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Living Food
16th November 2012, 13:10
The nutritional value of our food has declined dramatically due to soil depletion. A report presented at the 1992 Earth Summit showed that the average US farm soil had lost 85% of the nutrients it had 100 years ago, and it's far worse now. And it shows in the declining nutritional value of our produce:

http://www.nutritionsecurity.org/PDF/Mineral%20Content%20of%20One%20Apple.pdf

http://www.nutritionsecurity.org/PDF/Mineral%20Content%20in%20Vegetables.pdf

http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2001/images/mar2001_vegetables_04.jpg

http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2001/images/mar2001_vegetables_02.jpg

Many other studies also show the decrease in nutrients from our foods over the last few decades. The impact on trace minerals and other phytonutrients is even worse.

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Another very important thing to keep in mind is that today people need more nutrients then ever before due to massive amounts of stress + pollution. So even if you only eat fresh produce straight from the garden/farm, you'll still be deficient in nutrients. But how many people do that? Even if you eat lots of unadulterated produce, it was likely picked days, weeks or even months ago, when it was unripe, and shipped hundreds of miles to your store. By the time you put it in your shopping cart the majority of the few nutrients it had in the first place will be gone. And then if you go home and cook it...well...what nutrients? Cooking does increase the availability of some nutrients such as lycopene, but overall it is far more harmful then beneficial.

* Green beans refrigerated after harvest lost more than 90% ascorbic acid following 16 days of refrigeration; broccoli lost about 50% of both ascorbic acid and beta-carotene
following 5 days of storage. (Howard LA, Wong AD, Perry AK, et al. B-carotene and ascorbic acid retention in fresh and processed vegetables. J Food Sci. 1999;64(5):929-936)

* Following cold storage for 8 days in the light, spinach lost 22% lutein; in 8 days of dark cold, spinach lost 18% beta- carotene (Kopas-Lane LM, Warthesen JJ. Carotenoid photostability in raw spinach and carrots during cold storage. J Food Sci. 1995;60(4):773-776)

* Storage of whole heads of lettuce or endive in the cold dark for 7 days resulted in total flavanol glycoside losses from 7-46% (DuPont MS, Mondin Z, Williamson G, et al. Effect of variety, processing, and storage on the flavonoid glycoside content and composition of lettuce and endive. J Agric Food Chem. 2000;48(9):3957-3964).

soleil
16th November 2012, 14:35
i wonder if the reason we are also losing nutrition in our apples is because they need man in order to grow, unless you want a pile of crap apple trees... by my house here in canada, there are many many apple fields, who due to the drought had terrible production. essentially they are grown from clones, lets say mcintosh apple, spliced (i think i'm not sure the term) with crap apple, in order to root. (i know this only because my family is interested in growing apples when we have larger property).

i wonder if the reason we are perpetuating apple trees this way is also contributing to the decline in nutrients? (sorry this is a wonder, more than an insightful post) as my knowledge is limited on nutrition.

GaelVictor
16th November 2012, 15:08
Apparently rock-dust from gravel does wonders to re-stock the depleted soil.

This summary article gives a wealth of infomation and links on the subject; http://www.soilandhealth.org/06clipfile/nutritional%20quality%20of%20organically-grown%20food.html

PurpleLama
16th November 2012, 15:17
http://www.azomite.com/

Carmody turned me on to this stuff. I have it sown liberally, throughout my garden. I got mine off of amazon, a 44lb bag for about eighty bucks.

Carmody
16th November 2012, 16:50
Yes, not only is the soil depleted, but that we disrupt the little nutrition that we get, via the ill preparation (ability to utilize what is incoming) and situation the body is in, via the mechanism of unnatural chemicals, compounds, and the entire environment (smoke, particles, electromagnetics, Rf frequencies, plastic chemicals, and so on).

Thus, the double correction is required. Proper food intake and removal from the untoward and debilitating environment.

The advertized growth rate for the azomite soil additives is a real thing. If one is looking to have their own garden, things like the azomite are critical, with regard to actually having something more than an 'empty food'.

The idea of needing simply potassium or nitrogen, or phosphorous, and so on... is kinda limited. As an overall functionality in view and answer, it is like thinking and visualizing that rubber bands are the motive force behind all flying devices and flying animals. Expansion in connectivity is required, with regard to thinking, data, rumination and knowledge.

