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Paul
8th August 2013, 22:24
Here's the best article I've seen so far explaining how intelligence agencies work with large software and Internet companies to spy on us humans: ‘Big Data’ Dynamo: How Giant Tech Firms Help the Government to Spy on Americans (Global Research) (http://www.globalresearch.ca/big-data-dynamo-how-giant-tech-firms-help-the-government-to-spy-on-americans/5344211)

Here are some snippets from this article:




...Indeed, a top secret NSA Inspector General’s report published by The Guardian, revealed that the agency “maintains relationships with over 100 US companies,” adding that the US has the “home field advantage as the primary hub for worldwide telecommunications.”

...
Three of those data-slurping programs, UPSTREAM, PRISM and X-KEYSCORE, shunt domestic and global communications collected from fiber optic cables, the servers of Apple, Google, Microsoft and Yahoo, along with telephone data (including metadata, call content and location) grabbed from AT&T, Sprint and Verizon into NSA-controlled databases.

But however large, a database is only useful to an organization, whether its a corporation or a spy agency, if the oceans of data collected can be searched and extracted in meaningful ways.

To the growing list of spooky acronyms and code-named black programs revealed by Edward Snowden, what other projects, including those in the public domain, are hiding in plain sight?

Add Google’s BigTable and Yahoo’s Hadoop to that list. Both are massive storage and retrieval systems designed to crunch ultra-large data sets and were developed as a practical means to overcome “big data” conundrums.

...Who might also have a compelling interest in cataloging and searching through very large data sets, away from prying eyes, and at granular levels to boot? It should be clear following Snowden’s disclosures, what’s good for commerce is also a highly-prized commodity among global eavesdroppers.

Despite benefits for medical and scientific researchers sifting through mountains of data, as Ars Technica pointed out BigTable and Hadoop “lacked compartmentalized security” vital to spy shops, so “in 2008, NSA set out to create a better version of BigTable, called Accumulo.”

Developed by agency specialists, it was eventually handed off to the “non-profit” Apache Software Foundation. Touted as an open software platform, Accumulo is described in Apache literature as “a robust, scalable, high performance data storage and retrieval system.”

“The platform allows for compartmentalization of segments of big data storage through an approach called cell-level security. The security level of each cell within an Accumulo table can be set independently, hiding it from users who don’t have a need to know: whole sections of data tables can be hidden from view in such a way that users (and applications) without clearance would never know they weren’t there,” Ars Technica explained.

...
(Since that Ars piece appeared, we have since learned that NSA is now conducting what is described as “three-hop analysis,” that is, three degrees of separation from a target’s email or phone number. This data dragnet “could allow the government to mine the records of 2.5 million Americans when investigating one suspected terrorist,” the Associated Press observed).

...
Once collected, data is separated into digestible fragments (phone numbers, email addresses and log ins), then reassembled at lightning speeds for searchable queries in graphic form. Information gathered in the hopper includes not only metadata tables, but the “full log,” including what spooks call Digital Network Intelligence, i.e., user content.

And while it may not yet be practical for NSA to collect and store each single packet flowing through the pipes, the agency is already collecting and storing vast reams of data intercepted from our phone records, IP addresses, emails, web searches and visits, and is doing so in much the same way that Amazon, eBay, Google and Yahoo does.

...
Additionally, NSA is feverishly working to bring supercomputers online “that can execute a quadrillion operations a second” at the Multiprogram Research facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee where enriched uranium for nuclear weapons is manufactured, as James Bamford disclosed last year in Wired.

As the secret state sinks tens of billions of dollars into various big data digital programs, and carries out research on next-gen cyberweapons more destructive than Flame or Stuxnet, as those supercomputers come online the cost of cracking encrypted passwords and communications will continue to fall.

Stanford University computer scientist David Mazières told CNET that mastering encrypted communications would “include an order to extract them from the server or network when the user logs in–which has been done before–or installing a keylogger at the client.”

This is precisely what Microsoft has already done with its SkyDrive cloud storage service “which now has 250 million users worldwide” and exabytes of data ready to be pilfered, as The Guardian disclosed.

One document “stated that NSA already had pre-encryption access to Outlook email. ‘For Prism collection against Hotmail, Live, and Outlook.com emails will be unaffected because Prism collects this data prior to encryption’.”

...

