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irishspirit
28th September 2010, 20:41
This fox new report is soooooo funny.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LcPF59CoGvs&feature=player_embedded#!

Having watched this report, and seeing how this gentleman breaks it down, kinda shows why so many of the sheep are ascared to speak for themselves.

Carmody
28th September 2010, 21:04
I'm paraphrasing from memory here so someone correct me on the smaller bits, please.

~~~~~~~~~
Fox was self- reassigned as an entertainment and not a news reporting agency. This is due to them being sued by one of their fired "actual journalistic reporter"(s), for lying to the public.

It went all the way to the US supreme court.

Fox got around it by having their organization listed as an entertainment organization from the top down. This means they are not legally bound by any potential law suits with regard to having to say or tell truthful things.

They can lie and fabricate all they want, as it's 'Fox Entertainment'.

You are looking at the arm or public face of a psyops program or network, that the public is not aware, in the general sense....of that organization being the legal equivalent of 'Comedy Central'.

Humble Janitor
29th September 2010, 01:02
Fox has long been the voice of the sheeple, promoting an agenda of hate and fear. Occasionally, they'll "accidentally" stumble upon on the truth (that is, if it's not censored immediately by them).

Reefer madness is silly and inexcusable in this day and age.

Decibellistics
29th September 2010, 05:20
LOL...........awesome....it's so dank it'll KILL YOU lol.

I've wanted to write a book about this for awhile, but like all my book ideas, someone's probably said it already and may or may not have been killed for saying something about it.

I really don't understand the argument....it's simple.....outgrow canada and the mexican cartel, put it on the front step of the white house and say your move holy man........your move. Of course a large scale information campaign would have to take place first.....meh. I think it's coming up on the ballot in a lot of states this year....Cali legalization Missouri medical status, so on so forth.....just playing their cheap tricks as usual this voting season. The problem is people are silly and like to get tore up on substances.....like all things,....moderation is key.....we don't live in a country that has an emphasis on moderation....no wonder the politicians are worried about the legislation on things of the such. That and the epiphanies and knowledge that would occur from utilizing the plant lol.

bluestflame
29th September 2010, 05:32
though the chemicals in the hydroponic variety that can have issues for those sensative to it

Carmody
29th September 2010, 15:25
Well, it gets crazier with regard to stats and histories. Pardon me, some of my data may be a bit off, but you'll get the idea.

Germany begins to militarize after the Weimar republic financial economic situation, when Hitler takes the reins and creates their own state issued currency, without debt attached, no private banks involved.

The economy rights itself in about 5 years, and things really begin to take off. It is seemingly allowed to happen as the government is fascist, meaning the corporations are on the inside of the government rule.

The whole enemy within program and pogrom beings in earnest. Jews, gypsies, homosexuals, etc,the beginnings of the round up and incarceration. No war yet, but getting close.

The war begins..and the filling of the prisons via 'identification of enemies of the state' really takes off and the jails begin to overflow. (done to polarize the German public, among other things.)

The German government has the incarcerated people making goods for the German war machine. The crucial point here. in the end tally, 85% of the operational hardware (soft goods, support goods, not actual hardware) for the military machine is produced by prisoners, wards of the state.

Ok, so the Germans were financed by the Federal reserve, clandestinely under cover of an entity known as 'the union banking corp' (IIRC) run by none other than senator (in the future to be one) Prescott Bush. The group of people who own the FED banks created and enabled this situation. (John J. McCloy, a lawyer in the employ of I.G. Farben. McCloy would later be president of Rockefellers Chase Manhattan Bank, chairman of the CFR, and serve on the Warren Commission investigating the assassination of Kennedy. Kennedy's crime that got him whacked was the creation of treasury issued notes which would have freed the USA from corporate banking rule. Same as Lincoln's situation. McCloy was in Hitler's box in the 1936 Olympics. Yes. True.)

Some 1930 to 1939 timeline data: http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:W-rOk9e3cYcJ:www.disclose.tv/forum/1930-39-t25954.html+1936+olympics+warburg+hitler%27s+box&cd=2&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=ca

End of war comes, the OSS- soon to be called 'CIA', through the Dulles Brothers, brings back approximately 5000 German scientists (and most were in the military as officers, etc, many ardent Fascists among them)..and the bankers get their money back in the form of the German black ops which are combined into US black ops programs. Except, in the US, this is part of the corporate/government structure. Similar to the German situation, but it appears as if the Corporations in the US version have more power in the given black ops.

The amount of money still being spent on black ops in the US at wars end..never really slows down. it barrels on ...unhindered, for the most part - for quite a bit longer. it is said that for each year of public life in science and technology (1946-7 estimate), 50 years or advancement happen in the black ops (military technological advancement 'rate of development') world as they are unhindered by limitations, or checks and balances, or whatever. Meaning they are developing the technologies that today, they kill you for looking at - as they want to keep those avenues of thought to themselves. Besides the idea of reptilians, UFO's what have you. This number, of years of advancement has dropped to 44 years per outside year in recent times. This means that black ops technology is about 3000 years ahead of what you see in the outside world today.

However this still leaves the military that is in the field using the 'normal' gear and hardware, today. They need support.

Fed bank and similar owners (direct connections), family member, etc, Nelson Rockefeller..and associated people note the near close call of public freedom that occurs due to the Vietnam war backlash in the USA. The fascists fight back.

The US gets the 'Rockefeller Drug laws,' NY state. 1973. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rockefeller_drug_laws The situation becomes absolutely draconian with regard to soft drugs.

Note the privatization of the prisons in the US.

The fascists launch wars of occupation and destruction all over the world and since their associates run the presses and media, the US public is largely unaware (aided by the fact that they would unconsciously, emotionally..not want to know of these horrific situations- anyway)of the depth of this governmental expenditure in the military machine... that is influenced and controlled by private interests.

There is much more connective tissue here but..I'd have to write a book and there have been books written in various ways, directions, topics, etc.. over the years.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The conclusion is that the US prisons are privately owned and operated, the public pays for it, and the incarcerated strong and intelligent labor pool (there as they smoked a joint, once)..is once again...producing 85% of the soft goods of the fascist war machine. Right under the public's noses. They needed the prison work force and they found a way to reach that target again, that free labor pool, that was actually paid for by the US public, using the US public as that slave labor.


That is the real, original point of having all those people in jail for such minor infractions.

Besides the current other uses, with regard to polarizing the public: religion, justice, conservatism, punishment, etc.

The follow up point is that the US appears to be primed to accept another puppet moron like Hitler (Who was no dummy) who was problematic in the end, to some degree... so this time they want someone dumber and more controllable, thus the functionally illiterate ones like Palin being courted and tested before the public eye. which is why McCain was run up the flagpole for the vote.

The German Weimar Republic scene (ruined economy and the public tired, confused.. and open to extreme manipulation) is being set up (Again!) and the plans for the north American union, the sealing of the borders, the desire to fill the prisons and the North American highway thing like the autobahn work project thing, all repeats, in perfect synchronicity.

Another point is that the general who ran the east German spy system in the cold war..he managed to get one out of every six people spying on one another and had huge files on everyone. He had east Germany locked up solid. The point was that the German WWII spay machine was given, in totality, intact as a spy system to the US and the developing CIA. The Germans were left in control of and running that spy network, from behind the Iron curtain. Mmmmk? the most paranoid, off t the scale, fascist 1984 wet dream of a spy network that you can imagine ever happening.

The east German general who did the best at this task... in east Germany.....when East Germany fell, he had to get a new gig. (general wolf? or similar name, nickname of 'fox' or the like, as well. Oddly enough, the egyptian desert fox is part of the Illuminati 'sign' stuff)

He came over to the US and is now working to create the same system, but modernized..for the FBI..in the USA.

If you are not crapping your pants yet, you should be.

The plan appears to be, to create a '9/11' in Canada somewhere, as Canada does not want to go along with the whole NA union/war machine fascist 1984 slave country thingie..as Canada is seen as a 'Rothschild fiefdom' and that is part of the European sect of the 'disagreeing' or warring factions of the 'Illuminati'. There are signs that they keep trying to create this needed 'event atmosphere' in Canada (Conservatives running Canada,and then the G20 summit in Toronto, as a test run for Canadian public acceptance of fascist paranoia), and keep failing as Canadians are actually, traditionally (although it seems not to some) pretty darned wary of their governments.

In essence, the Fox ENTERTAINMENT thing is all just part of a larger and quite involved agenda coming from the nasty fascist side of these agendas.

I had to write all of this so you could begin to see the shape and placement of the Fox news story, in context.

Ie, the DEA being part of that organization, 'Fox Entertainment' being part of the arm of the media spin and control system, or pacifier for the conservative and unaware public..and the DEA a part of the system that works for those who finances black ops, meaning corporations from both sides/ends of the situation. Slave labor on the prison side and attempting to wholly control the drug trade via CIA connections/systems. They can't have individuals feeding themselves by making and selling Mary Jane, in those house Hydro operations.

Those grow/ produce/ package/move/sell operations need to be big so that they are capable of being controlled and run by these entities, and they also need to be in different countries in order to insert themselves into the system on the black/dark side of things. Ie, wars, taking over countries, financing black ops, making billionaires out of the people in those systems, etc.

This is why the fed/fascist/corporate system is working hard to stop ANY attempt to legalize drugs/weed in any US state.

This game of theirs won't work (it will be hindered mightily) if those dang independent people start grow ops in houses. Those pesky independent people need to be targeted and turned back into slave labor in privately run prisons. Stop it with that dang independence and freedom thing. They can't stand or have legalized marijuana in the system as that just opens the floodgates and begins draining their carefully and well built system of people and money control.

So the level of federal and federal organization and directed energies.. and controlled media pressure against legalization of weed can now be put into context and you can now see the level of pressure that they WILL bring against any initiative to legalize weed.

Down to the point of blatantly violating state laws in California, for example, and coming in with Federal organizations... and slamming/incarcerating anyone and everyone they can.

The United states was built as a decentralized power system in order to curtail and prevent a single organization or head from herding the people of the united states into a single controlled state. The dark system went after the federal system and has done it's best to infuse the Federal organization with the power to control the country as a single entity, and you can even chart out it's pressures, tactics, and trail over the past 250 years or more in the History of the US and it's governmental systems/laws enacted, etc.

This 'drug grow op weed legalization thing' is on the direct front lines of this war.

I hope I've managed to help people get the right pair of glasses on and look at these things from the correct perspective. Everything I have said here can be researched and found. Data, news, names, all of it.

For if you don't do so (look at the bigger picture as a flow system), you stand no chance of ever working your way out of this emerging and constantly growing hole.

heyokah
30th September 2010, 06:24
Thank you for this information Carmody.
Found the right pair of glasses :cool:

tone3jaguar
30th September 2010, 11:55
LOL, it will kill you when you suffocate to death on the food you are shoving down your throat.

Loki
3rd October 2010, 22:39
California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger signed a bill Friday morning that decriminalizes possession of marijuana in the state.

Those caught with less than an ounce of marijuana will still receive a maximum penalty of $100. However, Senate Bill 1449 reduces the legal categorization of marijuana possession from a misdemeanor to a civil infraction. This means that those caught will not have to appear in court, pay court fees or receive a criminal record.

Source: http://www.examiner.com/crime-in-los-angeles/schwarzenegger-signs-california-marijuana-decriminalization-bill

noxon medem
3rd October 2010, 23:19
..
- funny, and clever : - )
.
- they, local government, want to be in on the action
California need to make money, not to spend it ..
- this is a random tax for holding or using
marijuana. Maybe a step on the way to
legalization, that seems the only viable solution.
- The prohibition law is fairly new, and possibly
not very well founded, either in common sense
or serious science on the field ...
..
- Any knowledge on how this absurd prohibition came
to pass in the first place, would be welcome.
Has to be an interesting history, involving intrigue,
conpiracy, and possible corruption in high political places.
..
It, the anti drug law, was exported from USA to Europe after the second world war
when most parts of it, also here in scandinavia, were weakened,
and had to get economic and practical help to rebuild, and USA
offered that help, and as part of the deal the receiving countrys accepted a bunch of
laws and sets of ideas on how to run, or ruin, their communitys.
..
So be it. Mistakes are made in the process. Realize it, and see it needs to be changed..
.

Fredkc
3rd October 2010, 23:22
Yay!

Fred

jack
3rd October 2010, 23:30
Do they get to keep the weed?

Carmody
3rd October 2010, 23:38
good question.

I used to have a high school teacher who stole our stuff. He'd call us to the front of the class and have us turn in our 'goodies'. But he'd never turn us in....It was his way of keeping a good supply, I guess.

HORIZONS
4th October 2010, 00:42
Calif could make millions taxing the growing and selling of Humbolt Co finest. The funny thing is is that nowadays the local growers are against the legalization of mary jane - as this would cut into their livelihoods.

tone3jaguar
4th October 2010, 03:54
Awesome, I will start applying for jobs in Cali tomorrow.

Redtailhawk
4th October 2010, 11:23
I believe Denver did this years ago.

Fredkc
4th October 2010, 16:01
Sadly, California already has this 30 years ago.

Once upon a time... (1979)
In a land just like this one, there lived four friends who were having a Friday night after work get together at the apartment.
Yes, we were partaking of a medicinal herb.
Yes, the windows were open, and maybe the music was a teeny bit loud.

Anyway, the first hint anyone objected was a local cop walking up the stairs.
We quickly tossed everything to a 'volunteer' among us, which meant the cops could only write one 'ticket' for possession.
They took the stuff, and left us a "receipt" which had the curious title:
Notice Of Violation (yes, a speeding ticket)

We each tossed our volunteer $25 in cash, and Monday morning he paid the $125 ticket. Done!
Finito.
Of course some anal jerk in the Federal justice system couldn't stand for things being this simple (no career advancement opportunities for him), and the whole process was thrown out, via the courts.

This may happen again, who knows; but for now, perhaps this time sanity will reign a bit longer.
Fred


Now I have come again
To the land of the fair, & the strong, & the wise.

Brothers & sisters of the pale forest
O children of Night
Who among you will run with the hunt?

Now Night arrives with her purple legion.
Retire now to your tents & to your dreams.
Tomorrow we enter the town of my birth.
I want to be ready.'

Jim Morrison, the E. A. Poe of the 20th Century

irishspirit
4th October 2010, 16:05
This can only be good news for the locals.

Now if we could just get them to Un Ban freedom of speech, they would be onto a winner.

Fredkc
4th October 2010, 16:14
This can only be good news for the locals.
Now if we could just get them to Un Ban freedom of speech, they would be onto a winner.

Yet another hot button of mine. Something else "Da Sheeple" swallowed whole like a big greezy cheeseburger (http://fredsitelive.com/fun/yumburger.jpg)...

The notion that "Free speech" needed, nay required a "Free Speech Zone!"
(usually several miles from any relevant activity or TV camera) ;)
Fred

irishspirit
4th October 2010, 16:23
Fred,

Couldn't agree more. I laugh though when you see the Sheeple walk into these "Zones". Shocking, just shocking!!!!

tone3jaguar
4th October 2010, 17:09
Will people be allowed to walk around with bongs tied around their necks like yards of beer, LOL

Fredkc
4th October 2010, 17:14
T3J;
Whatta weird, yet very interesting question!

I have seen felony convictions here in Cal. lately for "paraphernalia".

The laws not properly adjusted you could wind up with a Meel Of A Hess.
Imagine a traffic ticket for pot, then a felony conviction, and prison for the pipe it was in?

You would presume sanity would require fixing these little snags, but then, we are talking about Gooberment.
Fred

tone3jaguar
4th October 2010, 17:26
That is what one hitters where invented for.

Fredkc
4th October 2010, 17:42
"One-hitter" unless discarded is still a pipe.

Only difference is the cops laugh at you for thinking you thought there was a difference ;)

irishspirit
4th October 2010, 17:44
"One-hitter" unless discarded is still a pipe.

Only difference is the cops laugh at you for thinking you thought there was a difference ;)

HAHA Fred,

Ross
4th October 2010, 19:34
Do they get to keep the weed?

Nope...sorry, that goes back to the lockup...or is that the smokeup:p

Ross

muxfolder
4th October 2010, 21:27
Here in Finland we're goin backwards in everything. Laws for smoking cigarettes are getting tighter every year. Actually, it is so bad you can't even smoke cigarettes while you're walking in public. Or in bigger cities there are always someone who across the street or at least cough when you come pass with them. But now when I'm drunk I just open my window.:) But I do like to smoke pot once in a while. I think it was the main thing why I started to realize what this world is all about. Anyways, it's not that bad that something makes someone calm and think about outside the box. Actually it's much better than alcohol.

Myra
5th October 2010, 04:31
Do they get to keep the weed?

Good question. Maybe that's how they get even more revenue lol

Studeo
5th October 2010, 08:34
Here is something to remind us of the history of this humble Herb. If true this could be how the hippie movement started. As a covert op to experiment on the general public. I mean, if you read between the lines it's the CIA that may have originally supplied the dealers back in the 50s & 60s. Studeo

The Fraudulent Criminalization of Marijuana

by: William John Cox, t r u t h o u t | Op-Ed

Source: Truthout
http://www.truth-out.org/the-fraudulent-criminalization-marijuana63664

For almost 40 years, the United States has waged a war on its own citizens who have used marijuana as a part of a drug culture originally encouraged by the government. The war was commenced despite the government's own findings that marijuana posed less of a risk to American society than alcohol, and that the greatest harm that would result from criminalization would be the injury caused to those arrested for possession and use. The harm caused by the war extends beyond its 15 million prisoners; its cost has exceeded a trillion dollars, and it has benefitted only those who profit from the illegal cultivation and sale of marijuana.
Government Responsibility for the Drug Culture
Drug use became endemic among U.S. troops serving in Vietnam with more than 80% getting stoned on marijuana and lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD). Many of the secrets are still hidden; however, we now have some information about the extent of the government's responsibility for the development of the drug culture in the military and in communities across America. These are the highlights:
Although the U.S. was a signatory to the Geneva Convention protocols banning the use of chemical weapons, the U.S. Army engaged in extensive testing of marijuana and its active ingredient, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) as an incapacitating agent in warfare. A secret research program tested these substances, including highly-concentrated derivatives, on thousands of American GIs without their informed consent.
The CIA engaged in a ten-year secret program to identify and test drugs for use as truth serums during interrogations and as incapacitating agents. Operation Midnight Climax secretly tested LSD on the unwitting patrons of a CIA-financed whorehouse.
The U.S. Army envisioned "driving people crazy for a few hours" by spiking a city's water supply and developed a super hallucinogen known as quinuclidinyl benzilate (BZ), which was tested on thousands of soldiers. Known as "agent buzz," the Army produced more than 100,000 pounds of the chemical in a facility specifically designed for its incorporation into conventional bombs. Allegations in foreign publications that BZ was deployed against North Vietnamese troops have never been confirmed, and all files on the subject remain top secret. However, it is known that the government considered using it for the control of domestic riots.
To facilitate its alliance with the intelligence agencies of Thailand and Nationalist China, the CIA supported the transportation and refining of opium into heroin in Southeast Asia, including the opening of a cluster of heroin laboratories in the Golden Triangle in 1968-1969. The CIA remained silent as its allies, including officers of the Hmong irregular army, routinely supplied heroin to American troops in Vietnam, resulting in the addiction rates as high as 34%. In a secret report in 1972, the CIA Inspector General said: "The past involvement of many of these officers in drugs is well-known."
During classified testimony before a House committee in 1999, CIA Inspector General Britt Snider admitted that the CIA allowed its Nicaraguan Contra allies to smuggle huge quantities of cocaine into the United States during the 1980's, which was refined into "crack" for sale by street gangs. The House report found that "CIA employees did nothing to verify or disprove drug trafficking information, even when they had the opportunity to do so. In some of these, receipt of a drug allegation appeared to provoke no specific response, and business went on as usual."
The National Commission on Marijuana and Drug Abuse
In 1971, President Nixon appointed Governor Raymond P. Shafer of Pennsylvania to chair a national commission to "report on the effects of marijuana and other drugs and recommend appropriate drug policies. Governor Shafer was a former prosecutor, who was known as a "law and order" governor.
The "Shafer" Commission conducted the most extensive and comprehensive examination of marijuana ever performed by the US government. More than 50 projects were funded, "ranging from a study of the effects of marihuana on man to a field survey of enforcement of the marihuana laws in six metropolitan jurisdictions . . ."
"Through formal and informal hearings, recorded in thousands of pages of transcripts, we solicited all points of view, including those of public officials, community leaders, professional experts and students. We commissioned a nationwide survey of public beliefs, information and experience... In addition, we conducted separate surveys of opinion among district attorneys, judges, probation officers, clinicians, university health officials and free clinic personnel."
Among the Commissions findings were:
"No significant physical, biochemical, or mental abnormalities could be attributed solely to their marihuana smoking."
"No verification is found of a causal relationship between marihuana use and subsequent heroin use."
"In sum, the weight of the evidence is that marihuana does not cause violent or aggressive behavior; if anything marihuana serves to inhibit the expression of such behavior."
"Neither the marihuana user nor the drug itself can be said to constitute a danger to public safety."
"Marihuana's relative potential for harm to the vast majority of individual users and its actual impact on society does not justify a social policy designed to seek out and firmly punish those who use it."
The Commission concluded that, "Society should seek to discourage use, while concentrating its attention on the prevention and treatment of heavy and very heavy use. The Commission feels that the criminalization of possession of marihuana for personal [use] is socially self-defeating as a means of achieving this objective… Considering the range of social concerns in contemporary America, marihuana does not, in our considered judgment, rank very high. We would deemphasize marihuana as a problem."
Busy schedule? Click here to keep up with Truthout with free email updates.
President Nixon called Governor Shafer on the carpet and pressured him to change the Commission's conclusion saying, "You see, the thing that is so terribly important here is that it not appear that the Commission's frankly just a bunch of do-gooders." Governor Shafer declined to change his conclusions, and Nixon declined to appoint him to a pending federal judgeship.
The War on Drugs
White House tapes reveal that Nixon's opinions about marijuana were based on his personal prejudices rather than the evidence. He can be heard to make statements such as: "That's a funny thing, every one of the bastards that are out for legalizing marijuana is Jewish. What the Christ is the matter with the Jews, Bob, what is the matter with them? I suppose it's because most of them are psychiatrists... By God, we are going to hit the marijuana thing, and I want to hit it right square in the puss..."
When Nixon was talking with Art Linkletter about "radical demonstrators," he said "They're all on drugs.'' On another occasion, Nixon compared marijuana to alcohol use saying that marijuana users smoke it to "get high," while "a person drinks to have fun."
Wanting to be strong "like the Russians," and to "scare" marijuana users, Nixon ordered his administration to come down hard on users and to target them as enemies in his "war on drugs."
The war on marijuana and the false myths associated with its usage have been continued by every president since Nixon. Since 1973, 15 million people, mostly young people who were committing no other crime, have been arrested for marijuana. In just the last ten years, 6.5 million Americans have been arrested on marijuana charges. Of the 829,625 people who were arrested in 2006, 738,915 of them were in simple possession.
Attorney General Eric H. Holder, Jr. announced in March 2009 that the administration would discontinue raids on the distributors of medical marijuana, including California - which was the first state to legalize marijuana sales upon a doctor's recommendation.
Although President Obama backed off on arresting medical marijuana users, his 2010 National Drug Control Strategy continues the hard line: "Keeping drugs illegal reduces their availability and lessens willingness to use them. That is why this Administration firmly opposes the legalization of marijuana or any other illicit drug." Contrary to the findings of the Shafer Commission, the only existing comprehensive government study on the subject, Obama goes on to say, "Diagnostic, laboratory, clinical and epidemiological studies clearly indicate that marijuana use is associated with dependence, respiratory and mental illness, poor motor performance, and cognitive impairment, among other negative effects, and legalization would only exacerbate these problems."
Fourteen states and the District of Columbia have now followed California in passing laws permitting the use of marijuana for medical purposes; however, no state, thus far, has decriminalized personal possession for recreational use or personal enjoyment.
After spending a trillion dollars in the battle, the war on marijuana has been a complete failure. Although a marijuana user is arrested every 38 seconds, one hundred million people, or about one third of all Americans acknowledge they have used marijuana, and 15 million "criminals" used it in the last month.
The only victors in the war on drugs have been the criminals who have profited from illegal sales. There is an estimated $15 billion in illegal cannabis transactions each year just in California. These transactions are not taxed or regulated.
The cultivation of marijuana in Mexico soared 35% last year to production levels greater than any time in the last 20 years. According to the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, in 2006 more than 60% of the revenue generated by Mexican drug cartels came from cannabis sales in the U.S.
Nixon's war has been expensive; it has been a failure; and it has caused great damage to the fabric of America society. The harm has been particularly felt by its young people who suffer up to 80% of the marijuana arrests and who are disproportionately African American and Latino.
California's Initiative to Decriminalize Marijuana Possession
The penalty upon conviction for possession and use of less than an ounce of marijuana in California is now restricted to a maximum of a $100 fine. If California voters approve Proposition 19 on their November ballot, such possession by a person over the age of 21 will no longer be a crime under California law.
Just as California and New York ended criminal sanctions against the possession and sale of alcohol before prohibition was repealed, California voters again have the chance to remedy the evils caused by almost 40 years of a war without foundation or cause.
The initiative "Changes California Law to Legalize Marijuana and Allow It to Be Regulated and Taxed." It includes the following provisions:
Allows people 21 years or older to possess, cultivate, or transport marijuana for personal use.
Permits local governments to regulate and tax commercial production and sale of marijuana to people 21 years or older.
Prohibits people from possession marijuana on school grounds, using it in public, smoking it while minors are present, or providing it to anyone under 21 years old, and;
Maintains current prohibitions against driving while impaired.
The California Legislative Analyst and the Director of Finance estimate there will be savings of up to several tens of millions of dollars annually to state and local governments on the costs of incarcerating and supervising certain marijuana offenders. In addition, there are unknown, but potentially major tax, fee, and benefit assessment revenues to state and local government related to the production and sale of marijuana products.
Conclusion
In 1972, during the same year of the Shafer Commission, I was a sergeant of police in Los Angeles and had just completed a two-year assignment to write and obtain approval of the Department's Policy Manual, which defined the principles and philosophy of policing in the city. I was also attending law school and I was "loaned" to the staff of the Police Task Force of President Nixon's National Advisory Commission on Criminal Justice Standards and Goals, where I was privileged to draft the introductory chapters defining the role of the police in America.
Following graduation the next year and passing the state bar examination, I moved to Washington, D.C. to work for the Justice Department's Law Enforcement Assistance Administration to implement national criminal justice standards and goals. As a result of these initiatives, the quality of policing in America has been vastly improved over the years, and today, law enforcement is a profession which I am proud to have been a part of.
Several times I had to fight for my life while enforcing the law, and three of my law enforcement friends were murdered in the line of duty. I am not naive. I have walked through too much blood and have seen too much pain and suffering during my career. Everything I have learned during almost 50 years in the justice system compels a conclusion that the criminalization of marijuana was a fraud on the American people from the very inception of the war on drugs.