Trace mineral mixes, as a soil additive and correction to original state and function..is where it is really at, and that is where the azomite scores big. The others are important, the basic elements in soil yes, but the entire package of a truly functional soil (grow medium) for plant growth..is something akin to the very wide/varied and complete element mix in additives like the azomite.

An excerpt from the 'story-article' from the azomite website. The data is heretically known as 'ancedotal', but you will get the point quite clearly......:

http://azomite.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=58:history&catid=36:azomite&Itemid=28

"To make his point, Rollin waved a small booklet: The Story of Trace Minerals by Dr. Melchior Dikkers. "Years of intensive study had convinced Dr. Dikkers that trace elements were the key to all living organisms, essential to the structure of certain complex chemical compounds that influence the course of metabolism, a vital factor in the health of every living being."

"Metabolism--the sum total of all chemical reactions that proceed in every single cell of the body twenty-four hours of each day--is what keeps us all alive. Some thirty trillion cells are at work, constantly, in each and every human body, twenty million in the human brain alone. In each cell, the process by which foodstuffs are synthesized into complex elements is carried out by enzymes, large proteins which are themselves synthesized by the cells. And it became clear to Dr. Dikkers that trace elements were essential to the creation of these enzymes, to act as catalysts to bring about chemical changes by their mere presence, without themselves undergoing change. It is a phenomenon for which science has no real explanation, but which clearly cannot occur without both the enzymes and the elements taking in and radiating energy to achieve specific effects."

"Combinations of trace elements have been found, under certain conditions, to acquire entirely new properties, very different from those of individual elements acting singly. There is a noted interaction among trace elements, such as iron and copper, both of which are concerned with blood formation. In plants, iron and magnesium are associated in chlorophyll formation." "Without chlorophyll there would be no life on earth, the very first green plants being the understood link between the energy of the sun and life on the planet. Only green plants and certain microorganisms are able to absorb the sun's energy, store it, transform it, and then transfer it to man in the form of wheat, corn, vegetables, and fruit. Uncooked and unprocessed food will supply enzymes directly to the blood. Some two thousand different enzymes, every one a protein, are synthesized by every cell from amino acids furnished by the blood, obtained from ingested food, best eaten raw."

"The activities of enzymes are extremely susceptible to foods. The mere presence of chemical additives in food may cause some trace elements to become unavailable. The same applies to chemical fertilizers to the soil. They can cause trace elements to become unavailable to plants. Enzyme reactions are influenced by a deficiency of any functional nutrient."

Strat
16th November 2012, 18:08
Carmody I got a question for you:

I've known about Azomite (A-Z of minerals + ite) for some time but haven't used it yet due to it's lead content. It's quite high, but does that get converted or something while it's in the plant. I would buy this stuff, it has rave reviews, but I can't get a straight answer to this question.

conk
16th November 2012, 18:32
Unfortunate, but true. Sadly, there are very effective remedies for this problem. It is imperative that we return to locally sourced food from people who understand the rules! This is why my family guzzle quality minerals and gobble raw food vitamins. Also add Willard's Water to our drinking water. Even doing all the right things is barely enough to maintain, as there are so many negatives in our evironment.

In the coming years non-hybrid, heirloom seed banks will be worth a small fortune.

TigaHawk
16th November 2012, 18:41
Out of pure interest, i wonder how many nutrients and minerals the plant spends trying to protect itself/survive after being sprayed with pestacides.

PurpleLama
16th November 2012, 19:50
Carmody I got a question for you:

I've known about Azomite (A-Z of minerals + ite) for some time but haven't used it yet due to it's lead content. It's quite high, but does that get converted or something while it's in the plant. I would buy this stuff, it has rave reviews, but I can't get a straight answer to this question.


http://azomite.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=66:certificate-of-analysis&catid=38&Itemid=11


http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/hwtr/dangermat/fert_standards.html

Hmmm, it is higher by 1 ppm for the guildelines in WA. I will be invesigating this further.

From the FAQ:


Does AZOMITE® contain heavy metals?
Yes, but in lesser amounts than exist in a typical soil. AZOMITE® is Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) by the US Food & Drug Administration (FDA).



