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jack
23rd June 2013, 01:07
Hi there guys,

Over the course of two years I've done a tremendous amount of research on parasite zappers and their healing effects. Considering that they are so darn expensive to buy I decided to make on myself! After much trial and error I perfected a device that put out the 30kHz square wave frequency that Dr. Hulda Clark recommended for killing parasites, virus, fungi and bacteria.

It worked beautifully. My digestive problems which I had suffered for many years suddenly dropped away and now I can eat like a horse (which i needed to being quite thin at the time). Ive had many other benefits from it and so have friends and family but I wanted to see if any of you guys have used parasite zappers and to what effect? Spill it :)

Sith73
23rd June 2013, 01:15
how much did it cost to make?

Bubu
23rd June 2013, 02:04
Good for you I\m glad. But it won't be of no use to others unless you share the plan

Lefty Dave
23rd June 2013, 02:11
Hi there guys,

Over the course of two years I've done a tremendous amount of research on parasite zappers and their healing effects. Considering that they are so darn expensive to buy I decided to make on myself! After much trial and error I perfected a device that put out the 30kHz square wave frequency that Dr. Hulda Clark recommended for killing parasites, virus, fungi and bacteria.

It worked beautifully. My digestive problems which I had suffered for many years suddenly dropped away and now I can eat like a horse (which i needed to being quite thin at the time). Ive had many other benefits from it and so have friends and family but I wanted to see if any of you guys have used parasite zappers and to what effect? Spill it :)


I'd sure like to know more about this...the effects...the device...can you expound...where did you get the idea...are there other zappers available...please post a link....thanks....blessings

sigma6
23rd June 2013, 04:41
yeah man ... spill the beans... I wanted to get one, but thought it way over priced too... I also knew a guy that built this crazy weird device, where he sat me down and put my feet on glass, and then I held this glass bulb thing, you have to be careful, if someone touches you it would be like getting a huge shock, whatever it was doing it was generating huge amounts of ozone as well, you could just smell it coming off this device. I was really hooked until he told me how much he wanted to show me how to make one... and that was the end of that!

kanishk
23rd June 2013, 05:12
I recently made a Hulda clark's zapper,

Indivisual parts cost me

.0047 uF capacitor (= 4.7 pF) (= 472 disk capacitor) :- 1/- rupees
.01 uF capacitor (= 10 pF) (= 103 disk capacitor) :- 1/- rupees
555 CMOS timer chip :- 5/- rupees
1/4 watt (= 0.25 watt) resistors boc {150 types} :- 20/ rupees
low-current red LED (1.5 volts) :- 1/- rupees
9 volt battery clips :- 3 rupees
One Toggle switch :- 5 rupees
Project board :- 60/- rupees

I made it according to circuit described in 'The Cure for all Diseases' book.

https://fbcdn-sphotos-e-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/q71/s720x720/10336_10200532079439550_1255318882_n.jpg
https://fbcdn-sphotos-c-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/q71/s720x720/1010185_10200532084039665_246868021_n.jpg

In resistors set I didn't had specific 3.9 K ohm resistor, so i joined different resistors in series to get desired resistance.

kanishk
23rd June 2013, 05:20
I recently found this website, were this things are discussed
evolution of usage of electricity
many types of Clark zappers and other zappers,
conversion of Hulda Clark frequencies into scalar frequencies,
and further exploration is encouraged.

kanishk
23rd June 2013, 05:32
Here you can download Electronic Assistant software. This is an converter, calculator and will also tell you about color codes on resistors, and digit codes on disk capacitor.
http://www.electronics2000.co.uk/assist/assist.exe


Here on this website sound card is used as an oscilloscope, so if you want to check the frequency of you device you can connect its two terminals into computer via jack were microphone is plugged. Also your zapper can harm the sound card of you computer, for that you have to add some resistors to the terminals to decrease the voltage, so that it will not harm the computers sound card. Electronics assistant can help to decide which resistors can be used.

http://www.zeitnitz.de/Christian/scope_en

http://www.ledametrix.com/oscope/oscope02.gif

XxLKfAZrhbM

HNM4jDLFWgk

kanishk
23rd June 2013, 05:37
After much trial and error I perfected a device that put out the 30kHz square wave frequency

How you have perfected the device, because I read somewhere that Hulda Clark explained in her books does not produce perfect square wave frequency and it bends on its corners and somewhat elongates.