I am not alone in this conclusion, which has been joined by a large number of active and retired law enforcement officials and judges in the United States and other countries.
Every voter has a duty to honestly consider the issues presented by Proposition 19 and vote as though one of his or her children, a niece or nephew, or a friend's child will be caught experimenting with marijuana in the future. How will you want the matter handled? By creating a criminal, or by using the occasion as an educational opportunity?
We hopefully remember the danger to society caused by the prohibition of alcohol and we have seen how education and reasonable regulation has substantially reduced the use of tobacco in our society.
Let us rely on the true facts, our experience, our best judgment, and our consciences, instead of our prejudices or the misleading myths that continue to be perpetuated by our government. Let us bring an end to the fraudulent war on marijuana.

noxon medem
10th October 2010, 02:18
- like it is about
watch the union, an insight into
- that side of life ..
so many potential uses,
wow

¤=[Post Update]=¤

and this:
..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hoK6NztH3eQ&feature=related
..

blackatiam
12th October 2010, 02:31
As California will be voting on Proposition 19 to Legalize Marijuana on Nov. 2, I ran across this article that lists who stands to lose money if Prop 19 passes. I thought it was interesting:
Follow the money: Who loses it if Marijuana is Legalized? Marijuana: A Renewable Resource
for the Prohibition Industrial Complex
Have you ever wondered about the forces which attempt to keep cannabis under lock and key? Why do they persist, in spite of decades of research, social and medical, which indicate, basically: it's not really that bad, and in fact, used judiciously, and appropriately, cannabis can actually be quite good?
Why do we, as a nation continue this policy of prohibition, which has nothing going for it societally, except the promulgation of misery, suffering, broken lives, broken families and overcrowded prisons; not to mention violence and death, not only in the United States, but beyond our borders.
I say these forces can be characterized as the Prohibition Industrial Complex.
To understand what comprises the Prohibition Industrial Complex, you only have to follow the money. The following list didn't take much research, most of it is pretty obvious, and the rest is common sense. It should also be pointed out that the list is far from complete, and I invite the correction of any omissions.
Here's a quick look at who stands to lose money if marijuana prohibition ends:
1. Alcohol Interests
a. breweries
b. bars
c. ad agencies
d. media ad revenue recipients
e. alcohol interest lobbyists
2. Pharmaceutical Interests
a. FDA-approved-drug peddlers
b. ad agencies
c. media ad revenue recipients
1.) TV broadcast and cable corporations
2.) Radio stations and corporations
3.) Newspapers and magazines
4.) Internet ad providers
d. pharmaceutical interest lobbyists
3. Addiction Industry
a. clinics
b. drug testing complex
1.) kit manufactures
2.) laboratories
c. Partnership for a Drug Free America

4. Prison/Criminal Justice Industry
a. Law enforcement
1.) Federal (DEA, ONDCP, NIDA)local LEO-funding derived from forfeiture and seizures
b. Privatized prison promoters, executives and stockholders
1.) Corrections Corporation of America
2.) GEO group
3.) Cornell Companies
c. Union of Prison Guards
5. Drug Cartels
6. Politicians
7. Armament Industry infrared-detection equipment manufacturers
b. helicopter manufacturers
c. SWAT equipment manufacturers and suppliers
d. military/industrial lobbyists and those who employ them
8. Drug War Mercenary Contractors and Providers
a. Xe (formerly Blackwater)
b. Haliburton
c. Wackenhut
d. Dyncorp
e. AirScan
f. Military Professional Resources, Inc.
g. Aviation Development Corporation
h. Raytheon
i. Arinc Corporation
j. Civilian Police International
k. Science Applications International Corporation
l. ITT Industries,
m. KBR
n. IAP Worldwide Services, Inc.
o. Triple Canopy
p. Lockheed Martin Corporation
q. Sikorsky
r. United Technologies
s. L-3,
t. Aerospace Industrial Development Corporation
u. Al Salam Aircraft Company Ltd.
v. Serco Group Plc.
w. Booz Allen Hamilton
x. CACI International
y. Triple Canopy

Carmody
12th October 2010, 08:49
And that's just the surface.

ktlight
9th June 2011, 09:41
FYI:


Connecticut lawmakers moments ago voted 90 to 57 in favor of Senate Bill 1014, decriminalizing the possession of small amounts of cannabis for personal use by adults. Senate lawmakers had narrowly approved an amended version of the measure on Saturday; House lawmakers concurred with the Senate today, sending the measure to Democrat Gov. Dannel Malloy — who will sign it into law.

As amended, SB 1014 reduces the penalties for the adult possession of up to one-half ounce of marijuana from a criminal misdemeanor (punishable by one year in jail and a $1,000 fine) to a non-criminal infraction, punishable by a fine, no jail time, and no criminal record. (This measure would similarly reduce penalties on the possession of marijuana paraphernalia.)

Once signed into law, Connecticut will become the fourteenth state to replace criminal sanctions and arrest for minor marijuana possession with largely non-criminal sanctions. (Seven states pose no criminal sanctions for cannabis possession; six states have eliminated the potential for jail terms for first offenses, but still classify the offense as a misdemeanor or minor misdemeanor.)

Connecticut is only the second state to enact decriminalization legislatively in the past decade. (Massachusetts enacted a similar law via ballot initiative in 2009.)

NORML supporters, and Connecticut NORML’s regional organizer and state lobbyist Erik Williams, played a significant role in sheparding this legislation through the State House — generating thousands of phone calls and e-mails to lawmakers at a time when political experts were alleging that the measure lacked the political will for passage. Below is a message from Erik Williams:

Dear CT NORML Friends and Supporters,

We did it! Moments ago, the Connecticut House of Representatives passed SB 1014, Decriminalizing Small Amounts of Marijuana. The Governor has pledged to sign the bill into law.

"Thank you for all of your hard work in making this a reality. Connecticut has taken a first step in addressing the outdated and unworkable War on Drugs, which costs taxpayers $billions every year and ruins individual lives and devastates communities.

While this is clearly a victory for CT NORML and the State of Connecticut, it is bittersweet as the Medical Marijuana bill has yet to be brought for a vote in the Senate. If it were to be brought for a vote, it would easily pass with both Republicans and Democrats supporting the measure. I pledge right now to all of you who have fought so hard with me for the legalization of medical marijuana that I will not give up until nobody stands in the way of you and your doctor making medical decisions. I will not give up until compassion is the main driver of public policy replacing political posturing, demagoguery and fear. I will not stop working until medical marijuana is legalized and I ask you to continue to fight by my side."

Connecticut’s legislative session ends tomorrow, but there is still time to act in favor of medical cannabis. If you live in Connecticut, please contact the office of Sen. Don Williams, President Pro Tempore, and urge him to allow the 2011 medical marijuana bill to receive a floor vote. You can also contact your own individual Senator via NORML’s ‘Take Action Center’ here.


source
http://blog.norml.org/2011/06/07/connecticut-lawmakers-vote-to-decriminalize-adult-marijuana-possession/

Maia Gabrial
9th June 2011, 14:18
I'd take it a step further: just legalize it PERIOD. It's an herb and we've been lied to about it. Time for everyone to come clean....
Maia

conk
9th June 2011, 18:10
Another nail in the coffin of Big Pharma and Big Business. Yahoo.

firstlook
9th June 2011, 18:17
Right on. My state also is decriminalized. $100 fine with an ounce or less. Some city's and towns badly want to ignore it. I haven't looked into how this has effected crime or even the money saved spent toward putting offenders through the system. I imagine it is not much of a difference. They really need to just legalize it. Then they will see how it breaks up the real crime and brings other issues of social dependence to more honest debates.

Go Connecticut! :)

¤=[Post Update]=¤

Oh and they should legalize Medical use before anything.

ktlight
16th July 2011, 09:08
FYI:

Mexican soldiers have reportedly uncovered the largest marijuana plantation ever detected in the country in the northwestern state of Baja California.


The huge field, covering almost 300 acres (120 hectares), sheltered under black screen-cloth in a huge square on the floor of the Baja California desert, located more than 241 kilometers (150 miles) south of the border city of Tijuana, Reuters quoted Mexico's Defense Department officials as saying on Thursday.

Army Gen. Alfonso Duarte said the discovery was made on Tuesday after government soldiers on the ground reached the isolated area.

"We estimate that in this area, approximately 60 people were working. When they saw the military personnel, they fled," Duarte said.

Six suspects were arrested later at a military checkpoint. No arrests were made at the scene.

The men tending the pot plants had dug a well at the barren site and pumped water through hoses to irrigate the crop.

It is estimated that drug traffickers could have harvested about 120 tons of marijuana from the plantation, worth about USD 160 million.

The recently found marijuana plantation is four times larger than the previous record discovery by Mexican authorities at a ranch in northern Chihuahua state in 1984.

source
http://www.presstv.ir/detail/189270.html

ktlight
25th July 2011, 08:56
FYI:

he US Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) has finally acknowledged a nine-year-old petition filed by The Coalition for Rescheduling Cannabis to reclassify marijuana as a schedule III, IV, or V drug, rather than its current, and more-serious, schedule I classification.

The acknowledgment, however, was an official denial of the petition based on claims that there are no studies to prove the medicinal value of marijuana, and that the plant is basically as unsafe as heroin.

Back in May, NaturalNews reported that a group of marijuana advocacy groups had filed a lawsuit against the federal government for failing to even acknowledge their petition to reschedule marijuana, which had been filed roughly nine years earlier.

By ignoring the petition, the federal government was invariably in violation of the Administrative Procedures Act, which requires it to respond to petitions within a reasonable amount of time (http://www.naturalnews.com/032546_m...).

If the agency had complied with the petition, it would have acknowledged that marijuana does, indeed, have legitimate medical use, and that its abuse potential is not as extreme as a schedule I classification deems it to be.

And by rescheduling marijuana to at least a schedule III classification rather than a schedule I, federal policy would have become more in line with those of the 16-and-counting states that have already legalized marijuana for medical purposes (http://medicalmarijuana.procon.org/...).

The agency's flat-out denial of the petition, however, shows that it plans to continue willfully ignoring the facts about marijuana, including the hundreds of studies -- many of these are peer-reviewed studies -- that suggest not only that marijuana has medicinal benefits, but also that it is safe.

According to ProCon.org, for instance, there are 33 studies, 17 of which involve humans, that suggest definitive medicinal benefits from using marijuana (http://medicalmarijuana.procon.org/...).

There is, however, absolutely no evidence to back the DEA's claim that "marijuana has a high potential for abuse, has no accepted medical use in the United States, and lacks an acceptable level of safety for use even under medical supervision," as DEA Administrator Michele M. Leonhart falsely stated in her announcement on behalf of the agency's decision in the matter. In fact, a report issued by the US Institute of Medicine (IOM) back in 1999 states the following contradiction to the DEA's claims:

"Scientific data indicate the potential therapeutic value of cannabinoid drugs, primarily THC, for pain relief, control of nausea and vomiting, and appetite stimulation" (http://medicalmarijuana.procon.org/...).

More recent studies than this have found that cannabinoids help reduce inflammation, prevent dementia, and even kill cancer cells. Perhaps this is why the federal government -- the very same federal government that has denounced marijuana as dangerous and medically useless -- filed a patent on all medicinal uses of cannabis.

The patent states that cannabinoids are "useful in the treatment of prophylaxis of wide variety of oxidation associated diseases, such as ischemic, age-related, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases."

The patent goes on to state that marijuana is neuroprotective, and that it limits "neurological damage, such as stroke or trauma, or in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and HIV dementia" (http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-...).

A recent report in TIME magazine also explains that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued an investigational new drug application (IND) in 2006 for Sativex, an "inhalable marijuana-derived drug" that contains both THC and CBD, the two main active ingredients in marijuana. Apparently a supposedly dangerous drug with no therapeutic value suddenly has potential value once a drug company has found a way to steal and patent it (http://healthland.time.com/2011/07/...).

So much for the idea that marijuana is both medically useless and harmful.

source to read more
http://www.naturalnews.com/033117_marijuana_reclassification.html

Teakai
25th July 2011, 09:48
So long as corporations rule the world that's the way it will be. DEATH TO CORPORATIONS, say I. DEATH TO CORPORATIONS - and their greedy money grubbing and conscienceless ways!!!!

Everyday I get more and more repulsed by this idea that some people feel they have the right to control others. I despise these mental tethers by which society is bound and marvel that I had no real idea they even existed until quite recently.

I always thought it was pretty sucky that people had to spend 8 hours 5 days a week working - but that was about the extent of it. Now I see it everywhere and it's repugnant.

etheric underground
25th July 2011, 10:04
Passionate words TEAKAI... Exactly what is needed.
I am totally on your vibe... With all that is going on and all that I know
I still find it bloody difficult not to give up on the majority and there
power/money zombie stupor. Every day i have to rebalance my energy and intentions
because of the complete ignorance and close minded ways of most.

Teakai
25th July 2011, 12:08
Passionate words TEAKAI... Exactly what is needed.
I am totally on your vibe... With all that is going on and all that I know
I still find it bloody difficult not to give up on the majority and there
power/money zombie stupor. Every day i have to rebalance my energy and intentions
because of the complete ignorance and close minded ways of most.

I understand what you mean, Etheric. I've wondered if all will come to light and all people will see the truth sooner or later (hopefully sooner)- and then I wonder if some people will just sleepwalk straight into the nwo agenda as a matter of course. Microchips? - my, what a fantastically handy idea!

People who came across this information years ago must have felt pretty frustrated by the blindness of society. Now, here we are with so much access to information - and you can put it under people's noses and say look, look, can't you see what is running this world? Can't you see that the conspiracy is real and it's HUGE? But they ignore it - or brush it off - because somehow, to them, it's not a part of their accepted reality. Oh, it's on you tube - you tube's not a genuine source of information. or - *pffft* you can't believe what you read on the internet.

I put all I find up on facebook, but seriously, I don't think anybody - other than those I've friended from here - looks at it - unless I post some mundane blithering about what I happen to be doing that day.

Ah well, che sera sera, I suppose. I can only do what I can do and leave others to either accept or deny, to sleep or to wake.

Sorry to take that off topic KT.

rufus7
25th July 2011, 16:18
They would like too see us stay there little puppets of fear forever. the chances of that happening are zero.
The truth cannot stay covered up forever.

Omni
25th July 2011, 16:54
The more the DEA says cannabis is like heroin, the more people will wake up to governmental abuse, underhandedness, and tyranny. Plenty of people have smoked cannabis. Almost everyone knows it's not as dangerous as heroin. The ones that think it is are definitely some of the most brainwashed/indoctrinated in society.

As per a couple posts about living in this world... Quite a predicament the awakened person is in. It can always get worse, trust me... Dealing with the serpents head is far worse than dealing with the asleep(not to say either is superior or inferior, just to put things in perspective of 'it's not that bad'). It is like the Matrix a bit. The asleep people can be programmed or end up this way naturally, to attack what threatened their reality. Attacking what threatens ones reality is ingrained into humanity by things like the Vatican and Catholicism if conditioning has anything to do with genetics. Oh and the fact that they were killing off a good deal of the awakened throughout history I'm sure didn't help. We've had natural selection inverted in ways I've noticed, to propagate more indoctrinated people by channels of religion. If you gained power and were preaching the truth(AKA against religious claims), you would be liable to be snuffed out, killed, crusified, etc back in our history.

True it's hard and not good energy to mosy through public situations where many are clueless on this planet of reality. Those days were easy compared to what I go through now though, or easy compared to like 1,300 years ago.... lol So be grateful maybe, too. One could see it as a good purpose to help awaken the drowsy and at least a good percent are not crusified for it at this time(some still are..).

Sierra
25th July 2011, 17:50
Arresting and jailing people hasn't worked, the massive anti-marijuana propaganda program going into its 80th decade hasn't worked. ... oh look! Here we go again. An artificial, controlled substance that I promise you will do jack all but line corporate pockets. And it will have side effects.

Freedom to partake of what Mother Earth gives us is a basic. human. right.

Sierra, medical marijuana user because I've tried everything else that doesn't work

Teakai
26th July 2011, 08:12
What I really don't get - and I've mentioned it in another thread a while back - is how people have to swear on the bible in a court of law - and in that same bible it gives humans the right to all that grows upon the earth for food and medicine.
So, not only how can't a lawyer win on those grounds alone - but how does it even get to be illegal to begin with????

etheric underground
27th July 2011, 04:00
Hey Teakai, what you provide and put out there is not in vain...
I totally agree with you. Why have we taken what we have learnt
so naturally and chosen to help those when they dont want to be helped.
My only motivation is a humble one... Work on you to be lighter in every facet of the word
Stay as positive and focused on ascension, enlightenment,spiritual awakening , higher vibration
or what ever you want to term it. And by living by your loving, lightened way we change those around us
by association....I HOPE ANYWAYS.
Keep up your purposeful means my friend it does make a difference.

ktlight
26th December 2011, 14:27
"Wisdom at last!
alekid 5 hours ago"

_JLvzHo3fbk

WhiteFeather
26th December 2011, 14:41
Why would the court system waste their time, no effort and money, we should all be able to carry a few buds with us on our person every day. Great Video, Thanks for sharing this.

Camilo
26th December 2011, 14:45
Good!...It was about time.

seko
26th December 2011, 15:25
The next big market it;s going to be the selling of marihuana. Maybe in the next 10 years we will see marihuana in stores or in everyone's gardens.:bounce:

Zampano
26th December 2011, 16:15
I am not the person who says...lets abandon drugs,
But there is a risk that you can get addicted from the effects that drugs are creating.

It doesnt matter if you are rich or poor-under stress you are looking for a relieve.
Some do sports or do yoga or whatever...
Alcohol and weed are also common methodes to "escape" from, yes the real world I think.

I have seen people "wasting" their lives with smoking pot everyday and dont do anything.
Up to the point where they got paranoid and had anxiety attacks.

Sometimes they created a second image of themselves:
The real and the drunk/high

At the end it is all about the responsible use of light drugs...but I think it disturbes our growth!


Smoking pot for spiritual purpose?
There are natural ways to do it

ktlight
26th December 2011, 17:20
I am not the person who says...lets abandon drugs,
But there is a risk that you can get addicted from the effects that drugs are creating.

It doesnt matter if you are rich or poor-under stress you are looking for a relieve.
Some do sports or do yoga or whatever...
Alcohol and weed are also common methodes to "escape" from, yes the real world I think.

I have seen people "wasting" their lives with smoking pot everyday and dont do anything.
Up to the point where they got paranoid and had anxiety attacks.

Sometimes they created a second image of themselves:
The real and the drunk/high

At the end it is all about the responsible use of light drugs...but I think it disturbes our growth!


Smoking pot for spiritual purpose?
There are natural ways to do it

There is a story in "the Drug Users Manual" about an American Indian who was continually visited by the police who told the police that until he could attain it naturally, he would continue to use, and they left him alone. There is a list in the book of people throughout the ages who used who were outstanding achievers, Aldous Huxley being one. H G Wells wrote a story about a weak minded man who ate Psilocybe and transformed into a strong minded man.

Zampano
26th December 2011, 17:45
Maybe they would have written some even greater books without drugs, who knows?

My point is that you can achieve those things without taking drugs-I just say from my own experiences.
I smoked pot, I drank alcohol, ate mushrooms-I know about the drug induced sensations.
But at the end you can do it without taking drugs.
And yes, that what drugs are doing-making a strong minded man from a person who is not like that.

ktlight
26th December 2011, 17:49
Maybe they would have written some even greater books without drugs, who knows?

My point is that you can achieve those things without taking drugs-I just say from my own experiences.
I smoked pot, I drank alcohol, ate mushrooms-I know about the drug induced sensations.
But at the end you can do it without taking drugs.
And yes, that what drugs are doing-making a strong minded man from a person who is not like that.

Agreed. But it's not only books, but inventions, paintings...in fact, anyone who ever achieved greatness.

Zampano
26th December 2011, 18:01
At the end it is about thinking different.
Or having a different approach

ktlight
26th December 2011, 18:04
At the end it is about thinking different.
Or having a different approach

And not ignoring facts. I agree we need to understand thought and then think differently. Maybe then an end to war.

Turcurulin
26th December 2011, 18:05
The joy and satisfaction that this news has created for my wife and I goes far beyond my descriptive capabilities. This is the best... Christmas gift... EVER! Must... talk like... William Shatner...

SkepticSoul
26th December 2011, 18:40
Maybe they would have written some even greater books without drugs, who knows?

My point is that you can achieve those things without taking drugs-I just say from my own experiences.
I smoked pot, I drank alcohol, ate mushrooms-I know about the drug induced sensations.
But at the end you can do it without taking drugs.
And yes, that what drugs are doing-making a strong minded man from a person who is not like that.

Some drugs can help us 'souls' to have a 'different' experience in the sense of the 'real world' ^^
I say, if it exists, it's part of our experience, why not take a moment and explore

Herbert
26th December 2011, 18:46
It was originally outlawed in order for Hearst and DuPont to replace naturally farm grown hemp with their more profitable oil, petrochemicals, plastic, and their owned vast timber lands - pulp and paper. Hemp (which they labelled as the 'evil' Cannabis or marijuana ; words the public were no familiar with at the time) was the primary crop grown in North America It was so essential to the economy that you could not own farmland unless you agreed to grow some hemp every year. Hemp is soft to handle(as in ropes) and wears practically forever. But at the same time is biodegradable.

alienHunter
26th December 2011, 18:51
At the end it is about thinking different.
Or having a different approach

And not ignoring facts. I agree we need to understand thought and then think differently. Maybe then an end to war.

That is an interesting comment. I remember watching a documentary during the Soviet/Afghanistan war and the reporter was asking one of the freedom fighters (living in a cave) what his thoughts were on the war. The fighter remarked that, "As long as I have my hashish, I am a brave soldier"...really, he said that. I think the effects of cannabis have long been known to be a psychoactive agent that is prone to predispositional effects.

Dawn
27th December 2011, 10:02
This has been posted on another thread, but is is worth re-posting here. The truth is that marijuana is a 100% effective cancer cure. And the sad thing that it is illegal. Considering that close to 50% of the population dies of cancer this is very important information. In case you are unaware of this please spend some time viewing this well done video:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0psJhQHk_GI

ktlight
27th December 2011, 10:13
This has been posted on another thread, but is is worth re-posting here. The truth is that marijuana is a 100% effective cancer cure. And the sad thing that it is illegal. Considering that close to 50% of the population dies of cancer this is very important information.

Does anyone know where to get a supply? It cannot be made from hemp seed for it to work. It has to be extracted from the bud.

And, yes, this is a brilliant video. Shows how to process it.

161803398
27th December 2011, 10:47
I dislike pot. But I hate the prison industrial complex. Its good to hear something sane happened for a change. I love justice. I am so disgusted by the so called war on drugs I could scream.

Enquiring1
27th December 2011, 11:18
From my POV and experience, the single biggest drug which causes the most problems head and shoulders above any other is..........Alcohol (surprise, surprise)

Humble Janitor
27th December 2011, 14:22
Maybe they would have written some even greater books without drugs, who knows?

My point is that you can achieve those things without taking drugs-I just say from my own experiences.
I smoked pot, I drank alcohol, ate mushrooms-I know about the drug induced sensations.
But at the end you can do it without taking drugs.
And yes, that what drugs are doing-making a strong minded man from a person who is not like that.

Some people, despite the effects of drugs, are highly-functioning beings.

Not everyone fits the convenient "lazy stoner" stereotype.

Gardener
27th December 2011, 14:34
From my POV and experience, the single biggest drug which causes the most problems head and shoulders above any other is..........Alcohol (surprise, surprise)

Your POV and experience is also backed by research and publication, it is a fact. I am not able to provide references as I no longer have an athens authorisation but anyone who has can find this. Speaks volumes doesn't it.

Belle
27th December 2011, 14:35
I love it! People took a stand and changed this man's possible future.

Spirituality and action in balance can make a major difference in this world. One without the other is futile...but together, in balance, are powerful.

PixieDust
27th December 2011, 14:52
i dont have much to add that hasn't been said already but as far as the addictive qualities go, of course there are going to be those people that have an destructive addiction to it. but theres other things that are legal that are possibly more destructive that people are addicted to. alcohol, cigerettes, sex, food.

i think our court systems would be better to focus on more dangerous criminals instead of a 17 year old that got caught with a few buds of weed. Or even the major dealers.

Humble Janitor
27th December 2011, 21:12
i dont have much to add that hasn't been said already but as far as the addictive qualities go, of course there are going to be those people that have an destructive addiction to it. but theres other things that are legal that are possibly more destructive that people are addicted to. alcohol, cigerettes, sex, food.

i think our court systems would be better to focus on more dangerous criminals instead of a 17 year old that got caught with a few buds of weed. Or even the major dealers.

I was addicted to food for many years. I finally found a way to get my health back so it's a HUGE change from the past 3 months when I started on my journey.

baddbob
27th December 2011, 21:17
Does that mean that im not a criminal anymore :hippie:

ktlight
27th December 2011, 21:39
Does that mean that im not a criminal anymore :hippie:

Were you not always sovereign?

Midnight Rambler
27th December 2011, 21:52
The Dutch drugs policy is probably one of the best things of the country I happened to be born in. It decriminalizes the users of cannabis and in The Netherlands the actual use of drugs is a lot less than in the countries that have strict drug rules and laws. It is probably much more exciting to use when it is forbidden by law. :)

Dutch drug policies do not increase marijuana use, study finds (http://www.cepr.org/pubs/bulletin/meets/1390.htm)

David Trd1
27th December 2011, 21:53
"Wisdom at last!
alekid 5 hours ago"

_JLvzHo3fbk


May this become the norm and let common sense prevail.While i dont indulge in the plant myself i still feel a grave injustice has been done to it.

The cats been out of the bag on marijuana for a very long time and now there is a plethera of scientific evidence to back up whats been known for centuries,that its is healing and benificial.

I mean counterbalance it off what alchohol or synthetic drugs do to people,The only crime in regards to this wonderful plant is that its not been decriminalised across the globe so that we can truley tap ''back'' into its healing properties and put it back where it belongs among the great herbs.

Tahnks for the vid.

TargeT
28th December 2011, 00:13
I am not the person who says...lets abandon drugs,
But there is a risk that you can get addicted from the effects that drugs are creating.

It doesnt matter if you are rich or poor-under stress you are looking for a relieve.
Some do sports or do yoga or whatever...
Alcohol and weed are also common methodes to "escape" from, yes the real world I think.

I have seen people "wasting" their lives with smoking pot everyday and dont do anything.
Up to the point where they got paranoid and had anxiety attacks.

Sometimes they created a second image of themselves:
The real and the drunk/high

At the end it is all about the responsible use of light drugs...but I think it disturbes our growth!


Smoking pot for spiritual purpose?
