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Spirithorse
28th November 2012, 23:26
Hi everyone,

I just got this sent to me from James via the ECETI newsletter, wanted to share that with you.
http://www.lightspeed-learning.com/testyourself/testyourself.htm

Do have a look, it's interesting...and fun.

It was left brain for me, unfortunately... but I could make her turn :-)

PurpleLama
28th November 2012, 23:28
Hmmm, the link didn't make it....

johnf
28th November 2012, 23:30
Is leaving out links right brain, or left brain?

Spirithorse
28th November 2012, 23:34
Sorry guys, haven't posted these things for ages, even had to look up how to create a new thread....
Could anybody help me getting the link up properly, please?

Is leaving out links right brain, or left brain?

TargeT
28th November 2012, 23:35
http://www.lightspeed-learning.com/testyourself/testyourself.htm

;)

and I see both, and can change the rotation if I concentrate. though I mostly see her spinning clockwise until i concentrate.


Left Or Right Brain?
If you see this lady turning clockwise, you are using your right brain. If you see it the other way, you are using your left brain.
Some people do see both ways, but most people see it only one way.

See if you can make her go one way and then the other by shifting the brain's current.



http://www.lightspeed-learning.com/images/left_right.gif


Experimentation has shown that the two different sides, or hemispheres of the brain are responsible for different manners of thinking.

The following table illustrates the differences between left-brain and right-brain thinking:

Left Brain......................Right Brain

Logical..........................Random
Sequential.....................Intuitive
Rational.........................Holistic
Analytical.......................Synthesizing
Objective......................Subjective
Looks at parts................Looks at wholes

Most individuals have a distinct preference for one of these styles of thinking. Some, however, are more whole-brained and equally adept at both modes. In general, schools tend to favor left-brain modes of thinking, while downplaying the right-brain activities. Left-brain scholastic subjects focus on logical thinking, analysis, and accuracy. Right-brained subjects, on the other hand, focus on aesthetics, feeling, and creativity.

If you look away, she may switch from one direction to the other.

Spirithorse
28th November 2012, 23:42
Thanks Target for getting the link right, would you pm me how you did it, please?
.
http://www.lightspeed-learning.com/testyourself/testyourself.htm

;)

and I see both, and can change the rotation if I concentrate. though I mostly see her spinning clockwise until i concentrate.


Left Or Right Brain?
If you see this lady turning clockwise, you are using your right brain. If you see it the other way, you are using your left brain.
Some people do see both ways, but most people see it only one way.

See if you can make her go one way and then the other by shifting the brain's current.



http://www.lightspeed-learning.com/images/left_right.gif


Experimentation has shown that the two different sides, or hemispheres of the brain are responsible for different manners of thinking.

The following table illustrates the differences between left-brain and right-brain thinking:

Left Brain Right Brain

Logical Random
Sequential Intuitive
Rational Holistic
Analytical Synthesizing
Objective Subjective
Looks at parts Looks at wholes

Most individuals have a distinct preference for one of these styles of thinking. Some, however, are more whole-brained and equally adept at both modes. In general, schools tend to favor left-brain modes of thinking, while downplaying the right-brain activities. Left-brain scholastic subjects focus on logical thinking, analysis, and accuracy. Right-brained subjects, on the other hand, focus on aesthetics, feeling, and creativity.

If you look away, she may switch from one direction to the other.

TargeT
28th November 2012, 23:48
Thanks Target for getting the link right, would you pm me how you did it, please?


I don't mind private lessons, but more people bennifit from public ones :)


The buttons above the posting area : http://projectavalon.net/forum4/images/editor/quote.png = quote code, you highlight what you want to be quoted (click and drag so its blue) then click that button to put the code on (or you can just type it out)

Hope that helps!

Here's what I posted:





http://www.lightspeed-learning.com/testyourself/testyourself.htm

;)

and I see both, and can change the rotation if I concentrate. though I mostly see her spinning clockwise until i concentrate.


Left Or Right Brain?
If you see this lady turning clockwise, you are using your right brain. If you see it the other way, you are using your left brain.
Some people do see both ways, but most people see it only one way.

See if you can make her go one way and then the other by shifting the brain's current.



http://www.lightspeed-learning.com/images/left_right.gif


Experimentation has shown that the two different sides, or hemispheres of the brain are responsible for different manners of thinking.

The following table illustrates the differences between left-brain and right-brain thinking:

Left Brain......................Right Brain

Logical..........................Random
Sequential.....................Intuitive
Rational.........................Holistic
Analytical.......................Synthesizing
Objective......................Subjective
Looks at parts................Looks at wholes

Most individuals have a distinct preference for one of these styles of thinking. Some, however, are more whole-brained and equally adept at both modes. In general, schools tend to favor left-brain modes of thinking, while downplaying the right-brain activities. Left-brain scholastic subjects focus on logical thinking, analysis, and accuracy. Right-brained subjects, on the other hand, focus on aesthetics, feeling, and creativity.

If you look away, she may switch from one direction to the other.

Paul
28th November 2012, 23:48
Could anybody help me getting the link up properly, please?
I fixed the link in the opening post now ... though it looks like I'm late to the party :).

(I'll wager that test would have gotten many fewer views over the years, if it was the silhouette of an ugly old man.)

RunningDeer
28th November 2012, 23:52
Both work. When I stare as if I'm waiting for an idea to pop in my head, or be in that relaxed place in mind, she turns counter-clockwise. I see this as a good focus tool, or at the very least a confirmation tool that both work together.

My focus/think place is in the heart-mind. So I tried it out. It goes both ways. That's really good and new information for me on the heart/brain connection. So thank you, Spirit Horse!

greybeard
28th November 2012, 23:52
The mobile is amazing and very pretty.
Im predominantly right brain but can see anti clockwise too-- assuming it doesn’t just change rotation itself.
Very clever anyway
Thanks
Chris

TargeT
28th November 2012, 23:54
Experimentation has shown that the two different sides, or hemispheres of the brain are responsible for different manners of thinking.

The following table illustrates the differences between left-brain and right-brain thinking:

Left Brain......................Right Brain

Logical..........................Random
Sequential.....................Intuitive
Rational.........................Holistic
Analytical.......................Synthesizing
Objective......................Subjective
Looks at parts................Looks at wholes

Most individuals have a distinct preference for one of these styles of thinking. Some, however, are more whole-brained and equally adept at both modes. In general, schools tend to favor left-brain modes of thinking, while downplaying the right-brain activities. Left-brain scholastic subjects focus on logical thinking, analysis, and accuracy. Right-brained subjects, on the other hand, focus on aesthetics, feeling, and creativity.

If you look away, she may switch from one direction to the other.



Funny, I always considered myself very analytical and logical, rational etc...

Paul
29th November 2012, 00:04
Here's what I posted:
I fancified up your presentation :).


Used ... around the various codes to keep them from expanding, instead of jamming in a dot (.).
Indented the entire display of what was actually posted earlier.