Bubu
23rd June 2013, 06:50
Hi kanishk,

can you post the circuit diagram?

Mu2143
23rd June 2013, 08:18
........................

kanishk
23rd June 2013, 08:24
http://zappers.narod.ru/originalzapper.gif

From, 'The Cure for All Diseases' educate-yourself.org/hc/cure.pdf

This is the circuit I use to make the zapper that I shown above. The connections between Pin 2 and pin 6 are hidden, those I connected below IC with a small piece of staple pin.

If make this using cardboard, it will look like this

Front
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/sGH0nYc6uxQG6eBxwL3qj_Q6-HX7-SE6KVe0e01ohA=w587-h397-no

Back
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-Y7FlSuy5zVg/UcaywFHyKwI/AAAAAAAAAAo/rWmy8EFq52o/w593-h436-no/Back.PNG

Even without placement of components on cardboard shown in above diagram, just following the steps below, one can assemble the zapper just by using small clips and connectors

Assembling The Zapper
1. You will be using the lid of the shoe box to mount the components. Save the box to enclose the finished project.
2. Pierce two holes near the ends of the lid. Enlarge the holes with a pen or pencil until the bolts would fit through. Mount the bolts on the outside about half way through the holes so there is a washer and nut holding it in place on both sides. Tighten. Label one hole “grounding bolt” on the inside and outside.
3. Mount the 555 chip in the wire wrap socket. Find the “top end” of the chip by searching the outside surface carefully for a cookie shaped bite or hole taken out of it. Align the chip with the socket
and very gently squeeze the pins of the chip into the socket until they click in place.
4. Make 8 pinholes to fit the wire wrap socket. Enlarge them slightly with a sharp pencil. Mount it on the outside. Write in the numbers of the pins (connections) on both the outside and inside, starting with number one to the left of the “cookie bite” as seen from outside. After number 4, cross over to number 5 and continue. Number 8 will be across from number 1.
5. Pierce two holes ½ inch apart very near to pins 5, 6, 7, and 8. They should be less than 1/8 inch away. (Or, one end of each component can share a hole with the 555 chip.) Mount the .01 uF capacitor near pin 5 on the outside. On the inside connect pin 5 to one end of this capacitor by simply twisting them together. Loop the capacitor wire around the pin first; then twist with the long-nose pliers until you have made a tight connection. Bend the other wire from the capacitor flat against the inside of the shoe box lid. Label it .01 on the outside and inside. Mount the .0047 uF capacitor near pin 6. On the inside twist the capacitor wire around the pin. Flatten the wire from the other end and label it .0047. Mount the 3.9 KW resistor near pin 7, connecting it on the inside to the pin. Flatten the wire on the other end and label it 3.9. Mount the 1 KW resistor and connect it similarly to pin 8 and label it 1K.
6. Pierce two holes ½ inch apart next to pin 3 (again, you can share the hole for pin 3 if you wish), in the direction of the bolt. Mount the other 1 KW resistor and label inside and outside. Twist the connections together and flatten the remaining wire. This resistor protects the circuit if you should accidentally short the terminals. Mount the 3.9KW resistor downward. One end can go in the same hole as the 1K resistor near pin 3. Twist that end around pin 3 which already has the 1K resistor attached to it. Flatten the far end. Label.
7. Next to the 3.9KW resistor pierce two holes ¼ inch apart for the LED. No tice that the LED has a positive and negative connection. The longer wire is the anode (positive). Mount the LED on the outside and bend back the wires, labeling them + and - on the inside.
8. Near the top pierce a hole for
the toggle switch. Enlarge it until the shaft fits through from the inside. Remove nut and washer from switch before mounting. You may need to trim away some paper with a serrated knife before replacing washer and nut on the outside. Tighten.
9. Next to the switch pierce two holes for the wires from the battery holder and poke them through. Attach the battery and tape it to the outside.

