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View Full Version : Attempted setup of Stewart Rhodes and Dan Johnson, with child porn



Dennis Leahy
25th July 2013, 05:30
(from the YouTube video description):

Stewart Rhodes is from Oathkeepers; Dan Johnson is from PANDAA (anti-NDAA)


"Streamed live on Jul 24, 2013 Someone just attempted to set-up Stewart Rhodes (founder of Oath Keepers) & Dan Johnson (founder of People Against the N.D.A.A) by sending child porn to Dan Johnson's email from a tormail.org anonymous email account, pretending to be Stewart. Clearly, they knew Dan and Stewart work together on anti-NDAA nullification legislation, so they tried to trick Dan into opening the files containing child porn by impersonating Stewart Rhodes. Fortunately, Dan realized it was a tormail email and not actually from Stewart, so he did not open the attached pdfs. PANDA'S internet security expert was able to determine that the files contained child porn without opening them. This attempt to set Dan Johnson up failed.

This attempt is very similar to the July 3 attempt to set up activist Luke Rudkowski, where someone claiming to be a whistle-blower emailed Luke saying he had some incriminating pictures of Bilderberg elites, which Luke was able to see with his "view" function and determine were actually child porn without opening them. Once Luke did a video exposing the attempt, he was contacted by the hackers who bragged that they were going to do the same thing to other alternative media activist leaders. This is something you all need to be aware of, and protect yourselves against. You can expect more of these malicious smear campaign attacks to happen going forward.

The video where Luke Rudkowski talks about how they tried to set him up: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zislz... (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zislzpkpvZc)

This just shows how desperate the powers that be are getting."
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XYVvuDRstDw

{edit, to add}
They go a bit into the email that Luke Rudkowski received, and take note of this:
"We plan to not just set you up with child porn but every alternative media founder and master on the planet."


Dennis

TargeT
25th July 2013, 15:46
I would hardly consider this "hacking" the simplistic nature of it makes me think it's probably a product of the "Left vr Right" dichotomy. It would be much more effective to access the computer, copy the files over then turn the person in.

Paul
26th July 2013, 02:36
Someone just attempted to set-up Stewart Rhodes (founder of Oath Keepers) & Dan Johnson (founder of People Against the N.D.A.A) by sending child porn to Dan Johnson's email from a tormail.org anonymous email account, pretending to be Stewart.


...


...

I deleted an irreverent post and a sensible reply thereto :).

Something I don't get about this ... how does this endanger Rhodes or Johnson? Could they not just delete the offending file and carry on, whether or not they viewed it? Granted, deleting all evidence of a file from one's system might take a bit of technical skill, but given that, what's the problem?

Bill Ryan
26th July 2013, 04:05
Something I don't get about this ... how does this endanger Rhodes or Johnson? Could they not just delete the offending file and carry on, whether or not they viewed it? Granted, deleting all evidence of a file from one's system might take a bit of technical skill, but given that, what's the problem?

Luke Rudkowski explained this quite well a few weeks ago:

http://infowars.com/attempted-setup-of-luke-rudkowski





Luke has had his computer searched by forensics when going into Canada to cover the G20 when they searched him and interrogated him for hours, something like this could happen again when we come back to the U.S. from travelling Europe.

Had this been the case, even with deleting, they would still find the images. There would be no understanding of the true story and he would be facing a felony charge. Besides that also completely jeopardizing his work, reputation and livelihood.

northstar
26th July 2013, 04:20
Regarding deleting of files, it is true that simply emptying your "recycling bin" in Windows does not actually delete the files, you can use any number of file cleaning utilities to wipe the files permanently after they are emptied from the recycling bin.

This is great information for everyone and it is easy to do.
Download CCCleaner - it is free! http://www.piriform.com/ccleaner
And use the software to permanently clean all the unused space on all your drives. I have used it myself. It is easy and it works great!

If you ever loan or sell a used computer to anyone you should definitely clean all the drive space before getting rid of it.

turiya
26th July 2013, 04:47
Could they not just delete the offending file and carry on, whether or not they viewed it? Granted, deleting all evidence of a file from one's system might take a bit of technical skill, but given that, what's the problem?

I do believe that the Cyber Cops can move pretty quickly when they want to… I remember sitting in a Public library one time and the police came in and arrested the guy sitting next to me. Certainly he may have been arrested in attempts at soliciting a policeman or woman pretending to be an under-aged teen. Its still entrapment in my book.