(I am pretty sure I am left brained, regardless of what that test says :).)

johnf
29th November 2012, 00:05
I originally saw it with my right, then changed it , it changed back ,and i felt like my head was going to eplode when i tried to get it going counterclockwise. I hope I made a new left brain wrinkle, lol.

Sidney
29th November 2012, 00:09
clockwise right brained for me.

TargeT
29th November 2012, 00:13
I originally saw it with my right, then changed it , it changed back ,and i felt like my head was going to eplode when i tried to get it going counterclockwise. I hope I made a new left brain wrinkle, lol.

Now I can't get her to make a complete counter clock wise circle, it always switches back to clockwise at the half way point... funny to see her wobble clockwise then counter clockwise...

I always liked that GIF.

WanderingRogue
29th November 2012, 00:28
OK...for a couple minutes I thought maybe I was slightly handicapped and maybe no one had ever had the nuts to tell me because for the life of me I couldn't get her to change directions no matter how long I tried staring or relaxing or concentrating...so I figured I would try looking at her upside down....yes, on my head....it worked! now I can change her directions easily! Brain just needed a kick start...:boink:...lol

For the record, I am clockwise dominant.

kikidoll
29th November 2012, 00:29
unfortunately I think it randomly rotates in both directions :-(

RunningDeer
29th November 2012, 00:34
I originally saw it with my right, then changed it , it changed back ,and i felt like my head was going to eplode when i tried to get it going counterclockwise. I hope I made a new left brain wrinkle, lol.

Now I can't get her to make a complete counter clock wise circle, it always switches back to clockwise at the half way point... funny to see her wobble clockwise then counter clockwise...

I always liked that GIF.

Couple of ideas:

Try the daydream stare or when you empty the mind for an idea to pop up. She'll counter clock. It's not looking but seeing it turn. What? If you daydream stare and then peek to see if it's working, that's putting the mind to task. Just allow and she'll reverse.

I'd also suggest that you know when you swing high on the swing, and then you are about to come down? There's that point when the stomach laughs and giggles. Apply that feeling and watch her go counter clockwise. It's a switch in energetic frequency.

angelahedgehog
29th November 2012, 00:44
I saw it anticlockwise first, then I blinked and saw it clockwise ... If I blink slowly, or change the viewing angle, I can flip between the two. It's fascinating, thanks for posting :)

WanderingRogue
29th November 2012, 00:44
unfortunately I think it randomly rotates in both directions :-(

Ok, I'm sitting here practicing with this thing (instead of getting my laundry done) and it definitely doesn't change directions on its own...in fact, you can make it seem as if she is simply hopping to the left and right with her leg outstretched of you want, and seems to be the easiest way for me to get her to change direction. Maybe try the standing on your head for a few seconds, the change in perspective throws off your expectation of her movement while your brain calibrates for the change of visual imput. =)

enfoldedblue
29th November 2012, 00:56
Kikidoll
"Re: left brain - right brain... which one do you use?
unfortunately I think it randomly rotates in both directions :-("

Parent Post I don't think so. Because, if I remember correctly, a few years ago some friends and I were doing it to gether, and we were all seeing her go different directions at the same time. I am alone now so I can't test that, but I find if I look below the animation (outside the box) so that I see her my peripheral vision, it becomes increasingly easier to make her change directions. And I have noticed also what Whitecrowblackdeer said. If I just daydream and imagine clouds going by she goes counter and when I start thinking of to do lists she goes clockwise.

Edit:

Gee sorry I'm hopeless with quotes...I will master it eventually I promise

TigaHawk
29th November 2012, 01:10
She keeps changing for me. Not Rapidly, but i'll look at her for a while, then i'll refocus and she'll turn the other way.


I wonder if this has something to do with why i feel like im able to look at things and see both sides of the story.

Wind
29th November 2012, 01:40
I've seen this one years ago, it really tickles your brain. It goes clockwise in my case. If I really focus then it will eventually shift to counter-clockwise rotation.

RunningDeer
29th November 2012, 01:57
unfortunately I think it randomly rotates in both directions :-(

FFT Kikidoll: Maybe you are open minded enough to go with the flow, so the perceived "randomly rotates" is fortuitous. If that's not a good enough explanation then I'd say check back tomorrow. See what you see. :wave:

Hervé
29th November 2012, 02:03
Well... individuals attracted to pointy, perky things haven't got a chance in hell or heaven to find out which way she actually rotates... those suffering from some sort of foot-fetich, on the other hand, may have a chance...

see this thread: Are you left brain or right brain dominant? Find out! (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?29920-Are-you-left-brain-or-right-brain-dominant-Find-out-)

... where I posted this:
That spinning beauty's got me into vertigo trying to determine which way she is going and gets me cross-eyed as she keeps switching from one to the other... :wacko2:

Yet, there is only one direction she factually spins...

Let you find that one out... :p

... and this:


I find this little exercise in perception very interesting in that, first there is an actual rotation described graphically, not just an oscillation from one side to the other and, second, that there therefore is an illusion and a factuality... hence the actual direction of spinning is observation and the reverse direction is perception/illusion... 'let you find out which is which...

olgraybear
29th November 2012, 03:07
unfortunately I think it randomly rotates in both directions :-(

Ok, I'm sitting here practicing with this thing (instead of getting my laundry done) and it definitely doesn't change directions on its own...in fact, you can make it seem as if she is simply hopping to the left and right with her leg outstretched of you want, and seems to be the easiest way for me to get her to change direction. Maybe try the standing on your head for a few seconds, the change in perspective throws off your expectation of her movement while your brain calibrates for the change of visual imput. =)

Agreed,
besides spinning left and right,
she can not spin at all

Carmen
29th November 2012, 03:10
That was an interesting exercise. The lady switched periodically for me but for my five year old granddaughter watching at the same time the figure switched much more often!

Tesseract
29th November 2012, 03:29
Clockwise.

Getting it to go counter just by focusing on the animation and trying to get it to 'go' the other way worked eventually but it took some time. I found that by just sharpening up my thoughts, like you do when you have to focus on something to deal with it, the figure would just start going counter automatically.

By letting my mind wander, like you do when you take a sigh and stare off into the middle distance and not engage in problem-solving type thinking I could get it to go back to clockwise.

When I opened this thread I was very ho-hum about it, more new-age self-improvement chaff I thought, so my mind was in the vague unfocused mode. This may be why I first observed the figure going clockwise.

If you first saw it going counter, that could mean that your initial curiosity had a sharper, more earnest, more scientific quality. In other words, how you perceived the thread before opening the link probably determined how you saw the figure. Don't worry if you didn't get the initial result that maybe you wanted.

Tane Mahuta
29th November 2012, 03:35
Left Brain...Right Brain...makes no difference!

Strive for balance!!