Is the lead in AZOMITE® harmful?
The FDA and American Association of Feed Control Officials establish strict guidelines for the amount of various natural contaminates that show up in all types of feed ingredients. At 6.2ppm, AZOMITE® is well below the guidelines for allowed lead in natural feedstuffs.

Ol' Roy
16th November 2012, 20:02
Guys,
It's not necessary to buy compost. I live in Central Kentucky, USA. We have an abudance of decidious trees. ie. oak, maple, and popalar. When the leaves fall, I mow my grass with a lawnmower plus bagger. The combination of leaves and grass make perfect compost material. Add a little 10-10-10 or lime in your pile on the garden (mix it up) in the spring you have instant compost.

So many people bag there leaves up and send them to the landfill. What a waste! If anything just, mulch your leaves without a bagger. It provides nutrients to your lawn. If nothing else, go out and collect your neighbors lawn and leaf baggings. In most cases they will not accuse you of stealing. lol!

Just reminds me of something. In a temperate zone, collect your green tomatoes before the first frost. Put them in a brown paper bag with a least one ripened tomato. The gases the rippened tomato emits will help rippen the other tomatoes. I have nice tomatoes up till the end of November.

The proof is in the pudding. A nice tomato from my brown bag has juice flowing from the tomato, on a sandwich. Mmm good. Find that in your local supermarket?

As to the mineral content of your soil, yes we are blessed with a rich limestone deposit in our soil. That's why Kentucky horses are so cherished! lol again!

Yes, I understand living in a city has its limitations on nutrifying the soil. But look around, you may have a goldmine within your reach. And it is all FREE!

Carmody
16th November 2012, 20:11
Carmody I got a question for you:

I've known about Azomite (A-Z of minerals + ite) for some time but haven't used it yet due to it's lead content. It's quite high, but does that get converted or something while it's in the plant. I would buy this stuff, it has rave reviews, but I can't get a straight answer to this question.

I've no idea how to answer that. I'm concerned with the aluminum content.

'bio-availability' becomes part of the equation, or actually, likely... the entire equation. Both for the plants and the humans consuming them.

PurpleLama
16th November 2012, 20:29
Carmody I got a question for you:

I've known about Azomite (A-Z of minerals + ite) for some time but haven't used it yet due to it's lead content. It's quite high, but does that get converted or something while it's in the plant. I would buy this stuff, it has rave reviews, but I can't get a straight answer to this question.

I've no idea how to answer that. I'm concerned with the aluminum content.

'bio-availability' becomes part of the equation, or actually, likely... the entire equation. Both for the plants and the humans consuming them.


Is AZOMITE® a bentonite?
No, Bentonite is an adsorbent aluminum phyllosilicate. AZOMITE® is a Hydrated Sodium Calcium Aluminosilicate (HSCAS), and does not swell.

Poking around a bit, the HSCAS seems to be a good thing, but I am not the most astute in chemistry.

For instance:
http://toxsci.oxfordjournals.org/content/41/2/175.full.pdf

meat suit
16th November 2012, 20:52
great thread!

there is also 'sea crop' http://www.sea-crop.com/
this is basically Ormus, but made in a quicker way. have a look... its too expensive to import from the US to where I am, but you guys in the US/Canada could give it a go.... its easy to make too, I should make some for the garden really...as it happens I consume it directly...

Living Food
16th November 2012, 22:23
Spot-on Carmody.

As for azomite...I don't know as I've never looked into it, but I have heard good things about it. I find that trace mineral drops (or diluted sea water), rock dust, and high-quality thermophilic compost are sufficient to produce amazing produce. Although kelp fertilizer is even better then mineral drops or diluted sea water as it contains organic nutrients that make plants far healthier then trace minerals alone.

Another forgotten element of the soil is the humus or organic matter, and the microorganisms that make it there home. These are vital - even if you have the perfect balance of trace minerals and other elements, the plants will always be inferior to those grown in soil with the exact same nutrients, but with a high humus and microorganism count. There is absolutely no comparison. And that's why compost is so important - correct composting conditions soil and adds humus, beneficial microorganisms, and sponge structure to the soil. I'm also convinced biological transmutation occurs during composting, although as far as I know I'm the first person to have realized that.