Especially for the courts & municipalities, arresting little people for insignificant sh*t is a money making proposition, pun intended.

http://curezone.com/upload/_T_Forums/Turiya_Files_/WRH_July_25_2013_CHILD_PORN.png (www.youtube.com/watch?v=WHVXaJIT-2A#t=1h11m54s)

All these were reported today:

- NY substitute teacher arrested on child porn charges (http://www.sfgate.com/news/crime/article/NY-substitute-teach-arrested-on-child-porn-charges-4687936.php)

- arrested for alleged possession of child porn (http://longisland.news12.com/news/francesco-santodonato-of-west-babylon-arrested-for-alleged-possession-of-child-porn-1.5771612)

- police charge Woodbridge man with possession of child pornography (http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/pr-william-police-arrest-woodbridge-man-on-possession-of-child-porn/2013/07/25/1b5470d4-f558-11e2-9434-60440856fadf_story.html
)

- Highlands Ranch man convicted of possessing child pornography (http://www.denverpost.com/breakingnews/ci_23732987/highlands-ranch-man-convicted-possessing-child-pornography)

- Ex-H.S. teacher arrested on child porn charges (http://www.wftv.com/news/news/local/ex-hs-math-teacher-arrested-child-porn-charges-3rd/nY2q9/)

- 5 Pittsburgh men arrested on child pornography charges (http://www.wpxi.com/news/news/local/ag-5-pittsburgh-men-arrested-child-pornography-cha/nY265/)

- Palm Bay man arrested for possession of child pornography (http://www.floridatoday.com/article/20130725/CRIME/130725016/Palm-Bay-man-arrested-possession-child-pornography)

- Regina man found guilty of child porn possession (http://www.leaderpost.com/news/Regina+found+guilty+child+porn+possession+accused+ breaching/8705291/story.html)

- Rincon couple busted for child porn (http://www.thecoastalsource.com/2013/07/25/rincon-couple-busted-for-child-porn/)

and... MORE (https://www.google.com/#tbm=nws&sclient=psy-ab&q=possession+child+pornography+sting+2013+u.s.&oq=possession+child+pornography+sting+2013+u.s.&gs_l=serp.3...85282.91121.9.93472.8.8.0.0.0.0.111. 796.5j3.8.0....0...1c.1.22.psy-ab..104.0.0.boeRltCeu7o&pbx=1&bav=on.2,or.r_qf.&fp=90713cee444bd5dc&biw=939&bih=559)

turiya :cool:

Bill Ryan
26th July 2013, 04:53
--------

Even overwriting deleted files once won't make your disk secure from sophisticated forensic analysis. The Apple Mac Disk Utility application states:




Writing data over the data 7 times meets the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) 5220-22-M standard for securely erasing magnetic media.
(On Macs there's also an option for a super-secure erase that overwrites the data 35 times -- which takes quite a while, but which renders data truly irrecoverable. The other choices are once and 7 times.)

johnf
26th July 2013, 05:35
I have an app that uses the dod 5220-22-m. This is on win7, are there records left elsewhere in windows like the registry, or other folders?

JF

Paul
26th July 2013, 08:37
--------

Even overwriting deleted files once won't make your disk secure from sophisticated forensic analysis. The Apple Mac Disk Utility application states:




Writing data over the data 7 times meets the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) 5220-22-M standard for securely erasing magnetic media.
(On Macs there's also an option for a super-secure erase that overwrites the data 35 times -- which takes quite a while, but which renders data truly irrecoverable. The other choices are once and 7 times.)

The main problem most of us will have isn't overwriting the files enough times. It takes very sophisticated analysis to retrieve the bits from an area that is overwritten even once, and the bigger our disks get, the fewer overwrites are needed to achieve a given level of hiding. These overwrite standards were developed when disks held less data, meaning each bit took up more space, making it easier to recover the "ghost images" of whatever previous bits were written in a specific location. Today's disk bits are thousands, even millions, of times smaller than those on early rotating magnetic disks, making it much more difficult to recover the "ghost images" of previous bits.

Rather the main problem most of us will have is trying to find all the places that something got written to the disk.

I usually read my email right in my browser. I use fastmail.fm.

Just now I read an ordinary email from a computer company (WinZip). It had a few pleasant looking bits of graphic images to make the email look inviting to the reader. Just viewing that email in my browser placed 14 image files in my web browser cache, as 14 separate files on my disk. These files will soon enough be deleted, magically by my browser. If I were on Windows, I'm confident that these deleted files would -not- end up in my Trash (Recycle Bin); rather they'd just disappear from any accessible path in the user file system. But even then, they'd still be on the disk, until something happen to overwrite them and reuse those blocks of disk space. Several of these images were just a single disk block in size, so just scanning the raw disk, without any effort to reassemble the scattered blocks into larger files, would still find these, as single isolated blocks that were formatted as image files. If any of these images that I briefly displayed in my web browser had been child porn, then even though I never downloaded some pdf file and opened it, my disk would still be unsafe for border crossing or inspection by a government official determined to pin some crime on me.