Thought it would've been a "no brainer"
(no pun intended)

TM

deridan
29th November 2012, 08:53
if one googles, one finds many quizzes.
most sites say i'm a left brainer, another says 'balanced'
however from the quiz questions i've realizzed that the formalization of learning has got me to switch or integrate processes which are seen as originative from a separate hemisphere

soleil
29th November 2012, 13:59
The mobile is amazing and very pretty.
Im predominantly right brain but can see anti clockwise too


ditto. mostly going clockwise for me too.

Axman
29th November 2012, 14:18
Watch her foot and the shadow foot thats how I make it change direction.

The Axman

13th Warrior
29th November 2012, 15:03
I use both sides equally; most likely because i'm Gemini.

Shamz
29th November 2012, 16:54
Saw this sometime back and initially she was moving only clockwise - then I tried different ways to make her turn anti-clockwise ( it was mentioned that some people do make her go other way ) so I knew I have to do this.
Eventually staring at her for long time ( after making sure my wife is not near me ;) ) I could make her swing either way.

Easiest way as someone above me mentioned is focus on her ankle which is spinning on the floor - and as the tows go behind her legs - imagine turning it other way in your brain... and after some tries you should be able to.

genevieve
29th November 2012, 18:05
I thought: Turn left, and she did. Turn right, and she did.

Over and over and over, with varied pauses in between.

Would the explanation for this be that I'm switching from
one hemisphere to the other as quickly as I please?

Peace Love Joy & Harmony,
Genevieve

Sidney
29th November 2012, 18:10
Ok so just out of curiosity, who here besides me is left handed. (for the life of me I cannot get her to change directions) My husband says I'm focusing on the wrong nipple. HAHA:doh::wacko::shocked:

edit: ok, so if I stare at the reflection of her feet way down at the bottom and get the grounded foot moving left to right I can get her to go counter-clockwise. And if I really focus, i can make her stay for a bit, but for the most part, I am officially right-brained.

DeDukshyn
29th November 2012, 18:20
It starts clockwise for me then switches to counter-clockwise after about 10 seconds. Then I can switch it mentally either way. ;) cool! thanks!

4evrneo
29th November 2012, 19:03
Definitely right brained. Only way to change it is if I dont look at it directly. Interesting and fun stuff !

Thanks,

Now I am not going to get anything done. :)

christian
29th November 2012, 19:15
How strange.

I can't even see her turning counter-clockwise if I tried.

When a look at it, it seems abundantly clear to me that she is rotating clockwise. I mean that as a fact. I don't get how you could perceive that any other way, I mean I'm trying to, but I honestly don't get it. "Objectively" she is turning clockwise, isn't she? I mean, this is a silhoutte, but it's still a woman turning. And she cannot turn in both directions simultaneously, so only one observation can be "correct" there, I'd wager?

TargeT
29th November 2012, 19:31
How strange.

I can't even see her turning counter-clockwise if I tried.

When a look at it, it seems abundantly clear to me that she is rotating clockwise. I mean that as a fact. I don't get how you could perceive that any other way, I mean I'm trying to, but I honestly don't get it. "Objectively" she is turning clockwise, isn't she? I mean, this is a silhoutte, but it's still a woman turning. And she cannot turn in both directions simultaneously, so only one observation can be "correct" there, I'd wager?

since its a 2d image she's not really turning any direction, its all about perception & that is why this test "works"; I suppose it's not very surprising that the majority of people on this forum (I'd wager allmost all) are "right" brain dominant.

Try looking at it upside down like wonderingrogue did.. haha..

thunder24
29th November 2012, 19:53
when i scrolled up and down the page, it was obvious she started spinning a different way, like i would hit a certain spot on the page scroling and she turned opposite...
it randomly changed
not convinced...

peace

christian
29th November 2012, 19:59
since its a 2d image she's not really turning any direction, its all about perception & that is why this test "works"

Every image on a screen is 2d, but still, when I film a woman turning and look at the film on a screen, she would just turn in one direction of course. It's the same with this silhouette in my eyes.

I believe, that you can see it differently, due to the fact that it may be harder to figure out, because you don't have all the reference points you'd normally have. But right now all I can see is her clearly turning clockwise.


Try looking at it upside down like wonderingrogue did.. haha..

For a slight moment I thought this would do the trick, but no, still clockwise.

Fred Steeves
29th November 2012, 20:07
it randomly changed
not convinced...


It was changing so rapidly for me, that I was seriously wondering the same thing thunder, maybe just a fun little psychological mind f**k.(LOL) Then just a few minutes ago, the lady next door came over for some dog food while our tiny dancer was still up on the screen. I asked her what she thought as we watched together, and soon enough we started seeing her spin the opposite ways from one another. That eased my suspicions.

Cheers,
Fred

Hervé
29th November 2012, 20:09
[...]

since its a 2d image she's not really turning any direction, its all about perception & that is why this test "works"; I suppose it's not very surprising that the majority of people on this forum (I'd wager almost all) are "right" brain dominant.

[...]

Correct about the 2D picture not rotating... however, the sequence of pictures do describe a 3D rotation full circle and NOT a mere oscillation from side to side.

But I let you find out which way the 2D graphic rendition of the 3D motion is actually and factually rotating :)

Edit:

See this post (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?29920-Are-you-left-brain-or-right-brain-dominant-Find-out-&p=307457&viewfull=1#post307457) <---

thunder24
29th November 2012, 22:03
ok i can do it now... i think of one emotional thing and it makes it go clockwise...which is sad
I think of another emotional thing or something i want and it goes counter clockwise...

I admit i had to close both eyes and concentrate on the subject and then i could even feel tingles on my head, but when i opened eyes sure enough it changed directions

Spirithorse
30th November 2012, 01:09
Thanks everyone for sharing your experiences, very interesting to read.



How strange.

I can't even see her turning counter-clockwise if I tried.

When a look at it, it seems abundantly clear to me that she is rotating clockwise. I mean that as a fact. I don't get how you could perceive that any other way, I mean I'm trying to, but I honestly don't get it. "Objectively" she is turning clockwise, isn't she? I mean, this is a silhoutte, but it's still a woman turning. And she cannot turn in both directions simultaneously, so only one observation can be "correct" there, I'd wager?

Christian, I'm not surprised that you're at home in the right brain :-)
Believe me, when I first looked at it I couldn't see it any other way than counter-clockwise... like you, I couldn't even imagine how it could change.

After some practice I now can flip it at will.
Is a bit like these subliminal pictures where you can see either way (like the famous 'two faces or goblet' picture).

Fred:

Most convincing your experience - 2 people, two directions at the same time.
Thank you for sharing... proves, it's a mind-thing.

deridan
30th November 2012, 09:41
http://www.bioenergy-services.com/Meditation.htm

a useful document describing alpha, beta, gamma and theta [brain]waves,
and how these relate to integration and functioning[.when.] of the hemispheres

angelahedgehog
30th November 2012, 15:25
An observation ....

Everyone saw the image twirl, some clockwise, some anti-clockwise and some both. It is a clever optical illusion made up of a sequence of images each one obscures whether your seeing the front or the back of the dancer by using a silhouette. So it does indeed appear to turn in either and both directions simultaneously - it's neither actually because its just a collection of still images, animated sequentially to simulate movement.