There are natural ways to do it

Just like sex, drug use is more often than not perverted from a spiritual enhancement to a gutteral/base enjoyment..


No restriction to anything I say... personal responsability for all!


& FYI Marijuana is a SLANG term used originaly in mexico.. it was used for Cannabis as a propiganda term... lets not further the propiganda and refer to the plant by its proper (shortend) name.. Cannabis.

baddbob
28th December 2011, 00:41
Here are the laws here in the USA
http://norml.org/states

DeDukshyn
28th December 2011, 01:28
From my POV and experience, the single biggest drug which causes the most problems head and shoulders above any other is..........Alcohol (surprise, surprise)

And let's not forget to add that +200,000 American die every single year from "legal" drugs prescribed legitimately by doctors (Big Pharma works hard to prevent the sheep from knowing these stats). I think the stats on pot killing people per year is around zero.

TargeT
28th December 2011, 02:08
From my POV and experience, the single biggest drug which causes the most problems head and shoulders above any other is..........Alcohol (surprise, surprise)

And let's not forget to add that +200,000 American die every single year from "legal" drugs prescribed legitimately by doctors (Big Pharma works hard to prevent the sheep from knowing these stats). I think the stats on pot killing people per year is around zero.

I'd say the biggest drug problem is Opiates (almost all perscribed drugs are opiates), second being alcohol.. more proof that externalizing your power only causes grief and angst... everything we try to regulate to "keep us safe" comes back to bite "us". (though honestly I think those types of lines are just justification for an action that was done for other reasons... in the case of drugs: blocking a spiritual door & creating a huge profit center while preverting that "spiritual gateway" to a base enjoyment. )

Laurel
28th December 2011, 05:12
"...might induce short term memory loss, but only while you're high"

This really made me giggle. Anyone else remember writing down "the most amazing idea ever", and then spending hours the next day trying to decipher what the heck you wrote down?

Seriously though, going to high school in the 70's, more people than not smoked pot. I would chose getting high over drinking. It did not turn me to harder drugs, I don't smoke cigarettes and seldom drink alcohol.

I don't know anyone who is addicted to marijuana, but plenty who are addicted to alcohol and cigarettes. Still marijuana is illegal, while alcohol and cigarettes are completely legal. I find that so frustratingly hypocritcal.

wolf_rt
28th December 2011, 06:45
This has been posted on another thread, but is is worth re-posting here. The truth is that marijuana is a 100% effective cancer cure. And the sad thing that it is illegal. Considering that close to 50% of the population dies of cancer this is very important information.

Does anyone know where to get a supply? It cannot be made from hemp seed for it to work. It has to be extracted from the bud.

And, yes, this is a brilliant video. Shows how to process it.

The amount of bud Rick uses would be prohibitively expensive to purchase for making your own hemp oil, and the majority of 'street' weed has high levels of chemical also... 'Street' Hash or oil will aslo be far less pure that what Rick makes... You ONLY want the THC... THC makes you 'High'... there are other active ingredients that make you 'stoned' or drowsy.
Rick also recommends using a particular strain... 'Sativa'??? i cant remember...rofl

buds will form on the plant in winter, once there is less than 12 hours of daylight... remember hemp is a tree, and will grow to 10-12 foot in under 9 months.
each plant will produce 1-2 pounds of bud per season.

Grow your own organically... seed can be had from most stoners, or if you cant find one, you can order seed online, though i wouldn't recommend having it delivered to your address.

wolf_rt
28th December 2011, 06:58
I am also of the opinion that marijuana was made illegal to popularize it. There was only a few Mexicans smoking pot before it was made illegal... after... well....

It does interfere with brain development in early teens....

When was the last time you saw a 15 year old with a Valium habit???

Mike Gorman
28th December 2011, 09:00
The point that comes to light for me in these debates about Drugs is primarily: The Freedom of the Individual to choose for themselves.
Regardless of whether you think the same states can be achieved 'Naturally' or with cold baths first thing-or any other consideration
is the Liberty of the individual to take whatever substance they see fit to take, as long as they are 1.Adults, 2.know the dangers, 3.are not hurting
others-I mean really, what is it to you, or the law, or anyone for that matter?

Midnight Rambler
28th December 2011, 09:07
You ONLY want the THC... THC makes you 'High'... there are other active ingredients that make you 'stoned' or drowsy.

The Dutch government advises to use a vaporizer. (http://www.cannabisbureau.nl/en/MedicinalCannabis/Patientinformation/Vaporiser/)


http://www.bestvaporizer.com/reviews/volcano_vaporizer.jpg


Smoking cannabis is just as harmful as smoking tobacco. It can cause lung complaints and possibly lung cancer. You are therefore advised not to smoke medicinal cannabis. To avoid harmful effects, cannabis can be inhaled used a vaporiser, which works by vaporising the active elements.

Vaporisers work by passing hot air (185 C) over the cannabis. The resulting vapour can be inhaled through a tube, or collected in a bag and then inhaled. As a rule, approximately 100 mg of medicinal cannabis must be placed in the atomiser each time it is used. The cannabis can, in principle, be used more than once, as there are usually some active elements remaining after the first use. However, if an identical effect is required each time the vaporiser is used, the used cannabis will need to be removed and replaced with a fresh dose.

Source (http://www.cannabisbureau.nl/en/MedicinalCannabis/Patientinformation/Vaporiser/)

wolf_rt
28th December 2011, 09:41
Midnight Rambler.... I was talking about THC for curing cancer... if you want to get stoned you will want ALL the active ingredients.... but good idea!

Midnight Rambler
28th December 2011, 14:17
Midnight Rambler.... I was talking about THC for curing cancer... if you want to get stoned you will want ALL the active ingredients.... but good idea!

This is for curing illnesses as well. The source (http://www.cannabisbureau.nl/en/MedicinalCannabis/Patientinformation/Vaporiser/) link goes to a Dutch government site about medicinal cannabis.

As a former smoker I have had a much better time when on a high instead when being stoned. Here in the Netherlands most people mix their cannabis with tobacco and the mix of THC and nicotine is the cause for the stoned state of mind. When smoking without tobacco you will get high instead. When using a vaporizer you will inhale only THC and some water vapor and no tar or other bad substances, that comes from burning the bud, will get in your lungs. So this is the healthiest way to inhale it.

I knew some folks who ate their hash, because they didn't smoke. And you can make some cannabis butter from the clippings. You can make cake, pies or just melt the butter and put it on a loaf of bread. This will bring on a mind altering effect as well.

Belle
28th December 2011, 14:29
Cannabis is also the best pain reliever, bringing instant relief from the most severe pain with no side effects.

seko
28th December 2011, 14:50
As a former smoker I have had a much better time when on a high instead when being stoned. Here in the Netherlands most people mix their cannabis with tobacco and the mix of THC and nicotine is the cause for the stoned state of mind. When smoking without tobacco you will get high instead.

Marijuana or Cannabis should be smoked without tobacco otherwise you'll get the bad toxins of cigarets and it's side effects.

ktlight
28th December 2011, 15:01
Does tobacco have side effects that hurt the shamans who use it in their rituals?

seko
28th December 2011, 15:12
Does tobacco have side effects that hurt the shamans who use it in their rituals?

Natural tobacco no.

Cigarettes like Malboro, Dunhill etc etc yes KT

Arrowwind
28th December 2011, 15:15
I am not the person who says...lets abandon drugs,
But there is a risk that you can get addicted from the effects that drugs are creating.

It doesnt matter if you are rich or poor-under stress you are looking for a relieve.
Some do sports or do yoga or whatever...
Alcohol and weed are also common methodes to "escape" from, yes the real world I think.

I have seen people "wasting" their lives with smoking pot everyday and dont do anything.
Up to the point where they got paranoid and had anxiety attacks.



And I have seen people run huge corporations and be responsible for tons of money and people and legalities associated with the responsibility, with out a hitch, without an incident, without being irresponsible, year after year, without acting like or appearing like a stoner or any of those sterotypes associated with pot.

Not everyone tolerates pot well. I am one of those. Some people don't tolerate alcohol, some people don't tolerate cabbage, some people don't tolerate religion or relatives. Most people learn to stay away from things that they don't tolerate well.

Those who don't are just down right stupid and will not succeed in anything they do in life, irregardless of pot smoking. They should not be punished for their stupidity, nor should I have to pay for a judicial system to control or punish them.


Its time we reduced our prison population, stop splitting up families, stop making money off of people who smoke.

and if smoking is going to be tolerated by the justice system then they also must tolerate and set free those who grow, distribute and sell marijuana.

percival tyro
28th December 2011, 16:35
In 1964 around one in 214 persons contracted cancer.......Since the formation of the larger cancer research agencies, the estimated total donated stands at around four trillion dollars......Today around one in three females and one in two males contract cancer.

ktlight
28th December 2011, 16:46
In 1964 around one in 214 persons contracted cancer.......Since the formation of the larger cancer research agencies, the estimated total donated stands at around four trillion dollars......Today around one in three females and one in two males contract cancer.

Cancer is big business, makes a lot of money from the sick.

percival tyro
28th December 2011, 19:56
definitely the scam of the century if you don't like human beings....here's the recipe for success...Find a deadly disease. Don't try to cure it but nurture and sustain it. When you have achieved the desired result, advertise for contributions towards a cure and create a fabulous income. Round up the collateral damage, (relatives and loved ones). Give them a tin and arrange with the supermarkets for a nice warm spot for them just inside the door. Call it a charity and don't pay any taxes. There you are Wall street that's how it should be done!.

TargeT
28th December 2011, 22:50
Cancer is big business, makes a lot of money from the sick.

they recently announced a "cure"

but when you listen to it, its just another treatment.. it embeds gold flakes in cancer cells then you hit htem with radio waves and they burn out the cancer... BUT DO NOT deal with its original formation...

so even the "cure" is just another treatment.....

if only everyone were educated in the Trivium... Grammar is first for a reason, a word MEANS something & people who know what "cure" vrs "treatment" means... well none of this would ever fly in an educated population...

our collective, purposefuly arrogant ignorance is a great challange currently.

Laurel
29th December 2011, 05:00
Alcohol and weed are also common methodes to "escape" from, yes the real world I think.

I have seen people "wasting" their lives with smoking pot everyday and dont do anything.


Those who don't are just down right stupid and will not succeed in anything they do in life, irregardless of pot smoking. They should not be punished for their stupidity, nor should I have to pay for a judicial system to control or punish them.

Arrowind, I agree. Zampano, the people who are escaping from their lives will do it regardless of the method. Pot is one tool, but it could be really anything that allows a person to escape. My point is that it's the person, not the tool.

Laurel
29th December 2011, 05:18
I am also of the opinion that marijuana was made illegal to popularize it. There was only a few Mexicans smoking pot before it was made illegal... after... well....

It does interfere with brain development in early teens....

When was the last time you saw a 15 year old with a Valium habit???

Marijuana/hemp was made illegal so cotton, paper, etc big businesses could take over. It had nothing to do with making it more popular.

Seriously, at 15?? You have to be kidding or don't have kids in high school. Scoffing at this infuriates me. True, Valium is passe. Now it's Oxycotin, various other painkillers, and sadly heroin. When I was in high school, it was Quaaludes (not for me though). This is a serious issue in the high schools, regardless of the neighborhood or wealth. We live in a very nice town and my daughter goes to one of the best schools in our state. Just about a year ago, one of her classmates died from an overdose of painkillers. This girl was gorgeous, popular and addicted to pills.

latte
29th December 2011, 05:33
In 1964 around one in 214 persons contracted cancer.......Since the formation of the larger cancer research agencies, the estimated total donated stands at around four trillion dollars......Today around one in three females and one in two males contract cancer.

percival, do you know where you found this statistic? Is there a link? Thanks!

wolf_rt
29th December 2011, 05:59
I am also of the opinion that marijuana was made illegal to popularize it. There was only a few Mexicans smoking pot before it was made illegal... after... well....

It does interfere with brain development in early teens....

When was the last time you saw a 15 year old with a Valium habit???

Marijuana/hemp was made illegal so cotton, paper, etc big businesses could take over. It had nothing to do with making it more popular.

Seriously, at 15?? You have to be kidding or don't have kids in high school. Scoffing at this infuriates me. True, Valium is passe. Now it's Oxycotin, various other painkillers, and sadly heroin. When I was in high school, it was Quaaludes (not for me though). This is a serious issue in the high schools, regardless of the neighborhood or wealth. We live in a very nice town and my daughter goes to one of the best schools in our state. Just about a year ago, one of her classmates died from an overdose of painkillers. This girl was gorgeous, popular and addicted to pills.

Every 'conspiracy' you look at has many angles, many causes and effects, i don't disagree about the Du-pont ect. angle... just think theres more to it also...

Im thinking here of the Reefer madness campaign in the 1930's.... when very few people actually smoked pot... it was more like advertising.

Scoffing at what???? Things are likely different in the US, but having a pill habit is not 'cool' in Australia (note - 'habit' not just taking pills when available).
When i was at school 12 years ago (quite a while admittedly) perhaps 0.5% had a Hard drug habit, compared to perhaps 15-20% who had a pot habit, As far as i know (and i was in a position to know) NOBODY had a 'pill' habit...

extacy is now very popular in school age people... but it is reserved for the weekend, when they hit it hard.... not really a habit in my opinion, i would call a habit daily use.

Laurel
29th December 2011, 06:20
I am also of the opinion that marijuana was made illegal to popularize it. There was only a few Mexicans smoking pot before it was made illegal... after... well....

It does interfere with brain development in early teens....

When was the last time you saw a 15 year old with a Valium habit???

Marijuana/hemp was made illegal so cotton, paper, etc big businesses could take over. It had nothing to do with making it more popular.

Seriously, at 15?? You have to be kidding or don't have kids in high school. Scoffing at this infuriates me. True, Valium is passe. Now it's Oxycotin, various other painkillers, and sadly heroin. When I was in high school, it was Quaaludes (not for me though). This is a serious issue in the high schools, regardless of the neighborhood or wealth. We live in a very nice town and my daughter goes to one of the best schools in our state. Just about a year ago, one of her classmates died from an overdose of painkillers. This girl was gorgeous, popular and addicted to pills.

Every 'conspiracy' you look at has many angles, many causes and effects, i don't disagree about the Du-pont ect. angle... just think theres more to it also...

Im thinking here of the Reefer madness campaign in the 1930's.... when very few people actually smoked pot... it was more like advertising.

Scoffing at what???? Things are likely different in the US, but having a pill habit is not 'cool' in Australia (note - 'habit' not just taking pills when available).
When i was at school 12 years ago (quite a while admittedly) perhaps 0.5% had a Hard drug habit, compared to perhaps 15-20% who had a pot habit, As far as i know (and i was in a position to know) NOBODY had a 'pill' habit...

extacy is now very popular in school age people... but it is reserved for the weekend, when they hit it hard.... not really a habit in my opinion, i would call a habit daily use.

I'm sorry for accusing you of scoffing. The subject of pills and teens is pretty emotional for me. You're right, it is a pretty serious issue in the US. I'll PM you with more info.

I understand your point that there may be more to it.

A little over a year ago, I bought Salvia in a regular store. Today it is illegal in my state. It's just crazy. Salvia is not addictive, not something you're going to want to use all the time. It doesn't get you high, but you will trip for about 15 minutes. It opens your mind, is shown to help tremendously with depression, has no harmful side effects and is a very positive experience. So, of course they make it illegal.

Mulder
29th December 2011, 06:51
Jury nullification (Jury nullification occurs in a trial when a jury reaches a verdict contrary to the judge's instructions as to the law) is the BEST non-violent way to show up the false war on drugs. I urge every jury to do this because the Govt is responsible for bringing in a lot of the drugs (see Iran-contra scandal for proof) , then they lock-up poor addicts who need to go receive treatment in a hospital for their drug addiction. I saw a great documentary in Canada about injecting rooms and the treatment of addicts. This treatment was even cheaper than the cost of prison!

spiritguide
29th December 2011, 08:22
Are we all not blind to the fact that Cannabis is a gift from the Creator with many uses including many healing uses. For many thousands of years if not more it has been used though the knowledge of the elders. Greed my friends has been the bane upon using the earth's bountiful treasures as we see fit for ourselves. Can any man. nation or society stand between you and the Creators gifts? Is it right or just? I say no because if we think we can we already lost our soul. IMO

Humble Janitor
29th December 2011, 09:09
I am also of the opinion that marijuana was made illegal to popularize it. There was only a few Mexicans smoking pot before it was made illegal... after... well....

It does interfere with brain development in early teens....

When was the last time you saw a 15 year old with a Valium habit???

Marijuana/hemp was made illegal so cotton, paper, etc big businesses could take over. It had nothing to do with making it more popular.

Seriously, at 15?? You have to be kidding or don't have kids in high school. Scoffing at this infuriates me. True, Valium is passe. Now it's Oxycotin, various other painkillers, and sadly heroin. When I was in high school, it was Quaaludes (not for me though). This is a serious issue in the high schools, regardless of the neighborhood or wealth. We live in a very nice town and my daughter goes to one of the best schools in our state. Just about a year ago, one of her classmates died from an overdose of painkillers. This girl was gorgeous, popular and addicted to pills.

Legalize marijuana and BAN THE ****ING PILLS!

Sorry for swearing but painkiller abuse infuriates me. There is no excuse for it in today's society and Big Pharma/Doctors are to blame for furthering the societal damage from painkiller abuse.

Cigarette smoking also infuriates me, especially when selfish smokers decide that their pathetic habit is more important than the people they love. I can't stand to visit my parents when my mother insists on smoking inside (it's too cold out! wahh!!) and collecting a check because her lungs are so damaged from years of smoking. She has to use several inhalers and a nebulizer everyday. I don't feel bad though. But, I'm not going to tolerate cigarette smoke when it damages my own health, even if it's not direct. I too, have to use an inhaler and I would prefer to stop at that.

My advice to smokers is to wake up, stop being so damn selfish and put the butts out for the last time.

Again, can someone tell me why cigarettes are LEGAL and marijuana is ILLEGAL? Where's the logic in that?

Arrowwind
29th December 2011, 17:32
I am also of the opinion that marijuana was made illegal to popularize it. There was only a few Mexicans smoking pot before it was made illegal... after... well....

It does interfere with brain development in early teens....

When was the last time you saw a 15 year old with a Valium habit???

Marijuana/hemp was made illegal so cotton, paper, etc big businesses could take over. It had nothing to do with making it more popular.

Seriously, at 15?? You have to be kidding or don't have kids in high school. Scoffing at this infuriates me. True, Valium is passe. Now it's Oxycotin, various other painkillers, and sadly heroin. When I was in high school, it was Quaaludes (not for me though). This is a serious issue in the high schools, regardless of the neighborhood or wealth. We live in a very nice town and my daughter goes to one of the best schools in our state. Just about a year ago, one of her classmates died from an overdose of painkillers. This girl was gorgeous, popular and addicted to pills.

Its too bad that the adults in their life were not responsible enough to keep these drugs away from their kids. Most of this stuff is not purchased on the internet but procured from grandma... There are also doctors out there who move it into the mainstream in large quantities.

Take the profit out of it and people will loose interest for the most part. Adults need to be educated on how to manage narcartics in their home. I was working a hospice case recently in a rural community and saw that the hospice nurse had no interest in removing the narcotics from the home after the patient died. Its a shame. In the city hospices that would never happen. All narcotics are disposed of that are in the patients name... so I had to take it upon myself to get rid of them, for there were teenagers around.


Adults also need to learn alternative methods of pain management and we need to get doctors and nurses on board with this. There are some very effective alternatives out there.

Ultimatley its the propaganda of the pharmaceutcal industry that we are up against and thier undending hunger for larger profits, will no concern for who gets taken out in the process.


Did you know that the application of an anti-inflammatory can reduce the need for a lot of narcotics? That homeopathy combination remedies can treat most anxiety conditions? That acupuncture can alleviate a lot of pain. That self hypnosis is a real viable pain control method? That many migraines cure with homeopathy combo remedies? That prolotherapy can not only eliminate joint pain but regenerate cartilage?

Correct the real problems, the lies, the illegalities, the profiteering, the gross negligence and then you will have a greatly reduced need for narcotics as well as a limited access.

Keep putting the petty drug dealer and user in jail and all you will get is higher taxes and a crumbling social system of split and damaged families, people who advance to higher levels of crime, and rich judges and lawyers.

Arrowwind
29th December 2011, 17:42
[A little over a year ago, I bought Salvia in a regular store. Today it is illegal in my state. It's just crazy. Salvia is not addictive, not something you're going to want to use all the time. It doesn't get you high, but you will trip for about 15 minutes. It opens your mind, is shown to help tremendously with depression, has no harmful side effects and is a very positive experience. So, of course they make it illegal.

Hey, I have a ton of it in my yard. Still legal for sale in my state. Its a hearty perennial.


My sons have also lost friends to methadone and oxycontin. It is a very real problem. Still I largely blame the parents. My kids were never inclined to do these drugs and I know why. Because I sat down and scared the sh^t out of them with real life stories of their use.. teilling them what a side effect is, what a poisoning effect is, telling them what building tolerance means, how many pills will likely do you in, and what mixes will kill you and my own horrifying experience with Darvons taken for the pain of a burn. . and also advised them that they would see friends die... just wait and see... and they did.

As long as adults and families at large are in denial so will be their children. No law, no judge, no social institution can protect them... only their own informed minds.

Arrowwind
29th December 2011, 17:45
Jury nullification (Jury nullification occurs in a trial when a jury reaches a verdict contrary to the judge's instructions as to the law) is the BEST non-violent way to show up the false war on drugs. I urge every jury to do this because the Govt is responsible for bringing in a lot of the drugs (see Iran-contra scandal for proof) , then they lock-up poor addicts who need to go receive treatment in a hospital for their drug addiction. I saw a great documentary in Canada about injecting rooms and the treatment of addicts. This treatment was even cheaper than the cost of prison!

Absolutely. We as citizens spend a lot of effort avoiding jury duty. The best civil disobedience you can do to effect social change and protect those that would enact their civil liberties is though getting on a jury and refusing to covict.

Thank you for this important post.

ExomatrixTV
29th June 2012, 10:23
nCJoQxyFD5Q

http://MushLove.whynotnews.eu ~credits video: http://youtube.com/chexrice (http://www.youtube.com/redirect?q=http%3A%2F%2Fyoutube.com%2Fchexrice&session_token=dkLkOPOUWUMuxuRNXFcb089HElx8MTM0MTA1 MTUyMkAxMzQwOTY1MTIy) National Organization for the Reform Marijuana Laws http://norml.org Marijuana Policy Project http://mpp.org

It has been almost 20 years since we have had a President that didn't smoke Marijuana. Listen to our last three United States Presidents talk about their use of Marijuana.

Marijuana, it's use is widespread throughout our culture. Marijuana is so prevalent in our culture that it has been almost 20 years since we have had a United States President that didn't use marijuana at some point in their life.

Bill Clinton was the first US President to admit to trying pot. President Clinton admitted to possessing Cannabis but he wouldn't admit to inhaling it or liking it.

Many people don't want to believe that George Bush used cocaine and marijuana. When candidate Bush was asked about his past drug use he refused to answer the questions about the indiscretions of his youth preferring to say that they were irrelevant. The answer to whether he had used marijuana was no longer open to debate when one of his advisors, Doug Wead, released tapes in 2005 that he secretly recorded of phone conversations with George Bush when he was a presidential candidate.

Barack Obama was the first US president to openly admit to inhaling marijuana. Not only did Barack Obama admit to Marijuana usage, he also wrote about positive drug experiences in his 1995 book "Dreams of my Father".

The last three Americans that have risen to the status of President of the United States have committed the crime of possession and use of Marijuana. Marijuana use is so common that the National Institute on Drug Abuse says that as of 2003 "More than 94 million Americans have tried marijuana at least once".

In 2009 858,408 Americans were arrested for marijuana offenses. Not only do those arrested face imprisonment, they also face a criminal record that will remain with them for the rest of their lives and will be the basis of discrimination in housing, education, and employment. When filling out an application the question is not "have you ever used marijuana", the question is "did you get caught?" Despite the widespread prevalence of Marijuana in our nation we have put those that get caught into a permanent underclass and place obstacles in their way for their entire life. Does this benefit our nation? Is it right that we encourage discrimination against those who got caught doing what so many of us have done? Does making it harder for those who got caught to get an education or find work lower the productivity of our economy?

Ask yourself: "If Bill Clinton, George Bush, or Barack Obama had been arrested and given a criminal record while they were committing youthful indiscretions would they have been able to move on with their lives and become the President of the United States?

My name is Chris and I am a pothead for life, even though I no longer smoke. I am a pothead for life because I have a criminal record for possession of Cannabis.

End the Discrimination!

Dad Gives Son Medical Marijuana Battling Brain Cancer Hijacked Governments Criminalizing Healing?

WWhn74HwiLI

~Hemp Revolution 2 - Hemp4Victory2 - Help Ron Paul to Decriminalize Cannabis Cures!

J0JbGqRQYFI

Vitalux
24th August 2012, 00:24
I have been following information lately about the Freeman Movement.

Is there any evidence to support that one can proclaim inherent birth right status of Common Law to be exempt from the state prosecuting them for smoking marijuana?


The reason why I ask is that I see them talk about evoking this rite common law to avoid taxes or having to travel with a drivers licence, but I have failed to see any one provide much discussion in terms of drug laws such as marijuana or other scheduled natural plants that are controlled by criminal code drug laws?


Discussion or thoughts?

:hippie:

we-R-one
24th August 2012, 00:27
Yes! With common law, there is only a crime committed if you have an injured party, plain and simple.

Vitalux
24th August 2012, 01:04
Yes! With common law, there is only a crime committed if you have an injured party, plain and simple.

It would be neat if someone could come forward that has actually used this in a case and won.
I do clearly see how the theory of this should work.

I would imagine that if the public at large was to become aware of this, that ....there would be a whole new way of doing things. :target:

Praxis
24th August 2012, 03:40
You are assuming that the law matters, whether common or other . . .

we-R-one
24th August 2012, 04:36
oh exactly Vitalux! ...take note of the two following definitions and herein lies part of the problem:

The government that is currently set up is known as the de facto government. Please note the definition from Black Law's Dictionary 5th edition:



GOVERNMENT DE FACTO-(this is how we've been set up): A government of fact. A government actually exercising power and control, as opposed to the true and lawful government; a government not established according to the constitution of the nation, or not lawfully entitled to recognition or supremacy, but which has nevertheless supplanted or displaced the government de jure. A government deemed unlawful, or deemed wrongful or unjust, which, nevertheless, receives presently habitual obedience from the bulk of the community.
PLEASE NOTE LAST SENTENCE....."receives presently habitual obedience from the bulk of the community." THIS IS REFERRING TO "WE THE PEOPLE". WE DON'T KNOW ANY BETTER SO WE ARE OBEDIENT.