My main points:

You don't need to download and open some pdf file to cause a problem.
Just seeing the preview image in one's web based email reader places that image on your disk.
Overwriting many times is not the main problem.
Rather overwriting the right places is the main problem.

If I were a high profile target who wanted to take any disk or flash memory across a border guarded by "hostile" (to my freedom) officials, I might consider one of the following strategies:

Delete all my cache and tmp files, empty my trash bin and use a utility to overwrite all my free disk space.
Delete all my cache and tmp files, empty my trash bin, erase a second spare disk completely, and copy all files to the second disk.
Put the data files I wanted in a compressed and encrypted archive, make an entirely fresh install on a second erased disk, and put the archive there.
Don't even have my important data on the system. Put a fresh install over an erased disk on my system, and bring my important data in an archive on another disk, physically disconnected, that had also been physically erased before usage.

Then hope the border officials are honest and don't plant some file on my disk :).

P.S. -- Since each single overwrite of a huge (multi-terabyte) disk might take a day (or a half day or two days) depending on your system's performance, I'd probably only overwrite 1 to 3 times. Be sure you have good, off-line (another disk, physically disconnected), backups when doing this. It is quite easy to overwrite the wrong thing. I've done it myself, recently <grin>. Some of these tools are complicated and not user friendly, and they are not tools that one uses very often.

P.P.S -- Verifying that you have successfully scrubbed any no longer wanted images from your disk is a bit trickier. The way that I would do it would be to identify the physical starting block location of each -wanted- image (tiff, png, jpg, gif, ...) on my disk, then scan the raw disk for blocks formatted as the headers of the same such image files, and verify that no raw disk block contained the start of an image file that I didn't have on my known wanted list. But this requires a level of expertise that few users have.

Bill Ryan
26th July 2013, 12:51
-------

Thanking Paul for his useful post above. Yes, this is exactly how it works.

I also use a free app called EasyFind which can search for invisible files (there are MANY of those on your computer, in some places you probably never knew existed). And I use PrivacyScan from SecureMac, which can be set to clean browsers (with deleted files overwritten many times over if you wish) -- in places which you may also never have known were there.

This is a totally different subject, but I often use the Tor Browser (based on Firefox), which creates a false (relayed) IP address for you. So you can be in the US, but it makes all your e-mails and Google search records look as if you're in Germany, or Japan, or Russia, or Australia.

Carmody
26th July 2013, 16:08
I have given up disc based hard drives for SSD storage.

This creates a different situation.

TargeT
26th July 2013, 16:22
I have given up disc based hard drives for SSD storage.

This creates a different situation.

having your computer completely booted in 7 seconds or so is worth it too ;)

there's some pretty damn amazing hardware out there these days, don't forget about moorse law,

http://www.hindawi.com/journals/acisc/2013/426962.fig.0015.jpg



if you are 2-3 years behind the technology edge you'll be shocked at what you can get now.

http://www.davidpaulkirkpatrick.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Encroaching-Metaverse.png

(On a side note, how many of the companies in the above graphic are NOT in bed with the government......)

Maia Gabrial
26th July 2013, 18:11
I think these guys wanted to make people aware that this is the new attack on Activists, to give everyone a heads up. I'm sure they took the necessary steps to protect themselves, but how about the ones who unwittingly step into the trap?

Carmody
26th July 2013, 18:12
I'm gonna go hide in the ditch with Ted.

Paul
27th July 2013, 10:35
If I were a high profile target who wanted to take any disk or flash memory across a border guarded by "hostile" (to my freedom) officials, I might consider one of the following strategies


Thanking Paul for his useful post above.

You're most welcome.

One more thing I'd do if I were a high profile target crossing a border.

I'd assume that my system, perhaps even down to the boot ROM firmware, was corrupted after I passed the border.

Cleaning the disk is conceptually easy, though a several day pain in the butt -- totally erase it, reformat, and reinstall from O.S. images that have checksums that match previously determined reliable checksums, then verify that the checksums of any encrypted archives of your own valued data are still valid.

I've forgotten the details of how to deal with a suspect boot ROM, and suspect that on some more recent systems, this might be difficult. My causal impression is that Microsoft and Apple prefer to make it difficult for users to hack their boot ROM. I'm confident that on my hand built PC's I could still do this, with a brief amount of research to remember the details and the specifics of my current mainboards.

... on the other hand ... Operating Systems from Apple and Microsoft can be presumed to be corrupted from the start, at least in some broad manner <grin>, so perhaps my post doesn't matter much for such users.

Paul
27th July 2013, 10:41
I have given up disc based hard drives for SSD storage.

This creates a different situation.

Heh - not an option for those of us managing many terabytes of storage off of a Social Security income :).