Make your own compost (http://journeytoforever.org/compost_make.html) Urine and yes, even your own stools (if composted safely) make excellent and free fertilizer, and composting your waste is a much better idea then polluting the environment with it, which is what happens when you flush it. Also excellent is vermicomposting (http://journeytoforever.org/compost_worm.html). The best farms have dozens of earthworms per square foot and the soil is unbelievable, you walk on it and you can literally feel the springiness; no compaction whatsoever, and the crops from such farms are the best in the world. Btw, earthworms love coffee grounds, so if you drink coffee (not good for your health), or you know someone who does, gather up all those coffee grounds and compost them or just add them directly to your soil. They are somewhat acidic, but you can add very large amounts without worrying about a change in pH.

A lengthy but informative guide to composting your own waste, The Humanure Handbook (http://www.gubaswaziland.org/files/documents/resource9.pdf). Also mentions the devastating environmental impact of the barbaric "flush toilets".

Rock dust is a great source of trace minerals; the pioneer in this field was Julius Hensel, and this is his book Bread from Stones (http://www.soilandhealth.org/01aglibrary/010173.hensel.pdf). I disagree with his opinion that animal fertilizer is detrimental to plants, but artificial fertilizer definitely is. More info on rock dust is available at the website remineralize.org (http://remineralize.org/).

And don't forget the old standbys like bio char, green manure, crop rotation, etc.

Even weeds can be very beneficial to your soil if used correctly - and they're wonderfully nutritious too (I live drinking weed juice...tastes horrible but makes you feel absolutely amazing because of all the trace minerals, phytonutrients and the very high electromagnetic vibration). Weeds, Guardians of the Soil (http://journeytoforever.org/farm_library/weeds/WeedsToC.html#contents) - a book that mentions the impressive role of weeds in gardening, great info. The section on eating weeds is disappointing, though; I much prefer to juice 'em raw rather then cooking them and removing most of the nutrients.

Living Food
16th November 2012, 22:37
Add a little 10-10-10 or lime in your pile on the garden (mix it up) in the spring you have instant compost.

Adding the lime is a very smart thing to do, but best to stay away from artificial fertilizers of all types. They destroy the soil and all of the beneficial microorganisms in it.

Living Food
16th November 2012, 22:40
Frankly, anything you find in a supermarket is basically empty calories, even the "fresh" produce (what a joke). My produce is as fresh as it gets - fresh picked weeds and sprouts that are still alive and growing up until they end up in my juicer or mouth. In summertime I treat myself to fresh fruit straight from the tree or bush, but at all other times I avoid it because store-bought fruit is absolutely not healthy. That said, if you're used to eating a diet of processed trash, store-bought fruit is much better for you. It does, however, have many drawbacks, as do store-bought vegetables.

Living Food
16th November 2012, 23:20
More obscure but quite effective methods of improving soil and crop quality include agnihotra ash and the agnihotra Homs ceremony, energized/magnetized water, and paramagnetic stone towers (the latter not being practical for small gardens).

If you grow plants in truly healthy soil, they will be immune to disease and insects and extremely resistant to cold, drought, overwatering and every form of stress, and the taste is divine. The brix rating is one of the best measurements of plant health and nutritional quality there is. Plants with very high brix ratings don't even rot, but merely dehydrate - and therefore have a much better shelf life then the crap we grow today, without any preservatives or artificial wax/coatings.

You'll also find that you fill up with far less food when you eat nutrient-dense foods.

Living Food
16th November 2012, 23:39
People to look into for anyone wanting to learn more about the topic of soil health: Dr. Charles Northern, Dr. Cary Reams, Dr. William Albrecht, Julius Hensel, Lady Eve Balfour, Sir Robert McCarrison, and Sir Albert Howard...for starters :) Like many topics involving health it's both very complex and very simple at the same time. A wonderful website listing works from most of the above, and others I didn't list, is http://journeytoforever.org/farm_library.html. The entire website is chock-full of good information, as a matter of fact. Another marvelous database is http://www.soilandhealth.org/01aglibrary/01aglibwelcome.html