I was interested in the opinions that the observer was convinced it only went in one direction, and despite several other posts claiming it did, were still not convinced that it could be observed going in a different direction to the one they saw, until they had proof.

So what does this tell you? (Apart from which brain hemisphere you naturally favour)
People's beliefs are inflexible unless substantiated by their own observed perception?

Consider this, there has been an attempt to get people to disconnect their left and right brain - why? well perhaps thats to weaken our collective creating abilities -I think this is what the covering of the one eye in advertising is intended to do and the lightning bolt is about disrupting the bridge between ... Symbols hold information, you may not watch tv or read mainstream stuff but you're exposed to it all the time without realising - posters, billboards, magazines ...

So maybe this little image is also a system's perception diagnostic tool for your body. If you can't see both ways, maybe you need practise flipping between the two modes - get yourself balanced.

Very interesting .... :)

Hervé
2nd December 2012, 07:55
An observation ....

[...]

... it's neither actually because its just a collection of still images, animated sequentially to simulate movement.

[...]

I like the observation as a whole except for the part quoted above.

Here is why:

There is a graphical clue as to which way the silhouette is actually, factually rotating from the sequence of still pictures making up the movie/.gif as explained by christian earlier in the thread in the case of making a movie of someone rotating and cutting it into still pictures to make a .gif.

... sorry if that's too much "left-brain" for some, but that's the case and not an opinion.

Which leads to the problem of one's perception as to which way the silhouette is seen to be rotating: one way is an illusion and one is fooled by it and the other way is an actuality and one's perception of the observed phenomenon is accurate and can be relied upon.


PS: Like many who keep looking at that spinning beauty, I get fooled half the times... :)

angelahedgehog
2nd December 2012, 15:51
Withdrawn because it was a complete waste of time.

RunningDeer
2nd December 2012, 19:27
An observation ....
... it's neither actually because its just a collection of still images, animated sequentially to simulate movement.


I'm sorry if the editing is not pretty, it's not my forte and I was editing on the iPad. I also don't know where best to put pictures online, there used to be a way to link directly to a pics URL on Flickr ... If anyone can recommend a good photo host (not photobhucket!) I'm all ears and fingers.....

Peace, love and lollipops...
Ang ;)

This may help. I upload to photobucket.

both
http://i1262.photobucket.com/albums/ii610/WhiteCrowBlackDeer/both.jpg

older
http://i1262.photobucket.com/albums/ii610/WhiteCrowBlackDeer/old.jpg

newer
http://i1262.photobucket.com/albums/ii610/WhiteCrowBlackDeer/new.jpg

BrianEn
2nd December 2012, 19:34
Right-brained sometimes birdbrained.

Hervé
2nd December 2012, 19:38
I'm not sure what you mean about the one picture being actuality and the other the illusion. I think i was misunderstood, but i don't quite now how to correct that ....

so i decided instead to hunt down the original 34 pics in one, from another thread ....

[...]

Not meaning to be antagonizing, but had you read my posts you would have spared yourself the hunt for the constituting pictures the spinning girl "movie/.gif/.swf" is made of:


[...]

Edit:

See this post (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?29920-Are-you-left-brain-or-right-brain-dominant-Find-out-&p=307457&viewfull=1#post307457) <---

... just needed to "click" on "this post (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?29920-Are-you-left-brain-or-right-brain-dominant-Find-out-&p=307457&viewfull=1#post307457) <---" to get to the sequence of pictures.

That particular sequence of still frames depicts only one rotation -- the factual, actual direction the silhouette is spinning -- and ONLY one, anything else, I agree, is one's mind playing tricks on one when looking at the girl spinning.

Hence, it's not "all an illusion": there is an actual, factual direction in which the girl is spinning as depicted in the sequence of frames.

Accordingly, these statements of mine are stayed [maintained]:


[...]

There is a graphical clue as to which way the silhouette is actually, factually rotating from the sequence of still pictures making up the movie/.gif as explained by christian earlier in the thread in the case of making a movie of someone rotating and cutting it into still pictures to make a .gif.

... sorry if that's too much "left-brain" for some, but that's the case and not an opinion.

Which leads to the problem of one's perception as to which way the silhouette is seen to be rotating: one way is an illusion and one is fooled by it and the other way is an actuality and one's perception of the observed phenomenon is accurate and can be relied upon.

[...]

Paul
2nd December 2012, 20:05
Accordingly, these statements of mine are stayed:


[...]

There is a graphical clue as to which way the silhouette is actually, factually rotating from the sequence of still pictures making up the movie/.gif as explained by christian earlier in the thread in the case of making a movie of someone rotating and cutting it into still pictures to make a .gif.


Does your word "stayed" mean "temporarily stopped" (the usual legal definition)?

In other words, do you currently think that there is actual evidence in the gif of which way the girl is "really" spinning?

So far as I can tell, it is entirely ambiguous which way she is spinning, clockwise or counter-clockwise.

Hervé
2nd December 2012, 20:28
Accordingly, these statements of mine are stayed:


[...]

There is a graphical clue as to which way the silhouette is actually, factually rotating from the sequence of still pictures making up the movie/.gif as explained by christian earlier in the thread in the case of making a movie of someone rotating and cutting it into still pictures to make a .gif.


Does your word "stayed" mean "temporarily stopped" (the usual legal definition)?

In other words, do you currently think that there is actual evidence in the gif of which way the girl is "really" spinning?

So far as I can tell, it is entirely ambiguous which way she is spinning, clockwise or counter-clockwise.

Good point.

"Stayed" is meant as "re-enforced, maintained."



In other words, do you currently think that there is actual evidence in the gif of which way the girl is "really" spinning?


YES! And it is not a "thinking," it is "written" in the graphic script.


There is a graphical clue as to which way the silhouette is actually, factually rotating from the sequence of still pictures making up the movie/.gif...

There is ONLY ONE WAY the girl is FACTUALLY spinning. The reverse way is an illusion. Which, again, demonstrates how one can be so fooled through one's perceptions...

RunningDeer
2nd December 2012, 20:58
WCBD... you did it again with those Ts & Is...
Nope, Amzer Zo http://serve.mysmiley.net/fighting/fighting0040.gif (http://www.mysmiley.net)
I just enlarged and provided the angelahedgehog's photos for everyone.

It's hard to tell if you are joking or not. If you are joking then this is for you - http://emoticoner.com/files/emoticons/smileys/big-smile2-smiley.gif (http://emoticoner.com)

If you are all judgy and critical then please fill in your favorite derogatory self-descriptor for yourself here (______). http://emoticoner.com/files/emoticons/smileys/yapyapyap-smiley.gif (http://emoticoner.com)

Toodles,
WhiteCrowBlackDeer

Hervé
2nd December 2012, 21:05
Apologies.