The best we can do is a mixed SSD and hard drive setup.

But, yes, secure erasure of SSD's has its own technical details. SSD firmware plays even more sophisticated tricks than modern hard drive firmware plays, moving data around and hiding spare blocks even from the low level operating system.

EYES WIDE OPEN
27th July 2013, 15:09
I use the free VPN http://www.spotflux.com/ along with TOR.
What is the best way to secure emails?

Paul
27th July 2013, 22:11
All these were reported today
These people were essentially sitting in their living rooms, not crossing borders.

Does anyone have any knowledge how they were caught? If the search, seizure and arrest was done by a proper court order, what sort of evidence was presented to the judge, or if not, how we can expose this even more outrageous violation of our freedom?

Dennis Leahy
27th July 2013, 23:47
All these were reported today
These people were essentially sitting in their living rooms, not crossing borders.

Does anyone have any knowledge how they were caught? If the search, seizure and arrest was done by a proper court order, what sort of evidence was presented to the judge, or if not, how we can expose this even more outrageous violation of our freedom?
As TargeT mentioned, the "pro" spooks could probably put anything into a computer - from child porn to nuclear bomb diagrams to state secrets (such as where the integrity of the US government went.)

We have all heard of cops planting evidence - imagine if they confiscate a computer from your home... if they want to create any scenario on the computer, what would stop them? We know they have no integrity, or if one cop does, his supervisor won't. I think the US police state has devolved to the point where the "authorities" can set you up for any crime they want - and probably convince the vast majority of the public that they caught an alQaeda mastermind, or child porn director.

So yes, these guys who had hidden files sent to them were set up, but probably not by the NSA or CIA or FBI.

Dennis

Paul
28th July 2013, 00:18
As TargeT mentioned, the "pro" spooks could probably put anything into a computer - from child porn to nuclear bomb diagrams to state secrets (such as where the integrity of the US government went.)
Yes, the child porn "found" on the computers of the ordinary people reported in turiya's post (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?p=707282#post707282) could have been planted in order to take them down for other nefarious reasons.

If these were in anyway people whom the bastards in power might be out to specifically target, that wouldn't surprise me.

However I got the sense that these were just random ordinary people who did something that led to some law enforcement agency suspecting them in particular of child porn.

Where I was doubting the law was in their respect for the constitutional rights and freedoms of these people, while looking for people to go after for child porn.

GoodETxSG
28th July 2013, 12:11
My drive array with data is set to spark and slag which is setup in some masonry in a disk array... but still dangerous. Best way, do them one at a time outside with respirator gear on. Be safe not like me...

Lfcr3khZE38



--------

Even overwriting deleted files once won't make your disk secure from sophisticated forensic analysis. The Apple Mac Disk Utility application states:




Writing data over the data 7 times meets the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) 5220-22-M standard for securely erasing magnetic media.
(On Macs there's also an option for a super-secure erase that overwrites the data 35 times -- which takes quite a while, but which renders data truly irrecoverable. The other choices are once and 7 times.)

The main problem most of us will have isn't overwriting the files enough times. It takes very sophisticated analysis to retrieve the bits from an area that is overwritten even once, and the bigger our disks get, the fewer overwrites are needed to achieve a given level of hiding. These overwrite standards were developed when disks held less data, meaning each bit took up more space, making it easier to recover the "ghost images" of whatever previous bits were written in a specific location. Today's disk bits are thousands, even millions, of times smaller than those on early rotating magnetic disks, making it much more difficult to recover the "ghost images" of previous bits.

Rather the main problem most of us will have is trying to find all the places that something got written to the disk.

I usually read my email right in my browser. I use fastmail.fm.

Just now I read an ordinary email from a computer company (WinZip). It had a few pleasant looking bits of graphic images to make the email look inviting to the reader. Just viewing that email in my browser placed 14 image files in my web browser cache, as 14 separate files on my disk. These files will soon enough be deleted, magically by my browser. If I were on Windows, I'm confident that these deleted files would -not- end up in my Trash (Recycle Bin); rather they'd just disappear from any accessible path in the user file system. But even then, they'd still be on the disk, until something happen to overwrite them and reuse those blocks of disk space. Several of these images were just a single disk block in size, so just scanning the raw disk, without any effort to reassemble the scattered blocks into larger files, would still find these, as single isolated blocks that were formatted as image files. If any of these images that I briefly displayed in my web browser had been child porn, then even though I never downloaded some pdf file and opened it, my disk would still be unsafe for border crossing or inspection by a government official determined to pin some crime on me.

My main points:

You don't need to download and open some pdf file to cause a problem.
Just seeing the preview image in one's web based email reader places that image on your disk.
Overwriting many times is not the main problem.
Rather overwriting the right places is the main problem.