The de facto government became possible because the de jure government was no longer inhabited. Please note definition of de jure from Black Law’s Dictionary 5th edition:

GOVERNMENT DE JURE- A government of right; the true and lawful government; a government established according to the constitution of the nation, and lawfully entitled to recognition and supremacy and the administration of the nation, but which is actually cut off from power or control. A government deemed lawful, or deemed rightful or just, which, nevertheless, has been supplanted or displaced; that is to say, which receives not presently (although it received formerly) habitual obedience from the bulk of the community.



The de facto government did not happen overnight. Several steps were put into place to ensure it's establishment. One being the Corporation Act of 1871. This was the beginning.......moving on 100+ years ahead you then had all the city's, counties, and states further solidify the corporate status via the agreement of obtaining EIN numbers, in which you can find all of them on DUNS AND BRADSTREET.

You see it's all about jurisdiction and right now you are a corporate slave via your all cap name, birth certificate and social security #. Every contract you sign, mortgage etc, in which you acknowledge your all cap name is really an agreement that binds you to the jurisdiction of the corporation. So many people have acquiesced that it has become difficult for those of us who no longer want to participate in "their" system. Part of the fraud lies in the fact that you were never told this, which if I remember correctly is a violation of contract law and can therefore make the agreement null and void.

The other problem you have are the courts themselves. Under common-law or color of law, the courts follow what's called interpretive ruling. Meaning they can interpret the law as they see fit, regardless of what you think is right or wrong. This is why nothing is black and white as it leaves the door open for the judge to do as he pleases and will often favor the corporation. The courts are so corrupt, which further adds to the difficulty of the entire situation.

If you were to challenge marijuana possession in court you would most likely you would have to prove that you have standing, meaning... the corporation doesn't have jurisdiction over you. Well how do you get standing? Depends on who you ask.....in my state we have made some headway with a 9th Amendment proclamation(affidavit) being recorded in the county where one resides. The point of this is, is to "declare" yourself no longer a part of the corporation. This is no sure thing, as each case is specific unto itself and if you decide to take a pro se approach, you had better know what you're doing. These guys know all the tricks in the book and if you aren't on top of your game you will be sucked into the system as you're merely seen as a cash cow to them and nothing more. It's not about justice, it's about the just-us club and you aint in it! Choose the state wisely, as to where you want to challenge their jurisdiction over you, because we are a long way away from building a precedence. I deeply respect those who have spent many years challenging the system, and paid dearly with their loses, all for sake of paving the way for the rest of us in hopes of re-establishing the republic that has long been un-inhabited.


DISCLAIMER

I am not a Attorney (Lawyer) medical professional or financial adviser orJudge or Tax Expert or expert in anything, I do not offer Legal Advice orany other form of Law. I research and share Information for Fun andEntertainment and for comparison. All theexchanges contained in this email are for personal use only. This private emailmessage, including any attachment[s] is limited to the sole use of the intendedrecipient[s] and may contain Privileged and/or Confidential Information.Since I Know that I am a Freeborn man with a living Spirit, put here by a creator. I have made him Fiduciary over my Soul.
I am a Living Spirit "One of the People" sent here to live in aFleshly Body "Dust of the Earth", Living on the Dry Soil, Domiciledin a place called Idaho and Living under the Laws and Commandments of the creator and having no intentions of causing harm to anyone or anything. Not being the Subject to Slavery or the Unconscionable Contracts ofUndisclosed "Assumptions" "Presumptions""Adhesive""Invisible" and/or Color of Law and/or wordsmith. MAXIMSOF LAW is the foundation....

****AS PER THE UNITED STATES SUPREME COURT;
A. The practice of Law CAN NOTbe licensed by any state/State Schware v. Board of Examiners,353 U.S. 238, 239
B. The practice of Law is ANOCCUPATION OF COMMON RIGHT!
Sims v. Aherns, 271S.W. 720 (1925) ****


NOTICE TO PRINCIPAL IS NOTICE TO AGENT.NOTICE TO AGENT IS NOTICE TO PRINCIPAL.

Vitalux
24th August 2012, 15:32
thank you so much =we-are-one

What might be good is for more folks to become aware, and form communities for support and information to further this awareness for others.

I totally appreciate your input and disclaimer and I do understand what you are conveying.

It is interesting that people seek the help of a lawyer to navigate the legal system and yet, the very lawyer only serves to perpetuate them further down the rabbit hole.

It might be interesting if groups of informed and aware people were to form communities and challenge this GOVERNMENT DE FACTO so that others could see that a parasite has invaded our nest and is eating us whole.:suspicious:

we-R-one
24th August 2012, 17:28
I like your idea of forming communities and have made such attempts. The problem is....people don't want the truth as they still operate in fear. Because they are programmed drones they don't believe what you're telling them as it's not being advertised on mainstream media or on the local newspapers stand. I mean no disrespect when I say that, but it's the truth. You would think the patriot groups would be ideal to handle this type of information. I have found unfortunately to the contrary- these guys can't step outside of the box, most likely due to fear and the other factor that often gets overlooked is ego. I know several patriot leaders in my state(been one myself) and have approached and even done seminars(for free!) giving them the information. My guess is they became overwhelmed with the legal context and didn't know what to do with it. I feel I have done everything I can to simplify the message so they at least walk away with a basic understanding.

My biggest pet peeve is that they won't put it in front of the people! I have been very vocal that it's not their choice to make ("their" meaning the leader of the group), it's the people's choice! This is where ego becomes a huge problem.

Now I don't say this lightly. I spent approx. two years in the forefront of the patriot movement starting two large groups of my own. I stepped away for a time period so I could study the law and further investigate what was really going on. The new leadership unfortunately could not handle the discoveries. What they don't understand is by withholding the information from their community they are creating the very dictatorship that they're trying to fight, by playing God themselves! Unbelievable! Another way of putting it- they're creating the same sheeple effect that they supposedly loathe.

So yes, unfortunately we're getting our asses handed to us and I see no end to it as long as the masses continue to acquiesce. The solution needs to be bottom up, not top down, imo. All attempts need to focus on a local level within each state.

conk
24th August 2012, 17:49
There should only be two laws.

1. Do not harm anyone else
2. Do as you say you'll do

Maia Gabrial
24th August 2012, 17:59
Yes! With common law, there is only a crime committed if you have an injured party, plain and simple.

It would be neat if someone could come forward that has actually used this in a case and won.
I do clearly see how the theory of this should work.

I would imagine that if the public at large was to become aware of this, that ....there would be a whole new way of doing things. :target:



I'm not sure if it was Svali who said that they were told they could use all the drugs except marijuana because it actually helped their minds. And I think she said that it healed them, too. THAT'S why big pharma helped to make it illegal because it healed many things. It competes with their horrible FDA approved nasty drugs....

Of course, I'd love to thrash our elected officials for going beyond their authorities to make this and many other things illegal. This is NOT a right given to them by the Constitution.... Maybe we should form a People's Court and try them there. Heaven knows we won't get justice from a court system that's designed to protect the US corporation and its interests. Not ours.

we-R-one
24th August 2012, 18:10
Posted by we-R-one (here)
Yes! With common law, there is only a crime committed if you have an injured party, plain and simple.
It would be neat if someone could come forward that has actually used this in a case and won.
I do clearly see how the theory of this should work.

I would imagine that if the public at large was to become aware of this, that ....there would be a whole new way of doing things.

I'm not sure if it was Svali who said that they were told they could use all the drugs except marijuana because it actually helped their minds. And I think she said that it healed them, too. THAT'S why big pharma helped to make it illegal because it healed many things. It competes with their horrible FDA approved nasty drugs....

Of course, I'd love to thrash our elected officials for going beyond their authorities to make this and many other things illegal. This is NOT a right given to them by the Constitution.... Maybe we should form a People's Court and try them there. Heaven knows we won't get justice from a court system that's designed to protect the US corporation and its interests. Not ours.

Hi Maia,

Thanks for your input. Can I ask that you fix my quote. You are mixing my comment in with what Vitalux said and I want it to be clear to the reader who said what. Thanks.

It would be nice if we could revert back to common law. I hate to say this, but under the current system, we have no rights as we are under the jurisdiction of the corporation.....legally. So really what's being done to us isn't unconstitutional, it's nonconstitutional and they are within their rights to follow corporate law. That's fine and dandy and I'm not suggesting the dismantling of the corporation, but rather giving the people the right to choose whether they want to be in the corporation. There will be some that would rather be under the the control of the government corporation, that's their right. In the same manner it's each individuals right to opt out if they want to. The system is set up to handle both common law and common-law, but there are many factors in place that are not allowing that to happen.

Paul
24th August 2012, 18:35
Yes! With common law, ...
It would be neat if ...
...



Thanks for your input. Can I ask that you fix my quote.
Quoting fixed :).

The forum tools for quoting posts are a bit confusing :).

we-R-one
24th August 2012, 18:42
Thanks Paul. I hate to be anal, but when you're putting yourself out there in regards to this topic, you gotta be careful.

M0JFK
24th August 2012, 18:47
A good website for more information on common law and act's is a website run by John Harris at www.tpuc.org. Plenty of video's on the website for your education can be found there on all things to do with your straw-man and you.

Vitalux
24th August 2012, 19:19
Thank you we-R-one

I know for myself, I have been really captivated and intrigued by learning this insight of our legal system and government ( or lack of).

One of my goals is to diminish fear by understanding the environment around me for which I exist in.
Very much as in your description, I am a soul having a physical experience here on this soil we call Earth, and circumstances has put me here on soil in Canada.
My wish is to understand my rights so I can navigate through this 3-dimension with happiness and with absence of fear.

Knowledge is a powerful tool, and the truth definitely can set us free.

I enjoy knowing this new found knowledge and I am going to convey it to others too ( if they choose to listen).
It makes me feel a bit more empowered knowing I have fundamental rights as a human being under the Bill of Rights ( I hope).

Like all things, it helps ease the mind a bit when you feel like you have even a small twig in your hand to fend off a lion that is attacking you.

http://www.scenicreflections.com/ithumbs/Lion_attacks_Zebra_Wallpaper_mpzes.jpg

The small bit of knowledge of "who I am" or more important " who I am not" brings solace to know that I am a free man.


It is also so refreshing to encounter another soul through my travels here in this space, that allows my awareness to increase mulitdirectionally

- Much love


:hippie:

we-R-one
25th August 2012, 01:09
Thanks Vitalux. Yes it's a real mind blower when you first start heading down this rabbit hole and it does get very interesting once you get over being pissed off at what's been done. The key is not to operate in fear no matter what, as that's how they win. It's a game and that's how you have to perceive it. They utilize the basis of belief systems to scare you into complying. You are taught to believe that anyone who gets arrested or served papers must be doing something wrong and therefore are labeled as bad. Most people are tried in public before their case even goes to court. It's so easy to judge based on these false belief systems which have been put in place to demoralize individuals by creating the perception that they have violated society. I am shocked at how many people in authority positions both implement and participate in the enforcement of laws that wrongfully enslave humanity; alas, this is the game of duality, and this is living in 3D, this is the Polarity Integration Game.

The knowledge that set me free and allowed me to no longer operate in fear was my own personal experience with reincarnation. This new found revelation was key in developing a stance against the fear based obstacles one must face while living through the atrocities of a 3rd dimensional existence. Having the ability to recognize memories of a significant past life, which I could verify utilizing my own 3D senses, validated the existence of my own consciousnesses as real, rather than my physical body. Once you understand this, the fear melts away....well, at least for me it did. I highly recommend it for those willing to explore outside the corporate matrix belief system, that one has been programmed to acknowledge as the only real truth - ah...and yet another rabbit hole that must be addressed.....one can never be bored with the playground of Alice In Wonderland nearby.

Much love to you too, and may the higher frequencies of love and compassion guide and protect you through your journey of discovery!

noprophet
25th August 2012, 01:47
There should only be two laws.

1. Do not harm anyone else
2. Do as you say you'll do

As best I understand, this is common law. 1) I shall not harm 2) Anything I am contract to I am bound.

The issues come in with the modification of #2 and the contractual-ization of individuals into trade laws through representing "citizen-ship".

Bongo
25th August 2012, 01:50
Here is the website you want to look at it has an absolute wealth of legal information & how to get around the statute.

http://www.fmotl.com/forum/index.php

Hip Hipnotist
7th November 2012, 04:44
Ah, to live and breathe -- and now smoke -- in Colorado.

http://www.activistpost.com/2012/11/colorado-legalizes-recreational.html

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/11/06/amendment-64-passes-in-co_n_2079899.html

To hell with the presidential election. Like it really matters.

This was a vote that mattered.

And I'm proud to say it's the only vote I cast.

They don't call me the Hip Hipnotist for nothin'.

( Yeah, I know. It's Hypnotist, not Hipnotist. But I was celebrating the recreational marijuana law waaaay before it passed ;-))

dreamer
7th November 2012, 04:53
Holy fu**ing s**t, screw the fake election, praise Odin the common sense is catching on!!!!!!!! Superb!!!!

nimmer
7th November 2012, 05:21
It will be interesting to see the federal government's reaction to this... hopefully there isn't one...

Jackson
7th November 2012, 05:50
Washington state also passed it's legalization of marijuana. (YES) Now we shall see what the feds are going to do.

We also passed the marriage equality vote.

Some sense of relief for many of us. Don't want to start rejoicing yet.

Jackson

Dennis Leahy
7th November 2012, 05:54
I am proud of Colorado. I did not realize they were going after industrial hemp as well, and that is just awesome. I hope every field in Eastern Colorado (flat as Kansas, for those that don't know) is planted in hemp/cannabis. Cannabis seeds! ("hemp hearts and omega 3 and 6 rich oil.) Hemp paper! Hemp cloth! Hempcrete! Once this takes off, the REAL green revolution will have begun.

Dennis

chancy
7th November 2012, 06:55
Hello Everyone:
Not trying to change threads here but there was more good news north of the border today regarding Hemp.
"The preliminary estimate for this year's hemp crop is 8,000 hectares."
Or
8000 Hectares = 19768.4304800 Acres

Here is the link:
http://ca.finance.yahoo.com/news/canadian-hemp-growing-weed-experts-ponder-help-industry-090020992.html

Hemp is gaining ground in North America as surely it should since it's got so many great attributes.
chancy

Cjay
7th November 2012, 07:21
From: http://www.activistpost.com/2012/11/colorado-legalizes-recreational.html


Massachusetts also voted by a dominant margin (63%) to legalize medical marijuana bringing the total number of medical cannabis states (http://www.activistpost.com/2012/07/medical-cannabis-states-legalized.html) to 18.

¤=[Post Update]=¤


Hello Everyone:
Not trying to change threads here but there was more good news north of the border today regarding Hemp.
"The preliminary estimate for this year's hemp crop is 8,000 hectares."
Or
8000 Hectares = 19768.4304800 Acres

Here is the link:
http://ca.finance.yahoo.com/news/canadian-hemp-growing-weed-experts-ponder-help-industry-090020992.html

Hemp is gaining ground in North America as surely it should since it's got so many great attributes.
chancy

I have been given the task of managing the expansion of the hemp industry in the southern hemisphere to 300,000 hectares (750,000 acres) within 5 to 7 years.

johnf
7th November 2012, 07:32
Legalizing industrial hemp is a biggie, I find it hard to believe the guv and the oil industry will not make some noises about that.

Cjay
7th November 2012, 07:48
Legalizing industrial hemp is a biggie, I find it hard to believe the guv and the oil industry will not make some noises about that.

The noises will be loud: gunfire, small explosions, breaking down doors and lots of whining from the feds who ARE losing their grip on the states.

In the end, the will of the people will prevail.

math330
7th November 2012, 11:49
Another step in the right direction. Well done, Colorado!

Now, fingers crossed Bangkok follows suit ;) Unlikely, I know, but I can always dream

WhiteFeather
7th November 2012, 13:21
Great News...If I May....


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wP7Chi9MPSg&feature=related

RMorgan
7th November 2012, 13:54
Wow! I was not expecting this kind of news!

That´s really great for you guys. I hope all other states follow this great example.

Brazil already has a similar project, which I hope to be approved soon.

If any of you guys is a farmer, I advise to start preparing for cultivating industrial hemp. It will become a huge market soon. It´s a nice opportunity to earn a lot of money.

Raf.

Dennis Leahy
7th November 2012, 14:21
Great News...If I May....


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wP7Chi9MPSg&feature=related
hehehehehehee good one, WhiteFeather!

Dennis

spiritguide
7th November 2012, 14:25
MJ / Hemp the Creator's gift that keeps on giving without boundaries. As Johnny Appleseed did with the apple let us do so with this fruit, in a subtle way and peacefully.

Camilo
7th November 2012, 14:48
It was about time. I hope other states catch up with it as well as other countries. It's time to get real.

bodhii71
7th November 2012, 14:59
Even if one doesn't partake with this plant, it really is remarkable and a progressive idea that has been a long time coming. A small win for individual freedom. There may be hope yet for America.

humanalien
7th November 2012, 16:43
There is a fallback to this new law though. Even though
these states have legalized pot, it is still illegal by
federal laws.

I bet there will be a lot of federal activity in those states
where federal officers will be breaking down doors of private
residents and busting them for for having an ounce or less
of pot in their homes.

TargeT
7th November 2012, 16:52
To me this seems to be proof that the country is changing from the bottom up..

Yes a lot of people fell for the left right trap again this year, and we re-elected a man that was ruining our country over a man that would ruin our country; but small steps like this are how the path back to freedom start.

It has been said earlier in this thread that the question of federal reaction is pending; if you are in either of these states I would not participate in anything large scale as certainly the DEA will attempt to assert & "earn" it's budget regardless of the state laws (as we have seen with medical dispensaries).

if the govoners of either state have the fortitude we may see some state/fed battles in a year or so.

deridan
7th November 2012, 17:00
greetings. cool for u'all ___ i think the best label i've ever tried for this product went by the label of afgan

& lets say it for the guys who think laboratory 'brain chemical releasers' are the shizz,
this one really is the central one of all experiences,(of which others are but a facet {deepening emphasizing}, ...though the winner for experience if u can get to that time in uo life safely, but in which there is a logical wall, is lsd)

lets the the astral body tune in and tune up..... ..explaining the bad release on so many..........................keep yo mouths clean therefore
& don't entrain any bad habits with it, u teenagers too early to it

blufire
7th November 2012, 17:00
Geez Louise People. . . . no wonder we go passively into what ever box ‘they’ have waiting for the bulk of the American population . . . . .

I thought this forum had some intelligent people . . . can you guys really not see what is going on with this ‘legalization’?

I am really really glad I live where I do . . . . far far away from ‘civilization’

confused
7th November 2012, 17:04
Interesting how the thread I started on smoking marijuana and possible neg/pos effects was removed by the moderators within a couple of hours because of its topic regarding an intoxicating substance - even had Bill Ryan personally check my profile page - but this one is A OK.

I wonder where they draw the line....

nurgle
7th November 2012, 17:10
I am so glad That I moved to colorado a year ago, fun times ahead!

eaglespirit
7th November 2012, 17:21
Geez Louise People. . . . no wonder we go ppassively into what ever box ‘they’ have waiting for the bulk of the American population . . . . .

I thought this forum had some intelligent people . . . can you guys really not see what is going on with this ‘legalization’?

I am really really glad I live where I do . . . . far far away from ‘civilization’

ALL of the 'manipulation' plans, behind the scenes and blatant...are about to backfire in rapid-fire succession, imho!

TargeT
7th November 2012, 17:27
Interesting how the thread I started on smoking marijuana and possible neg/pos effects was removed by the moderators within a couple of hours because of its topic regarding an intoxicating substance - even had Bill Ryan personally check my profile page - but this one is A OK.

I wonder where they draw the line....

the line is thin and wavering.. and also mostly defined by legality.

BTW, your thread is still there, I post in it from time to time.

http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?50321-Smoking-Marijuana-thoughts&highlight=smoking

blufire
7th November 2012, 17:37
Geez Louise People. . . . no wonder we go ppassively into what ever box ‘they’ have waiting for the bulk of the American population . . . . .

I thought this forum had some intelligent people . . . can you guys really not see what is going on with this ‘legalization’?

I am really really glad I live where I do . . . . far far away from ‘civilization’


ALL of the 'manipulation' plans, behind the scenes and blatant...are about to backfire in rapid-fire succession, imho!


eaglespirit . . . would you mind expanding a bit more on your comment? Do you think somehow the 'controllers' are going to loose control?

TargeT
7th November 2012, 17:57
Geez Louise People. . . . no wonder we go ppassively into what ever box ‘they’ have waiting for the bulk of the American population . . . . .

I thought this forum had some intelligent people . . . can you guys really not see what is going on with this ‘legalization’?

I am really really glad I live where I do . . . . far far away from ‘civilization’


ALL of the 'manipulation' plans, behind the scenes and blatant...are about to backfire in rapid-fire succession, imho!


eaglespirit . . . would you mind expanding a bit more on your comment? Do you think somehow the 'controllers' are going to loose control?

I would have said similar words, my meaning would have been:

THC has a dissociation of autonomic and cognitive patterns; which some medical papers elude to being bad, it's not. This is the source of "inspiration" that is often talked about by cannabis users & is also why the 60's had such a high propensity for "peace and love" because of this effect "mind patterns" break down and reform in new and interesting ways.]

People will start to change the way they think.

blufire
7th November 2012, 18:11
Geez Louise People. . . . no wonder we go ppassively into what ever box ‘they’ have waiting for the bulk of the American population . . . . .

I thought this forum had some intelligent people . . . can you guys really not see what is going on with this ‘legalization’?

I am really really glad I live where I do . . . . far far away from ‘civilization’


ALL of the 'manipulation' plans, behind the scenes and blatant...are about to backfire in rapid-fire succession, imho!


eaglespirit . . . would you mind expanding a bit more on your comment? Do you think somehow the 'controllers' are going to loose control?

I would have said similar words, my meaning would have been:

THC has a dissociation of autonomic and cognitive patterns; which some medical papers elude to being bad, it's not. This is the source of "inspiration" that is often talked about by cannabis users & is also why the 60's had such a high propensity for "peace and love" because of this effect "mind patterns" break down and reform in new and interesting ways.]

People will start to change the way they think.


Okay . . . and exactly what kind of solutions came from these disassociated ‘inspirations’ and love and peace from the 60’s and 70’s.

If this era and ‘inspirations’ brought around a new way of thinking from the 'new mind patterns' that has somehow changed the world for the better or more positive then I missed the turnip truck let alone fell out of the thing.

Flash
7th November 2012, 18:15
Interesting how the thread I started on smoking marijuana and possible neg/pos effects was removed by the moderators within a couple of hours because of its topic regarding an intoxicating substance - even had Bill Ryan personally check my profile page - but this one is A OK.

I wonder where they draw the line....

The line is probably drawn with legality. The forum cannot promote in any way anything that is illegal without having authorities menacing to close it down. If marijuana becomes legal in certain states, discussion on the topic will probably be ok on the forum. I just wonder how moderators will moderate this: ok all the way or ok just from the posters whos IP adress is from these states???

I bet anything your posts/thread crossed the legality line unknowingly. Check with the moderators to see.

TargeT
7th November 2012, 18:35
Okay . . . and exactly what kind of solutions came from these disassociated ‘inspirations’ and love and peace from the 60’s and 70’s.

If this era and ‘inspirations’ brought around a new way of thinking from the 'new mind patterns' that has somehow changed the world for the better or more positive then I missed the turnip truck let alone fell out of the thing.

It was not legal then and only a small counter culture participated in that movement (though if you look at history they had profound, if ultimately meaningless, effects)

You can still see some echo's of that era, I was raised by a "hippy" and am a very giving empathetic & considerate person due to my upbringing, so while the metrics of the movement may be hard to find, they are present.

We have become what we are though many paths of suppression and oppression, it will take many paths of the opposite to reverse that & legalization of plants is one of those.

WyoSeeker
7th November 2012, 18:47
I live 9 miles north of Colorado, just across the state line and it's not legal in any form here. There is already talk in town of pot shops on that side of the border across from the fireworks stands on this side. :-)

This would be a financial windfall for anyone involved as long as the Feds don't take action. I've been seeing ads seeking funding for grow and retail operations in local business publications for a while in anticipation of this.

I can already smell Wyoming highway patrol checkpoints on the way back from Colorado. We'll see, it will be interesting.

eaglespirit
7th November 2012, 19:34
Geez Louise People. . . . no wonder we go ppassively into what ever box ‘they’ have waiting for the bulk of the American population . . . . .

I thought this forum had some intelligent people . . . can you guys really not see what is going on with this ‘legalization’?

I am really really glad I live where I do . . . . far far away from ‘civilization’


ALL of the 'manipulation' plans, behind the scenes and blatant...are about to backfire in rapid-fire succession, imho!


eaglespirit . . . would you mind expanding a bit more on your comment? Do you think somehow the 'controllers' are going to lose control?

I, personally, have been living my life free of the 'control' grasp...I feel a good many Folks are about to make these determined choices in volume.
More and more good People are making personal responsibility choices and adjusting their own lives to a more active giving persona while riding a wave of wisdom and stepping aside from the societal trappings , imho!
The active selfless choices each of Us now make in Our daily lives will help to dissipate the 'control' factor immensely now.

Hope that answers Your question a bit, Blufire

Belle
7th November 2012, 19:40
Okay . . . and exactly what kind of solutions came from these disassociated ‘inspirations’ and love and peace from the 60’s and 70’s.

If this era and ‘inspirations’ brought around a new way of thinking from the 'new mind patterns' that has somehow changed the world for the better or more positive then I missed the turnip truck let alone fell out of the thing.

What kind of solutions?...how about opting out of the 1950's paradigm and the "go along to get along" kind of thinking...creating a culture that supports peace, not war...getting off their butts to protest injustice? There were as many ways to fight what they called the "establishment" and what we call tptb as there were individuals who did not want to walk down the "bow down to authority" path...taking control of their lives rather than being under the control of others.

It was a movement that brought the national guard to gun down peaceful protesters because it grew to be so large and so unwieldy so quickly in ways they did not expect...and in all probability slowed down the agenda of tptb by more than a few years.

Besides the truth of how and why cannibis was suppressed to begin with, being in a calm state of mind allowed one to see how ridiculous the crap coming out of Washington truly was and see the benefit of "Ghandi type revolution" to make the kind of change we wanted to see in the world..."out of the box" thinking prevailed. The search for true spirituality, not religion, brought people to seek meaning in their lives and how they could make it better and more fulfilling.

Of course, tptb went into double time to suppress, infiltrate, divide, side-track what was happening...Reagan was just the icing on the cake after all their manipulation to create 'yuppiedom'...corporations leading the way to the new meme of how to get ahead by having the right job, the right clothes, the right home, the right everything as the sheep were brought back under the control of the 'shepherd'.