I removed the incriminating statement since it was inaccurate.

gripreaper
2nd December 2012, 21:05
Well, the short answer is: It depends on how the synapses between the two hemisphere's were "wired" in the early developmental stages of infancy and early childhood. If you are an Archonic reptilian bent on global domination and control, and you have zero empathy for anyone and are totally narcissistic, you are going to want to stamp out all right brain and make your children totally left brain before the age of two.

The rest of us, who have the garden variety neurotic parents, may get a bit of nurturing and stimulation from the love of our parents, and therefore have some connection to our right brain creative side, but I would venture to say that since the turn of the last century, and the advent of public schools, this too has been stamped out of most people.

Pink Floyd's. "The Wall" is a good illustration of this phenomenon, and it would make Edward Bernay's proud, the social engineer of the New Global Century.

So, looking at it from the subjective individual point of view, I have had to work at developing my right hemisphere due to the upbringing I was subjected to. First, I had to recognize the lack of synaptic connection in my own psyche, and then take steps to develop my internal feminine connectedness to this side of my brain. I do believe that the synapses can be rewired, and it takes a resonant return to the scene where the energy was severed and became dominant, but it can be done.

pugwash84
2nd December 2012, 21:18
I made it turn both ways, I must be able to swap which side I use xxx

angelahedgehog
2nd December 2012, 22:12
So far as I can tell, it is entirely ambiguous which way she is spinning, clockwise or counter-clockwise.

Thank you!

Paul
2nd December 2012, 22:43
There is a graphical clue as to which way the silhouette is actually, factually rotating from the sequence of still pictures making up the movie/.gif
...There is ONLY ONE WAY the girl is FACTUALLY spinning.
And, pray tell, which way is it that she is factually spinning, and what is the graphical clue of this fact?

P.S. -- I can guess however that anyone who would say it is unambiguous which way she is really spinning is strongly left brained, and so would see her spinning clockwise :).

angelahedgehog
2nd December 2012, 22:45
Not meaning to be antagonizing, but ...



Not to be pedantic but ... :) ... I was trying to clarify what I was saying earlier that I thought you may not have completely understood what I was trying to say. It is a deliberately ambiguous image. The use of the silhouette is deceiving because it can be perceived to be spinning either way.

Did you see that the trick is explained by my reasoning in the images I created? This is how I understood the images. I think it's important to consider that my understanding may be as correct as yours. As originally stated it was just an observation. Nothing quite as serious as world peace.

If you look at the images I drew on, in white pen, as you would if you were reading a book, you might see that the first set shows the clockwise perspective, and the second set depicts the counterclockwise perspective.
The source image is the same, the white lines change the meaning.

I don't know how to make this clearer so if you don't agree with that, I don't mind. If nobody agrees with that, i don't mind.
it's just an illusion conjured up by your mind and is determined by which brain hemisphere is dominant.

Thank you WhiteCrowBlackDear for adding the images, that was a lovely surprise and I am very thankful. Bless you. :)
The first one might be better labelled "clockwise" and the second, "counter clockwise"

Rolling on .... :kiss:

angelahedgehog
2nd December 2012, 22:54
So, looking at it from the subjective individual point of view, I have had to work at developing my right hemisphere due to the upbringing I was subjected to. First, I had to recognize the lack of synaptic connection in my own psyche, and then take steps to develop my internal feminine connectedness to this side of my brain. I do believe that the synapses can be rewired, and it takes a resonant return to the scene where the energy was severed and became dominant, but it can be done.

You're right, it can be done but it requires awareness and intent to increase the number of connections you have. Eventually you can create more efficient pathways and your hemispheres can work together. You're right about having to overcome the intense programming you're subjected to if you're just left to "flow" through the system with minimal guidance you have so much to learn first (new connections to build). In computing terms, the connection between left and right brain is hard wired and the programming to disrupt communications is just software - can be altered.

:)

Hervé
2nd December 2012, 23:12
There is a graphical clue as to which way the silhouette is actually, factually rotating from the sequence of still pictures making up the movie/.gif<B>

...
</B>There is ONLY ONE WAY the girl is FACTUALLY spinning.
And, pray tell, which way is it that she is factually spinning, and what is the graphical clue of this fact?

P.S. -- I can guess however that anyone who would say it is unambiguous which way she is really spinning is strongly left brained, and so would see her spinning clockwise :).

Sorry Paul, I am not gona tell which are the clues because, lets say, of this saying:

"The truth will set you free... but first it'll piss you off!"


And, so far, this thread -- and even the previous one on this subject -- demonstrates a reality for those who have eyes to see and that is: the divide between people trusting their perceptions and inclined to pursue an illusion and keep being fooled by it and those who have an accurate perception that can be relied upon and, of course, all the shades of greys in-between.

As I wrote earlier:
PS: Like many who keep looking at that spinning beauty, I get fooled half the times... :)

Paul
2nd December 2012, 23:20
Sorry Paul, I am not gona tell which are the clues because, lets say, of this saying:
Ah - Ok then - so be it.

I will continue to trust my lying eyes over someone who claims to have some contrary insights, but declines to state them for rather generic reasons.

Cool ... carry on ...

Hervé
2nd December 2012, 23:48
[...]

... I was trying to clarify what I was saying earlier that I thought you may not have completely understood what I was trying to say. It is a deliberately ambiguous image. The use of the silhouette is deceiving because it can be perceived to be spinning either way.

[...]

I did understand what you wrote and explained which didn't address the point I am making:



An observation ....

[...]

... it's neither actually because its just a collection of still images, animated sequentially to simulate movement.

[...]

I like the observation as a whole except for the part quoted above.

Here is why:

There is a graphical clue as to which way the silhouette is actually, factually rotating from the sequence of still pictures making up the movie/.gif as explained by christian earlier in the thread in the case of making a movie of someone rotating and cutting it into still pictures to make a .gif.

... sorry if that's too much "left-brain" for some, but that's the case and not an opinion.

Which leads to the problem of one's perception as to which way the silhouette is seen to be rotating: one way is an illusion and one is fooled by it and the other way is an actuality and one's perception of the observed phenomenon is accurate and can be relied upon.


PS: Like many who keep looking at that spinning beauty, I get fooled half the times... :)

There is ONLY ONE DIRECTION the silhouette is really, actually, factually spinning.

Both directions are perceptions. However, one is complete illusion and the other matches the reality included in the graphic rendering.

Accordinlgy, the "it's all an illusion" is not correct nor true.

I agree that the gif/swf is deliberately misleading. However, when one considers the graphical clues, one is then able to perceive the actual direction of rotation graphically depicted through the correct anchoring of one's frame of reference.

There isn't much else I can write about this short of divulging the clues which no one else seems to have gotten or else they have kept it to themselves, which I would understand why they would do so.

Paul
3rd December 2012, 00:08
There is ONLY ONE DIRECTION the silhouette is really, actually, factually spinning.
The graphics programmers that I worked with in a prior job could have easily taken a 3D model of the surface of a lovely young lady, then calculated its projection from various angles, then constructed a dynamic gif from a selection of those projections. In which case, there would never have been any real person spinning, not even the modeling of someone spinning, except as simulated in the final product, with the selection of several projections, shown in a selected sequence.

