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View Full Version : Fake police officers rob citizens at gun point



Vitalux
4th August 2013, 02:56
I normally would not post a video such as this, but I wanted to bring some awareness and even perhaps some humor to fellow Avalonians.:yes4:

Who would ever of believed that one day cops in uniform would be arresting other cops in uniform for armed robbery of the very same citizens they were being paid to protects :playball:

"A string of robberies by people "dressed as police" led the people of Detroit to believe there were "fake cops" out robbing people at gunpoint, it turns out they were "not fake after all," MyFoxDetroit reports:

DETROIT (WJBK) - A second officer, a 17-year veteran from Saint Clair Shores, has been arrested accused of robbing unsuspecting drivers at gunpoint.

On Saturday, Fox 2 also reported a Detroit police sergeant was arrested at the 12th precinct. A tip sent to Fox 2 helped lead to the arrests. We forwarded a photo from one scene to Detroit Police. They recognized one of their own in the photo.

More information is expected Monday during a press conference scheduled for Monday at 3 p.m.

The first incident took place at a Citgo gas station near French and I-94 on Detroit's east side last Sunday. The clerk says two white men in a black Ford F-150 with police lights allegedly pistol-whipped customers pumping gas. The men stole cash and cell phones from their victims. A warning went out to be on the lookout for "fake cops" but it turns out those officers were not fake after all. It appears the sergeant in this case was driving his personal vehicle.

There were at least two reports of men posing as police officers and robbing unsuspecting drivers at gunpoint. The men had police badges, bullet proof vests and guns. They looked very official and police considered them armed and dangerous.

A second incident happened near Harper and 3 Mile Drive. A man says he was pulled over by three men in a unmarked Crown Victoria. The man was searched and while he answered questions, his wallet and CDs were stolen.

So, what can you do? Even police say you have permission not to stop if you don't believe a real police officer is trying to pull you over. Instead, call 911 and ask the dispatcher for assistance. If all else fails, drive to the nearest precinct.
I like this advice, that is if the police actually tolerate it (which I find it hard to believe they would). I wonder how much revenue they could extract if every tax-slave being pulled over drove all the way to the nearest precinct to check-in.

While these cops who robbed people at gunpoint acting in an unofficial capacity have been caught, real police who do the same in their official capacity through traffic-ticket extortion will remain at large."
- http://www.informationliberation.com/?id=44556


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=90QSlBZrERk

Tesla_WTC_Solution
4th August 2013, 04:38
Scary and disappointing... Ty for sharing

Flash
4th August 2013, 05:34
When I worked in Mexico many years ago, this was a regular occurence, police stealing people, sometimes disguised thiefs into policemen, but most of the time not. Mexico is an underdeveloped country. It just tells you where USA is going, down the drain.

NancyV
4th August 2013, 06:46
When I worked in Mexico many years ago, this was a regular occurence, police stealing people, sometimes disguised thiefs into policemen, but most of the time not. Mexico is an underdeveloped country. It just tells you where USA is going, down the drain.
When I lived in Mexico it was pretty well understood that when an American, or even a Mexican, was pulled over by the police we could pay the "fine" (a bribe) directly to them. The several times I was pulled over I always politely asked if they would let me pay them directly so I wouldn't have to go pay the fine elsewhere. The game was understood by all. One thing you didn't want to do was insult them. In some ways it was easier in Mexico where the corruption was rampant but understood. You could usually get out of most bad situations with money.

When I lived in Illinois with my first husband he was a Chicago cop, a marine who had recently returned from Vietnam. He still had some youthful illusions of honor, justice and service, which were soon totally shattered by the corruption in the Chicago police department. We were young, he was 23 and I was 18. After about a year I urged him to quit since he was getting very depressed. So he quit law enforcement completely. I would guess that law enforcement in Chicago has probably gotten even more corrupt in the 46 years since I lived there. I was 20 when we left Illinois.

As the economy gets worse and the US is molded more and more into a socialist nation, I would expect crime to increase everywhere, also within police departments. One of the major problems I found with cops is that they can be greatly influenced and tempted because of their power over others. If they are the type who would abuse power, which many people are in every area of life, then they abuse it as cops. Most people cannot be trusted to use their power, even if it's only a little power, in a fair and just way all the time or even most of the time. That's just one of the realities of the human condition, at least as I see it.

Flash
4th August 2013, 06:51
Well Nancy, you are right about paying directly in most corrupt countries (including El Salvador and Turkey where I lived).

The difference was that being young at the time, blonde, blue eyes, the potential for demands for payment in nature was very high. And this I really did not want. :eek:

You are right, when we know what to expect, we behave in consequence. The main problem is thinking we are in non corrupt places while the reality is quite different.

write4change
4th August 2013, 10:04
Driving back to California from Texas I was stopped by a cop in the middle of no where who said if I paid him 75 dollars right then and there, he would not write me a ticket. I refused and got the ticket which was essentially he said she said as it is not my policy to speed ever.

Vitalux
4th August 2013, 12:52
Driving back to California from Texas I was stopped by a cop in the middle of no where who said if I paid him 75 dollars right then and there, he would not write me a ticket. I refused and got the ticket which was essentially he said she said as it is not my policy to speed ever.


The one thing I can say about Canada is that all my experiences with the police have been quite positive.

I believe that most, if not all, police in Canada are good police officers that do their best to help people and protect society.
My father was a Metropolitan Toronto Police officer, who had integrity and great moral character.

Life presents all of us unique learning and testing situations.
The irony is that, in my opinion, in the end, we really don't get away cheating at any system. It all comes out in the wash during the afterlife.