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Cidersomerset
11th November 2012, 21:55
JHT0QQQoar4

11 November 2012 Last updated at 05:37 Help Bulgarian archaeologists have unearthed ancient golden artefacts during excavation works in the north of the country.

The findings include golden rings, female figurines and 100 gold buttons. They are thought to date back to the late 4th or early 3rd century BC.

James Kelly reports.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-20285981

MorningSong
12th November 2012, 19:51
I just found this article... says these treasure might be linked to Alexander the Great:


Golden find: Treasures linked to Alexander the Great found in Bulgaria (PHOTOS)

Published: 12 November, 2012, 19:25

Ancient Thracian treasures dating back to the time of Alexander the Great have been unearthed in Bulgarian tombs. Scientists believe the artefacts could be linked to the Macedon king’s family.

­The discovery was made in the biggest network of Thracian tombs in northern Bulgaria included horse trappings, a tiara with animal motifs, four bracelets, rings and golden buttons dating back to the late fourth and early third century BC. The treasures must have belonged to the Getae tribe that was in close contact with the ancient Greeks.

“These are amazing finds from the height of the rule of the Getae,” the head of the archaeology team on the site Diana Gergova says.

Gergova and her team expect to find much more in the tomb complex near the village of Sveshtari, some 400 km from Sofia. The riches discovered show the site could be a major ritual burial place, possibly linked to the burial of Getic ruler Cothelas, said Gergova, a renowned researcher of Thracian culture with the Sofia-based National Archaeology Institute. They also believe the funeral site of the Gath ruler Kotela, one of the father-in-laws of Alexander the Great's father, Philip II of Macedon, could also be discovered nearby in the future.

Gergova says such an important find has never before been made in Bulgaria. Local authorities have arranged to display the treasures at the National Archaeological Museum in Sofia.

One of the tombs in the complex, known as the Tomb of Sveshtari, is included in the UNESCO World Heritage List.

The Thracians inhabited the lands of modern Bulgaria along with parts of modern Macedonia, Greece, Romania and Turkey between 4,000 B.C. and the 7th century A.D, AP reports. Most of the artefacts which explain their culture were found in Bulgaria's Thracian tombs in recent decades.

http://rt.com/art-and-culture/news/alexander-great-bulgaria-thracian-528/

Follow the link to see the treasures...lovely!

Cidersomerset
12th November 2012, 20:20
http://media.tumblr.com/tumblr_md9uvzwujG1qgjbhq.jpg

Newly unearthed gold artifacts from a third-century B.C. tomb include a golden horse head, a ring or brooch (top right), and tiny busts of a woman, which likely decorated clothing.

"You're looking at workmanship made for the elite," Hiebert said. "It's very fine and the motifs reflect all sorts of different influences."

The artifacts were discovered in the biggest of 150 ancient tombs of a Thracian tribe called the Getae.

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Thrace was annexed by Alexanders father Philip 2nd of Macedonia so was
part of Alexanders empire.............