chancy
17th November 2012, 04:34
Hello Everyone:
Living Food's thoughts about humus reminds me of our hay field. For years we had 4 foot high hay. As the years went by even though we were rotating other crops through the field the hay each year steadily got shorter and shorter until in most places it was about 5-6 inches high. It was like a wave of frost had literally destroyed the hay.
We got the soil analyzed and it was up in all nutrients and especially nitrogen.
The last attempt was to put liquid manure on the land. The best is very expensive. $500 dollars a load. You have to water the liquid manure into the soil or it will burn it. Before the next cutting of hay the hay had started to come out of the state of stunting it was in. By the next year we were getting 4 foot hay again. That made me a believer in natural fertilizer. We bought it from the closest dairy who had a pond of approximately 250,000 gallons he was trying to get rid of...or should I say sell because the cost was $500 a load.
Well worth the cost though.
If you can get liquid fertilizer from a dairy or hog farm make sure you water it into the soil due to it's strong but natural trates.
chancy

Carmody
17th November 2012, 18:39
Hello Everyone:
Living Food's thoughts about humus reminds me of our hay field. For years we had 4 foot high hay. As the years went by even though we were rotating other crops through the field the hay each year steadily got shorter and shorter until in most places it was about 5-6 inches high. It was like a wave of frost had literally destroyed the hay.
We got the soil analyzed and it was up in all nutrients and especially nitrogen.
The last attempt was to put liquid manure on the land. The best is very expensive. $500 dollars a load. You have to water the liquid manure into the soil or it will burn it. Before the next cutting of hay the hay had started to come out of the state of stunting it was in. By the next year we were getting 4 foot hay again. That made me a believer in natural fertilizer. We bought it from the closest dairy who had a pond of approximately 250,000 gallons he was trying to get rid of...or should I say sell because the cost was $500 a load.
Well worth the cost though.
If you can get liquid fertilizer from a dairy or hog farm make sure you water it into the soil due to it's strong but natural trates.
chancy

The concern in that one, is what have the cattle or pigs been fed, and what is concentrated in their excrement and associated effluent? for the concentration levels of the correct elements and such combinations may be nicely heightened..but there is also potential for a side issue of high levels of concentration of unwanted chemicals.

Recall (IIRC) DDT killing eagles via egg shell weakening...via concentration of DDT in the seagulls that they where preying upon, due to Seagulls eating the fish that had been hit hard by DDT effluent in the water.

Living Food
17th November 2012, 18:56
Yes, it's best to avoid manure from CAFO animals or other animals fed typical GMO, pesticide, hormone and antibiotic-laden fare if possible. Their manure can even contain dangerous bacteria and parasites. However, if allowed to age for about 2 years, or 6 months or so in a thermophilic compost pile, all dangerous organisms will be dead and most of the toxins present in the manure will have been safely neutralized as well. Done correctly, you can even compost sewage sludge and make it into a safe fertilizer - that's how we should be treating it, not dumping it in the oceans.

blufire
17th November 2012, 21:44
Yes, the nutritional value or density of nutrients of all foods, both conventionally and organically grown have rapidly declined.

There is an exponentially larger demand for food world wide, period let alone the higher demand for organic food. The farmers cannot keep up with the demand and rotate their fields to replenish the mineral content in the soils. They choose . . . starve the people or starve the soil . . . .

Regarding Azomite . . I have used it on my organic farms for many years and love it. I also have my soils tested up to three times a year and add minerals and nutrients to the azomite if mineral levels need to be adjusted. I used to buy it by the semi-truck load.

If using azomite is too expensive get to know the mineral content of different Weeds. Watch what weeds are growing around your property . . .this is Mother Earth’s gentle way of repairing her ‘skin’. You then can hurry the healing along by artificially adding that particular mineral found in that particular weed or just let the weeds grow for a season.

Someone mentioned using dust of road gravel . . . only if your soil is low in ‘lime’ otherwise not a very good idea.