NOW TO CONNECT EVERYTHING

First, make holes at the corners of the lid with a pencil. Slit
each corner to the hole. They will accommodate extra loops of
wire that you get from using the clip leads to make connections.
After each connection gently tuck away the excess wire.
1. Twist the free ends of the two capacitors (.01 and .0047) together. Connect this to the grounding bolt using an alligator clip.
2. Bend the top ends of pin 2 and pin 6 (which already has a connection) inward towards each other in an L shape. Catch them both with an alligator clip and attach the other end of the alligator clip to the free end of the 3.9KW resistor by pin 7.
3. Using an alligator clip connect pin 7 to the free end of the 1KW resistor attached to pin 8.
4. Using two microclips connect pin 8 to one end of the switch, and pin 4 to the same end of the switch. (Put one hook inside the hole and the other hook around the whole connection. Check to make sure they are securely connected.)
5. Use an alligator clip to connect the free end of the other 1KW resistor (by pin 3) to the bolt.
6. Twist the free end of the 3.9KW resistor around the plus end of the
LED. Connect the minus end
of the LED to the grounding bolt using an alligator clip.
7. Connect pin number 1 on the chip to the grounding bolt with an alligator clip.
8. Attach an alligator clip to the outside of one of the bolts. Attach the other end to a handhold (copper pipe). Do the same for the other bolt and handhold.
9. Connect the minus end of the battery (black wire) to the grounding bolt with an alligator clip.
10. Connect the plus end of the battery (red wire) to the free end of the switch using a microclip lead. If the LED lights up you know the switch is ON. If it does not, flip the switch and see if the LED lights. Label the switch clearly. If you cannot get the LED to light in either switch position, you must double-check all of your connections, and make sure you have a fresh battery.
11. Finally replace the lid on the box, loosely, and slip a couple of rubber bands around the box to keep it securely shut.
• Optional: measure the frequency of your zapper by connecting an oscilloscope or frequency counter to the handholds. Any electronics shop can do this. It should read between 20 and 40 kHz.
• Optional: measure the voltage output by connecting it to an oscilloscope. It should be about 8 to 9 volts. Note: a voltage meter will only read 4 to 5 volts.
• Optional: measure the current that flows through you when you are getting zapped. You will need a 1 KW resistor and oscilloscope. Connect the grounding bolt on the zapper to one end of the resistor. Connect the other end of the resistor to a handhold. (Adding this resistor to the circuit decreases the current slightly, but not significantly.)

778 neighbour of some guy
23rd June 2013, 11:41
This is the perfect zapper, at least that's how its advertised, don't own one myself, but want to asap.

zap.intergate.ca/

There are many many more zappers on the market,

the Bob Beck Zapper, Hulda Clark, T rex zapper ( Don Croft), these are just some examples, not all of them are good to my understanding, its not only the frequency that makes these things effective but also the blockwave, the wave is what has to be finely tuned they say.

Earth Angel
23rd June 2013, 15:04
Ive owned one of the Hulda Clark zappers for about three years now but have to admit I often forget to use it.....I know tonight is a perfect time to zap as they recommend doing it during a full moon.......since I don't use it often enough I haven't got a lot to report.... I did get mine after a particularly bad gallbladder attack that lasted a full month.....doing research on remedies that didn't include surgery lead me to the zapper.....i did zap quite regularly when i got it and its now 3 years and I have not had any more trouble with my gallbladder......I also did the lemon and olive oil flush .....my husband also had a very painful big toe for about 10 years (from a jump where he probably broke it but never had it seen to)......since zapping he also has no more pain in that toe.

sigma6
25th June 2013, 12:59
Here you can download Electronic Assistant software. This is an converter, calculator and will also tell you about color codes on resistors, and digit codes on disk capacitor.
http://www.electronics2000.co.uk/assist/assist.exe


Here on this website sound card is used as an oscilloscope, so if you want to check the frequency of you device you can connect its two terminals into computer via jack were microphone is plugged. Also your zapper can harm the sound card of you computer, for that you have to add some resistors to the terminals to decrease the voltage, so that it will not harm the computers sound card. Electronics assistant can help to decide which resistors can be used.

http://www.zeitnitz.de/Christian/scope_en

Thanks Kanishk for sharing your electronic wizardry... I think you are brilliant... 96 rupees comes in around $16 US?...

Here's a scenario for you:
Clean up the design, so it looks "prettier", include the actual building designs as an educational tool, double the cost to retail it at $32, add delivery cost.... You could make a web page and figure out delivery (although eBay I think has this function built in now) and start selling these... make some money the old fashion way, finding something of great intrinsic value, that people want and are looking for (Hulda Clarke et al, have done most of the advertising for you) and "deliver" on it. Your "advantage" will be your price and the the "educational" aspect. If your price is right, it could tap into a whole existing demographic that more expensive models are overlooking.

