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jagman
27th January 2013, 08:21
Hello Avalon,

If you have not done so already, It's time to put together a Emergency Kit! A backpack or book bag will suffice for storage of your kit. You probably will be able.
to find quite a few items that you will need laying around your house. What items you
dont have you can probably pick up for about 20 dollars.

Pack 3 days worth of food and water for one person.
Flashlight and batteries
Thread & needle
Liter & matches
couple of candles
Fishing line and hooks
antibiotics
Tape & bandages
bottle of rubbing alcohol
Sharp Knife & fork, Bowl
Pocket radio & Extra batteries
Ink pen & paper
Compass & map of your surroundings.
Find out where your closest fresh water source is.
If you dont have a camoflage outfit get one.

Ofcourse these are some pretty loose guidelines and i know i have left out alot but it
is time to prepare and it could very well mean the difference in survival or death!
This is not about fear! This is about Empowerment!

Ammit
27th January 2013, 10:19
Nice one Jagman.

People also need to consider their life habits. I do a lot of driving, so, I keep a bug out bag in my car as well as my house. I also have one strategicaly hidden in my area. All carry the same items, except the hidden one. The reason for this in my mind is simple, if for some reason I was unable to return home then I can still bug out with my car. If I am on foot then I can still bug out with my hidden kit.

I know it may sound paranoid but why not be ready for anything.

Also my hidden bag can act as a spare to replenish me for a further 5 days and has a small metal box which is grounded to a 4 foot sunk copper pole. This contains repicated data on different media.

Ammit

D-Day
27th January 2013, 10:41
Hey jagman, you forgot to pack your guns and ammo!!

... silly bugger ;)

Ammit
27th January 2013, 11:04
Also, as a tip.

If you use fast food places or your friends do, collect or ask them to collect the free items for you. Teabags, coffee sachets, salt, pepper hand wipes, sugar and whitener.

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b40/donnyindiana/freebees_zps54334b8a.jpg

778 neighbour of some guy
27th January 2013, 13:56
Contents of my "funny" Bag.

Hacksaw plus blade (2.49 euro), folding pruning saw (7 euro), Mora knife ( 29 euro), around the sheath i have wrapped about 10 meters of red nylon cord twelve lare zip ties, some ranger bands and a fire steel ( about twelve euro all together), small folding pick and shovel ( 7.99), siphoning pump ( so i can steal your gas out of your wrecked car or the water out of your toilet tank or shallow puddles 2.00 euro), Esbit stove (1.25 euro)with some striker tipped barbeque starters ( 1 euro 29 cents) these bbq starters burn about five or six minutes each, plenty of time to fix a burger, chinese military water filter 0.01 micron ( 2000 liters 35 euro), tiny flashlight ( 1.25 euro), cheap @ss multi tool ( 3.00 euro), knife sharpening ( 3.00 euro), small good folding knife (16.00 euro), two emergency space blankets( 1 euro each), small am/fm radio and spare batteries ( 22 euro all together). All that stuff fits in a small 10 inch netbook case btw ( left in the picture)

This is not a new pic btw, i have added a large poncho( say tent) and a life straw to this.

20191

Below some on the move caps i made myself, i make these all the time lately and have added them to the bag, i also have a small dripper bottle with Sole and a set of mms 1 incluided, the capsules contain good nutrients, spirulina, chlorella, maca, wheatgrass, chia seeds, and hemp protein powder, ascorbic acid, not a lot of calories but very good first class nutrients.

20192

It was a small investment, but i am betting my @ss this is the most usefull bag in town in case of whatever. All of this i usually carry in the large front pouch of my 25 liter every day backpack ( if you pack smart it fits and you dont even notice its there when you get used to it) plenty of room for my stuff i need for work and my lunch and camera. Nobody but me knows its there and i never show and never tell, I dont own a car, just a folding bike since i live in the city, so i had to be smart about this, i think i will do fine with this stuff, i see purses from my female collegues who contain more useless crap then the small very usefull lifesaving baggie i carry around stealthily it also weighs less.

Picture below, the cash I allways carry ( you never know, I saved this a buck/euro at a time and took it to the gas station to change it into larger bills and it has added up over time, two years), the sleeping bag is a tiny microfiber bag and weighs about 200 gram and goes to 7 celsius, inside i rolled up a small travel sheet bag that takes care of me to below zero), that fishing rod is a pen rod, its about 20 cm long and extends to 1 meter ( crappy old nokia for size comp), the ducktape is 20 meters rolled on some old useless discount card from a supermarket and a small folding multitool, this stuff i keep at home btw, but its always where i know i can just stuff it in my bag and split.