Bhusunda
18th November 2012, 22:44
Interesting thread, like to point out a translation I did of an article about the use of Schindele's Minerals in this context. Probably to expensive to use in the garden though:
Have you eaten your stone today (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?38677-Have-you-eaten-your-stone-today)

Cheers Bhusunda

Living Food
29th November 2012, 23:02
Eating stones is a bad idea, but adding ground up rocks to your soil works wonders. Some types of rocks work better then others. Paramagnetic rock dust works wonders, for example.

conk
30th November 2012, 16:16
Out of pure interest, i wonder how many nutrients and minerals the plant spends trying to protect itself/survive after being sprayed with pestacides.
The human body certainly expends tremendous energy and nutrients cleaning up the toxins we ingest. People often ask me what supplements they should take. I tell them to take nothing until they stop the bad habits first. It does little good to take expensive, quality supplements if you are still poisoning yourself.

Living Food
30th December 2012, 22:46
Another factor causing produce to be deficient in minerals is the high yields being used today - more plants in the same space leads to each of them having less nutrients due to competition and stress caused by lack space. In addition, however, high-yield plants also seem to pick up less nutrients in the soil wether they are overcrowded or not; somehow the genetic manipulation that allows you to cram more plants in the same space leads to them picking up less nutrients even if plenty are available. Probably this is because one of the things that makes a high-yield cultivar have a high yield is because they require less nutrients. Maybe you could only grow 100 normal broccoli plants in your garden before, but you can grow 120 high-yield broccoli hybrids. That may be because they each use 1/5 less nutrients from the soil, freeing up those nutrients for the extra 20 plants. The result would be that the high-yield broccoli only has 80% of the nutrients of the normal broccoli!

So the question is...why would you choose to eat plants engineered to have less nutrients?????

One study (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jsfa.2601/abstract?deniedAccessCustomisedMessage=&userIsAuthenticated=false) on fourteen different cultivars of wheat showed that the zinc, iron, and selenium concentrations in wheat decreased as the yield increased, and also decreased based on when the cultivar was released - ie, the oldest varieties tended to have the greatest concentration of nutrients, whereas the newest varieties tended to have the least concentration of nutrients.

Another study (http://journal.ashspublications.org/content/125/3/344.full.pdf) showed that the levels of calcium and magnesium in broccoli heads had a negative correlation to the density + weight of the heads - in other words, the more the heads weighed, the less nutrients they had gram for gram. As the broccoli in the experiments was grown with the same number of plants per acre for all varieties, it is logical that the broccoli with higher head weight came from high-yield varieties.

This paper* (http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/nsinf/fnb/2000/00000021/00000004/art00009) [Under "Green Revolution varieties of wheat, page 4 to page 5] discusses a study where it was shown that there was a correlation between yield and nutrient density of wheat. The yield of the cultivars increased by roughly 1% every year, with a corresponding decrease in the concentration of iron, zinc, and phosphorous of about .3% every year. It doesn't sound like much, but from 1950 to 1992 - the time the study was conducted - the wheat lost 5 ppm iron and zinc. Assuming that a similar or greater decrease in nutrients occurs in all high-yield produce, which it seems to, that could add up fast.

Most produce on the market has been selectively breed for higher yields for decades. Your best bet is to look for heirloom varieties grown sustainably whenever possible, and even better incorporate as many wild greens in your diet as you can - food as nature intended, never touched by man and his destructive practices.

* You need to click on "View Now PDF" right above the abstract to see the whole study.

More coming.

Living Food
30th December 2012, 23:09
Here's a study (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0889157507000336) that shows that the mineral content of fruits, vegetables and grains in Finland has decreased from the 1970s to mid-2000.

"In most cases trace elements contents are now lower than before...We found that trace element density in vegetable foods has decreased over the past three decades. Per capita daily intakes of mineral elements in the 2000s were lower than in the 1970s, although the consumption of fruits and vegetables has increased since 1970s." [my emphasis]

So people aren't just getting less nutrients from the same amount of vegetables, they're eating more vegetables but still getting less nutrients.

This study (http://www.jacn.org/content/23/6/669.short) looked at the nutrient values for 43 different crops from the USDA database from 1950 to 1999; they found a statistically significant decrease in protein, calcium, phosphorous, iron, riboflavin and ascorbic acid, ranging from a 6% to 38%.

