PDA

View Full Version : 8 yr old handcuffed for tantrum!!



Sidney
7th March 2013, 23:07
If this isn't a police state, I don't know what it. I am appalled at this.

http://www.csmonitor.com/The-Culture/Family/Modern-Parenthood/2013/0307/8-year-old-handcuffed-for-tantrum-Was-it-the-right-move

8-year-old handcuffed for tantrum: Was it the right move?
An 8-year-old girl was handcuffed for a tantrum at her elementary school in Alton, Ill. Would you handcuff an 8-year-old for a tantrum?


By Alicia Pflaumer, Contributor / March 7, 2013


A police officer stands near the entrance at an elementary school in Minnesota. On Tuesday, Alton, Ill. police placed an 8-year-old girl in handcuffs and placed in a juvenile detention room to wait for her guardian to pick her up.

Photo illustration: Jim Mone/AP/File







If an 8-year-old is staging a mega-temper tantrum, what would you do?

That is what school officials were confronted with at the LoveJoy Elementary School in Alton, Ill. when a child in their care began to act out and disrupt the rest of the class.

Eight-year-old Jmyha Rickmon, who is in a special behavior disorder class, threw a tantrum and reports say the girl was "out of control and tearing up two classrooms."

After officials called the Alton police, the girl was placed in handcuffs and taken to the police station and placed in a juvenile detention room to wait for her guardian to pick her up.

RECOMMENDED: Are you a Helicopter Parent? Take our quiz

The girls’ uncle and guardian Nehemiah Keeton, who has cared for her since she was less than two-weeks-old, and also has two other daughters, arrived to pick up his niece two hours after being called. Keeton said, according to The Telegraph in Alton, Ill., that he had to leave his janitorial job in St. Louis – about 23 miles away – to pick her up.

By the time he arrived, "she had handcuffs on her wrists and legs. She asked to use the restroom several times but was denied. The police officer told her if she didn't stop kicking the seat of the car, he was not going to call me."

Alton school officials and police stand by their decision to place the 8-year-old in handcuffs and under arrest.

Jmyha stayed home from school on Wednesday, the day after the incident, because she was afraid. Keeton told The Telegraph, "I'm not sending her back. If she stays here, at least I know she will be safe. This is unacceptable; she woke up with nightmares." Keeton said he plans to file charges.

Kristie Baumgartner, assistant superintendent at the Alton School District, issued a statement about the incident Wednesday afternoon:

"I cannot comment on any specifics regarding the incident, as we protect the confidentiality of our students, and also will not comment of the Alton Police Department's involvement," her statement read. "In the extremely rare instance that a student demonstrates behaviors that are harmful to (the student) or others, our district procedure is to contact the parent immediately and require that they pick up their child after all school-based interventions have been provided.

"If a parent refuses, we then contact law enforcement for additional intervention, if needed," Baumgartner said. "Our first priority is the safety of students and staff, and this procedure is designed to protect everyone involved."

Keeton told KMOV.com in St. Louis that he had told school officials Tuesday that he was coming to pick up the girl, but said he thought school officials grew impatient and called the police. “I feel like if you can’t handle an 8-year-old without calling the police,” said Keeton, “to put fear in them like my child, you don’t need to work with kids.”

shadowstalker
7th March 2013, 23:15
A special needs child??
Bet they feel big and bad don't they..(the cops)

Flash
7th March 2013, 23:19
there is special blankets to put over the child to help calm down, kids in special behavior classes already have difficluties with their own behaviors, those classes should be well equiped and have these blankets. This is rather a case where the personnel is not trained to handle such children and obviously did not know what to do.

Ellisa
7th March 2013, 23:54
The problem for the teachers (and others) in this sort of incident is that often a child who is having a tantrum (and this is an 8 year-old, not a toddler) will have the potential to hurt others (adults as well as children). There is a duty of care for the others in the vicinity, as well as the angry child. However handcuffing is horrific. I do not understand how they managed it, unless they handled the child using excessive force.

One technique, which works well and can be rehearsed, is to remove the other children from the class room in a controlled way. This leaves the out of control child without what they want most-- an audience. Then the others can be taken somewhere safe and teachers or other trained staff can deal with the disturbed child. There are ways to do this, depending on the individual child. Blankets (as suggested by Flash) may work, distraction can be helpful once there are no others to dampen the effects and often children having this sort of outburst have their own triggers and diffusers which can be used.

It may be necessary to call emergency services, but that should not be the first resort. They are not trained to deal with angry children and control should not include physical restraint of this sort. It would be illegal in many countries, including mine, to use hand or leg cuffs on a child.