If I were a high profile target who wanted to take any disk or flash memory across a border guarded by "hostile" (to my freedom) officials, I might consider one of the following strategies:

Delete all my cache and tmp files, empty my trash bin and use a utility to overwrite all my free disk space.
Delete all my cache and tmp files, empty my trash bin, erase a second spare disk completely, and copy all files to the second disk.
Put the data files I wanted in a compressed and encrypted archive, make an entirely fresh install on a second erased disk, and put the archive there.
Don't even have my important data on the system. Put a fresh install over an erased disk on my system, and bring my important data in an archive on another disk, physically disconnected, that had also been physically erased before usage.

Then hope the border officials are honest and don't plant some file on my disk :).

P.S. -- Since each single overwrite of a huge (multi-terabyte) disk might take a day (or a half day or two days) depending on your system's performance, I'd probably only overwrite 1 to 3 times. Be sure you have good, off-line (another disk, physically disconnected), backups when doing this. It is quite easy to overwrite the wrong thing. I've done it myself, recently <grin>. Some of these tools are complicated and not user friendly, and they are not tools that one uses very often.

P.P.S -- Verifying that you have successfully scrubbed any no longer wanted images from your disk is a bit trickier. The way that I would do it would be to identify the physical starting block location of each -wanted- image (tiff, png, jpg, gif, ...) on my disk, then scan the raw disk for blocks formatted as the headers of the same such image files, and verify that no raw disk block contained the start of an image file that I didn't have on my known wanted list. But this requires a level of expertise that few users have.

GoodETxSG
28th July 2013, 12:28
Embedding PDF's and other like files have been used for years to smuggle data. This stopped mostly when Obama's White House Web Site Posted Birth Cert. was taken apart in layers w/the same SW used to retrieve smuggled data. So hiding porn is easy/scary...



--------

Even overwriting deleted files once won't make your disk secure from sophisticated forensic analysis. The Apple Mac Disk Utility application states:




Writing data over the data 7 times meets the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) 5220-22-M standard for securely erasing magnetic media.
(On Macs there's also an option for a super-secure erase that overwrites the data 35 times -- which takes quite a while, but which renders data truly irrecoverable. The other choices are once and 7 times.)

The main problem most of us will have isn't overwriting the files enough times. It takes very sophisticated analysis to retrieve the bits from an area that is overwritten even once, and the bigger our disks get, the fewer overwrites are needed to achieve a given level of hiding. These overwrite standards were developed when disks held less data, meaning each bit took up more space, making it easier to recover the "ghost images" of whatever previous bits were written in a specific location. Today's disk bits are thousands, even millions, of times smaller than those on early rotating magnetic disks, making it much more difficult to recover the "ghost images" of previous bits.

Rather the main problem most of us will have is trying to find all the places that something got written to the disk.

I usually read my email right in my browser. I use fastmail.fm.

Just now I read an ordinary email from a computer company (WinZip). It had a few pleasant looking bits of graphic images to make the email look inviting to the reader. Just viewing that email in my browser placed 14 image files in my web browser cache, as 14 separate files on my disk. These files will soon enough be deleted, magically by my browser. If I were on Windows, I'm confident that these deleted files would -not- end up in my Trash (Recycle Bin); rather they'd just disappear from any accessible path in the user file system. But even then, they'd still be on the disk, until something happen to overwrite them and reuse those blocks of disk space. Several of these images were just a single disk block in size, so just scanning the raw disk, without any effort to reassemble the scattered blocks into larger files, would still find these, as single isolated blocks that were formatted as image files. If any of these images that I briefly displayed in my web browser had been child porn, then even though I never downloaded some pdf file and opened it, my disk would still be unsafe for border crossing or inspection by a government official determined to pin some crime on me.

My main points:

You don't need to download and open some pdf file to cause a problem.
Just seeing the preview image in one's web based email reader places that image on your disk.
Overwriting many times is not the main problem.
Rather overwriting the right places is the main problem.

If I were a high profile target who wanted to take any disk or flash memory across a border guarded by "hostile" (to my freedom) officials, I might consider one of the following strategies:

Delete all my cache and tmp files, empty my trash bin and use a utility to overwrite all my free disk space.
Delete all my cache and tmp files, empty my trash bin, erase a second spare disk completely, and copy all files to the second disk.
Put the data files I wanted in a compressed and encrypted archive, make an entirely fresh install on a second erased disk, and put the archive there.
Don't even have my important data on the system. Put a fresh install over an erased disk on my system, and bring my important data in an archive on another disk, physically disconnected, that had also been physically erased before usage.

Then hope the border officials are honest and don't plant some file on my disk :).