* Protein levels decreased 6%
* Calcium 16%
* Phosphorous 9%
* Iron 15%
* Riboflavin 38%
* Ascorbic acid 20%

This one's (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0946672X08000679) interesting; it looked at the iron, zinc, copper and magnesium content of wheat in the UK and found that the decrease in those nutrients seems to be related to the introduction of high-yield varieties.

"The concentrations of zinc, iron, copper and magnesium remained stable between 1845 and the mid 1960s, but since then have decreased significantly, which coincided with the introduction of semi-dwarf, high-yield cultivars...multiple regression analysis showed that both increasing yield and harvest index were highly significant factors that explained the downward trend in grain mineral concentration."

¤=[Post Update]=¤

A study (http://www.maydica.org/articles/51_417.pdf) on the macronutrient content of corn over the last 80 years showed that as the yield increased, the protein and oil content has decreased while the starch levels have increased. That's not good.

I've been trying to find a way to copy the graphs from the study, but it won't let me. Click on the link and scroll down to the top of page 4; the graphs show the decline over time of overall protein and fat levels as well as the decrease in the essential amino acids lysine, tryptophan, and methionine.

Also look at graph A on page 5, which shows that the level of protein decreases as the plant density (more plants grown in the same space) increases. High plant density also causes an increase in starch content.

The graphs on page 6 show that the newer the corn variety, the less oil it has. It appears we are breeding corn to have higher and higher starch levels at the expense of protein and fat, which of course is harmful to our health.

This is another graph that shows the average changes in protein, oil, and starch content. The big vertical lines show the complete range of change based on growing conditions [environment and density] and the horizontal line in the midle shows the average change:

http://hortsci.ashspublications.org/content/44/1/15/F8.medium.gif






A British study (http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?articleid=870383&show=abstract) showed that there were "statistically significant reductions in the levels of Ca, Mg, Cu and Na in vegetables and Mg, Fe, Cu and K in fruit" in the 20 fruits and 20 vegetables studied, over 50 years. This was based on the data gathered from the UK Government’s Composition of Foods tables. Although you can't see it in the abstract, the study showed that the average copper levels decreased by 80%.

foreverfan
31st December 2012, 05:05
Make sure any heart patient sees this video.

Magnesium Articles
Dosages, forms, benefits, warnings and uses of magnesium

Magnesium is an essential mineral used for hundreds of biochemical reactions, making it crucial for health. Massive magnesium deficiencies in the general population have led to a tidal wave of sudden coronary deaths, diabetes, strokes and cancer. Even a mild deficiency of magnesium can cause increased sensitivity to noise, nervousness, irritability, mental depression, confusion, twitching, trembling, apprehension, and insomnia.

The modern diet, with an overabundance of refined grains, processed foods and sugars, contains very little magnesium. Even the magnesium inside whole grains and fresh vegetables has been declining steadily in recent years because of depletion of minerals in our soils, making magnesium supplementation necessary for most people. Dr. Sircus recommends the use of transdermal magnesium chloride as the most effective way to improve your magnesium levels quickly.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w-kWEkrHMzQ&playnext=1&list=PL819140F83CEBBD77&feature=results_video

PurpleLama
19th February 2013, 22:44
http://soilminerals.com/Agricolas4-8-4_MainPage.htm

Having followed leads from Living Food, this is where I have arrived. My next investment in fertilizer type substances will be the 4-8-4.

Bump.

Soul Safari
20th February 2013, 00:02
I can vouch for her Remag product..

For someone who suffers from panic attacks, palpitations and anxiety this gets my vote! Works instantly as well. Ive noticed that my bones don't ache as much after a workout- especially knees and elbows. I feel much more relaxed come sleep time and feel a real warm, happy glow about myself. Ive also managed to get my dear old mum on it as well. Usually she takes some coaxing and will only take Apple Cider Vinegar. Glad she's coming round to this new information.


Make sure any heart patient sees this video.

Magnesium Articles
Dosages, forms, benefits, warnings and uses of magnesium

Magnesium is an essential mineral used for hundreds of biochemical reactions, making it crucial for health. Massive magnesium deficiencies in the general population have led to a tidal wave of sudden coronary deaths, diabetes, strokes and cancer. Even a mild deficiency of magnesium can cause increased sensitivity to noise, nervousness, irritability, mental depression, confusion, twitching, trembling, apprehension, and insomnia.