Then, when the fuss dies down the child needs to be assessed. She has special needs apparently. Something that is obvious in this awful story is that those special needs are not being met and this will happen again until they are.

Carmody
8th March 2013, 02:46
There is so much crap in the food and environment that I'm betting that some of that originated from such influences. Not just the general environment of 'doom' as a cloud hanging over us. OK, three chief things, then. There are going to be exceptions to norms and this little girl sounds like one. I don't know and we don't know. Not one of us was there. As for her potentially harming herself, I don't know myself. We've no idea what is going on in her home life and we have no idea how she is wired. I'm not thinking handcuffs was the better option, though. The school passed the buck, as they probably did not want to be sued or take the chance of being sued. The modern USA is like that. The most litigious place in the human universe- the USA. The school would be damned if they did ...and damned if they didn't. So they passed the buck.

My dog used to flip out all the time. We had to lie on top of her - For like half an hour at a time. This went on for the first 2-3 years of her life.

But she was also the most potent alpha female anyone had ever seen, never had a friend in another dog (totally impossible), was a stone killer, and could haul like a freight train. she had no give in her, whatsoever. She had to be given away as a pup, as she would not surrender to the authority of any pack leader or other dog, she'd die first. In the literal sense, she had to be separated from all her own pack family, she would die before giving in. She was a runt who spent her earliest days fighting to stay alive. She fooled them, though, she outlived them all and died at the age of 14. But, so stubborn, even in the end that she literally took more trank to 'go down' than any two horses. When we had to put her down, when she could not walk anymore, she took 5-6 syringes full of trank and a full hour to die. This was a 70 pound dog.

Even though I have no kids of such nature, I understand some of the complexities.

DouglasDanger
8th March 2013, 03:09
Yes I would have cuffed, charged the girl and handed the bill of damages and fines to her parents/guardian. She was Not special needs, she was special behavior class, she was destroying 2 classrooms and continued to attempt violence in the patrol car ( kicking the seat) after being cuffed. So if the cuffs where so painfull she would not have been kicking the seat. Coooing and trying to wrap them in blankets is a horrible reaction to a violent action, just horrible. I am not saying be violent to the child I am saying when a child reacts violently they need to be disciplined accordingly.( the police are the ones who handle all violent acts by adults why should parents of bystanding children accept anything else, other than police interaction). We have Juvinile laws for a reason, not all children are angels. some are down right brats who need a good cuffing and some time in a time out cell to learn where they are headed with thier actions if they do not smarten up as they get older, its called scared straight a program that has worked for many children all of them where cuffed.

Carmody
8th March 2013, 03:24
No, I never suggested to handcuff her. Not at all. But something like when dealing with a cat. Wrap them in a towel. Flash mentioned a blanket. We basically had to do the same with our pup. We had to lie on top of her, any way we could, with what we could for half an hour straight, most times.

The pup was specifically foisted on me, as they knew anyone else would have simply put her down. This came from people highly experienced at veterinary clinics. The most impossible dog they'd ever met.

Ellisa
8th March 2013, 03:42
The point of the blanket (which i have not ever used) is, I suppose, to deprive the child of sensory stimulation. Sometimes children with special needs, which includes children who have behavioural issues, have a low tolerance for many things, and they act as a trigger for this type of behaviour. The people who work with her need to discover exactly why this child is out of control. It is not normal behaviour to have such a violent tantrum at 8 that the police have to be called- and they decide to forcefully restrain her. It is in everyone's interest to defuse the reasons for such rage. We do not know why this happened, and maybe this child will always have anger problems, but at 8 years old we should be trying to help her deal with this, not meeting her violence with further violence and confirming for her that the only way to get attention is to act out, hurt people and damage property.

Carmody
8th March 2013, 03:57
Yes, what else can one say or do. A near impossible situation with no good answers. Akin the Alzheimer's nightmare, but in reverse.


I'm thinking and recalling that I'm probably exaggerating bit on the syringes. It was, I think 4 of them. but these were 60ml+ syringes. The last 1.5 was straight into her belly, which is the last choice on methods. More than enough to kill a horse, in total.

And I'm now hearing the only sound she ever uttered, she never barked in her entire life. (maybe 2-3 times in total). I'm hearing howling outside right now.

Isn't that the way the universe is.