It may not have lasted very long as a movement, but many shades of it can still be seen today. A lot of it is still underground...and a lot of it can be seen on forums such as PA. They were called "free-thinkers" for a reason, following the path bohemians walked in prior generations.

blufire
7th November 2012, 21:31
Geez Louise People. . . . no wonder we go ppassively into what ever box ‘they’ have waiting for the bulk of the American population . . . . .

I thought this forum had some intelligent people . . . can you guys really not see what is going on with this ‘legalization’?

I am really really glad I live where I do . . . . far far away from ‘civilization’


ALL of the 'manipulation' plans, behind the scenes and blatant...are about to backfire in rapid-fire succession, imho!


eaglespirit . . . would you mind expanding a bit more on your comment? Do you think somehow the 'controllers' are going to lose control?

I, personally, have been living my life free of the 'control' grasp...I feel a good many Folks are about to make these determined choices in volume.
More and more good People are making personal responsibility choices and adjusting their own lives to a more active giving persona while riding a wave of wisdom and stepping aside from the societal trappings , imho!The active selfless choices each of Us now make in Our daily lives will help to dissipate the 'control' factor immensely now.

Hope that answers Your question a bit, Blufire


I don’t want to sound flippant . . . but are they and will they? I apologize but I simply don’t see it. . . perhaps in individual (very very few) lives.

I know I have . . . live outside the box or control . . . . I am nearly 100% self sufficient and off-grid. As well as working hard in my community to make a true change toward abundance for everyone here in my small mountain town.

Again I know this will sound flippant and negative, but when I think of the people that are heavy pot users (and I know a bunch) Hell I grew the stuff for years . . . they ARE very complacent and peaceful . . . but they are also ‘generally’ very self involved and not self starters or not very motivated. These attributes of heavy pot users are not capable of bring about your comment of
ALL of the 'manipulation' plans, behind the scenes and blatant...are about to backfire in rapid-fire succession, imho

Does anyone have the opinion that ‘on the surface” the reason for pot legalization is for the very fact pot smokers are more complacent, peaceful and malleable?

Which would you rather go toe to toe with in bringing a population and a country to its knees . . . complacent peaceful pot smokers or those of us who are a bit more on edge and armed to the teeth with all our scruples?

Legalizing pot is simply a tactic to bring about a very deep multifaceted plan

bodhii71
7th November 2012, 21:42
Hmmm, Buddha was complacent and peaceful.

blufire
7th November 2012, 21:47
Hmmm, Buddha was complacent and peaceful.

You completely missed my point . . .

Vitalux
7th November 2012, 21:51
I guess....in a way.....a decision like this can actually restore hope into what appears to be a insane world

TargeT
7th November 2012, 21:57
I don’t want to sound flippant . . . but are they and will they? I apologize but I simply don’t see it. . . perhaps in individual (very very few) lives.

I know I have . . . live outside the box or control . . . . I am nearly 100% self sufficient and off-grid. As well as working hard in my community to make a true change toward abundance for everyone here in my small mountain town.

Again I know this will sound flippant and negative, but when I think of the people that are heavy pot users (and I know a bunch) Hell I grew the stuff for years . . . they ARE very complacent and peaceful . . . but they are also ‘generally’ very self involved and not self starters or not very motivated. These attributes of heavy pot users are not capable of bring about your comment of
ALL of the 'manipulation' plans, behind the scenes and blatant...are about to backfire in rapid-fire succession, imho

Does anyone have the opinion that ‘on the surface” the reason for pot legalization is for the very fact pot smokers are more complacent, peaceful and malleable?

Which would you rather go toe to toe with in bringing a population and a country to its knees . . . complacent peaceful pot smokers or those of us who are a bit more on edge and armed to the teeth with all our scruples?

Legalizing pot is simply a tactic to bring about a very deep multifaceted plan

Don't blame the tool when it is mis-used.. A gun can be used to provide food or to do horrible things, it is not the guns fault which it is used for.

in short: your judgement on this topic is not based on good metrics, you are commenting on poeple that would be who they are with or with out that plant.

I doubt your more armed and trained than I am (13 year military vet, multiple deployments etc etc..); I am mostly not complacent though I do toe the line out of conveience at times (for example: airport scanners, I just go through them) I am also a sometimes-cannabis user.

I am a carbon steel rod of resistance covered by the velvet of peace; I think you should question your conviction and what you "know" here.. there's a bit of latin in my signature that I try to follow at all times "question everything, always" it sort of translates to.

I think you are confusing Cannabis with anti-depresants, (yeah.. those legal ones that are perscribed en mass) anti-depresants make maliable complacent people, pot smokers have vibrantly dyed hair, cloths of their own choosing & generaly do not conform to the status quo (exactly what is needed RIGHT NOW)

thunder24
7th November 2012, 22:49
I think you are confusing Cannabis with anti-depresants, (yeah.. those legal ones that are perscribed en mass) anti-depresants make maliable complacent people, pot smokers have dyed hair, cloths of their own choosing & generaly do not conform to the status quo (exactly what is needed RIGHT NOW)

my thoughts exactly...:thumb::thumb::thumb:

blufire
7th November 2012, 22:53
still missing my main point guys

Maybe you need to open a window and let a bit of smoke out . . . just kidding, just kidding . . . . well sorta :p

eaglespirit
7th November 2012, 23:03
Blufire...there really are People on this Beautiful Planet in the rhythm of the Folks in this movie...
and THEY ARE Advanced Cannabis People, imho : )
All We have to do is 'actively' adopt some of Their ways in Our Own day to day lives, right now!

fyiyYrkzPbQ

thunder24
7th November 2012, 23:04
I get up at 7:30 in the morning usually per my rhythms. in spring summer fall i garden... i talk about it, i watch it, i do it.... I am very motivated to do such...

It has been snowy and cold here... I wake up about 7;30 and im working on building a cabin, that eventually will b encircled by a self sufficient farm... I am not lazy, though when i want to rest I DO!
and I partake of the doja.

If one of ur points was that it makes them unmotivated, or not starters.... I beg to differ... and can, though won't, provide a list of others that do not fit in that mold.

peace

Belle
7th November 2012, 23:18
I don’t want to sound flippant . . . but are they and will they? I apologize but I simply don’t see it. . . perhaps in individual (very very few) lives.

I know I have . . . live outside the box or control . . . . I am nearly 100% self sufficient and off-grid. As well as working hard in my community to make a true change toward abundance for everyone here in my small mountain town.

Again I know this will sound flippant and negative, but when I think of the people that are heavy pot users (and I know a bunch) Hell I grew the stuff for years . . . they ARE very complacent and peaceful . . . but they are also ‘generally’ very self involved and not self starters or not very motivated. These attributes of heavy pot users are not capable of bring about your comment of
ALL of the 'manipulation' plans, behind the scenes and blatant...are about to backfire in rapid-fire succession, imho

Does anyone have the opinion that ‘on the surface” the reason for pot legalization is for the very fact pot smokers are more complacent, peaceful and malleable?

Which would you rather go toe to toe with in bringing a population and a country to its knees . . . complacent peaceful pot smokers or those of us who are a bit more on edge and armed to the teeth with all our scruples?

Legalizing pot is simply a tactic to bring about a very deep multifaceted plan

That is not exactly my definition of living outside of the box or control...after reading your posts for a long time, it seems to me you've learned to function very well within the system, knowing how to use it for your (and your community's) benefit.

Pot smokers may be peaceful, but complacent and malleable?!!? Not a chance. Shunning the system and simplifying life does not make one complacent or malleable, imho. In my experience they place value on what is important in their life...especially other people. They don't need to fight the system or work within it...it doesn't exist to them. They have chosen a different way...most of the ones I know have turned their back on it completely...along with several people who do not smoke but have also turned their back on the system.

What absolutely astonishes me is that fact that it was outlawed to begin with...it's medicinal value supplanted with chemicals (and all their harmful side effects) to feed big pharma...it's oil that burns clean replaced with the oil that comes out of the ground, is harmful, expensive, and wars are fought over it...it's recreational value replaced with alcohol, especially grain alcohol which is toxic to humans...it's industrial value as cloth (let's grow cotten instead or how about creating our own fibers that do not breathe and are chock full of chemicals), paper (much better to cut down all our trees instead), rope and so much more given up for the benefit of who?....industries that don't care about us or the earth.

The way I see it is that you can choose to play their game their way for little things or stop playing. I do not accept their 'authority' over me. Period. Who are they to say what we can and cannot do, make or use? Maybe they carry a big stick and use it as often as they can, but if we all stop playing along....think about it. Government can only function/exist if we agree to it.

By approving this question, the people have clearly stated they don't agree with the law as it exists. Now we get to see if the people were heard...will the state legislature actually pass the bill legalizing it or not?

Paul
7th November 2012, 23:26
When I was in high school, in a small town in upstate New York, in the late 1960's, there was no pot that I know of.

There were 29 in my high school class ... most of us had been in the same class and same school since kindergarten. The other 28 in my class all went 100 miles south, to a farm near Woodstock (http://history1900s.about.com/od/1960s/p/woodstock.htm), New York, in August of 1969. I stayed home that weekend, to study for an upcoming test. I was probably the only one who got an A on that test :). I also might have been the only one in my class who had not smoked pot yet, come Monday of the next week.

I then attended a "hippie" school (we called it Berkeley North) -- Reed College, Portland, Oregon. I first smoked pot in my junior year there, when I learned I was going to become a "dorm dad" (resident advisor) in one of the on campus dormitories my senior year. I figured I'd better have some idea what most of those around me were doing. I quit any smoking (what little I did) a year later, because it interfered with my doing math. Some of the math I was doing required days (through wakefulness and sleep) of concentration of my perhaps modest mental capacities, and I noticed that I absolutely could not keep up that constant concentration (like playing chess in one's head, without the board) anytime within about three days after smoking.

Given the ubiquity of pot in colleges since then, and in high schools at least as of the time my son attended high school a few years back, and given that major military, intelligence and financial agencies are up to their eyeballs in drug running (both pot and harder stuff), it seems manifestly clear to me that drugs, both legal and illegal, both hard and soft, are seriously big business on this planet.

As with most big business, serious conflicts are built into the structure, which seems to provide the bastards in power more control over the ongoing process.

It also seems manifestly clear to me that the sort of hard and focused work of which blufire speaks, or the extended mental concentration of the fond but fading memories of my own youth, don't mix well with being stoned. From what I've seen, violent revolution is a greater risk in a population that drinks alcohol than in a population that smokes dope.

===

So, like fluoride, I suspect pot may be a "mellowing out" drug for the populace.

===

But there may be something else going on here as well, and that is a new round of "isolationism" in America, rather as happened over a century ago with the decline of the British Empire and the Pound Sterling.

An economic analyst who I have been following quite closely for a few years now, Eric Janszen of iTulip, continues to get his major calls amazingly accurate, even if he has zero tolerance for the sort of tin foil hat conspiracy junk (what he might call it) that we engage in on this forum. In his latest public article, Reality Check, Election Edition – Part I: 1936 Election Recycled - Eric Janszen (http://www.itulip.com/forums/showthread.php/23950-Reality-Check-Election-Edition-%C2%96-Part-I-1936-Election-Recycled-Eric-Janszen), Eric makes brief mention, right at the end, of the second Part of that article, which is for subscribers (I am one) only. The last topic in Part II is "Energy Isolationism", which I won't describe in detail, since it is behind the iTulip.com pay wall. But in rough summary, America will be bringing critical sources back home.

Two of its most critical imports are oil and drugs. Eric doesn't discuss drugs (he's probably smoked less pot than I ever did), but he has been discussing "Peak Cheap Oil" for years now.

As the value of the "almighty US Dollar" shrinks, and is no longer accepted for much in exchange for imports, and as the American Empire shrinks, just as did the British Empire a century ago, reversing once again a tidal wave of Anglo world dominance, the US will need to rely on domestic energy sources far more heavily. Eric would not give "Free Energy" mechanisms the time of day, and I suspect he's right on that too. America will start using the domestic reserves of gas and oil that Big Oil has kept off the market, and out of public view, the last half century.

Similarly, we're going to have to start growing our own dope. As I used to jokingly tell my son when he entered adolescence, the single most dangerous species on this planet, bar none, is the young adult human male. We (well, our Lordly Masters) have been keeping the populace drugged down in various ways, including fluoride and (especially for young adolescent and adult males) pot, since at least that epic festival in Woodstock, the fall of 1969.

Hemp, in its other forms as well, could be a boon to a new era of American isolationism.

bodhii71
7th November 2012, 23:27
I actually become more motivated, feel more creative, and usually end up doing more when enjoying this plant. Sometimes it is used in sacrament. I built a 34 string Regency harp, while "high". I do understand what Bluefire is attempting to get across, although it is a bit biased. Like many mind expanding substances, wherever one's mind may be it will magnify and can leave one ungrounded or out of sorts. It is all balance. It does allow one to reset their beliefs and thinking.
The benefit far outweigh any detriment.
I think one should apply logic to this discussion and be wary of any fallacies that may arise. We have been subjected to decades of propaganda. It could easily be argued that those who are unmotivated and despondent would be so either way.
How would you describe the rest of humanity when all we would hold as worthy are being systematically stripped away? It all starts and ends with consciousness.

Paul, you do raise a interesting point, I concede to your life experiences and appreciate your point of view on this topic. It can and does have it's own drawbacks. I personally don't advocate heavy use, but I also cannot say it is without it's merits either. You may even be spot on in your analysis concerning the governments' involvement, I don't doubt this at all. Isn't that why we see Federal agencies strong arming dispensaries, extracting every last cent from both ends?

Belle
7th November 2012, 23:31
Seems to me the government and its agencies have been running everything except pot...flooding the ghettos with cocaine and heroin, crack and you name it...but never pot. Why?

TargeT
8th November 2012, 00:09
I actually become more motivated, feel more creative, and usually end up doing more when enjoying this plant. Sometimes it is used in sacrament. I built a 34 string Regency harp, while "high". I do understand what Bluefire is attempting to get across, although it is a bit biased. Like many mind expanding substances, wherever one's mind may be it will magnify and can leave one ungrounded or out of sorts. It is all balance. It does allow one to reset their beliefs and thinking.
The benefit far outweigh any detriment.
I think one should apply logic to this discussion and be wary of any fallacies that may arise. We have been subjected to decades of propaganda. It could easily be argued that those who are unmotivated and despondent would be so either way.
How would you describe the rest of humanity when all we would hold as worthy are being systematically stripped away? It all starts and ends with consciousness.

Paul, you do raise a interesting point, I concede to your life experiences and appreciate your point of view on this topic. It can and does have it's own drawbacks. I personally don't advocate heavy use, but I also cannot say it is without it's merits either. You may even be spot on in your analysis concerning the governments' involvement, I don't doubt this at all. Isn't that why we see Federal agencies strong arming dispensaries, extracting every last cent from both ends?



I noticed that I absolutely could not keep up that constant concentration (like playing chess in one's head, without the board) anytime within about three days after smoking.




So strange how different people react so differently, I often wonder if its based on the spesific plant type that is being consumed or if it is personal chemistery (which I lean to more).

I also do not lose cognitive ability though I can be "lost in thought"; I have rebuilt 3 engines while heavily under the influence of this plant & they all ran beautifully, but I also do not get "spacy" unless i'm introduced to a heavily indica strain


Seems to me the government and its agencies have been running everything except pot...flooding the ghettos with cocaine and heroin, crack and you name it...but never pot. Why?

I'd say its probably profit margine & volume.

1/8th an oz of cannabis takes up roughly 20 times the volume of 1/8 oz of cocaine. and sells for like 1/5th the price.

Paul
8th November 2012, 00:16
I also do not lose cognitive ability though I can be "lost in thought"; I have rebuilt 3 engines while heavily under the influence of this plant & they all ran beautifully

If I were competent in rebuilding engines, I wouldn't be at all surprised to discover that I could rebuild just fine, perhaps even better, while stoned, or even days later.

The only difference I could tell in my mental capacities, 2 or 3 days after being stoned, was that I could not maintain the pure focus required, for hours and days on end, to work the sort of math problems I had determined to work. There was nothing in the physical world to support such mental work ... it was purely in thought.

¤=[Post Update]=¤


but I also cannot say it is without it's merits either
Indeed -- I'm much better at kissing when stoned (or so I remember.) :)

Hip Hipnotist
8th November 2012, 00:18
Seems to me the government and its agencies have been running everything except pot...flooding the ghettos with cocaine and heroin, crack and you name it...but never pot. Why?

Smoking pot is not physically addicting. Cocaine, heroin, crack ( crack = smoking cocaine ) are. The government has no interest in drugs that aren't addictive, especially when they profit from them.

-----------------

"Legalizing pot is simply a tactic to bring about a very deep multifaceted plan"

The only deep, multifaceted plan in legalizing pot are the funds it will generate for the state(s) that wise up and except it. Does anyone actually believe that the controlling interests need anything else to further dumb down those that aren't already brain dead? When those that are in control ( of the brain dead ) get ready to 'pull the plug' ( currency collapse, plague, Project Bluebeam -- whatever ) they're gonna pull it. The sheople are already herded. Legalizing pot serves no other purpose than to generate funds. Just another arcane/archaic 'law' that needs the boot.

Just a reminder, kids. Oral sex is still illegal in many states. You can look up which ones.

Whew, thank god Colorado isn't one of them. I couldn't imagine doing time for two of my favorite things.

Ah, come on, lighten up. I'm just joshin'. Sort'a. ;-))

thunder24
8th November 2012, 00:24
Seems to me the government and its agencies have been running everything except pot...flooding the ghettos with cocaine and heroin, crack and you name it...but never pot. Why?

Smoking pot is not physically addicting. Cocaine, heroin, crack ( crack = smoking cocaine ) are. The government has no interest in drugs that aren't addictive, especially when they profit from them.

-----------------

"Legalizing pot is simply a tactic to bring about a very deep multifaceted plan"

The only deep, multifacted plan in legalizing pot are the funds it will generate for the state(s) that wise up and except it. Does anyone actually believe that the controlling interests need anything else to further dumb down those that aren't already brain dead? When those that are in control ( of the brain dead ) get ready to 'pull the plug' ( currency collapse, plague, Project Bluebeam -- whatever ) they're gonna pull it. The sheep are already herded. Legalizing pot serves no other purpose than to generate funds. Just another arcane 'law' that needs the boot.

Just a reminder, kids. Oral sex is still illegal in many states. You can look up which ones.

Whew, thank god Colorado isn't one of them. I couldn't imagine doing time for two of my favorite things.

Ah, come on, lighten up. I'm just joshin'. Sort'a. ;-))

:jaw: :lol: now that was funny

TargeT
8th November 2012, 00:25
I also do not lose cognitive ability though I can be "lost in thought"; I have rebuilt 3 engines while heavily under the influence of this plant & they all ran beautifully

If I were competent in rebuilding engines, I wouldn't be at all surprised to discover that I could rebuild just fine, perhaps even better, while stoned, or even days later.

The only difference I could tell in my mental capacities, 2 or 3 days after being stoned, was that I could not maintain the pure focus required, for hours and days on end, to work the sort of math problems I had determined to work. There was nothing in the physical world to support such mental work ... it was purely in thought.



I suppose you're right, though myself not being an advanced math person and you not being familar with what it takes to rebuild an engine I'm sure there are probably more incommon with the two than not; though the attention to detail is the focus for an engine rebuild, checking tolerances performing things in the proper sequence etc.. and you do, of course, have the engine to remind you which part you have done already. (I always thought the word "build" in engine rebuilding is a bit misleading, as its mostly a mental exersize punctuated by a few physical tasks)



Just a reminder, kids. Oral sex is still illegal in many states. You can look up which ones.

Whew, thank god Colorado isn't one of them. I couldn't imagine doing time for two of my favorite things.

Ah, come on, lighten up. I'm just joshin'. Sort'a. ;-))

there is an ordinance in Anchorage that starting on Jan. 2nd men are not to shave their beards until after the Fur Rendezvous carnival where they have a beard contest. (started back in the mid 30's and as far as I know never repealed)
( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fur_Rendezvous_Festival)

:confused:

there is an ordinance in Fairbanks that requires police to keep moose off the streets

it is also illegal to "view a moose" from a plane

nurgle
8th November 2012, 00:30
I agree with you TargeT that the reaction might have to do with the chemical make up of ones brain. For example I have some very serious depression and anxiety (have dealt with it all my life) but just recently I have been smoking pot to take the edge off. For me Pot just levels me, my girl says I just act "normal and fun". She doesn't have any major mental health issues and when she smokes it, it totally wrecks her, she gets all spaced out, slow, and the giggles. She sits in one spot were as I move all round making stuff and accomplishing things. I have taken many different kindas of anti depressants and anti anxiety pills, and they are really brutal, on your body and mind. I recommend not to take them if one really doesn't have too. They only helped me by making me an emotionless zombie so I wouldn't kill myself. Weed just makes me happy, light hearted, and hungry; a good combo if you ask me. I RATHER SMILE THAN DROOL!

-be safe

Paul
8th November 2012, 00:31
I suppose you're right, though myself not being an advanced math person and you not being familar with what it takes to rebuild an engine I'm sure there are probably more incommon with the two than not; though the attention to detail is the focus for an engine rebuild, checking tolerances performing things in the proper sequence etc.. and you do, of course, have the engine to remind you which part you have done already. (I always thought the word "build" in engine rebuilding is a bit misleading, as its mostly a mental exersize punctuated by a few physical tasks)
I could do the one or two hour math problem without any noticeable difference in ability, two days after being stoned.

It was only the one or two day (as in 24 to 48 hours, non-stop) math problem that I couldn't keep in focus.

eaglespirit
8th November 2012, 00:54
It also seems manifestly clear to me that the sort of hard and focused work of which blufire speaks, or the extended mental concentration of the fond but fading memories of my own youth, don't mix well with being stoned. From what I've seen, violent revolution is a greater risk in a population that drinks alcohol than in a population that smokes dope.

===

Hemp, in its other forms as well, could be a boon to a new era of American isolationism.

...and so it is, in the rhythms I am picking up and this will be unfolding strongly!
Hemp is on its way back, imho!

.......
I could never smoke pot consistently in my younger years either, Paul, without having the same matters occur that You shared...as in taking Calculus tests while stoned...it just did not work for me.

I am not a pot smoker, but recently have been joining my Native American Friend smoking a very special blend he gets...it has been a profound spiritual experience...and I am grateful and surprised and felt the need to share that here.

Belle
8th November 2012, 01:24
Posted by Belle (here)
Seems to me the government and its agencies have been running everything except pot...flooding the ghettos with cocaine and heroin, crack and you name it...but never pot. Why?
I'd say its probably profit margine & volume.


Posted by TargeT
1/8th an oz of cannabis takes up roughly 20 times the volume of 1/8 oz of cocaine. and sells for like 1/5th the price.


Posted by Hip Hipnotist
Smoking pot is not physically addicting. Cocaine, heroin, crack ( crack = smoking cocaine ) are. The government has no interest in drugs that aren't addictive, especially when they profit from them.

Two good reasons the government should not care about pot usage...it really does not take away from their drug business because pot users tend not to use heavier drugs.

I must admit I have a vested interest. My son has been in chronic pain for 5 years...and has had negative side effects from just about every prescription drug they have tried...he even had a bad reaction to a steroid injection in the spine that landed him in the emergency room. His pain management specialist has just in the past month put him on morphine (15mg. 4-6 hour tabs)...one a day plus a few to be taken before he has to go to an appointment. He is trying not to take them for fear of addiction.

Pot is the only thing that works immediately and completely on the pain, is non-addictive and has no side effects. Yet try to get even a 1/4 oz here in Massachusetts and it's very difficult...there have been so many pot busts in the past couple of years, even tho' possession of small amounts is punishable by only a $100. fine. But I know several places to go and people from whom I can get all the coke I could ever want.

Massachusetts has once again passed the ballot question on medical marijuana, but it's up to the state legislature to pass an actual bill...which it hasn't in the past.

Abundance of drugs that can kill, but little availability of pot...I don't get it. I can only conclude that there is a reason they are trying to keep pot out of the hands of people...I just don't know what it could be other than either a power play or an attempt to hide the benefits of usage...quite the opposite of the point blufire was trying to make about tptb wanting to legalize for nefarious purposes.

Dennis Leahy
8th November 2012, 04:16
When I was in high school, in a small town in upstate New York, in the late 1960's, there was no pot that I know of.

There were 29 in my high school class ... most of us had been in the same class and same school since kindergarten. The other 28 in my class all went 100 miles south, to a farm near Woodstock (http://history1900s.about.com/od/1960s/p/woodstock.htm), New York, in August of 1969. I stayed home that weekend, to study for an upcoming test. I was probably the only one who got an A on that test :). I also might have been the only one in my class who had not smoked pot yet, come Monday of the next week....
That is such a great story, Paul! hahahahahaahha Sometimes a life-changing event is the event that didn't happen.

Dennis

gripreaper
8th November 2012, 04:31
When I was in high school, in a small town in upstate New York, in the late 1960's, there was no pot that I know of.

There were 29 in my high school class ... most of us had been in the same class and same school since kindergarten. The other 28 in my class all went 100 miles south, to a farm near Woodstock (http://history1900s.about.com/od/1960s/p/woodstock.htm), New York, in August of 1969. I stayed home that weekend, to study for an upcoming test. I was probably the only one who got an A on that test :). I also might have been the only one in my class who had not smoked pot yet, come Monday of the next week....
That is such a great story, Paul! hahahahahaahha Sometimes a life-changing event is the event that didn't happen.

Dennis

Well, I lived in Arizona back in the late sixties and early seventies, and we used to get kilo's come in through Mexico, and everybody had a sandwich bag full of pot at all times. Between classes was an occasion to share a joint, as was lunch, after school, arriving at school, seeing someone for the first time that day, a moment of clarity, whatever.

I smoked so much pot back then, I'm surprised I made it through some of the experiences I had back then. Not only pot, but a bunch of LSD too. I am a product of that generation and that time.

I've been out of body and to the edge of the universe, where I knew if I kept going, I would not be able to make it back. I've been to a rock concerts where the lights were dripping from the ceiling and the sounds faded in and out.

Yes, those were definitely some strange times indeed.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gBCdlBrgEmE

Nobody told me there'd be days like these...Strange days indeed...strange days indeed...