The modern diet, with an overabundance of refined grains, processed foods and sugars, contains very little magnesium. Even the magnesium inside whole grains and fresh vegetables has been declining steadily in recent years because of depletion of minerals in our soils, making magnesium supplementation necessary for most people. Dr. Sircus recommends the use of transdermal magnesium chloride as the most effective way to improve your magnesium levels quickly.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w-kWEkrHMzQ&playnext=1&list=PL819140F83CEBBD77&feature=results_video

UniVive
20th February 2013, 00:22
Thank you LivingFoods, this thread is a very important one:)

Over the past couple of months I've started only eating heirloom, non-hybrid veggies (luckily where I live we have a pretty good variety of things), as well as stock piling heirloom seeds on whatever I can. I was so surprised to learn some of the veggies that are actually man made hybrids. (carrots, spinach, celery, etc.)
Since learning which veggies are 'electric foods' it has totally rocked my world.....that and finally getting a greenstar:)

Treating your soil like a part of your family is key, in my book. That, and making sure you're detoxing as best you can. No use in spending all your effort in trying to pump up full of minerals if they're just being leeched out anyway...

PurpleLama
25th February 2013, 13:49
Agricola's 4-8-4, from the website:

Agricola's Best Soil Minerals
Ingredients

Azomite Volcanic Rock Powder:  An ancient deposit of volcanic ash that later became a sea bed, Azomite is a superb source of 67 naturally chelated minerals. Azomite stands for "A to Z Of Minerals Including Trace Elements." From the pink hills of Utah, the Beehive State.

Vashon Glacial Rock Powder:  Freshly ground glacial rock powder from the Vashon glacial deposit on Puget Sound in Washington State, the southern tip of the last ice age.  Freshly ground rock powder increases the paramagnetic force in the soil, allowing greater interaction with the Earth's magnetic field.  Contains more than 60 mineral elements.

Colloidal Clay Phosphate:  A soft, powdery phosphate, Calcium, and trace element source from Florida.  High exchange capacity and readily available. Agronomist Carey Reams used it extensively.

Jersey Greensand:  The famous slow release potassium and iron source from an ancient seabed in New Jersey.  J. I. Rodale recommended it highly.  Also a source of Calcium, Magnesium, and phosphoric acid along with 30 or more trace elements.

Ocean Kelp Meal:  Cold water ocean kelp contains ALL of the naturally occurring elements in seawater.  It is a good source of Potassium and probably the best source of natural Iodine.

Humate Ore (Leonardite/Lignite): Humic and fulvic acids are extremely complex organic molecules that promote life in the soil.  They dissolve in water and penetrate soil deeply, increase exchange capacity, and greatly assist in making minerals available.  Humates also improve tilth and increase water holding ability. The chelated trace elements in Humate ore are immediately available to soil life.

Boron:  Boron is essential for Calcium utilization and movement in living organisms.  When used as directed, Agricola's Best supplies 1.5 ppm Boron  from mines in the Mojave desert of California.

Iron, Manganese, Copper, and Zinc sulfates:  Purified from natural mined sources, these important nutrient  minerals are needed by all living things.  When applied to 1000 sqft (100 mt) Agricola's best supplies approx. 2ppm Copper, 3.5ppm Zinc, 10ppm Manganese and 20ppm Iron in easily available sulfate form.

Plus these Beneficial Soil Organisms in Each 20 lb Bag of Agricola's Best Minerals

4 oz (250g) Biozome® Archaeobacteria:  The life's work of Dr. Carl Oppenheimer of the U of Texas, Biozome is a collection of primitive bacteria from harsh environments around the world.  Biozome can break down toxic pesticides and even oil spills into plant food and water.  Decomposes fresh organic matter quickly and releases nutrient minerals from soil rocks.

1 oz (28g) MycoApply® Endo/Ecto :  Beneficial fungi can increase nutrient uptake and water efficiency by ten times.  MycoApply MAXX is a blend of 4 Species Endo mycorrhizae and 7 Species Ecto mycorrizae.  The various fungi in MycoApply Endo/Ecto will adapt to your soil, with the ones that are best suited to your climate and garden becoming established.