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View Full Version : Fantastic video of killer whales behind a boat!



Swanette
5th May 2013, 17:23
I just saw this and was so moved by it. I see orcas (killer whales) very often in the waters near me but never have I seen them do this. They are so intelligent! Enjoy :)



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Sidney
5th May 2013, 17:32
Very cool. Seems like they could easily get hurt doing that. If the boat should suddenly slow or stop they could collide. That said, it appears they have been taking lessons from their neighborhood dolphins!!!! Thanks for sharing. gave me a smile. : )

blufire
5th May 2013, 17:43
I have to admit if I were in the boat I would be ranging from “this is freaking awesome’!!! to being fairly nervous . . . . those whales are quite a bit bigger and heavier than the boat . . . .plus Orcas aren’t known for this particular type of behavior.

ghostrider
5th May 2013, 17:50
That was a weather ballon or swamp gas in the ocean, because we are the only intelligent life on or in the ocean right ??? there can't possibly be other life forms ???

araucaria
5th May 2013, 19:11
from the Hitchhiker's guide to the ocean, chapter 42 :) Thank you!

blufire
5th May 2013, 19:32
I am curious.

A couple people have mentioned that this particular behavior of these Orcas is considered intelligent . . . . why? Why would this pure animal instinct be intelligent?

My very first thought when I watched the video was, ‘Are they ‘hunting”? My cats chase and eat mice and I don’t consider this intelligent particularly . . . it is instinct. They also sometimes just play with a mouse for a bit and let them go . . . not because they feel compassion for the mouse but because they are not hungry at that moment.

Whether the Orcas’ are just playing or hunting I would not consider this an ‘intelligent’ behavior.

I love and respect all animals deeply. But I am always careful not to imprint human traits or emotions on them. I admire and treat them from the place that each creature comes from. I do not interact with my dogs the same way I interact with my chickens or the bear that sometimes come to visit my beehives.

Now many times I often wonder who is the more intelligent species . . . human or creature . . . but not based or compared with human attributes.

TigaHawk
6th May 2013, 02:55
I am getting annoyed with how people think an animal must display an act of something to show that it is "intelligent".


The same goes for those whom seem to referr to them as "dumb animals" and generaly tend to think their purpose here is nothing more than to be of some use to us, blatantly deny they have a soul or are entitled to anything we take for granted being human.



That is all i'd like to comment on here, well that and other than the video's were beautifull to watch, thankyou.

blufire
6th May 2013, 03:21
I am getting annoyed with how people think an animal must display an act of something to show that it is "intelligent".


The same goes for those whom seem to referr to them as "dumb animals" and generaly tend to think their purpose here is nothing more than to be of some use to us, blatantly deny they have a soul or are entitled to anything we take for granted being human.



That is all i'd like to comment on here, well that and other than the video's were beautifull to watch, thankyou.


Boy, I know what you mean Tigahawk . . . it truly is annoying when people feel like they need to judge animals by human standards or attributes . . .arrogant isn’t it?

It matters not to me whether I feel a particular animal (or human) is intelligent or not . . . . I only feel blessed and thrilled to share this planet with such an unimaginable diverse multitude of souls.

gripreaper
6th May 2013, 04:05
Sometimes humans help.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ekmMD8oYtJ0

bruno dante
6th May 2013, 04:23
I must say: I was quite shocked and intimidated by this animals speed and agility.

Orcas do have a habit of being un-Orca like around humans. Not so long ago I saw a documentary about an Orca.that made quick work of a great white shark, seemingly for no other reason than to entertain a sightseeing group that was passing by. I'm.not a scientist, but watching the vid one gets the distinct impression of playfulness, or maybe sadistic hubris..or maybe a combination of the 2. The orca forces the great white into a stupor-like submission by manipulating it into a belly up position. It was incredibly impressive,.and left.absolutely no.doubt as to who was the alpha predator.in the ocean. I'd love to post it here but I don't know how on this phone. If anyone is familiar with the video and would take the time to post it, I would greatly appreciate.it.