scarletfire
8th November 2012, 04:48
Wonder how this affects those with professional state licenses, can nurses and doctors partake? I don't understand what the big deal since we all openly partake in alcohol consumption, marijuana is such an incredibly mild form of intoxication, at least in my experience, that I've often wondered how this has been kept an issue for so long. Just watched a documentary called "square grouper" that illustrates the adventures and consequences of those involved with the pot trade. I can't get past how a plant can be deemed illegal, seems absolutely CRAZY. In a time when we are so economically challenged, this seems like a fool proof method to harness revenue. Anyway, the trailer to this documentary is below for anybody interested.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Koa8txkzC5s

modwiz
8th November 2012, 04:50
Hemp is a miracle crop that needs to be taken advantage of and used for all it has to offer. I think habitual pot smoking is a bad idea. I think making it illegal is criminal. Leave us to use Nature as it was intended. In ways that do not harm others. Arguments about family impacts of drug use are personal and not the domain of government.

Want to do something useful government? Nationalizing the electrical grid, instead of leaving it to profiteers would be a nice start. Then, free energy devices would look like a very good idea. Same thing with oil.

confused
8th November 2012, 13:37
The pros and cons of pot are a complicated issue. As a heavy pot user, I see both sides of the issue and I can not disagree with Paul on his assessment regarding the mellowing out of the population - although I don't yet agree either.

Pot has been a catalyst for my awakening for a long time, or so I believe. Perhaps I was on that path whether I ever smoked that first joint or not - I will never know. But I do know that when I smoke I am definitely more aware of myself and my relationships. It helps me to drop the filter that clouds my own perception of self so that I can better recognize those things I would like to change and start working on them.

Also, it gives me energy for exercise or at least removes that other voice in my head telling me I don't want to go for that run, or hit that bag, or whatever. In stark contrast to Paul, my math and science skills are just as good when I smoke as not. Physics, Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, these were brutal in college - I took them at Harvard and let me tell you those problem sets would take an entire week to finish from the day they were assigned to the day they were due. But smoking actually made me do better. My analytical mind is very receptive to the weed, so I think that is a subjective thing. And I finished those courses near the top of my class. On the other hand, I have trouble in reading comprehension and writing when I am stoned. Both skills come from the left brain, so who knows what is going on there.

What makes me most suspicious is the abundant availability in the US. Although members here keep referring to the illegal nature being evidence TPTB don't want it around, the problem is that it is actually everywhere. Only 10 years ago I was in high school, and it was easier to get pot than cigarettes or alcohol. It was everywhere, and almost everyone I knew was smoking it. It was the one common denominator between everyone I knew - from those living in the projects to those in their million dollar homes. In my generation it was how people hung out - in Europe they have the cafe culture where you sit with friends and smoke endless cigarettes sipping your coffee or cappuccino, but in the US it is weed. That is how we socialized in high school and caught up with friends. It was typically like "Yo what's up man? - Nothin much, just chillin. - Wanna meet up and smoke an 'el'? - Sure" and so it went on and on like that. And it wasn't just where I grew up in NY/NJ area - when I went to college most of the kids I met had a similar culture.

It is everywhere, at least in the Northeastern US, very abundant, and the fact that it is illegal doesn't mean it isn't actually distributed to the population by TPTB. Perhaps it serves two purposes, to dumb/mellow us down, and then if they want to take it one step further if we do get out of line then they can imprison us too. It is really quite clever. Perhaps they have somehow altered it over decades and decades of engineering to include components that were not originally in there - I am talking about the strains available for smoking in the general population. How would we know? We really wouldn't.

RMorgan
8th November 2012, 14:11
What makes me most suspicious is the abundant availability in the US. Although members here keep referring to the illegal nature being evidence TPTB don't want it around, the problem is that it is actually everywhere.

Hey mate,

This is literally the essence of this problem.

There´s no way to control the entrance of illegal drugs on a country as big as the USA and, in my case, Brazil.

That´s why all reasoning points to the decriminalization of drugs.

At least here in Brazil, millions of tax money is wasted with this pointless war on drugs. Rio, as an example, is basically a war zone.

By making drugs such as cannabis legal, all this money could be used in much more important things, such as public education and health.

Besides, by making it legal, we´ll be hitting drug dealers and criminals where it hurts more; their pockets. These folks will lose a lot of money and the police will be able to focus more efficiently on much more destructive drugs, such as crack and heroine.

I´m totally with Colorado and Washington in this once. Specially Colorado, where people will be allowed to have six plants in their homes.

Sooner or later the whole country will be following the example of these two states.

About MJ being considered a drug that transforms people into conformists, I think it´s BS. Literally, everyone I know who smokes it are much more awake and aware than those who don´t.

Cheers,

Raf.

confused
8th November 2012, 14:58
Raf, I do 100% agree with legalization. I am just not convinced that the strains available now are not in some way modified for nefarious purposes.

However, not being convinced does not mean that I do not at the moment, given the current information I have, agree with it being mostly positive. Right now, I still hold the belief that it is mostly beneficial in awakening people, but I am not 100% convinced there are no hidden negatives. I just have some doubts, but considering I am a huge stoner for well over a decade (ironic eh?), I tend to lean to your side.

blufire
8th November 2012, 15:08
Belle said:
That is not exactly my definition of living outside of the box or control...after reading your posts for a long time, it seems to me you've learned to function very well within the system, knowing how to use it for your (and your community's) benefit.

Perhaps I could clarify the point of what living or functioning inside/outside the box and being controlled by government entities. I am going to use the example of legalizing pot which is the topic of this thread.

To me if one has the expectation that the government has to legalize pot and give ‘permission’ for pot to be used freely and legally then that individual is still living solidly within the confines of the ‘box’ and therefore highly controlled.

Hemp is a plant and herb and grows naturally throughout North America. Like all other plants, as a medicinal herbalist, I use this herb when the medicinal constituent is needed . . . .I have even shredded the stem of hemp plants just to see what it is like and how to use the fibers.

I do not nor will I ever have the expectation or ‘controlled’ attitude that I have to wait for the government and/or authorities to give me permission to use natural elements.

So which frame of mind is living in a tightly controlled box?

And yes Belle . . . I am highly knowledgeable on how to function and use (when needed) the system we currently have in place and use it to the full advantage of the town and my family and friends.


I form much of my strategy when I have to work within the ‘system’ from the teachings and writings of Sun Tzu, The Art of War

It is said that if you know your enemies and know yourself, you will not be imperiled in a hundred battles; if you do not know your enemies but do know yourself, you will win one and lose one; if you do not know your enemies nor yourself, you will be imperiled in every single battle.

Victorious warriors win first and then go to war, while defeated warriors go to war first and then seek to win.

All men can see these tactics whereby I conquer, but what none can see is the strategy out of which victory is evolved

blufire
8th November 2012, 15:50
Another thought about pot and the smokers’ ability to function . . . . .

A week ago after Hurricane Sandy we got 14 inches of heavy wet snow and high winds and trees were brought down all over the area and we lost power over three counties.

Instead of waiting for the government (fema and county vdot) to send out help we formed our own crews to remove the debris. Two young men showed up to work on one of the crews fairly stoned . . . I had to make the judgment and call to send them home. They would have been a high risk to themselves and the rest of the crew . . . .we were using highly dangerous equipment . . .chain saws, chipper/shredders that can chew through 4 inch trees, and log splitters that can handle 30 inch trees. Their slow reaction time and mellow state was not a good fit in anyway.

As well as on the organic farm I had in Kansas. . . .stoned people and dangerous equipment was not a good fit. But, I did have the option there to give them less dangerous jobs, like weeding or sorting vegetables etc . . . .but I still was put in the position to have to make that judgment call.

So I speak from actual personal experience . . . . .

RMorgan
8th November 2012, 16:07
Another thought about pot and the smokers’ ability to function . . . . .

A week ago after Hurricane Sandy we got 14 inches of heavy wet snow and high winds and trees were brought down all over the area and we lost power over three counties.

Instead of waiting for the government (fema and county vdot) to send out help we formed our own crews to remove the debris. Two young men showed up to work on one of the crews fairly stoned . . . I had to make the judgment and call to send them home. They would have been a high risk to themselves and the rest of the crew . . . .we were using highly dangerous equipment . . .chain saws, chipper/shredders that can chew through 4 inch trees, and log splitters that can handle 30 inch trees. Their slow reaction time and mellow state was not a good fit in anyway.

As well as on the organic farm I had in Kansas. . . .stoned people and dangerous equipment was not a good fit. But, I did have the option there to give them less dangerous jobs, like weeding or sorting vegetables etc . . . .but I still was put in the position to have to make that judgment call.

So I speak from actual personal experience . . . . .

I have to agree with that indeed.

I don´t recommend stoned people to operate heavy machinery at all. It is very dangerous.

Like everything else, MJ must be used with responsibility.

Excessive use is not recommended, except if you´re an artist; then you can smoke as much pot as you want.

Cheers,

Raf.

TargeT
8th November 2012, 22:53
To me if one has the expectation that the government has to legalize pot and give ‘permission’ for pot to be used freely and legally then that individual is still living solidly within the confines of the ‘box’ and therefore highly controlled.



The only caveat I would think of there is that this is a STATE thing, NOT a federal thing (where nearly all of the control structure is) you see, the base of the pyramid actually has far less direct influence than the tip (and this continues proportionately throughout a hierarchical structure)

So a state thumbing their nose at the federal government is less questionable than the federal government doing something without it being forced to (which may happen, but I doubt it).

The states are not directly controlled like the federal government is, this is not how hierarchy works, the states are coerced, bribed and bulled into submission, they could actually stand up for themselves if they could get past the coercion, bribes & threats....


This is the main reason I have hope for a "grass roots" movement, it actually could happen...


I have to agree with that indeed.

I don´t recommend stoned people to operate heavy machinery at all. It is very dangerous.

Like everything else, MJ must be used with responsibility.

Excessive use is not recommended, except if you´re an artist; then you can smoke as much pot as you want.

Cheers,

Raf.


That goes with everything that intoxicates, definitely.. there is a time and a place for everything..

I don't trust myself with anything more complex than a lawn mower or blender (and even then I make sure I'm paying attention) after a few beers.. haha

Carmody
8th November 2012, 23:30
All you have to do, is a governor, is to instruct your state troopers that they are to immediately swoop in on any federal forces that are attempting to enforce federal laws on state land. And to disarm said federal officers at gunpoint, if required,and to free any 'prisoners' they have taken. And then to place the federal officers into incarceration, awaiting hearings and or bail. And at the minimum, charge them with breach of the public trust, armed insurrection, destruction of private property and kidnapping.

The minimum charges would be of that nature.

Each federal officer involved should receive such charges levied against them, and be HELD pending trial/prosecution.

Any Federal officers who get away and take Colorado citizens off of state land, are to have arrest warrants issued for them, and have a bounty put out for their capture.

I can virtually guarantee you, that the feds would NOT comply and that a fully blown gun battle would ensue.

But that is exactly the sort of thing that it is going to take ----to bring this insanity to a close.

Enough funding of the CIA black ops projects and giving away free labourers to their prison companies and super cheap slave labour to military corporations.

As that is what is actually going on.

Carmody
8th November 2012, 23:48
There are federal employees and think tank groups made up of upper staff members and insider advisers (corporate types, 'security experts', wet work specialists and so on)... that are trying to find ways right now, to create horrific situations, murders and such, which they can make sure are laid at the feet of this new law.

Bet on it.

edit;

Please understand and that this colorado situation....is a direct and full frontal threat on a multi-trillion dollar machine, a machine that is full of hundreds of thousands of fanatical paranoid psychotics who really don't know or understand any better.

They WILL kill and they WILL be underhanded, in any way possible. Whatever it takes, nothings outside of the realm of possibility or decency. Nothing will be off limits.

Imagine, for example after much seeking for the weak points by their darker goups.... key Colorado employees of the state, found dead, looking like some bizarre murder scene with the body parts of young children and satanic literalture. And pounds of the problem: hydro weed in the house.

This sort of thing, all over the federal level news, for weeks. Attack after attack, of this nature, besides the continual infiltration of Colorado land and the arrest and incarceration of Colorado state citizens.

That is the likely outcome.

we are talking about a multi, multi-trillion dollar machine that is playing black ops, running the prisons, and being paid for it, running wars all over the world, and using free US prison labour to assemble the hardware, hardware made by companies who get sweet overpaid contracts, and use free prison labour....and on and on and on. And much worse.

You really think this sort of animal is going to just... roll over?

it's not just a couple of bags of weed, and some industrial hemp. It is a potent core level disturbance of that machine.

modwiz
9th November 2012, 00:49
There are federal employees and think thank groups made up of upper staff members and insider advisers (corporate types, 'security experts', wet work specialists and so on)... that are trying to find ways right now, to create horrific situations, murders and such, which they can make sure are laid at the feet of this new law.

Bet on it.

edit;

Please understand and that this colorado situation....is a direct and full frontal threat on a multi-trillion dollar machine, a machine that is full of hundreds of thousands of fanatical paranoid psychotics who really don't know or understand any better.

They WILL kill and they WILL be underhanded, in any way possible. Whatever it takes, nothings outside of the realm of possibility or decency. Nothing will be off limits.

Imagine, for example after much seeking for the weak points by their darker goups.... key Colorado employees of the state, found dead, looking like some bizarre murder scene with the body parts of young children and satanic literalture. And pounds of the problem: hydro weed in the house.

This sort of thing, all over the federal level news, for weeks. Attack after attack, of this nature, besides the continual infiltration of Colorado land and the arrest and incarceration of Colorado state citizens.

That is the likely outcome.

we are talking about a multi, multi-trillion dollar machine that is playing black ops, running the prisons, and being paid for it, running wars all over the world, and using free US prison labour to assemble the hardware, hardware made by companies who get sweet overpaid contracts, and use free prison labour....and on and on and on. And much worse.

You really think this sort of animal is going to just... roll over?

it's not just a couple of bags of weed, and some industrial hemp. It is a potent core level disturbance of that machine.

It is the industrial hemp that they really fear. They will count on ignorance to conflate hemp with pot and then allow any crime or murder they can, in any way possible connect with pot, to help squash the hemp legalization. If pot smokers want their dope to stay available, a mass instruction on the difference between to two crops might help. I say might because the average intelligence is quite unremarkable.

TargeT
9th November 2012, 01:04
There are federal employees and think thank groups made up of upper staff members and insider advisers (corporate types, 'security experts', wet work specialists and so on)... that are trying to find ways right now, to create horrific situations, murders and such, which they can make sure are laid at the feet of this new law.

Bet on it.

edit;

Please understand and that this colorado situation....is a direct and full frontal threat on a multi-trillion dollar machine, a machine that is full of hundreds of thousands of fanatical paranoid psychotics who really don't know or understand any better.

They WILL kill and they WILL be underhanded, in any way possible. Whatever it takes, nothings outside of the realm of possibility or decency. Nothing will be off limits......
It is a potent core level disturbance of that machine.


71 shots fired into an individual ( a father) SUSPECTED of being involved with Cannabis.. (he wasn't, there was nothing illegal in his house at all) with his family in the house, the 4yr old daughter is probably traumatized for life.
9LsxnRUNKuE

Don't take Carmody's post lightly, these individuals are not to be trusted, when they come to your door the chances of a fatality (yours) are V E R Y high; guilty or not.

Humble Janitor
9th November 2012, 01:22
Vermont may be one of the next to do so. It's gaining ground at least where I live as an initiative to legalize has passed.

Dennis Leahy
9th November 2012, 04:23
I suppose this article may be rattling sabers, but I don't think so. As TargeT said, States are coerced, funds withheld, etc. to bully States into federal compliance. It's all about compliance.

Source: Marijuana legalization victories could be short-lived (http://news.yahoo.com/marijuana-legalization-victories-could-short-lived-022257328.html)


(Reuters) - Votes making Colorado and Washington the first U.S. states to legalize marijuana for recreational use could be short-lived victories for pot backers because the federal government will fight them, two former U.S. drug control officials said on Wednesday. They said the federal government could sue to block parts of the measures or send threatening letters to marijuana shops, followed up by street-level clampdowns similar to those targeting medical marijuana dispensaries the government suspects are fronts for drug traffickers.
Dennis

ghostrider
9th November 2012, 05:18
you know oil is gone, and the economy needs a boost, what better way than to introduce a never ending trading , investing, manufacturing product that has an endless market, and endless uses , the gov will regulate and tax and fee and license and gain lots of new money from this. All from the use of the sacred weed.... nice to see they finally catch up to the native americans after 230 years. slow pokes silly pale faces welcome to the party. Watch the money start rolling in , in those two states. the others will be jealous and make changes to get some of that cash.....

Carmody
9th November 2012, 05:44
One has to look at the timeline, who is involved, what went down, how it has played out, the whole flow of it, up to this day.

The Rockefeller drug laws of the 70's in NY state is where it all really took a turn for the worse, and went into high gear. Like a disease, it spread out from there.

That's when a plan to finance black ops with drug money (run other countries via the war and the drug running), to subjugate the US from the inside, to increase the prison populations (to provide cheap labour for military corporations and the like), and privatize them, to create a paranoid police state and so on, that is when this entire thing that is in the USA at this date...really geared up and came on line. It has to do with the fact that they seemingly...nearly lost control, in the late 60's. From that time forward, they started to gather and plan, and stay on it, to regain control, and they have not let up since.

To think that this giant war and domination machine will be 'taken down' by Colorado's public and government - is the deal, here.

The State of Colorado and State of Washington... are now squarely in the sights of this thing.

The folks in those two states are about to find out how much of a battle they are into. This will be a very dirty war.

Make all of it as public as possible, as it will get very underhanded.

Paul
9th November 2012, 06:04
To think that this giant war and domination machine will be 'taken down' by Colorado's public and government - is the deal, here.

The State of Colorado and State of Washington... are now squarely in the sights of this thing.

The folks in those two states are about to find out how much of a battle they are into. This will be a very dirty war.

The question in my mind is whether

this is big guys (the Rockefellers and other such elite) vs little guy (a couple of states), or whether
there are "big" guys on both sides, both warring and cooperating in a complex dance, or whether
there are even bigger guys, behind both sides, moving and consolidating their various powers around the globe, manipulating peoples, nations and the elite families for larger purposes that span eons.

... or all of the above :).

GlassSteagallfan
9th November 2012, 08:34
Here are some of the 'big guys'....

...George Soros's henchmen are crowing that the full-scale legalization of marijuana passed by voters in the states of Colorado and Washington, with the support of the Obama administration, sets the precedent needed to "pav[e] the way for the rest of the country and the world to follow."

... Drug Policy Alliance chief Ethan Nadelmann, took credit for drafting, financing, and organizing the initiatives which make those two states "the first political jurisdictions anywhere in the world to approve regulating, taxing and controlling marijuana similar to alcohol." ...

Part of a LaRouche article

modwiz
9th November 2012, 09:01
...George Soros's henchmen are crowing that the full-scale legalization of marijuana passed by voters in the states of Colorado and Washington, with the support of the Obama administration, sets the precedent needed to "pav[e] the way for the rest of the country and the world to follow."

George Soros, he eats the children of Conservatives. Do I have that correct? I guess his henchmen are cocks, since they are crowing.

Journalism, not written for literate grown-ups.

Conchis
9th November 2012, 11:41
It'll be interesting to see if the Federal government can get a conviction in a federal court of Colorado citizens following Colorado law. I would think this sets up a classic example of jury nullification in action.

WhiteFeather
9th November 2012, 14:05
Geez Louise People. . . . no wonder we go ppassively into what ever box ‘they’ have waiting for the bulk of the American population . . . . .

I thought this forum had some intelligent people . . . can you guys really not see what is going on with this ‘legalization’?

I am really really glad I live where I do . . . . far far away from ‘civilization’


ALL of the 'manipulation' plans, behind the scenes and blatant...are about to backfire in rapid-fire succession, imho!


eaglespirit . . . would you mind expanding a bit more on your comment? Do you think somehow the 'controllers' are going to loose control?

What we think we become, Consciousness changes Everything. As we are on a path to change it. The power of thought is priceless......

soleil
9th November 2012, 15:36
it is interesting to read this post. based on a few of them i am glad to be here and know we'll get along.
its good to see some good changes in the USA since what happened in cali. also shout outs to amsterdam for keeping things the same as well.

for my addition to this post, my family is very pro home grown greens and industrial hemp. im happy to see that there are some good things happening with this lovely green herb. i hope obama does not do anything to stop the legalization in the states in the next 4 yrs.

Carmody
9th November 2012, 19:44
To think that this giant war and domination machine will be 'taken down' by Colorado's public and government - is the deal, here.

The State of Colorado and State of Washington... are now squarely in the sights of this thing.

The folks in those two states are about to find out how much of a battle they are into. This will be a very dirty war.

The question in my mind is whether

this is big guys (the Rockefellers and other such elite) vs little guy (a couple of states), or whether
there are "big" guys on both sides, both warring and cooperating in a complex dance, or whether
there are even bigger guys, behind both sides, moving and consolidating their various powers around the globe, manipulating peoples, nations and the elite families for larger purposes that span eons.

... or all of the above :).

in my experience - in some way or another...all of the above.

Entering this game, part of that is the knowledge and the acceptance, rather - that it exists. One cannot change anything, until one accepts that the given thing exists, as a preliminary step.

Pushing against the electric fence, repeatedly (after and upon multiple shocks and screams of rage), like a stubborn pig, does not result in much - with regard to being effective. As matter of fact, the fence is designed to handle that specific situation.

TargeT
9th November 2012, 20:01
I suppose this article may be rattling sabers, but I don't think so. As TargeT said, States are coerced, funds withheld, etc. to bully States into federal compliance. It's all about compliance.

Source: Marijuana legalization victories could be short-lived (http://news.yahoo.com/marijuana-legalization-victories-could-short-lived-022257328.html)


(Reuters) - Votes making Colorado and Washington the first U.S. states to legalize marijuana for recreational use could be short-lived victories for pot backers because the federal government will fight them, two former U.S. drug control officials said on Wednesday. They said the federal government could sue to block parts of the measures or send threatening letters to marijuana shops, followed up by street-level clampdowns similar to those targeting medical marijuana dispensaries the government suspects are fronts for drug traffickers.
Dennis

Via the 10th amendment the states absolutely have the right to do what they did; however the 10th amendment has atrophied so much that most people don't even know what it says anymore; I do not see how the federal government could sue anyone (legally) or block anything (legally) though they have done it with Medical Cannabis so I'm sure this will be no different.

As Cam eluded to earlier, it will take a strong governor to back these laws & I have yet to see one (aside from J. Ventura) that would do it (and according to Jesse "they" made sure another Gov. Ventura will never get elected; as his election caught TPTB totally by surprise)

Humble Janitor
9th November 2012, 20:06
Here are some of the 'big guys'....

...George Soros's henchmen are crowing that the full-scale legalization of marijuana passed by voters in the states of Colorado and Washington, with the support of the Obama administration, sets the precedent needed to "pav[e] the way for the rest of the country and the world to follow."

... Drug Policy Alliance chief Ethan Nadelmann, took credit for drafting, financing, and organizing the initiatives which make those two states "the first political jurisdictions anywhere in the world to approve regulating, taxing and controlling marijuana similar to alcohol." ...

Part of a LaRouche article

So what's the issue then, with Soros that is?

I see conservatives harp on about how "evil" he is and they usually cite sensationalist sources like LaRouche, etc.

nurgle
9th November 2012, 21:26
Well At least in Colorado they are going to use the tax revenue towards Public Schools. I think this is smart that they paired those to things together. So if the federal government rolls in and starts fighting this, they could very well look bad in the public eye. The federal government taking money away from the kids' education? (ah oh!) Of course there are many arguments why those two things should be put together, but hey think of the slogans--- SMOKE UP! DO IT FOR THE KIDS!

HA! fun...

Here is the article I saw this in http://nation.time.com/2012/11/09/marijuana-in-colorado-ready-for-business-complete-with-regulations/

NancyV
9th November 2012, 21:35
My husband and I live in Washington state and voted for the legalization of marijuana. Neither one of us smokes pot and probably won't in the future, but we know that the government has used drug revenue for decades to fund black ops projects. We both know this from personal experience. I was a DEA contract undercover agent in the early 70's and my husband was a black ops counter terrorist all throughout the 70's and early 80's.

What I found out through working cases for the DEA in Mexico and South America was that only CERTAIN drug lords would be targeted and others were off limits. Why? Because the drug lords who cooperate with the DEA are spared from being destroyed and the ones who are independent and won't cooperate ARE destroyed whenever possible.

I had a perspective that included being a full on hippy in the late 60's for about 4 years. I smoked a lot of pot at that time, but the hippy movement changed dramatically around 1970 when cocaine became more prevalent. Cocaine is not by any stretch of the imagination a peace/love inducing drug. So when peace/love hippies started snorting tons of cocaine, the peace/love movement began to quickly devolve with many becoming more hostile, competitive and paranoid. At about the same time the DEA became more active and began to see the benefits of controlling the drug trade.

I quit ALL drugs when I was 25 in 1972 (40 years ago), in fact I became VERY anti drug. About a year after quitting I contacted the DEA and told them I would like to work for them since I had a first hand knowledge of how drugs were smuggled from Mexico and South America, mostly Peru and Colombia, as I had done that myself for a few years. Basically I was totally bored when I quit the drug world since I had lived a dangerous and exciting several years of personally bringing drugs in from Mexico, Colombia, Peru and Europe, and then selling them wholesale for about 3 years. I knew the people in this drug world and I knew how to buy, import and sell on a large scale.

They were very excited to get me, since I was quite knowledgeable and effective, and I began working for them on a contract basis. It took me about a year to realize that although I had thought the drug lords were the REALLY bad guys, the DEA was not any less "bad" because they had full intentions of controlling the drug trade and importation into the USA and not the intention I thought they had of ENDING the drug trade. So I quit after having successfully busted quite a few drug operations. Of course they wanted me to continue, but I was disillusioned. It was the beginning of me starting to wake up to the fact that the lines between so-called "good" and "evil" are basically difficult to discern and even non existent in many cases.

Of course the Feds will likely file lawsuits against Colorado and Washington. Even the super liberal/progressive/socialist Obama cannot support legalized drugs which would cut back on black ops funding. Oregon has had very liberal medical marijuana laws for quite a while but the Feds often target and bust legal growers.

If drugs were legalized and taxed massive amounts of money would be generated, but these funds could not be as easily diverted to all the black ops projects that now thrive on revenue from illegal drugs. Obviously a majority of people want marijuana legalized, at least in the few states that have promoted medical marijuana and legalization, or at the very least decriminalization. But as several have mentioned the prison system is a for profit business and marijuana users and sellers make up a good portion of the prison population. They don't want to lose money so they want MORE people in jail.

Hemp is also a fantastically useful crop which is dangerous to several industries who want to keep the status quo. The fact that hemp is legal in Canada and many other countries but still illegal in the USA is amazing. We truly do live in a controlled country where the corporations, banks and government control products for their own benefit and not for the benefit of the people. Still I am happy that the people in CO and WA made their voices heard about the insane drug laws.