Hervé
3rd December 2012, 00:15
There is ONLY ONE DIRECTION the silhouette is really, actually, factually spinning.
The graphics programmers that I worked with in a prior job could have easily taken a 3D model of the surface of a lovely young lady, then calculated its projection from various angles, then constructed a dynamic gif from a selection of those projections. In which case, there would never have been any real person spinning, not even the modeling of someone spinning, except as simulated in the final product, with the selection of several projections, shown in a selected sequence.

Indeed, that's why I keep with: "Graphically depicted."

The individual(s) who designed this spinning silhouette included graphic clues as to which direction she is being made to be actually spinning.

Paul
3rd December 2012, 02:02
The individual(s) who designed this spinning silhouette included graphic clues as to which direction she is being made to be actually spinning.
And a teapot (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russell%27s_teapot) orbits the Sun somewhere in space between the Earth and Mars :)

By the way, the individual who designed this was, I believe, Nobuyuki Kayahara (http://www.procreo.jp/labo/labo13.html)

Hervé
3rd December 2012, 02:21
The individual(s) who designed this spinning silhouette included graphic clues as to which direction she is being made to be actually spinning.
And a teapot (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russell%27s_teapot) orbits the Sun somewhere in space between the Earth and Mars :)

By the way, the individual who designed this was, I believe, Nobuyuki Kayahara (http://www.procreo.jp/labo/labo13.html)

And?

It doesn't negate that the graphically depicted motion describes a very specific direction of rotation.

Thank you for the Nobuyuki Kayahara (http://www.procreo.jp/labo/labo13.html) link, it makes it even more obvious! Well, at least to me... :)

Paul
3rd December 2012, 02:26
It doesn't negate that the graphically depicted motion describes a very specific direction of rotation.
My point in referencing Russell's teapot is that it is yourself who is making the unfalsifiable claim, so the burden of proof is on you to explain how the depicted motion does determine the direction, not us to provide that no such direction is determined.

Hervé
3rd December 2012, 02:41
It doesn't negate that the graphically depicted motion describes a very specific direction of rotation.
My point in referencing Russell's teapot is that it is yourself who is making the unfalsifiable claim, so the burden of proof is on you to explain how the depicted motion does determine the direction, not us to provide that no such direction is determined.

Nop!

I must admit it is definitely challenging... :)

Paul
3rd December 2012, 02:48
Nop!

I must admit it is definitely challenging... :)

If you should ever relent and decide to show us why one direction of rotation is the definitive direction ... I'd like to know :).

Meanwhile, for now at least, I will remain confident there is no definitive direction.

Only you can choose to change this deadlock.

Daughter of Time
3rd December 2012, 07:21
I looked at the silhouette for about 20 minutes. To my perception, the silhouette changes rotation:

First it was clockwise for quite some time.

Then it went counterclockwise

Then back to clockwise

Then counterclockwise

Then clockwise again

Because it was clockwise for a long time, i imagine I'm right brain. I've always considered myself Right Brain.

But if I'm to go with what I see the silhouette do, then I guess I'm just a scatter-brain.

Hervé
3rd December 2012, 07:39
I looked at the silhouette for about 20 minutes. To my perception, the silhouette changes rotation:

First it was clockwise for quite some time.

Then it went counterclockwise

Then back to clockwise

Then counterclockwise

Then clockwise again

Because it was clockwise for a long time, i imagine I'm right brain. I've always considered myself Right Brain.

But if I'm to go with what I see the silhouette do, then I guess I'm just a scatter-brain.

Thanks for the chuckle DoT!

Actually their interpretation of being able to perceive both is different than a "scatter brain":


The following table illustrates the differences between left-brain and right-brain thinking:

Left Brain .................. Right Brain

Logical ....................... Random
Sequential .................. Intuitive
Rational ...................... Holistic
Analytical ................... Synthesizing
Objective ....................Subjective
Looks at parts ............. Looks at wholes

Most individuals have a distinct preference for one of these styles of thinking. Some, however, are more whole-brained and equally adept at both modes. In general, schools tend to favor left-brain modes of thinking, while downplaying the right-brain activities. Left-brain scholastic subjects focus on logicalthinking, analysis, and accuracy. Right-brained subjects, on the other hand, focus on aesthetics, feeling, and creativity.

Eram
3rd December 2012, 08:33
Very interesting test!

It moved clockwise for me. so... that means right brain eh?
I would never have guessed.
I mean... I know that I'm an intuitive, but strangely, I always figured myself to be quite analytical, logical and objective... hmmm :suspicious:

time for introspection :moil:

sangstar1
3rd December 2012, 09:27
Some years ago, I volunteered to have a brain scan at the Brain Research Institute situated at the Austin Hospital in Heidelberg.
When I was in this tube I was shown objects like animals and some numbers as well plus other things.
At the end when they started to show my brain images, it was revealed that my brain works both the left and right side at the same time.
One Professor there said to me that it was very unusual for anyone using both side of the brain at the same time but he assured me that there was nothing wrong with my brain.

angelahedgehog
3rd December 2012, 09:55
Withdrawn because I don't really care anymore .... Moving on.

Hervé
3rd December 2012, 10:13
[...]

You tell me I'm wrong, instead of commenting on the CONTENT I created...

[...]

Nowhere did I mentioned you being wrong.

The only thing I keep mentioning is that from either possibilities you depicted, there is an ACTUAL, FACTUAL direction of rotation that's graphically depicted and which, obviously, is kept being missed.

greybeard
3rd December 2012, 11:16
[...]

You tell me I'm wrong, instead of commenting on the CONTENT I created...

[...]

Nowhere did I mentioned you being wrong.

The only thing I keep mentioning is that from either possibilities you depicted, there is an ACTUAL, FACTUAL direction of rotation that's graphically depicted and which, obviously, is kept being missed.

Yes but!!!
Please say which is the actual direction factual.
My senses say that somebody is actually joking---in other words the fact is that it spins clockwise for a definite time then anti clockwise then back.
Nothing over much to do with left or right brain thinking--- The Emperor has no clothes said the boy who saw clearly.
So please say what is the fact Amzer Zo--- I dont mind being wrong.

Chris

Kristin
4th December 2012, 00:28
I looked at the silhouette for about 20 minutes. To my perception, the silhouette changes rotation:

First it was clockwise for quite some time.

Then it went counterclockwise

Then back to clockwise

Then counterclockwise

Then clockwise again

Because it was clockwise for a long time, i imagine I'm right brain. I've always considered myself Right Brain.

But if I'm to go with what I see the silhouette do, then I guess I'm just a scatter-brain.

Thanks for the chuckle DoT!

