quick symbolic meanings of silver:

Purity
Clarity
Awareness
Focus
Single-ness of Purpose
Femininity
Persistence
Vision
Strength
Silver is symbolic of such attributes as awareness, clarity, and vision because of its bright/clear appearance.

Silver is a symbol for strength because this metal withstands abuse, weathering, and even heat. Nevertheless, it can still be molded into desired forms.

This is symbolic of a subtle strength. The message here is that we ourselves can be flexible enough to be molded into something better – but strong enough to keep our core integrity in tact.

---

So the Silver Cock besides playing upon the history of the site (poultry) and the silver workings of the Mappin family that had utilized the site previously, also plays upon the symbolism of the alchemical metal silver and the illumination of the rooster.

It seems as if the site may be a ritual location hidden in plain sight.

Carmody
21st October 2012, 18:09
To this day the Rooster seen on a weathervane is steeped in symbolic meanings that deal with watchful vigilance against evil, as weathervanes are commonly seen atop churches.

Yes. Note that rooster is always pointed into the wind. Nose and eyes into the flow and direction of the immediate prevailing energies.