I am more of a conservative than a liberal but both conservative and liberal politicians seem to want to preserve the status quo. I detest both the radical left and the radical right. Obama is a radical left type who is still controlled by others much more powerful than he is. I can't see him going along with legalizing marijuana. He may try to do it, or make liberals think he is trying since he doesn't have to get re-elected, but I would bet that the black ops boys would inform him that he would be a lot safer if he kept his nose out of their piggy bank.

Carmody
10th November 2012, 00:16
I suppose this article may be rattling sabers, but I don't think so. As TargeT said, States are coerced, funds withheld, etc. to bully States into federal compliance. It's all about compliance.

Source: Marijuana legalization victories could be short-lived (http://news.yahoo.com/marijuana-legalization-victories-could-short-lived-022257328.html)


(Reuters) - Votes making Colorado and Washington the first U.S. states to legalize marijuana for recreational use could be short-lived victories for pot backers because the federal government will fight them, two former U.S. drug control officials said on Wednesday. They said the federal government could sue to block parts of the measures or send threatening letters to marijuana shops, followed up by street-level clampdowns similar to those targeting medical marijuana dispensaries the government suspects are fronts for drug traffickers.
Dennis

Via the 10th amendment the states absolutely have the right to do what they did; however the 10th amendment has atrophied so much that most people don't even know what it says anymore; I do not see how the federal government could sue anyone (legally) or block anything (legally) though they have done it with Medical Cannabis so I'm sure this will be no different.

As Cam eluded to earlier, it will take a strong governor to back these laws & I have yet to see one (aside from J. Ventura) that would do it (and according to Jesse "they" made sure another Gov. Ventura will never get elected; as his election caught TPTB totally by surprise)

If the 10th amendment is ...what it is supposed to be, then the state of Colorado and Washington, simply have to say that they will completely IGNORE anything that the 'supreme court' tries to say on the matter.

And, to instruct their troopers act upon the manner in similar ways as I have outlined.


edit:

Ignoring is a key point here. That the state should ignore all calls to attend to the Supreme court to settle the matter. For simple acceptance of any paperwork in that direction, in that moment, the acceptance of the jurisdiction of the supreme court, in the given matter at hand, is accepted, in the titular and thus real sense, as a cascading eventuality in legal premise.

IF-- a federal official tries to serve summons TO elements of the government OF Colorado or Washington ON this matter, the given government officials involved SHOULD handcuff the given federal representative and bring them to the given state line and simply...toss them out. Without a single word being spoken on the matter, whatsoever.

Then..video record the situation, as it happens, and broadcast that to the world and the rest of the USA. That is the kind of 'open escalation' that it is going to take, to keep such laws in place.

These are dreamy idealizations of what should be done, and probably won't take place at all...as few people have the spine to carry though, when every aspect of their lives and families will be threatened and some killed.

If spine is not shown, if direct acts of direct refusal on a wide public scale are not in evidence... it will be a slow grind via vicious groups operating in the backdrop, to slowly bring down the individuals and all involved. In clandestine and open attacks of both nefarious and planted/falsified acts and evidence.

Once again, count on it, bet on it.

Paul
10th November 2012, 00:50
If spine is not shown, if direct acts of direct refusal on a wide public scale are not in evidence... it will be a slow grind via vicious groups operating in the backdrop, to slowly bring down the individuals and all involved. In clandestine and open attacks of both nefarious and planted/falsified acts and evidence.
Perhaps this game is not about deciding a clear winner, whether those two states, or the federal government.

Perhaps it is about putting on another display of mud wrestling, intended to further sully the reputation of both state and federal government in the eyes of the populace.

TargeT
10th November 2012, 01:13
If spine is not shown, if direct acts of direct refusal on a wide public scale are not in evidence... it will be a slow grind via vicious groups operating in the backdrop, to slowly bring down the individuals and all involved. In clandestine and open attacks of both nefarious and planted/falsified acts and evidence.
Perhaps this game is not about deciding a clear winner, whether those two states, or the federal government.

Perhaps it is about putting on another display of mud wrestling, intended to further sully the reputation of both state and federal government in the eyes of the populace.

This would definitely line up with the "one world government" agenda... and this topic (if it gains more public support) would be a great one to leverage & show the "ineptitude" of the current United States system.

Hip Hipnotist
10th November 2012, 03:08
This just in...

http://news.yahoo.com/colo-wash-await-federal-response-pot-measure-202557189.html

and a lot more to follow -- guaranteed.

BTW: Many thought provoking responses to the thread.

Lot's of intelligent folks here.

But you knew that. ;-)

Rocky_Shorz
13th November 2012, 21:26
Wall Street just realized what it means, MDBX a maker of vending machines for dispensaries, had a huge jump today...

jumped from 6 to 10.80

on only 550 shares...

they know what is about to happen.

an article on Marketwatch hit at the same time...

link (http://www.smartmoney.com/invest/stocks/how-to-invest-in-legalized-marijuana-1352828147907/?cid=1186)

article at 11:30AM...

stock jumped a few hours later, who is the big investors on that one? wouldn't be related to "Smartwatch" who first published the article would it?

that's why California hasn't taken that step...

It'll go from Cartel CIA Controlled to Wall Street Controlled...

Smile for the camera :)

They've learned even if you think it is ok in the state, the Fed can sweep in at any time to take everything away, crops inventories...

States that have made it legal for medical or otherwise need to bring this forward to change the laws of the lands to control their own on this one.

Can't wait for the TcoTs to have to see POT clicking across their ticker... :pound:

latshaw
14th November 2012, 03:01
thank you blufire for your post...my sentiments exactly. The more people that are numbed out the more they relinquish their personal power. No judgement here just expressing sad disappointment.

Dennis Leahy
14th November 2012, 03:58
thank you blufire for your post...my sentiments exactly. The more people that are numbed out the more they relinquish their personal power. No judgement here just expressing sad disappointment.In my opinion, I would like this theory a lot better if the federal government "caves in" and legalizes hemp/cannabis/marijuana across the US (and would need to remove support for the international/UN treaty as well.) Then I might believe they were strategically sacrificing a bishop on the chessboard.

If the States went this slowly (next election is not for 2 years, and it is not even a ballot consideration in MN at this point, for example), how long would it take for this devious plan (if it is) to really take effect? 6 years? 12? The economic S**T storm is going to Hit the Big Fan Blades long before even Colorado or Washington start allowing non-medical sales (if they ever do.) To me, this really is a distraction (like the elections) to get us to de-focus from the real problems and any possible strategic moves or solutions that citizens have left.

Also, both the Colorado and Washington governors have come out with the VERY wimpy stance that they will kowtow to whatever the feds tell them - not the stance that they will defend their State's 10th amendment rights. Those two governors handed the feds the ball.

I do agree that...
...if was 18 years old to twentysomething, and pot smoking was not only legal but pot was this strong (some modern cannabis is nearly 25% THC), you could take me off the list of active activists. Yes, there are some people like Michael Phelps that can take a few tokes (I really have no idea how much) and still win a handful of olympic gold medals, but the average person (like I was) who smokes becomes less motivated (like I did.) If it was legalized, that's the main reason I would not smoke it. I would, however, have it handy as a medicine to fight off the cancers that many of us will be fighting off. And, I will continue to make plenty of noise about legalizing hemp/cannabis/marijuana for 20,000 other reasons besides getting high (and agree that those that want to smoke should be able to do so - with no tax beyond sales tax.)

Dennis

modwiz
14th November 2012, 04:05
thank you blufire for your post...my sentiments exactly. The more people that are numbed out the more they relinquish their personal power. No judgement here just expressing sad disappointment.In my opinion, I would like this theory a lot better if the federal government "caves in" and legalizes hemp/cannabis/marijuana across the US (and would need to remove support for the international/UN treaty as well.) Then I might believe they were strategically sacrificing a bishop on the chessboard.

If the States went this slowly (next election is not for 2 years, and it is not even a ballot consideration in MN at this point, for example), how long would it take for this devious plan (if it is) to really take effect? 6 years? 12? The economic S**T storm is going to Hit the Big Fan Blades long before even Colorado or Washington start allowing non-medical sales (if they ever do.) To me, this really is a distraction (like the elections) to get us to de-focus from the real problems and any possible strategic moves or solutions that citizens have left.

Also, both the Colorado and Washington governors have come out with the VERY wimpy stance that they will kowtow to whatever the feds tell them - not the stance that they will defend their State's 10th amendment rights. Those two governors handed the feds the ball.

I do agree that...
...if was 18 years old to twentysomething, and pot smoking was not only legal but pot was this strong (some modern cannabis is nearly 25% THC), you could take me off the list of active activists. Yes, there are some people like Michael Phelps that can take a few tokes (I really have no idea how much) and still win a handful of olympic gold medals, but the average person (like I was) who smokes becomes less motivated (like I did.) If it was legalized, that's the main reason I would not smoke it. I would, however, have it handy as a medicine to fight off the cancers that many of us will be fighting off. And, I will continue to make plenty of noise about legalizing hemp/cannabis/marijuana for 20,000 other reasons besides getting high (and agree that those that want to smoke should be able to do so - with no tax beyond sales tax.)

Dennis

No matter how bad pot smoking is for you, going to prison is incalculably worse. That is the reason it should be legal, so that people with problems do not end up with being a criminal as another one. Any other argument misses this very important point. I know people who overcame heroin addiction and went on to productive lives. I do not know of any felons who did.

I don't know any politicians either. :p

modwiz
14th November 2012, 04:10
thank you blufire for your post...my sentiments exactly. The more people that are numbed out the more they relinquish their personal power. No judgement here just expressing sad disappointment.

Being in prison is the ultimate relinquishing of power. Never lose sight of that when it comes to the legality of drug usage. To forget this crucial point is to hand our power and freedom over to the government. When we question the legality of drug use we question the right to be free to make decisions about our private lives. The government makes note of that ambiguity and imposes harsh drug laws that feed the prison-industrial complex.

Rocky_Shorz
16th November 2012, 22:25
Wall Street just realized what it means, MDBX a maker of vending machines for dispensaries, had a huge jump today...

jumped from 6 to 10.80

on only 550 shares...

they know what is about to happen.

an article on Marketwatch hit at the same time...

link (http://www.smartmoney.com/invest/stocks/how-to-invest-in-legalized-marijuana-1352828147907/?cid=1186)

article at 11:30AM...

stock jumped a few hours later, who is the big investors on that one? wouldn't be related to "Smartwatch" who first published the article would it?

that's why California hasn't taken that step...

It'll go from Cartel CIA Controlled to Wall Street Controlled...

Smile for the camera :)

They've learned even if you think it is ok in the state, the Fed can sweep in at any time to take everything away, crops inventories...

States that have made it legal for medical or otherwise need to bring this forward to change the laws of the lands to control their own on this one.

Can't wait for the TcoTs to have to see POT clicking across their ticker... :pound:

bought in around 11 dumped at $200... not a bad week... ;)

Twinsel
20th November 2012, 01:49
From now on lesser visitors to the Netherlands from Colorado i guess :p

baddbob
6th December 2012, 22:00
Finally a step out of the dark ages where Marijuana had roots in hell.
After the recreational use of marijuana was made legal in both Washington state and Colorado, people have been wondering what states, if any, will allow their citizens to smoke pot in the privacy of their own homes. Tommy Chong, best known for his role in the comedy duo Cheech and Chong, has made statements on the subject.

talks start @ 1:22
CfYgIt7aeCw

Read more here;:cool:
http://www.ibtimes.com/tommy-chong-chimes-marijuana-legalization-says-obama-wont-interfere-users-wont-miss-old-days-video

DeDukshyn
6th December 2012, 22:04
Excellent frank discussion ... great stuff, Thanks ;)

KiwiElf
16th May 2013, 00:39
Cannabis prohibition estimated to cost NZ taxpayers $500m
Aotearoa Legalise Cannabis Party (ALCP), Fuseworks May 16, 2013, 11:38 am

http://nz.news.yahoo.com/a/-/top-stories/17176604/cannabis-prohibition-estimated-to-cost-taxpayers-500m/

Maintaining cannabis prohibition in New Zealand is estimated to cost the taxpayer $500 million annually. Add to that the tax revenue which could be generated from licensed cannabis distributors and producers and it is clear that ALCP policy would easily add over $1 billion to the government's operational budget each year, benefiting all New Zealanders.

Already, jurisdictions in The Netherlands, Spain, Portugal and Colorado State are regulating cannabis, allowing locals and foreigners to buy or possess small amounts of the product. They have managed to establish the industry, despite the United Nations Single Convention on Narcotics.

Not only would a regulated marketplace for cannabis generate revenue for government, it would do so at the same time as drastically cutting government spending. Regulation of cannabis would also allow small business owners to earn a decent income and provide employment opportunities for numerous staff members.

Medical research has comprehensively shown that cannabis is safe and has therapeutic benefits for hundreds of medical conditions. Medical Marijuana producers could establish a significant presence in New Zealand reducing the cost of importing cannabis medicines like Sativex (http://www.medsafe.govt.nz/profs/RIss/Sativex.asp). Cannabinoids have been described as the "wonder-drug of the 21st century" by the Harvard Medical School. Allowing cannabis medicines to be produced in New Zealand would reduce Pharmac's expenditure, freeing up funds to subsidise specialised drugs for more specific treatments.

In 1938, the Hemp Industry was the first agricultural crop to be valued in the billions of dollars. The same year prohibition of hemp lead to the rise of synthetic and petro-chemical products, at huge cost to the environment. Returning to hemp products, which have over 20,000 known uses, would reverse the tide of environmental degradation, deforestation and pesticide use.

Entire houses can be constructed from hemp-crete, hemp fibre boards and hemp plastics. Hemp houses are naturally warm, dry and healthy to live in. New Zealand;s housing shortage could easily be addressed by building homes out of affordable hemp materials. Fuels made from hemp can generate electricity and power our motor vehicles, while maintaining a neutral carbon footprint.

Hemp farming should be promoted in New Zealand, to create employment and train young people in establishing successful, environmentally sustainable businesses. Hemp products have a huge export market especially in the United States when its production is currently illegal. New Zealand farmers should apply to the Ministry of Health for a Hemp Licence. (http://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/regulation-health-and-disability-system/medicines-control/hemp-industrial-hemp)

Regulating cannabis would take the market away from gangs and make it harder for youth to access, while allowing adults to make free choices about their cannabis use. Medical marijuana will reduce cancer rates and help treat many illnesses. Hemp Food nutrition will improve health and prevent disease. Hemp will be used for fuels, construction and manufacturing bio-plastics, insulating New Zealand's economy from international fluctuation in the price of oil.

ALCP are not a party that only cares about one issue, as outlined above, we believe our policy will have positive impacts across a wide range of government sectors. Our policy would have a range of social, economic and environmental benefits across society. ALCP support personal responsibility, civil liberties and true justice. Our policy endorses Common Law and the Treaty of Waitangi and seeks a proper and just balance between the power of the state and the rights and dignity of the individual.

It is impossible to estimate how valuable the hemp industry will become for our economy but it is clear that ALCP policy will deliver billions of dollars in revenue to the taxpayer, reduce crime and access to hard drugs while providing employment and skills training. The overall value of the Cannabis, Industrial Hemp and Medical Marijuana industries would total in the tens of billions of dollars annually, with no limit to growth in the industry. Unlike traditional resources, hemp is renewable and carbon neutral allowing economic growth and environmental sustainability to occur simultaneously.

Sidney
16th May 2013, 02:23
Cannabis prohibition estimated to cost NZ taxpayers $500m
Aotearoa Legalise Cannabis Party (ALCP), Fuseworks May 16, 2013, 11:38 am

http://nz.news.yahoo.com/a/-/top-stories/17176604/cannabis-prohibition-estimated-to-cost-taxpayers-500m/

Maintaining cannabis prohibition in New Zealand is estimated to cost the taxpayer $500 million annually. Add to that the tax revenue which could be generated from licensed cannabis distributors and producers and it is clear that ALCP policy would easily add over $1 billion to the government's operational budget each year, benefiting all New Zealanders.

Already, jurisdictions in The Netherlands, Spain, Portugal and Colorado State are regulating cannabis, allowing locals and foreigners to buy or possess small amounts of the product. They have managed to establish the industry, despite the United Nations Single Convention on Narcotics.

Not only would a regulated marketplace for cannabis generate revenue for government, it would do so at the same time as drastically cutting government spending. Regulation of cannabis would also allow small business owners to earn a decent income and provide employment opportunities for numerous staff members.

Medical research has comprehensively shown that cannabis is safe and has therapeutic benefits for hundreds of medical conditions. Medical Marijuana producers could establish a significant presence in New Zealand reducing the cost of importing cannabis medicines like Sativex (http://www.medsafe.govt.nz/profs/RIss/Sativex.asp). Cannabinoids have been described as the "wonder-drug of the 21st century" by the Harvard Medical School. Allowing cannabis medicines to be produced in New Zealand would reduce Pharmac's expenditure, freeing up funds to subsidise specialised drugs for more specific treatments.

In 1938, the Hemp Industry was the first agricultural crop to be valued in the billions of dollars. The same year prohibition of hemp lead to the rise of synthetic and petro-chemical products, at huge cost to the environment. Returning to hemp products, which have over 20,000 known uses, would reverse the tide of environmental degradation, deforestation and pesticide use.

Entire houses can be constructed from hemp-crete, hemp fibre boards and hemp plastics. Hemp houses are naturally warm, dry and healthy to live in. New Zealand;s housing shortage could easily be addressed by building homes out of affordable hemp materials. Fuels made from hemp can generate electricity and power our motor vehicles, while maintaining a neutral carbon footprint.

Hemp farming should be promoted in New Zealand, to create employment and train young people in establishing successful, environmentally sustainable businesses. Hemp products have a huge export market especially in the United States when its production is currently illegal. New Zealand farmers should apply to the Ministry of Health for a Hemp Licence. (http://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/regulation-health-and-disability-system/medicines-control/hemp-industrial-hemp)

Regulating cannabis would take the market away from gangs and make it harder for youth to access, while allowing adults to make free choices about their cannabis use. Medical marijuana will reduce cancer rates and help treat many illnesses. Hemp Food nutrition will improve health and prevent disease. Hemp will be used for fuels, construction and manufacturing bio-plastics, insulating New Zealand's economy from international fluctuation in the price of oil.

ALCP are not a party that only cares about one issue, as outlined above, we believe our policy will have positive impacts across a wide range of government sectors. Our policy would have a range of social, economic and environmental benefits across society. ALCP support personal responsibility, civil liberties and true justice. Our policy endorses Common Law and the Treaty of Waitangi and seeks a proper and just balance between the power of the state and the rights and dignity of the individual.

It is impossible to estimate how valuable the hemp industry will become for our economy but it is clear that ALCP policy will deliver billions of dollars in revenue to the taxpayer, reduce crime and access to hard drugs while providing employment and skills training. The overall value of the Cannabis, Industrial Hemp and Medical Marijuana industries would total in the tens of billions of dollars annually, with no limit to growth in the industry. Unlike traditional resources, hemp is renewable and carbon neutral allowing economic growth and environmental sustainability to occur simultaneously.

Big pharma can't have our health being helped, hurts their business.
But you are absolutely right, this should be promoted in all countries. I believe it is beginning to catch on though. Each year a few more American states are legalizing, medical and recreational uses. Its a start.

ghostrider
16th May 2013, 02:26
the government will poo poo anything you can do on your own and make money easily ...big pharma can sell side effect death pills, but the little guy and a weed ??? go to jail ...shouldn't it be the other way around, the little guy supported and big pharma in jail ??? Anyone can grow it and sell it, ehummm economic freedom... no need for a government to tell you what to do ...budwieser and big pharma out of business , just go see Joey and bring ten bucks ... lol ...I don't use it, but have no problem with those who want to grow or sell or use it, it comes out of earth, with sunlight and water, it can't be any worse than gentically altered food ...

witchy1
16th May 2013, 10:15
In NZ they legalized Sativex in 2010. However at 300.00 for a spray cannister is too steep for most people, could last a week or a month and no one has apparently applied to have Pharmac subisidize it....

http://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/wellbeing/4315144/Medicinal-cannabis-legalised

Ernie Nemeth
16th August 2013, 20:49
The link between the criminalization of marijuana and violent crime is clearly evident in this report from Infowars. In the Netherlands, new tighter marijuanna laws has caused the selling of drugs on the street, with its attendant escalation in violence and availability of harder drugs.

http://www.infowars.com/holland-criminalizes-marijuana-violent-drug-dealers-take-over-the-streets/

Members of local government in Holland decided to implement stricter marijuana laws which then gave more power to violent street dealers that began to take over the market. When the governments realized this was happening, they eased up on some of the laws again. When the coffee shops were allowed to sell cannabis to tourists again, members of these gangs threatened coffee shop owners because their business was being taken away from them, This video shows footage of one of the street dealers threatening a coffeshop owner and the experience of the person who was filming the confrontation.

Tesla_WTC_Solution
16th August 2013, 21:29
I should start thanking God for at least giving the Dutch some common sense. They are among the only ones telling truth about MJ in any capacity.

seko
16th August 2013, 21:31
Each person is responsible of what they do with their lives and prohibiting friendly drugs will cause more problems to everyone involved and will waste police time.

Real and honest businesses will make $$$ and pay taxes and of course we will not have dodgy dealers on the streets.

Tesla_WTC_Solution
16th August 2013, 21:37
I hope mmj can rescue the Wa state budget, lol -- nothing else is working :(

Ernie Nemeth
16th August 2013, 21:59
Violent crime in North America especially is all about illegal drugs - their manufacture, distribution and sales, and the laws that back their enforcement. It is big business. Very big business. So big that governments themselves are involved in the profits, if not some of the other aspects of its avalability. The jails are full to capacity and the majority of inmates are there serving drug-related sentences. That is also big business.

And whatever happened to the criminal syndicates that were all over the news in the eighties and earlier? How come we hear virtually no talk of them in recent decades? Could it be they managed to infiltrate our governments and corporations? Could it be that they are still in control of that very lucrative business? Could they be behind the war on drugs? A war that cannot be won? A war that only brings larger profits to those that control the trade?

In any case, the fact that making drugs illegal is directly related to escalating violence is proven beyond a doubt. Good first step.

dpwishy
16th August 2013, 22:12
Ok, so a lot of people are going to jump on my back for this. This is coming from a former grower and connoisseur. It was part of my path for over a decade. In the end I found marijuana to be one of the hardest spiritual traps to beat, even harder than alcohol. Don't get me wrong, marijuana has its place as a medicine and as an entheogen, but its a very trickster entity. Why is it such a spiritual trap? It gives the false sense of spiritual progression all while the user stays stagnant. Its a very sly trick it plays and a very slim % of users see it for what it is. It also changes how your body functions for about a month. Its not something you really notice as an all the time smoker, but take a few months off and see what level of clarity you get too and then make an experiment out of it and smoke again. I think you will find that a fog lasts and stays for far longer than you expected. It changes how your chakras and third eye function and effects them for a month even if you only feel the high for one day. Its counter productive to working these systems naturally.

I have this talk with my partner all the time. I ask her why she still wants to consume in that capacity and her reply will be "well it makes me a better person, I see when I hurt people more easily. I can be less stressed out about the world or more creative". We all know the replies, ill end them with those but I could have added countless more. People fail to realize if you are using a tool to accomplish these things, you will never be able to do them on your own. Sure you may need a tool to show you the other side so you have something to work towards, but if you are using the tool constantly to achieve those ends, you are missing the point completely. The point is to be a better person without a tool, to see why you hurt others without a tool. To live less stressful without a tool and so on. I find this to be a realization that few come to with marijuana.

Training wheels are awesome as a kid as they teach us how to ride a bike. But how useless are they if we never take them off and learn to ride alone? There comes a time where the training wheels need to be taken off so you can truly enjoy what it means to ride a bike. Why I say this is far greater as a spiritual trap as I see SO MANY very evolved beings that are still riding a bike with training wheels when it comes to marijuana. The spell marijuana has over evolved beings amazes me the more I see it. Its a very trickster entity. But like all good traps, it must give you tons of truths to rope you in....

There comes a point where all will figure out that there is a contradiction in using a material realm method to achieve the spiritual....

Ill leave you with one last question I want to pose. The world is not what it seems, everything is very calculated and set up for a reason. I'm sure if anyone knows this, its you guys at this forum. When marijuana had the chance to truly wake up a society it was banned in the beginning of this century. When the people are awake and it has a chance to keep those that are awake suppressed, it became legal. Do you think that this is a coincidence...?

In divine friendship,
your brother,
-wishy

Tesla_WTC_Solution
16th August 2013, 22:19
Personally I enjoyed some of the distance from modern b.s. that mj provided. I adopted many research interests that would otherwise never have entered my mind. Yes, it affects perception. But so does thyroid disease...

It doesn't destroy your sex life or kill your pregnancy, either -- modern antidepressants do.

Some dutch docs think mental patients seek mj because it helps calm their symptoms.

Dr Gupta on CNN says it cures epilepsy and bipolars often use seizure suppressants.

DeDukshyn
16th August 2013, 23:18
Ok, so a lot of people are going to jump on my back for this. This is coming from a former grower and connoisseur. It was part of my path for over a decade. In the end I found marijuana to be one of the hardest spiritual traps to beat, even harder than alcohol. Don't get me wrong, marijuana has its place as a medicine and as an entheogen, but its a very trickster entity. Why is it such a spiritual trap? It gives the false sense of spiritual progression all while the user stays stagnant. Its a very sly trick it plays and a very slim % of users see it for what it is. It also changes how your body functions for about a month. Its not something you really notice as an all the time smoker, but take a few months off and see what level of clarity you get too and then make an experiment out of it and smoke again. I think you will find that a fog lasts and stays for far longer than you expected. It changes how your chakras and third eye function and effects them for a month even if you only feel the high for one day. Its counter productive to working these systems naturally.

I have this talk with my partner all the time. I ask her why she still wants to consume in that capacity and her reply will be "well it makes me a better person, I see when I hurt people more easily. I can be less stressed out about the world or more creative". We all know the replies, ill end them with those but I could have added countless more. People fail to realize if you are using a tool to accomplish these things, you will never be able to do them on your own. Sure you may need a tool to show you the other side so you have something to work towards, but if you are using the tool constantly to achieve those ends, you are missing the point completely. The point is to be a better person without a tool, to see why you hurt others without a tool. To live less stressful without a tool and so on. I find this to be a realization that few come to with marijuana.

Training wheels are awesome as a kid as they teach us how to ride a bike. But how useless are they if we never take them off and learn to ride alone? There comes a time where the training wheels need to be taken off so you can truly enjoy what it means to ride a bike. Why I say this is far greater as a spiritual trap as I see SO MANY very evolved beings that are still riding a bike with training wheels when it comes to marijuana. The spell marijuana has over evolved beings amazes me the more I see it. Its a very trickster entity. But like all good traps, it must give you tons of truths first to rope you in....

There comes a point where all will figure out that there is a contradiction in using a material realm method to achieve the spiritual....