Actually their interpretation of being able to perceive both is different than a "scatter brain":


The following table illustrates the differences between left-brain and right-brain thinking:

Left Brain .................. Right Brain

Logical ....................... Random
Sequential .................. Intuitive
Rational ...................... Holistic
Analytical ................... Synthesizing
Objective ....................Subjective
Looks at parts ............. Looks at wholes

Most individuals have a distinct preference for one of these styles of thinking. Some, however, are more whole-brained and equally adept at both modes. In general, schools tend to favor left-brain modes of thinking, while downplaying the right-brain activities. Left-brain scholastic subjects focus on logicalthinking, analysis, and accuracy. Right-brained subjects, on the other hand, focus on aesthetics, feeling, and creativity.

I am also a scatter brain!

Paul
5th December 2012, 04:27
Here's a larger version of this now infamous rotating image: http://www.procreo.jp/labo/silhouette.swf

Hervé
5th December 2012, 05:05
Thanks, Paul, for the larger version.

So... ain't it obvious!?

There aren't that many graphical features to consider and of the only two possibilities, one is totally impossible as descibed graphically.

Here is a clue:


https://fwtinw.bay.livefilestore.com/y1pVYbt04cyMRMJV8U9btIRRTvuTY6eEBsZN6USreL7Poi-Ugs5spbJ70EPU-ISuoNkspeevYPfFtosaSwr_UBaT8Mn-_nysVFQ/016%20(2).JPG?psid=1

Paul
5th December 2012, 05:20
Thanks, Paul, for the larger version.
You're welcome.


So... ain't it obvious!?
No, quite the contrary.

It remains increasingly obvious to me that there is no preferred direction of rotation.

The image you show just above has texture and depth clues absent in the infamous silhouette.

Daughter of Time
5th December 2012, 05:23
Here's a larger version of this now infamous rotating image: http://www.procreo.jp/labo/silhouette.swf

Well, it was the same thing again for me:

first clockwise

then counterclockwise

then clockwise again

then counterclockwise

then clockwise...

And Amzer Zo, I don't get the clue!

Paul
5th December 2012, 05:27
Well, it was the same thing again for me:
When I first viewed this image, it was pretty consistently rotating clockwise (left brain). Only by looking away and "holding my mind" just right could I get it to rotate the other way.

By now, I can blink, get one, blink, get the other way, back and forth ... too much practice :).

(or ... is it that my brain is becoming more scattered ?)

Hervé
5th December 2012, 05:31
[...]

It remains increasingly obvious to me that there is no preferred direction of rotation.

[...]

True from a preception viewpoint... but from a graphical analysis, there is only one direction of rotation that's being described :)

Hervé
5th December 2012, 05:38
[...]consistently rotating clockwise (left brain).

[...]

(or ... is it that my brain is becoming more scattered ?)

Cough... cough...

According to the op linked webpage:



Left Or Right Brain?


If you see this lady turning clockwise, you are using your right brain. If you see it the other way, you are using your left brain.


Some people do see both ways, but most people see it only one way.

Daughter of Time
5th December 2012, 05:39
[...]

It remains increasingly obvious to me that there is no preferred direction of rotation.

[...]

True from a preception viewpoint... but from a graphical analysis, there is only one direction of rotation that's being described :)

I still don't get it.

Maybe I am a scatter-brain after all!

OK, so according to your last post, it's the brain that sees it rotate one way or the other. I did get that right from the start, but... how is this accomplished by a simple design of a silhouette? How is the silhouette made to rotate if clockwise or counterclockwise rotation is all in one's brain? I'm finding this rather frustrating...

TargeT
5th December 2012, 05:47
I think the graphic is ambiguous enough that it does NOT describe a direction.. Each frame can be seen as spinning either way depending on perception





When I first viewed this image, it was pretty consistently rotating clockwise (left brain).

I wonder if our professions give us this false sense of left brain dominance.... Haha

Paul
5th December 2012, 05:51
I'm finding this rather frustrating...
Yeah - whether or not that is Amzer Zo's intention, I have no way to know. But it is the affect of his pronouncements on this thread.

Hervé
5th December 2012, 06:11
I am sorry that anyone feels frustrated with this and I didn't think I would be the only one to catch on the graphic design but, so far, so it is.

I too get fooled half of the time in spite of the knowledge derived from the graphic sequence :)

What's that saying about "... it's in the details?"

Daughter of Time
5th December 2012, 06:18
I am sorry that anyone feels frustrated with this and I didn't think I would be the only one to catch on the graphic design but, so far, so it is.

I too get fooled half of the time in spite of the knowledge derived from the graphic sequence :)

What's that saying about "... it's in the details?"

Maybe if I understood how graphic designs are made to work on a computer screen this might become clearer to me. But my technological ineptitudes are rather unaparalleled.

Anyhow, it been frustrating and amusing at the same time.

Thanks for the entertainment.

Paul
5th December 2012, 07:03
Maybe if I understood how graphic designs are made to work on a computer screen this might become clearer to me. But my technological ineptitudes are rather unaparalleled.
Well, I'm not a graphical designer or programmer myself, but I spent twenty years working side by side with some of the best such to be had.

In the case of this silhouette, one could create such an image (I do not know how Nobuyuki Kayahara actually did it) by using ray tracing software, with both the light source and camera (light sensor) at "infinity".

Imagine a wall filled with tiny laser flashlights, shining at another wall filled with tiny cameras, one laser for each camera, all the laser beams in parallel. Imagine the solid object in between, blocking some of the beams. Shine each light, and record whether its beam makes it to its corresponding camera. The light gets through, except when the solid body is in the way.

Don't actually build this apparatus physically, rather simulate the calculations in a computer. Computers are quite good at such repetitive calculations (especially large parallel computers, such as what I specialized in.) Notice in doing this that it does not matter which is the light source, and which is the light sensor. One could switch the pairs of light and camera around and get the same answer.

Using such technology, no actual rotating lady need ever have existed. Rather a single solid image (data file) of such a lady need be computed one time, perhaps by using the equivalent of the U.S.'s Transportation Safety Administration's (TSA's) "full body scanner". That single solid image is reduced to a simple solid 3D opaque data model of an object, with no surface texture. It's just computer bits saying there's object at this location, but not at that location, for many locations in 3D space.

This ray tracing software thus calculates the silhouette of such a solid, from a range of angles. The silhouette with the light at azimuth 30 degrees and the sensor at azimuth 210 degrees would be identical, pixel for pixel, to that with the light and sensor azimuth's reversed. Then assemble 30 or 40 such silhouette's, taken at sequentially increasing (or decreasing, doesn't matter) azimuth angles, sufficient to make one full circle, into a flash (swf) video.

All the above technology existed and was generally available to professional practitioners in the field by the mid 1990's.