Besides selling the actual product "like" a Hulda Clarke Zapper, and the building designs as an educational aspect, this also leads into an "opportunity" to tease the customer with the possibility of learning how to do it themselves, (with a working model!) So they in turn could make them and sell them too...

Selling something that is a fantastic value, at say $32 is just the start, but selling someone an opportunity to make hundreds of dollars more from their home is where the money is at... and will motivate 20x more buying behaviour (greater perceived value) And the beauty is you would be doing what you are selling... with a clean simple website, an eBay link... has all the potential to be a money maker. I'll be your first customer... ;)

Down the road you might follow up with the option to provide pre-made packages of all the parts required... Here you are selling the convenience, as many are intimidated as to finding all the correct components, etc...

kanishk
25th June 2013, 14:26
Here you can download Electronic Assistant software. This is an converter, calculator and will also tell you about color codes on resistors, and digit codes on disk capacitor.
http://www.electronics2000.co.uk/assist/assist.exe


Here on this website sound card is used as an oscilloscope, so if you want to check the frequency of you device you can connect its two terminals into computer via jack were microphone is plugged. Also your zapper can harm the sound card of you computer, for that you have to add some resistors to the terminals to decrease the voltage, so that it will not harm the computers sound card. Electronics assistant can help to decide which resistors can be used.

http://www.zeitnitz.de/Christian/scope_en

Thanks Kanishk for sharing your electronic wizardry... I think you are brilliant... 96 rupees comes in around $16 US?...

Here's a scenario for you:
Clean up the design, so it looks "prettier", include the actual building designs as an educational tool, double the cost to retail it at $32, add delivery cost.... You could make a web page and figure out delivery (although eBay I think has this function built in now) and start selling these... make some money the old fashion way, finding something of great intrinsic value, that people want and are looking for (Hulda Clarke et al, have done most of the advertising for you) and "deliver" on it. Your "advantage" will be your price and the the "educational" aspect. If your price is right, it could tap into a whole existing demographic that more expensive models are overlooking.

Besides selling the actual product "like" a Hulda Clarke Zapper, and the building designs as an educational aspect, this also leads into an "opportunity" to tease the customer with the possibility of learning how to do it themselves, (with a working model!) So they in turn could make them and sell them too...

Selling something that is a fantastic value, at say $32 is just the start, but selling someone an opportunity to make hundreds of dollars more from their home is where the money is at... and will motivate 20x more buying behaviour (greater perceived value) And the beauty is you would be doing what you are selling... with a clean simple website, an eBay link... has all the potential to be a money maker. I'll be your first customer... ;)

Down the road you might follow up with the option to provide pre-made packages of all the parts required... Here you are selling the convenience, as many are intimidated as to finding all the correct components, etc...

Thankyou sigma6, that you are encouraging me to make these devices and sell.
I didn't study anything about electronics, and don't know how electronics people see electric diagrams. My stream is completely different now.

But I wanted to replicate some free energy devices. Want to Make some HHO cells and use it in car to run them for free. And I often imagine to use this for earning money and also for covertly spreading awareness about it.

Well don't know when, I will be doing all these things. And it would be great if I will in future be having a web page were I will sell Hulda Clark zappers.

96 rupees are equal to around 1.8 dollars. But if we consider purchasing power parity it would cost around 18 dollars to buy these parts in USA. If I have used PCB board (cost 5 rupess) instead project board that is used by students, it would cost me around 40 rupees. Then you need to have soldering iron (30 rupees) and nickel wire(5 rupees).

And in India it is very difficult for a person to ask for electronics components in shops. They have their own terminologies for these parts,
Like to .0047 uF disk capacitors they call it 4.7 pF only, but if you say capacitor after that they will not understand. If you say disk capacitor they will give some other type of capacitor with some very different value. If you say give me 472 code capacitor you will get something else. I have experienced this for diodes, transistors, wires, bulbs etc.. One day I went to a shop and asked '9 volts battery' for this zapper and he gave me a medical tablet spelled similar to it.

BODHIKALA
23rd June 2014, 11:53
Dear Kanishk,

Hi, I am Kalavathi from India. Have been doing a lot of research on Hulda Clark zappers and was happy to note that you have been doing a lot of work on this area. I am looking for a Hulda Clark type zapper. Do you think you can help me. Regards