Ill leave you with one last question I want to pose. The world is not what it seems, everything is very calculated and set up for a reason. I'm sure if anyone knows this, its you guys at this forum. When marijuana had the chance to truly wake up a society it was banned in the beginning of this century. When the people are awake and it has a chance to keep those that are awake suppressed, it became legal. Do you think that this is a coincidence...?

In divine friendship,
your brother,
-wishy

Marijuana use and chronic marijuana "addiction" are two entirely different things. It's a bit like saying that sex is wrong because sex addiction has ruined lives.

I partly agree with much of what you are saying -- I also noticed easily within myself that occasional use will temporarily heighten spiritual considerations and expand your consciousness, and also I noticed that regular use tends to have the opposite effect.

It makes more sense if we look at this from physiological point of view. Consider that mj induces certain chemical releases in the brain -- these releases is what is responsible for the heightened spiritual considerations and expanded thoughts - not the mj itself. Also consider that after release it takes some time and effort on your body's part to restore these chemicals that give that effect. Occasional use, if done infrequently enough, will always give the desired effect. Chronic use never gives your body enough time to replenish those brain chemicals (nuero-transmitters, exciters, depressors, or whatever) that cause the effect -- thus you ruin your relationship with these higher states of consciousness very easily with chronic use.

Right now, the fact that mj gets you a high is almost completely irrelevant in comparison to the change in industry that legalization or at least decriminalization can bring. If everyone understands how it works physiologically, and understand the power of psychological addictions can pose, then it should be their choice - just like sex -- it can be dangerous if misused.

My 2 cents ;)

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Personally I enjoyed some of the distance from modern b.s. that mj provided. I adopted many research interests that would otherwise never have entered my mind. Yes, it affects perception. But so does thyroid disease...

It doesn't destroy your sex life or kill your pregnancy, either -- modern antidepressants do.

Some dutch docs think mental patients seek mj because it helps calm their symptoms.

Dr Gupta on CNN says it cures epilepsy and bipolars often use seizure suppressants.

It is prescribed sometimes to schizophrenics in Canada -- brings them a bit back to earth ... ironically.

Wind
16th August 2013, 23:18
I've never used any drugs, but I'm highly against the ban of marijuana and psychedelics. It's ironic and insane, because at the same we are pumping people full of medical "drugs" and allow the consuming of alcohol and tobacco. Every adult should have a right to decide how they want to explore their consciousness. It really seems that marijuana and psychedelics are true eye openers, but as everything, so can they too be abused. I prefer meditation, but I'm open as to the idea of altering my consciousness by using medical plants. I just don't want to be labeled as a criminal by criminal governments!

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DeDukshyn
16th August 2013, 23:49
I've never used any drugs, but I'm highly against the ban of marijuana and psychedelics. It's ironic and insane, because at the same we are pumping people full of medical "drugs" and allow the consuming of alcohol and tobacco. Every adult should have a right to decide how they want to explore their consciousness. It really seems that marijuana and psychedelics are true eye openers, but as everything, so can they too be abused. I prefer meditation, but I'm open as to the idea of altering my consciousness by using medical plants. I just don't want to be labeled as a criminal by criminal governments!

...<trim>...

My experiences with MDMA put me on a relentless desire to be able to mimick the effect from a spiritual standpoint, rather than a chemical one. MDMA gives you an opportunity to see what life without programmed fear is like, as in my experiences - with pure mdma - that it temporarily relieves your subconscious of all programmed fears - it truly is an incredible experience - yet it should be only experienced once in my opinion, if at all.

From there I sought to rid my subconscious of fear via advanced spiritual methods, and I was successful. Having that baseline -- that point B to know where wanted to go in that regard. I have since relapsed spiritually and sometimes think that another hit might motivate me again (it's been 15+ years) ;) - yet at the same time .. I don't want that as a crutch either, catch22 I guess.

Point of my story? Sometime mind altering substances can have huge physical, emotional, mental and spiritual impacts in the most positive of ways - but it should be considered more a one time "presentation" then something to "use"

I still smoke mj occasionally and drink too much beer these days, lol. At least I know where I am and have a rough idea of where to go ;)

Another 2 cents ;)

BTW MDMA is chemical based, not plant based. I know of no plant based source that has the same effect (then again I'm not an expert in the field)

Bit off topic ...

Bubu
17th August 2013, 08:46
When I started with mj I was cautious because of the issues in regards so I became a responsible user. On the other hand I was a food glutton and that makes me ill chronically. Money is good if we use it responsibly. Internet same; knife..... It's not about the tool it's about how we use it.

firstlook
17th August 2013, 20:50
conflict stimulates certain personality types and individuals. The best thing is not to involve yourself in that.

Example, I have been found with Pot on my persons multiple times by countless Law officers over the years. Recently, 70-80% do not even take it from me anymore. Granted I live in a state where it has been decriminalized ($100 fine under one ounce), it shows how the tides can turn.

Greed and fear cloud the debate in different ways, but Weed just makes to much sense in to many ways. It will reach a tipping point eventually and be tolerated all over IMO.

Lifebringer
21st August 2013, 12:56
It was the same when prohibition of alcohol stopped. The liquor store owners were threatened by the black marketeers, and they got away because of "no witnesses."
They always said that the big and strong, were short on brains, so it is with this also. The camera's, public security for businesses cameras, can be set to roof tops, rear of buildings, front street entrances, and license plate height, of any vehicle that pulls up, and a zoom can be applied.

All I can say, is the traps will be sprung, and the rats will be caught. Time to put some Generations X, Y, and Z JUSTICE on that nasty little virus called black marketeers of ill intent. LOCK THEM UP IS HOW WE WER TAUGHT. What is good for the young geese, is great for the old decrepit of mind gander/gangster wannabe's.

After all, that is what the police force is for, harm to the public and businesses, eh. Well, that's the laws, so it's time for our generations to pursue them, and they pursue those threats to businesses. Extortion? Idon't think so.

Keep PD's clean, and WE the world will have justice and fair play. Keep the Judges on a clean and tight by the laws WE the people implement by vote on the ballot, not backroom deals, and WE have the government, WE the peoples of the world want, while working to make this planet, cleaner, healthier, environmentally safe waters, air and oceans. There is a virus now killing thousands of dolfins around the world, but here in VA, 75 just this month with some hemmoraging of the eyes, and orafices, like ecoli.

Just saying, the 'shhthf" so hope you are prepared for the people who's eyes aren't awake to it, and those who will try to harm you for yours. If you can, store plenty of tree seeds, fruit tree seeds, and grapes. Vitamin C, will be needed for a while. Portables and greenhouses that can be moved in an instant, with extra set, if you don't have the time.

Well folks, that's the beginning of the solutions, and the ending of the problems, we've faced for centuries under these self appointed Demi-God mentality psychos.

Prodigal Son
21st August 2013, 13:11
Violent crime in North America especially is all about illegal drugs - their manufacture, distribution and sales, and the laws that back their enforcement. It is big business. Very big business. So big that governments themselves are involved in the profits, if not some of the other aspects of its avalability. The jails are full to capacity and the majority of inmates are there serving drug-related sentences. That is also big business.

And whatever happened to the criminal syndicates that were all over the news in the eighties and earlier? How come we hear virtually no talk of them in recent decades? Could it be they managed to infiltrate our governments and corporations? Could it be that they are still in control of that very lucrative business? Could they be behind the war on drugs? A war that cannot be won? A war that only brings larger profits to those that control the trade?

In any case, the fact that making drugs illegal is directly related to escalating violence is proven beyond a doubt. Good first step.

I'll take it a step further and say that when you get to the top of the drug pyramid, you'll find pond scum like Dick Cheney, the top levels of the CIA, and the Vatican.

The US invaded Afghanistan because the Taliban burned the poppy fields in response to a threat from the CIA for attempting to renege on a deal to feed Enron's brand new $3.5 billion refinery in India with a pipeline through the middle of Afghanistan, which supplies 90% of the world's heroin. The Russians offered them a better deal and they were trying to get more money out of the Bush/Rockefeller Standard Oil whores. The war papers were already on Bush's desk on 9/10/01, the US fleet was already poised in the Persian Gulf to commence with the opening ceremonies, and FEMA had already set up shop on NYC's pier 92 the night before 911 with enough personnel and equipment to broom sweep the whole mess in a few days under the guise of drill exercises called "Tripod II".

I have a friend who has been a CIA agent for nearly 40 years... he calls himself a "made man". Where have I heard that before?

Post update:

Just top get back on topic, we can feed, clothe and house the world with hemp, just as it was done for thousands of years... if anyone has never seen this article on the marijuana conspiracy, it'll really put things in perspective...

http://www.world-mysteries.com/marijuana1.htm

spiritguide
21st August 2013, 17:46
Article lead in...

Federal Drug Agency Denies Marijuana Is Less Toxic Than Alcohol
By Robin Wilkey
Posted: 08/19/2013 8:02 pm EDT | Updated: 08/20/2013 11:48 am EDT

The National Institute on Drug Abuse released an eyebrow-raising statement to PolitiFact on Monday, denying that marijuana is less toxic than alcohol.

"Claiming that marijuana is less toxic than alcohol cannot be substantiated since each possess their own unique set of risks and consequences for a given individual," wrote the institute. NIDA, part of the National Institutes of Health, funds government-backed scientific research and has a stated mission "to lead the nation in bringing the power of science to bear on drug abuse and addiction."

The statement was in response to a declaration by the pro-pot policy group Marijuana Policy Project that marijuana is less harmful than alcohol –- a claim that was the centerpiece of a controversial pro-marijuana commercial aired during a NASCAR race last month.

PolitiFact took the claim to task, comparing marijuana-related deaths to alcohol-related deaths and toxicity levels of the two substances.

As noted by PolitiFact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics reported 41,682 alcohol-related deaths in 2010. The center had no reports listing marijuana as a cause of death.

PolitiFact also noted a study by Robert Gable, an emeritus professor of psychology at Claremont Graduate University, that measured the toxicity levels of substances ranging from heroin to marijuana. The study showed that "marijuana is about 100 times safer than alcohol or cocaine."

PolitiFact noted that evidence surrounding the long-term effects of marijuana use is murky. Still, the fact-checker ruled the claim that marijuana is less toxic than alcohol "mostly true."

Article link with video a must watch...

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/19/marijuana-less-toxic-alcohol_n_3782100.html

Government lies continue and the administration allows or promulgates it. Psych ops still being fostered upon the masses. IMHO

Peace!

Tesla_WTC_Solution
21st August 2013, 18:11
I've never seen someone pass out, stop breathing, or have a single car accident due to mj.

Maybe it's toxic to cancerous growths such as our lovely gubment.

Paul
21st August 2013, 19:07
Maybe it's toxic to cancerous growths such as our lovely gubment.
It's toxic because it has a greater long term risk of imprisonment :).

Snoweagle
22nd August 2013, 02:36
When the Rothschild dynasty claimed their prize of Palestine they sent the English to remove the Turkish military peace keepers stationed there.
The trick was not to really create a bloodbath and create further hostilities with the Islamic friendly Turkish people so they avoided direct military conflict.
So they "bombed" the Turkish military positions with drugs. Loads of drugs and other goodies fell from the sky. The Turkish military were slam dunked trashed loving everyone.
The British came ashore and walked up the beach, packed the Turkish troops onto trucks and sent them home.

During the Blair-Brown years of governing the UK the classification for cannabis was lowered, effectively legalised for personal use. This only lasted a few years but during that time, many new controversial laws were introduced to Parliament and subsequently passed with little opposition. Most importantly, these law changes included the dumbing down of the Treason laws which were necessary for the Zionists to take control of the UK. Blair exploited these changes voraciously.

Now we see in the USA, the promotion of the peace inducing influence of cannabis in place of the anger promoting reactions to alcohol at a time when the global economy is about to crash and warfare breaks out in the US. Ii would not be unreasonable to expect a massive escalation of both hard and soft drugs being infused into the communities across the states. Keeping everybody docile as a keeper smokes the hive, each to their prize.

Ernie Nemeth
22nd August 2013, 18:14
Excellent read, thanks Prodigal Son.

It is a travesty, like so many other things in this modern world.

All you have to do to see the truth is observe that after more than two thousand years under this same sort of societal structure, the average world citizen is poor, hungry, undereducated and enslaved to the system that purports to enrich their lives. The system, however, is doing just fine, supporting a growing base of wealthy individuals and their companies. Those lucky enough to ride the coattails of these super-rich get to enjoy a modicum of these luxuries handed down as crumbs from the tables of the elite. Such luxuries include a full belly, a 40hr.+ per week job, 40 years of toil, shelter and not much more as they must pay for their own education, home, vacation, savings, health and anything else they might wish to consume.

I still say organized crime has infiltrated our governments at all levels and it is they that control the laws on hemp and others by coercion, threat and violence.

Ernie Nemeth
25th August 2013, 17:51
I decided to add a personal note, one I already wrote out in a post but decided to erase. Long ago I was diagnosed with depression, duh. In the old days depression just sort of went hand in hand with seeing through the lies but not being able to convince anyone of that fact.

They wanted to put me on anti-depressants. I refused. Having watched many family and friends put on those drugs and seeing their personalities change into a sort of automaton, there was no way I was going to subject mtself to that.

All the above is the lead in to the fact that I have smoked MJ ever since, closing in on thirty years now. It has allowed me to function in this crazy world to some satisfactory level. And mj, when used therapeutically, is not a brain drain. It does not make you lathargic and lazy, or maybe it does 'cause I am. It has a bit of an effect on short term memory but I learned a method of conpensation that works so well that I can dredge up almost any information I have ever heard and filed away in my brain.

Also, I found mj to be helpful in causing motivation, creativity and sparks of imagination(genius). It helps me maintain a weight just this side of skinny. Without it I'd be in dangerous territory in that regard.

The negative aspects are a certain amount of retardation in emotional growth, a lack of ambition and drive and a phychological addiction that can become obsessive if not managed with great care. I make sure I regularly quit smoking for periods of time like a month or two to make sure I don't begin using the medicine to excess.

Notice I used the term drug for the establishment's version of medicine and medicine for the establishment's idea of MJ.

Without MJ I would not have made it this far in life. I've grown it in my garden, under my garage, in attics, in basements, in closets. I've taught others how to grow it. I've even set up a few grow-ops too, being an electrician. That was all back before the turn of the millenium, before they turned up the heat here in Canada. There was a time, not that long ago, when you could purchase high quality seeds from a catalogue store in British Columbia. We're talking about fifty dollars and up for one seed! 'Course one seed can be used to clone hundreds of plants. I would not try ordering from them any more, not in this political climate with Harper the "tough on crime" ahole that he is.

Some may see this as perfect proof that mj is pretty much a nasty drug, or not. Sometimes I do not know how my posts might be taken by others.

So that's it, gonna smoke a dubbie now. See ya on the other side. Or as my good friend would say, "Onward through the fog!"

spiritguide
29th August 2013, 12:33
Entire article...

Sen. Patrick Leahy wants top Obama administration officials to clarify how conflicting state and federal marijuana laws should be handled.

The Vermont Democrat announced Monday that he's invited Attorney General Eric Holder and Deputy Attorney General James Cole to address the issue at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing next month to discuss the conflict in statutes in the aftermath of Washington and Colorado legalizing marijuana for recreational use in November and 19 states and the District of Columbia allowing the drug to be used for medicinal purposes.

Particularly, Leahy wants to know what assurances the administration are willing to give to state officials responsible for the licensing of marijuana retailers to ensure they will not face criminal penalties for carrying out their duties under those state laws.

"It is important, especially at a time of budget constraints, to determine whether it is the best use of federal resources to prosecute the personal or medicinal use of marijuana in states that have made such consumption legal," Leahy said in a statement. "I believe that these state laws should be respected. At a minimum, there should be guidance about enforcement from the federal government."

Last week, White House spokesman Josh Earnest said Obama doesn't advocate any change in federal laws.

Earnest added that the administration's position "has been clear and consistent for some time now that while the prosecution of drug traffickers remains an important priority, the president and the administration believe that targeting individual marijuana users, especially those with serious illnesses and their caregivers, is not the best allocation for federal law enforcement resources."

Maybe some of our Reps are growing a backbone and thinking of those they represent...the people.

Keep it positive with peace and love!

Dennis Leahy
29th August 2013, 18:05
Until the US federal government removes cannabis/marijuana from the Schedule drugs list (not just downgrading from Type I to Type II either), they are keeping a back door where they can control everything. In direct opposition to the constitution verbiage and spirit, the federal US government (now UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT, INC.) has complete control over States. Exercising "States rights" are like a toddler standing up in a room full of seated toddlers - they simply have not been dealt with yet.

Obama, reportedly quite a "dope" smoker in his day, knows full well that cannabis is only on the Schedule drug list because of collusion with multiple industries (likely Big Pharma being the current major player that hasn't figured out how to make a trillion dollars on legalized cannabis - yet.)

With spiritguide's directive to "keep it positive", I'll try to end on a positive note: I believe a pathway and a comprehensive plan for US citizens to finally understand the gambit and non-violently take control of the US government away from "vested interests" and put it into the hands of citizens has been presented. When a critical threshold of citizens has been reached, I believe we can do this. That will open all the doors to activists' myriad of issues - including the full legalization of this extremely important plant.

Dennis

Vitalux
1st September 2013, 16:55
What a beautiful outlook for the future :grouphug:



It's legal to light up in Colorado and Washington, and soon smoking pot could be legalized across the country following a decision Thursday by the federal government.

After Washington state and Colorado passed laws in November 2012 legalizing the consumption and sale of marijuana for adults over 18, lawmakers in both states waited to see whether the federal government would continue to prosecute pot crimes under federal statutes in their states.

Both Colorado and Washington have been working to set up regulatory systems in order to license and tax marijuana growers and retail sellers, but have been wary of whether federal prosecutors would come after them for doing so. They are the first states to legalize pot, and therefore to go through the process of trying to set up a regulatory system.

Consumption and sale of marijuana is still illegal in all other states, though some cities and towns have passed local laws decriminalizing it or making it a low priority for law enforcement officers. There are also movements in many states to legalize pot, including legalization bills introduced in Maine and Rhode Island, discussion of possible bills in states including Massachusetts and Vermont, and talk of ballot initiatives in California and Oregon.

But on Thursday, the Department of Justice announced that it would not prosecute marijuana crimes that were legal under state law, a move that could signal the end of the country's longtime prohibition on pot is nearing. "It certainly appears to be potentially the beginning of the end," said Paul Armantano, deputy director of the pot lobby group NORML.

The memo sent to states Thursday by the DOJ said that as long as states set up comprehensive regulations governing marijuana, there would be no need for the federal government to step in, a decision that will save the Justice Department from having to use its limited resources on prosecuting individuals for growing or smoking marijuana.

"This memo appears to be sending the message to states regarding marijuana prohibition that is a recognition that a majority of the public and in some states majority of lawmakers no longer want to continue down the road of illegal cannabis, and would rather experiment with different regulatory schemes of license and retail sale of cannabis," Armantano said.

Richard Collins, a law professor at the University of Colorado Boulder, said that the memo from the DOJ points out specifically that the federal government will only walk away from marijuana crimes in states where there is a solid regulatory system for the drug's growth and disemenation.

For other states to mimic the systems in Colorado and Washington, they will first have to get legalization laws on their ballots or in their state houses, which could post a challenge, he said.

While Colorado and Washington have not yet set up their regulatory systems, both states will likely sell licenses to farmers who want to grow marijuana as well as to manufacturing plants and retail sellers. The marijuana will also likely be taxed at each stage of its growth, processing, and sale.

"In both Colorado and Washington, legalization was done by citizens with no participation by elected representatives until they had to pass laws to comply with the initiative. In other initiative states I would expect such measures - I would expect a new one in California, for instance - and roughly half the states permit this and the rest don't.

"In the states that do have initiatives I expect efforts to get it on the ballot. The other half it will be much tougher. It's hard to get elected representatives to do this," Collins said.

Armantano is more optimistic about the spread of legalized pot. He compared the DOJ's announcement to the federal government's actions toward the end of alcohol prohibition in America a century ago, when states decided to stop following the federal ban on alcohol sales and the federal government said it would not step in and prosecute crimes.

"For first time we now have clear message from fed government saying they will not stand in way of states that wish to implement alternative regulatory schemes in lieu of federal prohibition," Armantano said.

He predicted that within the next one to three years, five or six other states may join Colorado and Washington in legalizing the drug, setting the stage for the rest of the country to follow.

Jim Pasco, executive director of the Fraternal Order of Police, the nation's largest police union, was disappointed with the Justice Department's decision, but said that he had already reached out to set up meetings to talk with leadership in the department and he was "open to discussion" about the benefits.

"I would tell you that certainly the overwhelming majority of law enforcement officers oppose legalization," he said, "but that is not to say that we're not willing to have a conversation about it. It is, from our perspective, a gateway drug and opinions to the contrary don't have the weight of fact behind them."

"We want to talk to (the DOJ) about their thought process and ours and where the disconnect is," he said. "From our perspective the only fault with the status quo is that we aren't making a bigger dent and we'd like to make a bigger one."


Source (http://news.yahoo.com/marijuana-ruling-could-signal-end-prohibition-pot-151612677--abc-news-topstories.html)

conk
3rd September 2013, 18:32
The federal gov't logic is likely that a bunch of stoners sitting on the couch watching cartoons will not be much resistance. "Dave? Dave's not here man, they took him away in an armoured vehicle".

TargeT
3rd September 2013, 19:28
early adopters will gain the most from this, economically, as always.

Spike
3rd September 2013, 20:30
What a beautiful outlook for the future :grouphug:



It's legal to light up in Colorado and Washington, and soon smoking pot could be legalized across the country following a decision Thursday by the federal government.

After Washington state and Colorado passed laws in November 2012 legalizing the consumption and sale of marijuana for adults over 18, lawmakers in both states waited to see whether the federal government would continue to prosecute pot crimes under federal statutes in their states.

Both Colorado and Washington have been working to set up regulatory systems in order to license and tax marijuana growers and retail sellers, but have been wary of whether federal prosecutors would come after them for doing so. They are the first states to legalize pot, and therefore to go through the process of trying to set up a regulatory system.

Consumption and sale of marijuana is still illegal in all other states, though some cities and towns have passed local laws decriminalizing it or making it a low priority for law enforcement officers. There are also movements in many states to legalize pot, including legalization bills introduced in Maine and Rhode Island, discussion of possible bills in states including Massachusetts and Vermont, and talk of ballot initiatives in California and Oregon.

But on Thursday, the Department of Justice announced that it would not prosecute marijuana crimes that were legal under state law, a move that could signal the end of the country's longtime prohibition on pot is nearing. "It certainly appears to be potentially the beginning of the end," said Paul Armantano, deputy director of the pot lobby group NORML.

The memo sent to states Thursday by the DOJ said that as long as states set up comprehensive regulations governing marijuana, there would be no need for the federal government to step in, a decision that will save the Justice Department from having to use its limited resources on prosecuting individuals for growing or smoking marijuana.

"This memo appears to be sending the message to states regarding marijuana prohibition that is a recognition that a majority of the public and in some states majority of lawmakers no longer want to continue down the road of illegal cannabis, and would rather experiment with different regulatory schemes of license and retail sale of cannabis," Armantano said.

Richard Collins, a law professor at the University of Colorado Boulder, said that the memo from the DOJ points out specifically that the federal government will only walk away from marijuana crimes in states where there is a solid regulatory system for the drug's growth and disemenation.

For other states to mimic the systems in Colorado and Washington, they will first have to get legalization laws on their ballots or in their state houses, which could post a challenge, he said.

While Colorado and Washington have not yet set up their regulatory systems, both states will likely sell licenses to farmers who want to grow marijuana as well as to manufacturing plants and retail sellers. The marijuana will also likely be taxed at each stage of its growth, processing, and sale.

"In both Colorado and Washington, legalization was done by citizens with no participation by elected representatives until they had to pass laws to comply with the initiative. In other initiative states I would expect such measures - I would expect a new one in California, for instance - and roughly half the states permit this and the rest don't.

"In the states that do have initiatives I expect efforts to get it on the ballot. The other half it will be much tougher. It's hard to get elected representatives to do this," Collins said.

Armantano is more optimistic about the spread of legalized pot. He compared the DOJ's announcement to the federal government's actions toward the end of alcohol prohibition in America a century ago, when states decided to stop following the federal ban on alcohol sales and the federal government said it would not step in and prosecute crimes.

"For first time we now have clear message from fed government saying they will not stand in way of states that wish to implement alternative regulatory schemes in lieu of federal prohibition," Armantano said.

He predicted that within the next one to three years, five or six other states may join Colorado and Washington in legalizing the drug, setting the stage for the rest of the country to follow.

Jim Pasco, executive director of the Fraternal Order of Police, the nation's largest police union, was disappointed with the Justice Department's decision, but said that he had already reached out to set up meetings to talk with leadership in the department and he was "open to discussion" about the benefits.

"I would tell you that certainly the overwhelming majority of law enforcement officers oppose legalization," he said, "but that is not to say that we're not willing to have a conversation about it. It is, from our perspective, a gateway drug and opinions to the contrary don't have the weight of fact behind them."

"We want to talk to (the DOJ) about their thought process and ours and where the disconnect is," he said. "From our perspective the only fault with the status quo is that we aren't making a bigger dent and we'd like to make a bigger one."


Source (http://news.yahoo.com/marijuana-ruling-could-signal-end-prohibition-pot-151612677--abc-news-topstories.html)

The u.s is going for broke the debt limit will be reached by oct 15th so its either make it legal and tax it or false flage attack on banks and stock market.

If you can't make it fake it thee old saying goes.

Vitalux
5th October 2013, 03:12
October 03, 2013, 03:47pm

As of this week, the possession of up to 10 grams of marijuana is no longer a criminal offense in Switzerland. Instead, the Swiss have decriminalized the possession of small amounts of weed, replacing possible jail time and a criminal record with a maximum fine of $110. The new law went into effect Tuesday.


http://i1023.photobucket.com/albums/af356/stuarburstphotography/83569301_zpsc11cec75.jpg (http://s1023.photobucket.com/user/stuarburstphotography/media/83569301_zpsc11cec75.jpg.html)

The change in the Swiss drug law brings the country in line with other European countries that have either formally or effectively decriminalized pot possession. It also brings uniformity within Switzerland, where previously, some cantons had turned a blind eye to marijuana offenses while others came down hard on offenders.

The change will also relieve pressure on Swiss police and courts. The country has dealt with 30,000 or so marijuana charges each year, a number that should decline dramatically under the new law.

Cultivation and distribution of marijuana remain criminal offenses, as does possession of more than 10 grams. The new law also increases penalties for sale to minors.

The country of some eight million people is thought to have up to 500,000 marijuana users.

Switzerland
http://stopthedrugwar.org/chronicle/2013/oct/03/switzerland_decrim

http://www.rockyroadrx.com/images/medical_marijuana.gif