Sunny-side-up
6th May 2013, 09:43
I am curious.

A couple people have mentioned that this particular behavior of these Orcas is considered intelligent . . . . why? Why would this pure animal instinct be intelligent?

My very first thought when I watched the video was, ‘Are they ‘hunting”? My cats chase and eat mice and I don’t consider this intelligent particularly . . . it is instinct. They also sometimes just play with a mouse for a bit and let them go . . . not because they feel compassion for the mouse but because they are not hungry at that moment.

Whether the Orcas’ are just playing or hunting I would not consider this an ‘intelligent’ behavior.

I love and respect all animals deeply. But I am always careful not to imprint human traits or emotions on them. I admire and treat them from the place that each creature comes from. I do not interact with my dogs the same way I interact with my chickens or the bear that sometimes come to visit my beehives.

Now many times I often wonder who is the more intelligent species . . . human or creature . . . but not based or compared with human attributes.
I'm sure if they where hunting the video would have been much, much shorter!
They was having fun, which is an intelligent act.
I'm very impressed by they stamina, to keep up with the speed boat like that. What an incredible creature/being :)

pixiestix
6th May 2013, 14:05
I have to admit if I were in the boat I would be ranging from “this is freaking awesome’!!! to being fairly nervous . . . . those whales are quite a bit bigger and heavier than the boat . . . .plus Orcas aren’t known for this particular type of behavior.

Actually, where I am from, we see this type of behaviour quite often when we are out sport salmon fishing. Usually the old male comes and checks us out first. Note: If they are trailing the boat we always put the motors in neutral, or in the case of a large pod, shut them off completely and enjoy the show. They are "curious" about the bubbles from the prop and could be hurt. I cringed watching this video..

They seem to do all the tricks in the wild that you see at marine shows!

araucaria
6th May 2013, 18:32
I have to admit if I were in the boat I would be ranging from “this is freaking awesome’!!! to being fairly nervous . . . . those whales are quite a bit bigger and heavier than the boat . . . .plus Orcas aren’t known for this particular type of behavior.

Actually, where I am from, we see this type of behaviour quite often when we are out sport salmon fishing. Usually the old male comes and checks us out first. Note: If they are trailing the boat we always put the motors in neutral, or in the case of a large pod, shut them off completely and enjoy the show. They are "curious" about the bubbles from the prop and could be hurt. I cringed watching this video..

They seem to do all the tricks in the wild that you see at marine shows!

Actually, I was a little concerned that they might get too close to the prop - but isn't there a protection against this happening? Anyway, I'm sure these guys have their surfer's code: don't get too close!

pixiestix
6th May 2013, 20:31
I have to admit if I were in the boat I would be ranging from “this is freaking awesome’!!! to being fairly nervous . . . . those whales are quite a bit bigger and heavier than the boat . . . .plus Orcas aren’t known for this particular type of behavior.

Actually, where I am from, we see this type of behaviour quite often when we are out sport salmon fishing. Usually the old male comes and checks us out first. Note: If they are trailing the boat we always put the motors in neutral, or in the case of a large pod, shut them off completely and enjoy the show. They are "curious" about the bubbles from the prop and could be hurt. I cringed watching this video..

They seem to do all the tricks in the wild that you see at marine shows!

Actually, I was a little concerned that they might get too close to the prop - but isn't there a protection against this happening? Anyway, I'm sure these guys have their surfer's code: don't get too close!

The surfers code applies to the boats......not the orcas.