Flash
8th March 2013, 05:28
Yes I would have cuffed, charged the girl and handed the bill of damages and fines to her parents/guardian. She was Not special needs, she was special behavior class, she was destroying 2 classrooms and continued to attempt violence in the patrol car ( kicking the seat) after being cuffed. So if the cuffs where so painfull she would not have been kicking the seat. Coooing and trying to wrap them in blankets is a horrible reaction to a violent action, just horrible. I am not saying be violent to the child I am saying when a child reacts violently they need to be disciplined accordingly.( the police are the ones who handle all violent acts by adults why should parents of bystanding children accept anything else, other than police interaction). We have Juvinile laws for a reason, not all children are angels. some are down right brats who need a good cuffing and some time in a time out cell to learn where they are headed with thier actions if they do not smarten up as they get older, its called scared straight a program that has worked for many children all of them where cuffed.

Special behavior classes ARE special needs classes. They generally regroup children who have ADHD, defiant behavior (because of brain impairment) and other behavior related to brain impairment. Very few in these classes are only litte spoiled uneducated brats, very few.
The blanket is a special one, used with Autistic children when they have a melt down, and other children having a melt down. They are extremely heavy yet do not block breathing and puts pressure on the children. It makes them feel more secure and they calm down.
When a child of 8 has such a tamper tantrum that he/she destroy 2 classrooms, this is not just being a brat. THis is showing a major problems, most probably brain related. it could also be a kid with major psychological problem due to home environment, such as being constantly beaten up, put in a cage, raped repeatedly, etc, heavy duty home environment.

This child is not 14, in which case you have to give very strict lessons, the child is 8, not developed yet, and most probably does not understand why he did this. The child has to be restrained not to hurt others and himself, and in order to calm down. THen hard questions have to be asked regarding brain impairment and family environment.

So, I disagree with you.

Flash
8th March 2013, 05:37
There is so much crap in the food and environment that I'm betting that some of that originated from such influences. Not just the general environment of 'doom' as a cloud hanging over us. OK, three chief things, then. There are going to be exceptions to norms and this little girl sounds like one. I don't know and we don't know. Not one of us was there. As for her potentially harming herself, I don't know myself. We've no idea what is going on in her home life and we have no idea how she is wired. I'm not thinking handcuffs was the better option, though. The school passed the buck, as they probably did not want to be sued or take the chance of being sued. The modern USA is like that. The most litigious place in the human universe- the USA. The school would be damned if they did ...and damned if they didn't. So they passed the buck.

My dog used to flip out all the time. We had to lie on top of her - For like half an hour at a time. This went on for the first 2-3 years of her life.

But she was also the most potent alpha female anyone had ever seen, never had a friend in another dog (totally impossible), was a stone killer, and could haul like a freight train. she had no give in her, whatsoever. She had to be given away as a pup, as she would not surrender to the authority of any pack leader or other dog, she'd die first. In the literal sense, she had to be separated from all her own pack family, she would die before giving in. She was a runt who spent her earliest days fighting to stay alive. She fooled them, though, she outlived them all and died at the age of 14. But, so stubborn, even in the end that she literally took more trank to 'go down' than any two horses. When we had to put her down, when she could not walk anymore, she took 5-6 syringes full of trank and a full hour to die. This was a 70 pound dog.

Even though I have no kids of such nature, I understand some of the complexities.

I am not sure anyone who has not lived such problems with children, their own or those of others, truly understand the complexities and mostly the inner despair of those children as well as the despair they create to others. Their despair of being who they are when it is a brain impairment and not being able to manage it, or their despair about their family situation, has no words, at 8. And yes, it is like your dog who knew that elsewhere he would have been put down early. Those children sometimes feel like that, not being liked or considered everywhere they go. For a child, this equates to being put down,if the child is able of empathy.

But that is fine Carmody, i will give you the benefice of the doubt in terms of undersanding for two reasons:


Your comments about your dog are right and there is some similarities
your comments about food and environement are spot on

witchy1
8th March 2013, 10:32
Yes I would have cuffed, charged the girl and handed the bill of damages and fines to her parents/guardian. She was Not special needs, she was special behavior class, she was destroying 2 classrooms and continued to attempt violence in the patrol car ( kicking the seat) after being cuffed. So if the cuffs where so painfull she would not have been kicking the seat. Coooing and trying to wrap them in blankets is a horrible reaction to a violent action, just horrible. I am not saying be violent to the child I am saying when a child reacts violently they need to be disciplined accordingly.( the police are the ones who handle all violent acts by adults why should parents of bystanding children accept anything else, other than police interaction). We have Juvinile laws for a reason, not all children are angels. some are down right brats who need a good cuffing and some time in a time out cell to learn where they are headed with thier actions if they do not smarten up as they get older, its called scared straight a program that has worked for many children all of them where cuffed.