Lefty Dave
8th August 2013, 23:09
Thanks Paul, one has to wonder why our own government would spy on our every transmission...what with nearly 200 other nations to spy on, many of whom are pretty upset with US at the present time. My own thoughts are that most of this is 'fear porn' put out there to piss us off as a nation...it would seem that TPTB want us to revolt...why, I'm not sure...maybe to initiate more draconian measures under the guise of 'law', to take more taxes (every law must be funded!), and suspend what few freedoms we have left.
I appreciate your efforts to keep us aware...blessings.

Paul
8th August 2013, 23:29
one has to wonder why our own government would spy on our every transmission...what with nearly 200 other nations to spy on, many of whom are pretty upset with US at the present time
Why choose? Do both :).

Tesla_WTC_Solution
8th August 2013, 23:58
Google knows enough about pretty much everyone to scare the Hell out of me!

RunningDeer
9th August 2013, 00:28
The last two paragraphs from the article got left off. Why I added them, I've explained below and reference this first paragraph.

"Call the “wrong” person or click a dodgy link and you might just be the lucky winner of a one-way trip to indefinite military detention under NDAA, or worse."

"What should also be clear since revelations about NSA surveillance programs began spilling out last month, is not a single ruling class sector in the United States–including corporations, the media, nor any branch of the US government–has the least interest in defending democratic rights or rolling-back America’s emerging police state."

I use Earthlink email. It provides a two tier spamblocker system before it goes through: suspect & virus blocker. I use to get one email every six months that went to virus blocker. Now it's more like several a week. Most of them want you to click on the 'photo' or important undeliverable package/notice.

It use to be that one worried about a computer virus, but now anyone can be 'set up'.

TargeT
9th August 2013, 00:32
one has to wonder why our own government would spy on our every transmission...what with nearly 200 other nations to spy on, many of whom are pretty upset with US at the present time
Why choose? Do both :).

better question:

Between the two choices ("us"(civilians) and "them"(other countries)) which do you think "they" view as the greater threat?

IT IS, after all, OUR complacency that allows these ridiculous actions.... who would YOU fear more (and by extension, who do you think they view as the real enemy......)?

RunningDeer
9th August 2013, 00:57
one has to wonder why our own government would spy on our every transmission...what with nearly 200 other nations to spy on, many of whom are pretty upset with US at the present time
Why choose? Do both :).

better question:

Between the two choices ("us"(civilians) and "them"(other countries)) which do you think "they" view as the greater threat?

IT IS, after all, OUR complacency that allows these ridiculous actions.... who would YOU fear more (and by extension, who do you think they view as the real enemy......)?

I vote us/civilians. My money is on "OUR complacency" flips to it opposite..."enough is enough".
(Though, I may have stated the obvious here.)

Note to self: do not put these thoughts and video in an email.



“I’m as mad as hell, and I’m not going to take this any more.”

q_qgVn-Op7Q

Paul
9th August 2013, 01:34
Note to self: do not put these thoughts and video in an email.
Don't worry - Google's already got you covered - their webbot has already read your post :).

Strat
9th August 2013, 01:44
In regards to the Sprint/AT&T/Verizon thing: Shouldn't I technically be able to sue them if they've been giving away my info? I don't think that's in my contract.

RunningDeer
9th August 2013, 01:53
Note to self: do not put these thoughts and video in an email.
Don't worry - Google's already got you covered - their webbot has already read your post :).
That's a relief! Now, I can stop the OCD behavior of 'clearing my Google history'. http://www.gif-picture.com/H/helicopter/gif-pict-helicopter-11.gif

And in case they Google-Goggle-bot this; OCD is NOT an obsessive–compulsive disorder, which can and will be used against one. OCD = out chewing daisies.


Google loves me, Goggle loves me not, Goggle loves me, Goggle loves...

http://avalonlibrary.net/paula/Zen/daisy_zpsa9502f1b.JPG

TargeT
9th August 2013, 02:07
In regards to the Sprint/AT&T/Verizon thing: Shouldn't I technically be able to sue them if they've been giving away my info? I don't think that's in my contract.

quick question (and no offense meant, 'cause I haven't) have you READ your contract?

TigaHawk
9th August 2013, 02:09
On a seperate, and slightly funny note....

The US Government will be replacing all of their PC's very soon if not allready.

a Hacking convention that took place recently revealed that Lenovo laptops - which are made in china, are all made with some free bonus hardware that's not listed anywhere at all! It pretty much sends info back to china on what the computer was doing and allowed for a backdoor. :heh:

They used Lenovo computer's for all of government. Which will also mean that the place i work for is being monitored by china as well. Which can be slightly scary as the main brunt of laptops they use to connect up to the pumps, desalination and treatment plants are lenovo's.


some other interesting stuff they had at the blackhat conference can be found here: http://www.blackhat.com/us-13/arsenal.html

Lefty Dave
9th August 2013, 02:11
one has to wonder why our own government would spy on our every transmission...what with nearly 200 other nations to spy on, many of whom are pretty upset with US at the present time
Why choose? Do both :).

better question:

Between the two choices ("us"(civilians) and "them"(other countries)) which do you think "they" view as the greater threat?