No lovely lady was harmed in this experiment, or even made dizzy :).

a1exanderga11ier
5th December 2012, 08:50
I occasionally ponder whether or not our under-functioning corpus callosum -- the "bridge" across the hemispheres of the brain -- to human physiology is an example of a modification which rendered our Species more "useful" to the "gods..."




http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-_DfHGJ92XHo/Ty8nie1LV8I/AAAAAAAADFA/CU0F6swicy8/s1600/eye_of_horus_thalamus_brain.jpg



At 01:25 in the video below, Jim Sparks (http://www.jim-sparks.com/faq.html) elaborates on a recent encounter between himself and what he describes as a "near future human" (unaltered? upgraded?) who writes with both hands simultaneously, engages in telepathy, carries on conversation etc.




Vk3gENi9SKU

a1exanderga11ier
5th December 2012, 08:56
As for the rotating lady, the orientation of bony landmarks and muscle groups convince me that she would perceive herself as rotating to her right [the big toe, arch of the foot, quadriceps, and medial/lateral ankles give it away].

Hervé
17th November 2013, 14:49
Despite what you've been told, you aren't 'left-brained' or 'right-brained' (http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/nov/16/left-right-brain-distinction-myth)

The brain is more complex than corporate team-building exercises suggest, but the myth is unlikely to die anytime soon

Amy Novotney (http://www.theguardian.com/profile/amy-novotney)
theguardian.com (http://www.theguardian.com/),
Saturday 16 November 2013 12.30 GMT


http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2010/11/16/1289912198718/A-human-brain-006.jpg

A new two-year study found no evidence that participants had a stronger left or right-sided brain network. Photograph: Bbs United/Getty Images


From self-help (http://www.amazon.com/Left-Brain-Right-Whole-Thinking-ebook/dp/B00E66Q6CA/ref=sr_1_6?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1384399894&sr=1-6&keywords=left+brain+thinking) and business success books (http://www.amazon.com/Right-Brain-Business-Plan-Jennifer-Lee-ebook/dp/B004O4D1X6/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1384399652&sr=1-4&keywords=right-brain+left-brain+thinking) to job applications (http://education.yahoo.net/articles/careers_by_brain_type.htm) and smartphone apps (https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.movisol.hemisferios&hl=en), the theory that the different halves of the human brain govern different skills and personality traits is a popular one. No doubt at some point in your life you've been schooled on "left-brained" and "right-brained" thinking – that people who use the right side of their brains most are more creative, spontaneous and subjective, while those who tap the left side more are more logical, detail-oriented and analytical.
Too bad it's not true.

In a new two-year study published in the journal Plos One (http://www.plosone.org/article/info%253Adoi%252F10.1371%252Fjournal.pone.0071275) , University of Utah neuroscientists scanned the brains of more than 1,000 people, ages 7 to 29, while they were lying quietly or reading, measuring their functional lateralization – the specific mental processes taking place on each side of the brain. They broke the brain into 7,000 regions, and while they did uncover patterns for why a brain connection might be strongly left or right-lateralized, they found no evidence that the study participants had a stronger left or right-sided brain network.

Jeff Anderson (http://neuroscience.med.utah.edu/Faculty/Anderson.html), the study's lead author and a professor of neuroradiology at the University of Utah says:
It's absolutely true that some brain functions occur in one or the other side of the brain, language tends to be on the left, attention more on the right.
But the brain isn't as clear-cut as the myth makes it out to be. For example, the right hemisphere is involved in processing some aspects of language, such as intonation and emphasis.

How, then, did the left-brained/right-brained theory take root? Experts suggest the myth dates back to the 1800s, when scientists discovered that an injury to one side of the brain caused a loss of specific abilities. The concept gained ground in the 1960s based on Nobel-prize-winning (http://www.nobelprize.org/educational/medicine/split-brain/background.html) "split-brain" work by neuropsychologists Robert Sperry (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Wolcott_Sperry), and Michael Gazzaniga (http://www.psych.ucsb.edu/people/faculty/gazzaniga). The researchers conducted studies with patients who had undergone surgery to cut the corpus callosum (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corpus_callosum) – the band of neural fibers that connect the hemispheres – as a last-resort treatment for epilepsy. They discovered that when the two sides of the brain weren't able to communicate with each other, they responded differently to stimuli, indicating that the hemispheres have different functions.

Both of these bodies of research tout findings related to function; it was popular psychology (http://www.theguardian.com/science/psychology) enthusiasts who undoubtedly took this work a step further and pegged personality types to brain hemispheres.

According to Anderson:
The neuroscience (http://www.theguardian.com/science/neuroscience) community has never accepted the idea of 'left-dominant' or 'right-dominant' personality types. Lesion studies don't support it, and the truth is that it would be highly inefficient for one half of the brain to consistently be more active than the other.
Yet, despite Anderson's work and other studies (http://scan.oxfordjournals.org/content/8/4/475.abstract?sid=b99d03b9-38cc-4858-98e3-49f54244898d) that continue to disprove the idea that personality type is related to one or the other side of the brain being stronger, my guess is that the left-brained/right-brained vernacular isn't going away anytime soon. Human society is built around categories, classifications and generalizations, and there's something seductively simple about labeling yourself and others as either a logical left-brainer or a free-spirited right brainer.

Similar to the Myers-Briggs test (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myers-Briggs_Type_Indicator) – another widely used personality test with limited scientific evidence – the left-brained/right-brained thinker theory provides us with an explanation for why we are the way we are, and offers insights into where we fit into the world. It's also a great conversation starter – and if used as a novelty, or a way to strengthen the "weaker half" of your brain, the myth is pretty harmless.

The problems start, however, when the left-brained/right-brained myth becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. When your 12-year-old fills out an online personality test that pegs her as a "right-brainer" and she decides to skip her math homework – because the test told her she isn't good with numbers – the persistence of this false dichotomy starts to become destructive. The same goes for the unemployed worker who forgoes applying for their dream job because the job description calls for creativity skills they think they may not have.

What research has yet to refute is the fact that the brain is remarkably malleable, even into late adulthood. It has an amazing ability to reorganize itself by forming new connections between brain cells, allowing us to continually learn new things and modify our behavior. Let's not underestimate our potential by allowing a simplistic myth to obscure the complexity of how our brains really work.


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I found it interesting that the author of the above article, although making a few steps in the right direction, stops short of considering the obvious: what in the world would entice a brain -- the so-called, according to some, "seat" of all thoughts, emotions, behaviours, etc (hence, it should be pleased with itself)... you know, the "It's all in your DNA!" kind of people -- to "re-wire"... I mean, birds haven't rewired their brains to remodel their nests according to some idea on aesthetics (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aesthetics)...

sheme
17th November 2013, 15:07
This is a random program nothing to do with individuals control -scroll the picture until you can only see her feet concentrate on the standing foot.

Hervé
17th November 2013, 15:11
This is a random program nothing to do with individuals control -scroll the picture until you can only see her feet concentrate on the standing foot.

Since this is an ordered sequence of pictured graphics... there is nothing random about it.

You are right, though, about concentrating on the feet... :)

sheme
17th November 2013, 15:16
The random bit starts depending where you begin your study.

Eram
17th November 2013, 15:20
Yep,

It's all in the details (of the toes) ;)

Mu2143
17th November 2013, 15:55
.............................