P.S. -- Since each single overwrite of a huge (multi-terabyte) disk might take a day (or a half day or two days) depending on your system's performance, I'd probably only overwrite 1 to 3 times. Be sure you have good, off-line (another disk, physically disconnected), backups when doing this. It is quite easy to overwrite the wrong thing. I've done it myself, recently <grin>. Some of these tools are complicated and not user friendly, and they are not tools that one uses very often.

P.P.S -- Verifying that you have successfully scrubbed any no longer wanted images from your disk is a bit trickier. The way that I would do it would be to identify the physical starting block location of each -wanted- image (tiff, png, jpg, gif, ...) on my disk, then scan the raw disk for blocks formatted as the headers of the same such image files, and verify that no raw disk block contained the start of an image file that I didn't have on my known wanted list. But this requires a level of expertise that few users have.

Paul
28th July 2013, 18:27
Embedding PDF's and other like files have been used for years to smuggle data. This stopped mostly when Obama's White House Web Site Posted Birth Cert. was taken apart in layers w/the same SW used to retrieve smuggled data. So hiding porn is easy/scary...
So ... you're saying that I could have large globs of child porn on my disk right now, placed inside pdf's and other structured files by someone up to no good, that I didn't know I had, just waiting to be found by some "law enforcement official" wanting to entrap me?

Or ... are you saying that if I really did want to keep a child porn collection, I could do so easily enough and relatively safe from such official prying eyes, by laying the images inside pdf's and other such structured files?

Or ... both :) ?

¤=[Post Update]=¤


My drive array with data is set to spark and slag which is setup in some masonry in a disk array...
Hmm ... that data is going to be really difficult to recover :)

norman
29th July 2013, 11:48
SSD drives are indeed a whole nother story.

They could easily have the potential to keep bit records going back to new for each memory address. We would never have to know about it. The manufacturers could build them like that and not tell anyone outside the intel/law enforcement world. Stuff like this has already been done with smart phone tech'. All the consumer ever knows about is the front end and the 'lifestyle' enhancements etc.

Over printing addresses on magnetic media is a subtractive process that gradually fades the past history away. Over printing on a solid state media that has some kind of bit history dimension to it's architecture would just add more and more 'history' until the device eventually fails.

I'm not saying SSD drives really are made like this but it seems to me it would be very easy for them to be so, and the industry could even come out and market the technology as something useful to the user. Imagine being able to turn the clock back and recover data you deleted last year and then decide you need it.

I'll call it 'Bit-History' but it could already be something the industry calls something else. Solid state memory makes such a thing very plausible and I very much doubt I'm the only person to have thought of it. I'll guess it's already being done, and because of it's 'snooper' value, it's likely to be one of those things they keep quiet about for as long as they can.

Bill Ryan
12th September 2013, 02:19
-------

Hi, Folks: reporting here an unusual and unsettling incident that I experienced today.

I was searching in the history of the browser I usually use (Safari on my Mac) for some images I'd looked at a few days previously. I knew they were from tumblr.com, so I entered 'tumblr' as the search term.

I found what I was looking for, but to my surprise there were a bunch of results from last year that (as I recall) were just 'tumblr' followed by a bunch of numbers and letters, and .jpg at the end. They were all dated June 2012, but I never remembered searching for or viewing anything like that.

So I did what most anyone would have done, and clicked on one of the links to see what the image was.

I was shocked: I saw a body covered in blood. I closed it immediately, and clicked on another. This was an image of a woman being strangled with wire. I clicked on a third, and it was so horrible I'm not even sure what it was. Straight away I deleted all the rest of the links without opening them, and then did a deep search on my computer with a special program I have to make sure (as best I could) that there were no such images left anywhere on my disk.

This was NOT the same thing as the report in the opening post, where illegal images were planted. These were links TO images. And if they were not illegal, they should be.

The whole thing was weird, and left a very nasty feeling. I cannot explain how the history URLs got there. No else has used my computer, and I never searched for or ever viewed those images before. As the thread suggests, we should all be aware of this kind of thing, and always take good care that we're not somehow being set up.

norman
12th September 2013, 02:36
-------

Hi, Folks: reporting here an unusual and unsettling incident that I experienced today.

I was searching in the history of the browser I usually use (Safari on my Mac) for some images I'd looked at a few days previously. I knew they were from tumblr.com, so I entered 'tumblr' as the search term.

I found what I was looking for, but to my surprise there were a bunch of results from last year that (as I recall) were just 'tumblr' followed by a bunch of numbers and letters, and .jpg at the end. They were all dated June 2012, but I never remembered searching for anything like that.

So I did what most anyone would have done, and clicked on one of the links to see what the image was.