20194

Hope the contents can get you started to if you decide to get some basic stuff together, it will be the best portable life saving investment you have ever made, SERIOUSLY!

Regards

Edgar

Ammit
27th January 2013, 14:35
Wow, I love that small fishing rod.

That is indeed a good pack, something I have done to my bike to also help when needed. Next time you lube the bottom bracket, firmly plug the tube that leads to the seat. I store all my fire making kit in this which includes kindling and as we are not looking for boy scout skill badges, I also have 2 fire lighters in there too just in case it is almost impossible conditions to start a fire normally. All this is stuffed in a slit plumbing pipe that just fits into the bike tube. It also has a piece of para cord so I can pull the bugger out when needed. Once all is in, replace the saddle. I also have water proofed the top of my seat stem so all is bone dry.

WhiteFeather
27th January 2013, 16:21
Great thread Jag. An outdoor survival book is good to have on hand as well.
Here's a free manual on Pdf. By The US Army.

www.ar15.com/content/manuals/FM21-76_SurvivalManual.pdf

Shamz
27th January 2013, 19:56
Hello,

I have not been online here for last 20 odd days... was away to meet family.

Can you please tell why do we need to make this emergency kit -- another doomsday date on the horizon ?? or was it just a suggestion for the members ?

thanks
Much love

Ammit
27th January 2013, 20:04
Shamz

Personally, I have one because I go out of town a lot into country side where not much else is around. A simple breakdown in the middle of nowhere and you have to take your chances, but, with such a pack in the car you can at least be comfortable.

Besides, I have had a complete bug out bag since I was 20, that was after I nearly froze to death from lack of kit and education.

Ammit

BrianEn
27th January 2013, 20:08
Non smokers can also build a supply of tobacco. That will be a great trading item.

778 neighbour of some guy
27th January 2013, 23:00
Hello,

I have not been online here for last 20 odd days... was away to meet family.

Can you please tell why do we need to make this emergency kit -- another doomsday date on the horizon ?? or was it just a suggestion for the members ?

thanks
Much love

Voluntary or unvolatary extended camping kit, how about calling it that, coincidence or sychronicity anwsered my questions you ask too, at the homeless shelter where i occasionally still work among other places we have a great guy, veteran, ptsd, fubar, he is also a well travelled worldwise old fart, but could no longer keep his regular job he got with some effort ( economic crisis) lost his house two years ago, whenever and who ever finds the shelter has to go through a minor security check, meaning, we do not want the following items in house to garrantee the safety of everybody in house, knives, pointy stabby looking objects, alcohol, drugs and whatever crap that even remotely resembles the before mentioned items. This means you let us take apart your bag/backpack and check it. The fellow was in possesion of all the stuff i bought myself after finding this in his bag, he lost his house and was too proud to come into a shelter when he got kicked out of his house because he could not pay his rent anymore, the man assembled the kit with his last money and he managed to live with nothing but that stuff/and his experience and a small tent for two years quite comfortably outside before he finally made the decision to go to the shelter ( getting old and tired), shelters are full most of the time btw and you lose your pride, dignity and privacy and the rules you have to play by are made by someone else, this man was the best prepared of any homeless guy i ever saw and also the smartest. Whatever happens in my life, knowing i have this stuff that cost me under 200 bucks all together makes me personally feel better, in the mean time its fun camping and if all goes well thats all it will be ever used for.

Tip from Kees ( the homeless guy) BUY/EAT MORE PEANUTBUTTER, and thats a good tip.

This is an edit

He had more tips.

When you are cold, do not drink coffee, you will dehydrate twice as fast, drink tea ( not strong) or some stock or just hot water.

Dont sweeten things with white sugar in particular, you will get a short energy boost but then you crash hard.

Duct tape, duct tape, duct tape, Fixes clothes ( when used on the inside of your ripped garments it works best), tents, is a bandage, is a windstopper on your zipper, closes up your sleeves and the bottom of your pants ( kills the windchill), makes nice hats, band aids, tourniqets, makes hacksaw handles, makes collapsable drinking bowls, plates and much much more.

Clean sigarette filters in a straw ( about 7 seem to be ideal) make a decent water filter. ( good enough to drink rain water of innercity dirty puddles or from any raingutter).

