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apokalypse
16th February 2013, 08:38
Thousands of dolphins spanning across 7 miles of ocean were sighted off the coast of San Diego on Thursday, a boat captain told NBC 7 San Diego.

Capt. Joe Dutra of Hornblower Cruises said he saw a “super mega-pod” of common dolphins Thursday around noon while he was on his daily tour. He said the pod was more than 7 miles long and 5 miles wide.

Dutra said the boat tour followed the pod for more than an hour and said he’s never seen anything like it.

“When you see something that is honestly truly beyond belief,” the captain said.

Guests aboard the boat started screaming and pointing when they first saw the school of adult and juvenile common dolphins. Dutra estimated there were about 100,000 dolphins swimming in the area.

“They were coming from all directions, you could see them from as far as the eye can see,” he said. “I’ve seen a lot of stuff out here… but this is the biggest I’ve ever seen, ever.”

Whale and dolphin watching tours have done particularly well this year, with dozens of animal sightings reported.

Marine mammal expert Sarah Wilkin said the reason the large pod might be there is because there’s plenty of food in the area, including sardines, herring and squid.

“They’re attracted to kind of the same thing, they might wind up in the same place,” she said.

Though dolphins typically travel in groups of 200 or less, Wilkin said “super-pods” are not unheard of.

“They’re definitely social animals, they stick together in small groups,” she said. “But sometimes, the schools come together.”

Dutra, who’s been boating for decades, said he felt lucky to enjoy such a rare phenomenon.

“You had to be there to experience it,” he said. “It was truly spectacular.”

http://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/local/Thousands-of-Dolphins-Spotted-Near-San-Diego-191455121.html?_osource=SocialFlowTwt_BAYBrand

Wow...upcoming of some event?

Cidersomerset
16th February 2013, 09:21
I saw a story about this last year,

Dolphin Super Pod off South African Coast - Chase Jarvis + Mike Horn


i92d4WCpahM

Published on 16 Aug 2012


While sailing with MikeHorn.com off the coast of South Africa we encountered
a superpod of literally thousands of dolphins. Kate snagged this video with her
iPhone while we were photographing/filming with other equip - we will definitely
pull together that video asap. Until then, enjoy this!

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The wonders and reality of nature, i did not realise Orcas hunted
Dolphins.Lean't something new .Orcas are one of the top sea predetors
and this shows even the loveable Dolphin has more than just man to
fear in the Mammal world.



EoqQpL2XZcE

Published on 24 Aug 2012


The best thing about working on the ocean is never knowing what you will find.
Thanks to Kira Matiwane and Katja Vinding-Petersen for spotting this incredible
encounter. Never before has this predatory behaviour been documented in
Gansbaai! For whale watching tours, click www.whalewatchsa.com



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Orca Play with Dolphin then Kills It


F_YN5GnW94o

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On a happier note...

fB3FT3t6_sE

Cidersomerset
16th February 2013, 09:27
Dolphins have always fascinated me and I view them as the
humans of the ocean and many stories have come down the
ages of positive interraction,( even though they are still killed
in some fishing communities)......


I posted this atricle on another thread...

wL9I4BxuryY

Published on 22 Jan 2013


Dolphins may be one of the planet's smartest creatures, but one thing they lack are
opposable thumbs. However, they are clever enough to recognize that, in a pinch,
they can approach humans to get help with those hard to reach spots.

In this video, a bottle nosed dolphin with limited mobility due to a hook and fishing
line restricting a pectoral fin, approaches some divers for help. Diving instructor
Keller Laros noticed that the dolphin was hanging around them, and that it wasn't
able to move freely. Closer inspection revealed the ocean debris lodged in the fin.

Thankfully, the dolphin not only allowed the divers to attempt to work the line and
hook out of the fin, but actually shifted its body to make it easier.

The divers were able to remove the fishing line which allowed increased movement
for the animal. Unfortunately, the hook was not able to be removed.





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lC3AkGSigrA

ploaded on 10 Jan 2012


Many species interact in the wild, most often as predator and prey. But recent
encounters between humpback whales and bottlenose dolphins reveal a playful side
to interspecies interaction. In two different locations in Hawaii, scientists watched
as dolphins "rode" the heads of whales: the whales lifted the dolphins up and out of
the water, and then the dolphins slid back down. The two species seemed to
cooperate in the activity, and neither displayed signs of aggression or distress.
Whales and dolphins in Hawaiian waters often interact, but playful social activity
such as this is extremely rare between species. The latest Bio Bulletin from the
Museum's Science Bulletins program presents the first recorded examples of this
type of behavior. Visitors to AMNH may view the video in the Hall of Biodiversity
until February 9, 2012.