Other than jet boats, some propellers have a cowling but that is less than 3% of the vessels on (or under) the water (my guess)

etheric underground
9th May 2013, 16:49
I had an experience with a killer whale when I was in the military working in antarctica.
I was about to board a ship off a man made ice jetty and I noticed something move in the water.
I stood right next to the waters edge...hoping to see a penguin. To my surprise it wasnt a penguin but a killer whale.
It came up out of the water and we literally looked in to each others eyes...I was in awe he was probably contemplating if
I was worth eating......But we had a moment whereby we looked into each others eye and connected...it was amazing and scary
at the same time... a number of people saw it and came running to take photos....but it was gone and I was drenched
....one of my favourite animal stories

Orion197
11th May 2013, 13:41
I love to see humans and animals interact in peace and harmony. I believe this is the way it should be and at the core, we are all one consciousness.
I had a wonderful experience with a dolphin in which we held each other and as we gazed at each other for quite a long time, had a wonderful connection of pure love. It was beyond words, and I long for the chance to do it again.
There is a big difference between intelligence and wisdom.
I will take the side of wisdom.

music
12th May 2013, 12:51
Here is a story I got from an Elder of the southern Yuin people (Wallaga Lake Mob as they are known now). The Yuin believed that they reincarnated as killer whales on death. The whales – anscestral spirits - kept a watchful eye on the people as they paddled their flimsy bark canoes across the treacherous waters of Twofold Bay, standing guard on the rare occasions they fell, keeping the sharks at bay, sometimes putting a fin under a tired swimmer as he made it back to shore.

Story goes that one day the mob were returning from the hunt along the sands of the bay. Night approached, the sou’ westerly was picking up, and it was getting real cold. An old fella, hurt during the day’s hunt, dropped back to rest. No one noticed, he became too weak to get up or call out loud enough over the wind, and the tribe rounded the headland. Next morning, when they realised he was missing, they went to retrieve his body, as no one expected him to have survived the cold. To their surprise, he was alive, and this is the story he told.

He lay himself down on the sand, ready to join the anscestors, making himself at peace. A killer whale, leader of a pod saw him and swam close to the shore. The old man got up on an elbow, looked the whale in the eye, the whale looked him in the eye, then swam away. Soon after, a commotion in the bay attracted the old man’s attention. A pod of killer whales was driving a southern wright whale on to the beach. The dying animal came to rest at the limit of the receding tide, and the old man gathered his strength and his cutting tool and crawled to the whale. With his razor-sharp stone tool, he cut at the flesh of the whale, and crawled inside the warm flesh. He lapped at the blood, and chewed small pieces of flesh to sustain him through the night.

When the mob saw he was alive inside the body of the whale, they rejoiced and started lighting a fire. They would have a party, and as the killer whales gathered just offshore, the people knew what they had to do – they turned the southern wright whale around so the killer whales could feast on the tongue – the only part of the whale they liked to eat. So it came to be that the people would gather on that beach, light fires, and wait for the killers to drive a whale on to the beach. Mostly the southern wrights, but sometimes a stinky minky, or even a humpback. And the people would always turn the whale around so the head was in the water, so the killers could join the feast.

And then the white men came to Twofold Bay. The Yuin men were good seamen, strong, and good with the short, stout spears they used. The Davidson family, when they set up their whaling operation in the bay, employed the locals, and soon the magic began. Whenever the Yuin men went out in the long boats, the killers, led by the whale they called Old Tom, would drive a whale to them for the kill, and the best on the harpoon was old Percy Mumbulla. Percy would ensure that before the Davidson’s tender could take the whale back for processing, the body would be buoyed up beside the boat so the killers could feast on the tongue. He was always sure to look after the spirits of the anscestors, just as the spirits looked after his people. And they all prospered.

Then, one day, the sou’ westerly was blowing once more, and old man Davidson didn’t want to risk losing the body of the whale in the coming storm, so he told the Yuin men “no time to feed the killers, that whale comes in now”, and despite the warnings that they’d never catch another whale, he ordered his men to take the carcass in. And so the killers left Twofold Bay, and the Yuins left Twofold Bay, walking up the coast to finally settle at Wallaga Lake to escape the shame that had been forced upon them. The Davidson whaling operation closed down soon after that, they discovered that the whales weren’t quite so easy to catch on their own, and they failed to compete with the big factory whaling ships that had come into service by then.