I was shocked: I saw a body covered in blood. I closed it immediately, and clicked on another. This was an image of a woman being strangled with wire. I clicked on a third, and it was so horrible I'm not even sure what it was. Straight away I deleted all the rest of the links without opening them, and then did a deep search on my computer with a special program I have to make sure (as best I could) that there were no such images left anywhere on my disk.

This was NOT the same thing as the report in the opening post, where illegal images were planted. These were links TO images. And if they were not illegal, they should be.

The whole thing was weird, and left a very nasty feeling. I cannot explain how the search URLs got there. No else has used my computer, and I never searched for those images. As the thread suggests, we should all be aware of this kind of thing, and always take good care that we're not somehow being set up.


Dead simple trick.

Sorry Bill.Macs are not god in his heaven.

A malware attack has set this up.

You need to go against your mac pride and investigate a malware destroyer program for macs, ( yes Macs ! ).

I can't begin to advise because I don't have one and every encounter I've ever had with one made me loose my temper. ( probably because the user I was in the company of was a not a computer savvy person who could have put me in touch with the ground level workings of a mac )

Anyway, back to the shocker, you've been hacked.

Google for a reliable none nobbled malware cleaning tool for your mac and get that bit sorted first, because whateverit did it has probably not given up on the chance it's got to stick around and do more devious stuff as time goes by and it's creator gets back in touch with it. ( most ,very, likely the NSA, considering who you are on the world stage these days )



Edit:

If you can't find an antimalware application that searches and find what it is, lurking inside your OS, you MUST, save your consumables, carefully, and wipe your system back to zeros. Then re install leopard or whatever it is, and all your stuff you live with daily. ( a good reason to keep all your sweet installers on one disc ready for such a rebirth, from time to time )


Edit 2:

Curent trends are getting way beyond me so there's a possibility that with apple being so control freakish about their whole concepts, your browser MAY be saving it's settings to a "cloud" server somewhere in cyberspace out of your control. I really don't know, and I hope someone else steps in here here to part fear from facts.

If your browser is cloud based, it may NOT be your own hardware that's been hacked.

Freed Fox
12th September 2013, 02:47
Wow, Bill... that is indeed a VERY shocking, disturbing discovery to make. I don't really know what to make of it, but as you implied it doesn't seem to have been a setup attempt (as they were not your images, or physically stored on your computer). Still, reading this account gives me a similarly nasty feeling on your behalf...

These kinds of tactics, and the materials utilized to carry them out... just utterly despicable. Not to mention how truly unsettling it is to have your privacy violated in such a direct manner.

Wishing you the very best right now, please take care.

norman
12th September 2013, 03:10
Edit 2:

Curent trends are getting way beyond me so there's a possibility that with apple being so control freakish about their whole concepts, your browser MAY be saving it's settings to a "cloud" server somewhere in cyberspace out of your control. I really don't know, and I hope someone else steps in here here to part fear from facts.

If your browser is cloud based, it may NOT be your own hardware that's been hacked

thunder24
12th September 2013, 04:23
Horus ra thread had some pics that were kinda gross and disturbing in june last year... and for sum reason i remember there being some pics not posted, but links were... mayb from that...


-------

Hi, Folks: reporting here an unusual and unsettling incident that I experienced today.

I was searching in the history of the browser I usually use (Safari on my Mac) for some images I'd looked at a few days previously. I knew they were from tumblr.com, so I entered 'tumblr' as the search term.

I found what I was looking for, but to my surprise there were a bunch of results from last year that (as I recall) were just 'tumblr' followed by a bunch of numbers and letters, and .jpg at the end. They were all dated June 2012, but I never remembered searching for or viewing anything like that.

So I did what most anyone would have done, and clicked on one of the links to see what the image was.

I was shocked: I saw a body covered in blood. I closed it immediately, and clicked on another. This was an image of a woman being strangled with wire. I clicked on a third, and it was so horrible I'm not even sure what it was. Straight away I deleted all the rest of the links without opening them, and then did a deep search on my computer with a special program I have to make sure (as best I could) that there were no such images left anywhere on my disk.

This was NOT the same thing as the report in the opening post, where illegal images were planted. These were links TO images. And if they were not illegal, they should be.

The whole thing was weird, and left a very nasty feeling. I cannot explain how the history URLs got there. No else has used my computer, and I never searched for or ever viewed those images before. As the thread suggests, we should all be aware of this kind of thing, and always take good care that we're not somehow being set up.

cursichella1
12th September 2013, 04:37
This is a totally different subject, but I often use the Tor Browser (based on Firefox), which creates a false (relayed) IP address for you. So you can be in the US, but it makes all your e-mails and Google search records look as if you're in Germany, or Japan, or Russia, or Australia.

Wouldn't this make one more likely to be targeted, since they claim to be capturing correspondence between the US and foreign countries? (That is, if one was corresponding with someone in the USA from this foreign UP address...)