IT IS, after all, OUR complacency that allows these ridiculous actions.... who would YOU fear more (and by extension, who do you think they view as the real enemy......)?


Yes, TargeT, I see your point, and you're probably right...I just find it a bit puzzling ... if... we're all in for some kind of space event...that will devastate the planet...why are we running around screwing with all these other nations...what good can it possibly do in the short term, or long run? It makes no sense to me. I get the feeling of being pulled in both directions. Why are we not trying to help one another get to high ground...stashing food and water for a few months of havoc...
It's all beyond my understanding...
best of luck to you

TargeT
9th August 2013, 02:20
On a seperate, and slightly funny note....

The US Government will be replacing all of their PC's very soon if not allready.

a Hacking convention that took place recently revealed that Lenovo laptops - which are made in china, are all made with some free bonus hardware that's not listed anywhere at all! It pretty much sends info back to china on what the computer was doing and allowed for a backdoor. :heh:

They used Lenovo computer's for all of government. Which will also mean that the place i work for is being monitored by china as well. Which can be slightly scary as the main brunt of laptops they use to connect up to the pumps, desalination and treatment plants are lenovo's.

the US government suffered something similar a few years ago with USB "thumb sticks"....also with china.

They are no longer allowed on any federal government computers (despite the extreme convince they offer & the many complaints)








one has to wonder why our own government would spy on our every transmission...what with nearly 200 other nations to spy on, many of whom are pretty upset with US at the present time
Why choose? Do both :).

better question:

Between the two choices ("us"(civilians) and "them"(other countries)) which do you think "they" view as the greater threat?

IT IS, after all, OUR complacency that allows these ridiculous actions.... who would YOU fear more (and by extension, who do you think they view as the real enemy......)?


Yes, TargeT, I see your point, and you're probably right...I just find it a bit puzzling ... if... we're all in for some kind of space event...that will devastate the planet...why are we running around screwing with all these other nations...what good can it possibly do in the short term, or long run? It makes no sense to me. I get the feeling of being pulled in both directions. Why are we not trying to help one another get to high ground...stashing food and water for a few months of havoc...
It's all beyond my understanding...
best of luck to you

Are we in for "some kind of space event" or is that just a really good " fear" to keep people's heads down, complacency up and attention focused on something that isn't likely to happen.

when one idea dominates, question that idea MOST.... as nothing is above question..

Omnia quaerite ac dubitate is Latin for Question EVERYTHING, Always (or near enough); a difficult moto I have attempted to live by for the last decade or so.

Strat
9th August 2013, 06:00
In regards to the Sprint/AT&T/Verizon thing: Shouldn't I technically be able to sue them if they've been giving away my info? I don't think that's in my contract.

quick question (and no offense meant, 'cause I haven't) have you READ your contract?

Haha, honestly don't even remember signing it. That was years ago and I'm slightly wiser now. I always get copies of contracts. I also skim over everything I sign, usually contracts are organized and easy to follow.

That being said (and slightly tongue in cheek here), how would they mention this in the contract? Surely they've covered their bases?

Dorjezigzag
9th August 2013, 12:16
Remember this quote,

“You've gotta dance like there's nobody watching,
Love like you'll never be hurt,
Sing like there's nobody listening,
And live like it's heaven on earth.”

― William W. Purkey

I think there should be a modern version something like



You gotta write emails like there's nobody watching
love like your not disposable
do banking like no one is listening
and live like its not surveillance hell

TargeT
9th August 2013, 14:36
In regards to the Sprint/AT&T/Verizon thing: Shouldn't I technically be able to sue them if they've been giving away my info? I don't think that's in my contract.

quick question (and no offense meant, 'cause I haven't) have you READ your contract?

Haha, honestly don't even remember signing it. That was years ago and I'm slightly wiser now. I always get copies of contracts. I also skim over everything I sign, usually contracts are organized and easy to follow.

That being said (and slightly tongue in cheek here), how would they mention this in the contract? Surely they've covered their bases?

Facebook does it and they have millions of users, I'm sure there could be a clause in there somewhere....