The girl was autistic DouglasDanger - plenty of info on the net. What kind of barbarian are you! I am beyond speechless

Not only was she just 8 years old.... she had her hands hand cuffed as well as her feet, she was refused permission to go to the bathroom and left detained for 2 hours in the cells, her eyes swollen shut due to crying.....what kind of horror must she have endured!!!!
http://ioneblackamericaweb.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/handcuffed7n-1-web.jpg?w=635

Sidney
8th March 2013, 18:15
Yes I would have cuffed, charged the girl and handed the bill of damages and fines to her parents/guardian. She was Not special needs, she was special behavior class, she was destroying 2 classrooms and continued to attempt violence in the patrol car ( kicking the seat) after being cuffed. So if the cuffs where so painfull she would not have been kicking the seat. Coooing and trying to wrap them in blankets is a horrible reaction to a violent action, just horrible. I am not saying be violent to the child I am saying when a child reacts violently they need to be disciplined accordingly.( the police are the ones who handle all violent acts by adults why should parents of bystanding children accept anything else, other than police interaction). We have Juvinile laws for a reason, not all children are angels. some are down right brats who need a good cuffing and some time in a time out cell to learn where they are headed with thier actions if they do not smarten up as they get older, its called scared straight a program that has worked for many children all of them where cuffed.

The girl was autistic DouglasDanger - plenty of info on the net. What kind of barbarian are you! I am beyond speechless

Not only was she just 8 years old.... she had her hands hand cuffed as well as her feet, she was refused permission to go to the bathroom and left detained for 2 hours in the cells, her eyes swollen shut due to crying.....what kind of horror must she have endured!!!!
http://ioneblackamericaweb.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/handcuffed7n-1-web.jpg?w=635

Exactly. I understand that some circumstances seem to have no answers, but legal child abuse is NOT the answer. Schools should have protocols in place for these behaviors that do not include handcuffs or police.

NewFounderHome
8th March 2013, 18:34
Yes I would have cuffed, charged the girl and handed the bill of damages and fines to her parents/guardian. She was Not special needs, she was special behavior class, she was destroying 2 classrooms and continued to attempt violence in the patrol car ( kicking the seat) after being cuffed. So if the cuffs where so painfull she would not have been kicking the seat. Coooing and trying to wrap them in blankets is a horrible reaction to a violent action, just horrible. I am not saying be violent to the child I am saying when a child reacts violently they need to be disciplined accordingly.( the police are the ones who handle all violent acts by adults why should parents of bystanding children accept anything else, other than police interaction). We have Juvinile laws for a reason, not all children are angels. some are down right brats who need a good cuffing and some time in a time out cell to learn where they are headed with thier actions if they do not smarten up as they get older, its called scared straight a program that has worked for many children all of them where cuffed.

The girl was autistic DouglasDanger - plenty of info on the net. What kind of barbarian are you! I am beyond speechless

Not only was she just 8 years old.... she had her hands hand cuffed as well as her feet, she was refused permission to go to the bathroom and left detained for 2 hours in the cells, her eyes swollen shut due to crying.....what kind of horror must she have endured!!!!
http://ioneblackamericaweb.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/handcuffed7n-1-web.jpg?w=635

Exactly. I understand that some circumstances seem to have no answers, but legal child abuse is NOT the answer. Schools should have protocols in place for these behaviors that do not include handcuffs or police.

I totally agree with you.

Know there should be a public investigation to bring corrections to their protocols and change the employs that don't fit the appropriate mind frame and also bring help to this kid that might need to be followed following this sad story.

Ellisa
8th March 2013, 21:19
Thank you for the explanation of the blanket.

This is a child of 8, that adults subdued and handcuffed by her hands and legs, and probably let her wet herself. No wonder she was terrified. If she was autistic it is all even more inexcusable to treat a child like that. There are techniques for dealing with autistic children that would help to calm down the situation. First would be to know the child well, observe the child carefully and head off outbreaks. This is easy to say, but once it becomes second nature, it is more advantageous for the child than calling the police as they have no training in dealing with violent children. Neither, apparently did the teachers and others at this child's school..

I emphasise she is 8. Have you got an 8 year kid in your family? Maybe they still believe in Santa and the tooth fairy, and are starting to explore the world outside the family. Or, maybe, you are worried that the outside world is too harsh for your child, and you keep them at home all the time. This child will have none of that, and, unless she is helped she is set for a life in which she can only see solutions in violence.

This is a horrible story of abuse. a child should have the right to expect better from the adults that care for her. She needs a proper plan to meet her needs for now and in the future. I hope she gets the help and treatment she needs.