Paul
12th September 2013, 06:02
Wouldn't this make one more likely to be targeted, since they claim to be capturing correspondence between the US and foreign countries? (That is, if one was corresponding with someone in the USA from this foreign UP address...)
TOR definitely hides one's true location, originating IP, and local Internet traffic better from the "little" guys, such as from common thieves, your local (censoring) Internet Service Provider, and other ordinary people up to no good.

TOR probably highlights you to the "big" guys, such as the NSA ... but the theory some people have is that the NSA will have its way with your data either way.

So, as with most security decisions, it's a tradeoff and risk assessment.

Cristian
12th September 2013, 13:02
Horus ra thread had some pics that were kinda gross and disturbing in june last year... and for sum reason i remember there being some pics not posted, but links were... mayb from that...


Frome Horus-Ra -warning DISTURBING IMAGES!!!-

http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?40941-Horus-Ra-as-the-Archontic-Alien-Parasite-A-follow-up-interview-with-Maarit&p=498914&viewfull=1#post498914

All images posted by Houman are hosted on tumblr and a lot of them were posted in June 2012.

Dennis Leahy
12th September 2013, 13:59
Yes, I entered the Horus-Ra thread, and exclaimed that I don't believe in Archons. That didn't go over too well... I think Houman wanted to prove to me, photographically, that evil was being acted out that was beyond human-to-human evil - and thus had to be non-human evil. I saw one or two disgusting pictures of torture, (which may have been real, may have been actors or Photoshopped, I don't know.) I promptly left the thread and haven't returned. (I still don't believe in Archons.)

I occasionally delete my temporary files from my hard drive, but I suppose the forensic geeks could undelete them if the physical sectors have not been overwritten yet.

Dennis

mountain_jim
12th September 2013, 17:16
I also came here to suggest that Bill's gruesome pictures came from the above mention thread links on this site.

Bill Ryan
12th September 2013, 18:25
-------

Hi again, and to those who have suggested, here and also privately, that the images may have come (somehow!) from the Horus-Ra thread:

Yes, this may be. However, I have absolutely no explanation how they came to be in my browser history. I've certainly never opened or viewed those images before.

I tried to recreate the situation, by browsing the thread on the pages where some of the disturbing images were linked as plain URLs -- and also reading through Jean-Luc's two PDF archives of the thread. Nothing appeared in my history.

I'm currently picking my way through my backup drive to see if I can find the original history links: a long process, as the search program has to examine 'invisible' file content, not just obvious filenames. If I can find the links again, I'll immediately check if they're also in the Horus-Ra thread. If so, case closed. I will report back. I very much appreciate everyone's comments and contributions.

:)

To Norman: many thanks. I have an inbuilt firewall, virus protection, and spyware filters. Everything's clean. I do know of course that this is no deterrent to the agencies, who could put a big picture of Micky Mouse (or anything else!) right in the middle of my desktop if they wanted to. But my protection is the best available at the moment, as best I know.

RUSirius
12th September 2013, 18:33
I'm so disgusted that this is happening, It puts a sick feeling in my stomach. Gives you a pretty good idea of the type of mind that would do these things, definitely dealing with sick beings here, literally as I type the sick feeling increases, just thought I'd mention that.

Paul
12th September 2013, 20:36
-------
I tried to recreate the situation, by browsing the thread on the pages where some of the disturbing images were linked as plain URLs -- and also reading through Jean-Luc's two PDF archives of the thread. Nothing appeared in my history.
Some of the images on that thread originally appeared visible and inline to anyone who loaded the pertinent page, but were subsequently turned into "click here" links, so that only those who chose to view them would.

If you loaded such a page before those images were converted to links, they would have ended up on your computer. Loading those pages now (but not clicking on the links) would no longer place those images on your computer.

Perhaps that's what happened? (And if you use brower tabs like I do, just loading a page of a thread doesn't mean you actually go around to looking at it :).)

7alon
29th July 2017, 07:28
Something I don't get about this ... how does this endanger Rhodes or Johnson? Could they not just delete the offending file and carry on, whether or not they viewed it? Granted, deleting all evidence of a file from one's system might take a bit of technical skill, but given that, what's the problem?

Luke Rudkowski explained this quite well a few weeks ago:

http://infowars.com/attempted-setup-of-luke-rudkowski





Luke has had his computer searched by forensics when going into Canada to cover the G20 when they searched him and interrogated him for hours, something like this could happen again when we come back to the U.S. from travelling Europe.

Had this been the case, even with deleting, they would still find the images. There would be no understanding of the true story and he would be facing a felony charge. Besides that also completely jeopardizing his work, reputation and livelihood.


Very good Bill, thank you! This is very very important information. :)