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View Full Version : Dizzying Pics of Hong Kong’s Massive High-Rise Neighborhoods



toad
21st August 2013, 17:01
http://www.wired.com/design/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/hk13.jpg

Here is a bit of daily perspective for you guys. Found this typology of photos fascinating, enjoy.


http://www.wired.com/design/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/HK1.jpg
http://www.wired.com/design/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/hk12.jpg
http://www.wired.com/design/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/hk11.jpg
http://www.wired.com/design/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/hk7.jpg
http://www.wired.com/design/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/hk10.jpg
http://www.wired.com/design/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/hk2.jpg
http://www.wired.com/design/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/hk9.jpg
http://www.wired.com/design/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/hk6.jpg

Photo: Michael Wolf


When you first see Michael Wolf’s photography, it takes a second to realize what you’re looking at. The multi-colored patterns look almost like an unidentifiable piece of technology, as though a chunk of plastic was plucked out of a motherboard and magnified. It’s only when you begin to notice the windows and balconies and even the occasional person punctuating his frame that you realize you’re staring at someone’s home. More specifically, you’re looking at Hong Kong’s colorful high-rises, the most prevalent form of housing in one of the most vertical cities on the planet. In his Architecture of Density project (now a book), Wolf transforms his adoptive home city’s ubiquitous architecture into stunning works of art.
‘By removing the context, viewers have no idea how big these building actually are.’

Wolf begins by driving around Hong Kong to scout possible photo locations. If he sees a photogenic building (tall, bright and detailed), he’ll look for the best vantage point for shooting the structure. “The location is crucial,” he says. “You need an unobstructed view.”

Fortunately, Hong Kong is a hilly place, so it’s easy for Wolf to walk up an incline to get parallel to the middle of a building. Occasionally, he’ll climb up on rooftops, parking garages or even schools. “Sometimes I’ll go into the building opposite,” he says. “I’ll try to find someone who will let me into his apartment so I can photograph out of the window.”

After Wolf gets his shots, he prints out the photographs and lays them on the floor to study them, sort of like the way a writer storyboards a novel. “At some point I just took a photograph and I folded away the sky and the horizon until I just had the pure architecture. I realized it was a very effective visual effect,” he explains. “By removing the context, viewers have no idea how big these building actually are.” It’s easy to imagine that the buildings Wolf shoots could easily rise another 40 stories, though it’s impossible to really know. “It gives you this illusion of almost endless size,” he says.

toad
21st August 2013, 17:02
http://www.wired.com/design/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/hk5.jpg
http://www.wired.com/design/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/hk4.jpg
http://www.wired.com/design/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/hk3.jpg
http://www.wired.com/design/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/hk8.jpg

marielle
21st August 2013, 17:54
I was listening to a C2C interview and the guest was saying how cheaply you can get 100mb internet or even 500mb internet in Hong Kong--I can see why. The infrastructure costs are much less per person when you have so many people packed like that compared to suburban US homes.

chocolate
21st August 2013, 18:33
this is times worse than i could have imagined and than was built here during the communism. i guess if it were a matter of price per m2 for the infrastructure this is excellent. for robots.

xerius
21st August 2013, 18:41
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onawah
21st August 2013, 19:18
China is trending that way as well
See post #92 here:
http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?60288-Videos-from-Forbidden-Knowledge&p=717869#post717869
_ZgUyjzPSh8

Paul
21st August 2013, 19:41
A bit of perspective:
http://kluwermediationblog.com/files/2012/12/hong-kong-day.jpeg

http://cdni.condenast.co.uk/646x430/g_j/HongKong16_CNT_12Oct10_pr_b.jpg

Links to similar, larger images:

http://cdnstatic-2.mydestination.com/library/images/189_1680_948.jpg
http://images5.makemytrip.com/hp-images/packages/12165/Hong%20Kong,%20Skyscrapers.jpg

toad
21st August 2013, 20:46
It is incredible Paul. I like though that the photographer didnt show top or bottom left it ambiguous. Sprawling.

If you wanna see some intense skylines check out the Chinese/HongKong gigapans:

Shanghai stitched from 12,000photos
http://gigapan.com/gigapans/66626

bennycog
21st August 2013, 23:22
I wonder how lonely they feel in those apartments, knowing there are thousands more around them..
I could not imagine not having a backyard to mow :)

toad
22nd August 2013, 01:18
I wonder how lonely they feel in those apartments, knowing there are thousands more around them..
I could not imagine not having a backyard to mow :)

Honestly I feel pretty significant amongst the stars.