http://library.thinkquest.org/10805/media/alexmap.gif

galilava
12th November 2012, 20:22
Thank you, Morning song - there is another recent VERY important discovery nearby:
from BBc - http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-20156681
Archaeologists in Bulgaria say they have uncovered the oldest prehistoric town found to date in Europe.
The walled fortified settlement, near the modern town of Provadia, is thought to have been an important centre for salt production.
Its discovery in north-east Bulgaria may explain the huge gold hoard found nearby 40 years ago.
Archaeologists believe that the town was home to some 350 people and dates back to between 4700 and 4200 BC.
That is about 1,500 years before the start of ancient Greek civilisation.
The residents boiled water from a local spring and used it to create salt bricks, which were traded and used to preserve meat.
Salt was a hugely valuable commodity at the time, which experts say could help to explain the huge defensive stone walls which ringed the town.
'Extremely interesting'
Excavations at the site, beginning in 2005, have also uncovered the remains of two-storey houses, a series of pits used for rituals, as well as parts of a gate and bastion structures.
A small necropolis, or burial ground, was discovered at the site earlier this year and is still being studied by archaeologists.
"We are not talking about a town like the Greek city-states, ancient Rome or medieval settlements, but about what archaeologists agree constituted a town in the fifth millennium BC," Vasil Nikolov, a researcher with Bulgaria's National Institute of Archaeology, told the AFP news agency.
Archaeologist Krum Bachvarov from the institute said the latest find was "extremely interesting".
"The huge walls around the settlement, which were built very tall and with stone blocks... are also something unseen in excavations of prehistoric sites in south-east Europe so far," he told AFP.
Similar salt mines near Tuzla in Bosnia and Turda in Romania help prove the existence of a series of civilisations which also mined copper and gold in the Carpathian and Balkan mountains during the same period.
BBC Europe correspondent Nick Thorpe says this latest discovery almost certainly explains the treasure found exactly 40 years ago at a cemetery on the outskirts of Varna, 35km (21 miles) away, the oldest hoard of gold objects found anywhere in the world.
http://news.bbcimg.co.uk/media/images/63836000/jpg/_63836195_63836192.jpg
link:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-20156681

Cidersomerset
12th November 2012, 20:35
Thanks galilava I had not heard of this discovery......


GL1ADkANGwY


31 October 2012 Last updated at 14:56
oldest prehistoric town unearthed in Bulgaria

http://news.bbcimg.co.uk/media/images/63836000/jpg/_63836195_63836192.jpg

The prehistoric town at Provadia features two-storey houses and a defensive wall
Continue reading the main story


Archaeologists in Bulgaria say they have uncovered the oldest prehistoric town found to date in Europe.

The walled fortified settlement, near the modern town of Provadia, is thought to have been an important centre for salt production.

Its discovery in north-east Bulgaria may explain the huge gold hoard found nearby 40 years ago.

Archaeologists believe that the town was home to some 350 people and dates back to between 4700 and 4200 BC.

That is about 1,500 years before the start of ancient Greek civilisation.

The residents boiled water from a local spring and used it to create salt bricks, which were traded and used to preserve meat.

Salt was a hugely valuable commodity at the time, which experts say could help to explain the huge defensive stone walls which ringed the town.

'Extremely interesting'

Excavations at the site, beginning in 2005, have also uncovered the remains of two-storey houses, a series of pits used for rituals, as well as parts of a gate and bastion structures.

A small necropolis, or burial ground, was discovered at the site earlier this year and is still being studied by archaeologists.

"We are not talking about a town like the Greek city-states, ancient Rome or medieval settlements, but about what archaeologists agree constituted a town in the fifth millennium BC," Vasil Nikolov, a researcher with Bulgaria's National Institute of Archaeology, told the AFP news agency.

Archaeologist Krum Bachvarov from the institute said the latest find was "extremely interesting".

"The huge walls around the settlement, which were built very tall and with stone blocks... are also something unseen in excavations of prehistoric sites in south-east Europe so far," he told AFP.

Similar salt mines near Tuzla in Bosnia and Turda in Romania help prove the existence of a series of civilisations which also mined copper and gold in the Carpathian and Balkan mountains during the same period.

BBC Europe correspondent Nick Thorpe says this latest discovery almost certainly explains the treasure found exactly 40 years ago at a cemetery on the outskirts of Varna, 35km (21 miles) away, the oldest hoard of gold objects found anywhere in the world.

Shade
12th November 2012, 20:38
I wonder are those figurines shaped that way in order to function purely as a figurine or is that just the way they liked to stamp their currency and it was like what our coins are today? Was that their queen?

Cidersomerset
12th November 2012, 20:51
I wonder are those figurines shaped that way in order to function purely as a figurine or is that just the way they liked to stamp their currency and it was like what our coins are today? Was that their queen?



The coins of the period are reconiseable as coin we use today.

http://www.ancientresource.com/images/greek/greek_coins/chersonesos-lion-2606a.jpg

http://www.ancientresource.com/lots/greek/greekcoins-silver-hoards1.html


The gold female busts are speculated as jewelry ??