Cans are great stoves.

You can cook in zip lock bags when put in boiling water, you cooked and still have clean water to drink or make tea or wash up.

Buy good vitamins whenever you have some spare money.

Get a small old dog from a pet shelter, they dont judge you and are warm in you sleeping bag.

Tin foil and spray on glue and a large poncho makes four season emergency tents, tealights will do the rest of the heating.

Carmody
28th January 2013, 00:01
The thermally reflective blanket has the ability to block a heat signature. They are very small and compact. pack two. With good duct tape, or 'gaffer's tape' being the best choice, they could be a tent, in a pinch, in a way that thermal recon hardware cannot easily find. the closest equivalent to gaffer's tape, would tape used to repair tarps. specifically that kind, as it is much more intense and waterproof than duct tape of any kind. Months of use, in one application.

Add in MMS for water and wounds, disease and so on. Something like antacids could be critical, depending on the person.

And effedrine - A small container of stimulants. Never know how far you are walking. Amphetamines where critical to the German blitzkrieg's efficacy. tea candles and a small fold down stove, for putting the candles under. A fondue set of the right design can be a very good choice, if you can find the right one. all you want is the wire frame fold down stove part. Or, the dual opening small cavity type for wind and rain breaks. heats the food slowly, keeps the wind and rain out, keeps the light from being seen.

Small fold up solar panel, for charging a GPS or phone or radio, or flashlight batteries, and so on.

I tend to have about 100 liters, or 25 gallons of stabilized (treated) gasoline in the garage, at all times, and two different sized generators. One for whole house, one for small use, 6500 watt, and 1500 watt. Plus a pure sine UPS with about 1500watt capacity, with built in battery function of about 200-300 minutes use before charging is necessary. I can also add batteries to it. A couple of back up solar panels, and so on.

778 neighbour of some guy
28th January 2013, 00:33
The thermally reflective blanket has the ability to block a heat signature. They are very small and compact. pack two. With good duct tape, or 'gaffer's tape' being the best choice, they could be a tent, in a pinch, in a way that thermal recon hardware cannot easily find. the closest equivalent to gaffer's tape, would tape used to repair tarps. specifically that kind, as it is much more intense and waterproof than duct tape of any kind. Months of use, in one application.

Thanks Carmody, all great tips too.

1H5QNEVu6C8


Add in MMS for water and wounds, disease and so on.

Thank god for Jim Humble, i have been using it since i saw the video and it is miraculous stuff, so is CDS btw ( make that myself).


the dual opeing small cavity type for wind and rain breaks. heats the food slowly, keeps the wind and rain out, keeps the light from being seen.


Top and bottomles small can will do just fine for that purpose i think, just poke two small airholes in it, put your can of food on top and you are cooking indeed. And Carmody, for some reason i think you will like the videos this below fellow makes.

-3mudUWyXxk

Carmody
28th January 2013, 01:04
The 'tarp repair tape' is the best of all, it leaves even the gaffer's tape in the dust. And that it is actually more widely available. it can be found in many a hardware store or, more likely in a farming supply shop. Also construction supply shops and so on. Gaffer's tape will last, but it won't last outside for months on end.

The tarp repair tape will last under any conditions for months, and it has not any side rip issues, it is designed to withstand all stressing of any kind, from any angle. It is the '200mph duct tape' of NASCAR racing 'instant repair' fame. The gaffer's tape gets stronger over time, in it's bonding, same for the tarp repair tape. Think of it as one sided 3M carpet tape. that insane bonding characteristic. gaffer's tape is designed to be removed. The tarp repair tape is designed to be permanent.

Shamz
28th January 2013, 04:20
I want to Thank Jagman - for starting this thread -- and also Ammit and 665 plumber of the beast ( for the lack of original name ) -- for replying to my post.

I agree and fully acknowledge that general preparedness is a must in these times and our members here can point to lot of different stuff based on their experiences and what one can often ignore or forget.

Thank you all again... please pardon me for derailing the OP ---

Much love

jagman
28th January 2013, 04:35
Hello Shamz
There is know specific threat that I intended for this thread. There are quite a few people that cannot afford to prep, So I just wanted to let them know that it would not cost a fortune to put together a life saving bag.

Ammit
28th January 2013, 18:18
Exactly Jagman.

You can produce a full bug out bag or emergency bag from your own home.

People should actually take time out just to see what they do on a daily basis. Besides a stove or microwave, most other things are there.