Science Bulletins is a production of the National Center for Science Literacy,
Education, and Technology (NCSLET), part of the Department of Education at the
American Museum of Natural History. Find out more about Science Bulletins at

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Dolphins Protect Diver from Hammerhead Shark


T3pXhU5vzas


Uploaded on 9 Nov 2011


While filming dolphins in the Bahamas I spotted a large Atlantic hammerhead shark
coming straight for me. I raised my camera and started filming. Then four young
dolphins whom I knew personally shot at the hammerhead and drove it off. No
question the dolphins knew they were saving me.

KiwiElf
16th February 2013, 10:13
Maybe they're here to "tell" us something...

vje2
16th February 2013, 11:55
Amazingly beautiful!

WhiteFeather
16th February 2013, 14:11
Dolphins have always fascnated me and I view them as the
humans of the oscean and many stories have come down the
ages of positive interraction,( even though they are still killed
in some fishing communities)......


I posted this atricle on another thread...

wL9I4BxuryY

Published on 22 Jan 2013


Dolphins may be one of the planet's smartest creatures, but one thing they lack are
opposable thumbs. However, they are clever enough to recognize that, in a pinch,
they can approach humans to get help with those hard to reach spots.

In this video, a bottle nosed dolphin with limited mobility due to a hook and fishing
line restricting a pectoral fin, approaches some divers for help. Diving instructor
Keller Laros noticed that the dolphin was hanging around them, and that it wasn't
able to move freely. Closer inspection revealed the ocean debris lodged in the fin.

Thankfully, the dolphin not only allowed the divers to attempt to work the line and
hook out of the fin, but actually shifted its body to make it easier.

The divers were able to remove the fishing line which allowed increased movement
for the animal. Unfortunately, the hook was not able to be removed.





---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

lC3AkGSigrA

ploaded on 10 Jan 2012


Many species interact in the wild, most often as predator and prey. But recent
encounters between humpback whales and bottlenose dolphins reveal a playful side
to interspecies interaction. In two different locations in Hawaii, scientists watched
as dolphins "rode" the heads of whales: the whales lifted the dolphins up and out of
the water, and then the dolphins slid back down. The two species seemed to
cooperate in the activity, and neither displayed signs of aggression or distress.
Whales and dolphins in Hawaiian waters often interact, but playful social activity
such as this is extremely rare between species. The latest Bio Bulletin from the
Museum's Science Bulletins program presents the first recorded examples of this
type of behavior. Visitors to AMNH may view the video in the Hall of Biodiversity
until February 9, 2012.

Science Bulletins is a production of the National Center for Science Literacy,
Education, and Technology (NCSLET), part of the Department of Education at the
American Museum of Natural History. Find out more about Science Bulletins at

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dolphins Protect Diver from Hammerhead Shark


T3pXhU5vzas


Uploaded on 9 Nov 2011


While filming dolphins in the Bahamas I spotted a large Atlantic hammerhead shark
coming straight for me. I raised my camera and started filming. Then four young
dolphins whom I knew personally shot at the hammerhead and drove it off. No
question the dolphins knew they were saving me.

To my understanding is the whales and dolphins are extra terrestrial entities. They have been here a long long time from a galaxy far away. And Far more advanced than us humans.

GoodETxSG
16th February 2013, 14:58
They are AMAZING beings... we look to space for beautiful intelligent beings to coexist with and look what we have here already.... and HOW we treat them for the most part.

ghostrider
16th February 2013, 16:38
I love dolphins and the ocean... the mass sighting is telling us something... nature never does anything just because, there is always a purpose, and its usually something with survival ... and safety ... I think we are more connected with the ocean than people think , just looking out at the ocean in person if you are a little stressed can calm you right down and make you feel at ease ...all the problems of the world seem to vanish quickly ...

shadowstalker
16th February 2013, 16:45
Patricia Cori should a take a trip to see this..

johnf
16th February 2013, 16:56
They must be getting ready to do the acrobatic sequence that means so long and thanks for all the fish!

Tesla_WTC_Solution
16th February 2013, 17:04
Since underwater earthquakes cause sinus damage to whales,
my guess about this aside from food related migration is,

they are getting away from a seismic source to avoid injury?
This is a common thing in nature, for animals to sense changes and flee before a disaster.

I could be 100% wrong. lol as usual. but keep it in mind.
when dolphins start beaching themselves en masse you can guarantee there has been a severe underwater shockwave generated by seismic waves

rgray222
16th February 2013, 21:05
This video was taken last year off the coast of California.
This astonishing video of 2,000 dolphins racing a whale-watching boat is either cute, unsettling or a bit of both. The ship was off Dana Point, Calif., when it encountered the "mega-pod," which paced the boat at up to 25 miles per hour. A normal pod contains about 12 dolphins, and "News" reported that baffled scientists believed the huge group might have been racing the boat just "for fun." That seems likelier than a solidarity swim to endorse the recently proposed dolphins' bill of rights.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZEXwlilZqnM