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View Full Version : Westboro church of @ssholes. ("God hates fags and Norway": the story of a hate preacher)



778 neighbour of some guy
20th September 2013, 09:45
I stumbled onto this here feller, first I was shocked, then I could not stop laughing.

This is so sad the only remedy is laughter, you will be amazed and feel uplifted skyhigh through the high quality of your own thoughts and feel really really smart after seeing this and calling it for what it is....BULLSH!TS.........

Have a look at the cross eyed Rev. Fred Cornholio Phelps and laugh yourself to death, this idiot is actually a living, breathing human being. ( please notice how his Brokeback Stetson and his message leave you really confused)

Listen to what he has to say about the shooting in Norway ( Anders Breivik) and what he perceives as the reason for it.

PC3K9ZoU7So

markpierre
20th September 2013, 10:06
Ouch. God hates guys who wear hats on cam to hide their baldness also.

panopticon
20th September 2013, 10:12
I stumbled onto this here feller, first I was shocked, then I could not stop laughing.

This is so sad the only remedy is laughter, you will be amazed and feel uplifted skyhigh through the high quality of your own thoughts and feel really really smart after seeing this and calling it for what it is....BULLSH!TS.........

Have a look at the cross eyed Rev. Fred Cornholio Phelps and laugh yourself to death, this idiot is actually a living, breathing human being. ( please notice how his Brokeback Stetson and his message leave you really confused)

Listen to what he has to say about the shooting in Norway ( Anders Breivik) and what he perceives as the reason for it.


Hey, this lot of numb nuts reckon all sorts of bollocks.

"God" hates everyone and every bloody thing evidently...

But if you live in Norway don't feel special.

Australia was there first!

7gAnwTWFuyI
Back at ya Fred Phelps & your numb nut family.

Reckon you're as mad as a cut snake and make as much sense as a chook with its head cut off.
Kind Regards, :yo:
Panopticon

778 neighbour of some guy
20th September 2013, 10:16
@ Pan

Bwahaha, unbelievable what a nutter, Lord Utternut has reveiled himself, holy crap, these people hate everyone.

@ Christian,

hey man, I can see those big red letters that make out your name on the bottom of the page, please be assured I have no ill intentions here, this is just hilarious in all of its sadness.

Sgt-Bones
20th September 2013, 10:26
It's unfortunate that in this day and age there are still intolerant, ignorant f***wits like this guy getting around.

Perhaps this is why Obama is so eager to restrict people's feedom of speech rights in the US? ;)

After watching this video, I'm starting to think maybe that wouldn't be such a bad thing after all. lol

778 neighbour of some guy
20th September 2013, 10:31
It's unfortunate that in this day and age there are still intolerant, ignorant f***wits like this guy getting around.

Perhaps this is why Obama is so eager to restrict people's feedom of speech rights in the US? ;)

After watching this video, I'm thinking maybe that wouldn't be such a bad thing after all? lol

I disagree, those numbskulls will never gain enough momentum to even come close to the 100th monkey effect they obviously desire to propel their @ssbackward movement forward, freedom of speech must stay as it was originally intended, free, let the jerk speak, now we know he exists, that's important, now you know who to ignore and why.

778 neighbour of some guy
20th September 2013, 10:51
Theroux returns to Topeka after four years, to investigate the departure of several members of the Phelps family since his last visit. His return was prompted by an email he received from a young member of the church he had interviewed previously, who had since left and been disfellowshipped. The US Supreme Court case of Snyder v. Phelps, heard following the suing of Westboro Baptist Church for distress caused by the picketing of the funeral of a US Marine killed in Iraq, formed the background to the new film. Theroux was interested in the ambivalent attitude of church members towards his first film, and stated that "the new documentary feels quite different than the original -- though still funny, a little darker and stranger".


rjmg69XmJp8

panopticon
20th September 2013, 10:56
There are always reasons why people behave and act the way they do.

The following is an article from the UK Telegraph (www.telegraph.co.uk/news/religion/9913463/My-father-the-hate-preacher-Nate-Phelps-on-escaping-Westboro-Baptist-Church.html) that talks about Fred Phelps and has an interview with one of his sons, Nate.

It's an eye opening lesson in how people exert power over others.

#####################

My father, the hate preacher: Nate Phelps on escaping Westboro Baptist Church

Pastor Fred Phelps, whose bizarre protests have made his tiny church reviled around the world, has a terrifying hold over his congregation. But one escapee is now Fred’s fiercest critic – his own son
By Alex Hannaford. 12 Mar 2013.

It was five minutes to midnight as Nate Phelps quietly picked his way through the three interconnected rooms where his siblings slept. At the end of the corridor there was the dining room. To the right, a closed door to the church which adjoined the house. There was no sound from the top of the staircase that led to his father’s room. Nate stood there in the darkness, staring at the old red clock in front of him and watched as the minute hand approached 12 and the moment he would turn 18.

He ran as fast as he could, back through the three rooms and out of the door into the night. Nate had no idea who had heard him or who, if anyone, was coming after him. He jumped into his waiting car, an old banger he’d bought for $300 from the high school security guard the previous week, and prayed as the engine spluttered to life. Then he disappeared, away from the church, from his father’s abuse and from the only life he’d ever known.

Phelps is the sixth of 13 children of Fred Phelps, the notorious pastor of Westboro Baptist Church in Topeka, Kansas. Westboro first came to international attention after its members (consisting largely of members of Phelps’s extended family) picketed the funeral of Matthew Shepard, the student who was murdered in 1998 because he was gay.

At Shepard’s funeral, Phelps and his followers held signs that read: “God Hates Fags” and “No Tears for Queers”. By 2005, the church was picketing funerals of fallen soldiers too. During one, Phelps told the Associated Press: “Our attitude toward what’s happening with the war is the Lord is punishing this evil nation for abandoning all moral imperatives that are worth a dime.”

Essentially, Phelps and his followers see all tragedies involving loss of life – war, natural disasters, mass shootings – as God’s judgment on a world that “enables” homosexuality. Using this bizarre logic, they have protested at Lady Gaga concerts, schools, the Oscars, and the funerals of Navy SEALS, miners, hurricane victims and Elizabeth Taylor – “fag enablers” one and all, they claim. The church has only about 40 members, yet Westboro is world famous. Several US states are introducing laws aimed at banning their protests; even the KKK has denounced them.

In the UK, the church was featured in a 2007 BBC documentary presented by Louis Theroux, called The Most Hated Family in America. Afterwards Fred’s daughter Shirley had just one fault to pick with the film: she wished it had been called “The Most Hated Family in the World”.

After Nate left his family in the dead of night, he moved to California and later to Canada. As his family’s notoriety grew, he began telling his story and became a vocal campaigner against religious extremism and child abuse. He also became his father’s biggest bête noire.

I meet Nate at his hotel a few hours before he is due to speak at the Lawrence Technical University in Detroit, Michigan, and we head for breakfast. He is an unlikely looking ex-member of one of the most notorious fundamentalist Christian churches in the world: a large, friendly man with a grey goatee and small hoop earring in his left ear, he looks relaxed as he recounts his horrifying story of mental and physical abuse.

Nate left Westboro in 1976 and says he has carried the emotional scars ever since. Even though a psychologist once told him he should leave the past behind and move on, he feels that part of his healing comes from speaking out against his father’s firebrand Christianity and hate speech.

When he was young, Nate, now 53, recalls his mother keeping him and his elder brother Mark away from their father as much as possible. It wasn’t until the boys were a little older that he says they too became victims of his violent behaviour.

“He had this old barber’s strap and used it so much that the last six inches were frayed, kind of like a cat-o-nine-tails, and he’d hit you with it and it’d wrap around your hips and rip the skin,” Nate says. “By the time I turned eight I remember he had started using a mattock handle instead. Similar to a pickaxe handle, it was about 4ft long and bigger than a baseball bat.” Nate says his father would fly into rages and beat him and his siblings mercilessly: “Then he’d set the mattock down and hit them with his fist.” Nate recalls one particular occasion when he was bent over a church pew backwards and felt like his back was breaking. When he tried to escape, Fred split his head open.

It’s an incident Mark Phelps, who left two years before Nate, recalls with clarity. “Fred’s always denied it, but there is no question,” Mark told me later in a telephone call. “He took great delight punishing Nate and Kathy, our sister. They got 80 per cent of the beatings, but Nate got more than anybody.”

Fred Phelps was born in Mississippi in 1929. By all accounts his childhood was tragic: his father worked on the railroads during the Great Depression and his mother died of cancer when he was five, leaving his aunt to raise him. Despite this, Nate says he and his siblings were told that their father was a star pupil, a Golden Gloves boxer and an Eagle Scout, the highest rank attainable, albeit one some people remembered as having an “antagonistic bent”. Fred met Margie Simms, Nate’s mother, in 1952 while they were both attending the Arizona Bible Institute.

Twelve years later he graduated with a law degree from a university in Kansas and fought various civil rights suits in the Sixties. According to local reports, he gained a reputation as a sharp, competent attorney “whose eloquent and fiery orations mesmerised juries”. Two decades later, he received awards from the Greater Kansas City Chapter of Blacks in Government and a local branch of the human rights group the NAACP.

But Nate Phelps says the perception in some circles that his father was once this champion of civil rights, railing against discrimination, is laughable. “We would all call black people ‘DNs’ at home. It stood for Dumb N------ and was our private language,” he says. “We thought it was clever to call them that in front of them. He was deeply prejudiced, and he believed the Bible said they were cursed.”

Nate says Fred Phelps saw an opportunity with the passing of the Civil Rights Act to cash in. “There was a lot of money, and a lot of opportunity,” he says. “And suddenly my father was the man to go to.” At the same time, Nate says, he and his siblings were being fed a distorted version of the Bible. “We were told we were the only people left on Earth; the only ones who were going to be saved.” Nate says his father became an itinerant preacher, attempting to save Mormons in Utah and Native Americans in the south west, and believing that he was never going to die.

I ask Nate whether it was a surprise to him when his father led his church in picketing the funerals of soldiers or started publicly holding homophobic signs up to draw attention to themselves. Had he seen anything during his childhood that hinted at the things to come?

Fred always had a tendency towards hyperbole and outlandish rhetoric, Nate says. He’s always spoken out against homosexuality. In fact, growing up, Nate was told there was a special place in hell reserved for gay people, that it was a sin from which they couldn’t recover. “That said, I saw no hint that it would turn into some sort of campaign.” He says he has no doubt that members of his dad’s church sit around and come up with these odious sound bites that are provocative and outrageous because it works. It gets people’s attention. “What’s remarkable,” says Nate, “is that they can maintain it with such longevity and not let the hatred eat away at their soul.”

After he left, Nate heard his father was furious that he’d gone; since he thought the old man detested him, this confused him. He saw a psychologist to try to rid him of the religious indoctrination he’d undergone, and ended up in a psychiatric hospital for two weeks where he was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder. In 1986, he married his girlfriend Tammi; after the couple had children, they attended a mainstream church in California — “to feel part of a community”.

In 1995, his second child, Tyler, then aged seven, asked him about hell, and how long people stayed there. “Forever, I told him, and he burst into tears. He was terrified.” Nate never took his children to church again, and eventually renounced Christianity altogether. He’s now divorced, single and living in Calgary, Canada, where he’s writing a book about growing up with Fred.

The first time Nate spoke in public at an atheist convention in Atlanta he got three standing ovations. He was sharing a platform that day with Richard Dawkins, and at the end of his talk, when it came to questions from the audience, Dawkins was the first to ask one. “He wanted to know why my old man wasn’t in jail,” Nate says. “From his perspective, what I’d been through was unacceptable. As bright as he [Dawkins] is, I don’t think he understood the power of religion here in America; that the law turns a blind eye to a lot of this really insane stuff.

“At first I wondered who the hell was going to want to hear my story,” says Nate. “Then I started getting emails and phone calls from people who had grown up in fundamentalist toxic religious environments.”

Today Westboro Baptist Church, which refused to respond to questions for this article, has a dwindling membership; Nate’s niece Libby Phelps Alvarez left the church in February, closely followed by her sisters Megan and Grace. Fred Phelps turned 83 in November. What does Nate think will happen to the church when his father dies? “I used to say after my old man died that the church would die,” he says. “Then I started to hear my sister Shirley and she sounds a lot like him. And now Tim, my youngest brother, looks and sounds a lot like my old man.”

Does Nate still harbour any affection at all for his father or the family he left behind? “That’s a tough one,” he says. “It’s hard to have any affection for a guy who screams at you with all that vitriol and hatred. I still have a deep animosity toward my father and I don’t know if it ever will – or should – go away.”

In the mid-Nineties, when Westboro’s campaign of hate was still in its infancy, Nate was driving home late one night, flicking through the radio stations, when he heard the voice of his father. It was a talk radio programme he listened to regularly. “I assumed it was a pre-recorded session,” Nate says, “so when I got home I called the station to talk to the hosts. But it wasn’t pre-recorded. It was live. The host said, ‘You’re Fred Phelps’s son, you wanna ask him a question?’ The presenter then turned to Fred Phelps and asked him, ‘Do you have a son, Nate?’ ‘Well, I used to,’ he replied.

“At that point I was still clinging to the religious arguments, so I asked him about passages in the Bible that I thought contradicted his behaviour,” Nate says. “How he justified his behaviour based on a particular verse.” But Nate got the wrong verse number, and his father picked him up on it. “I’d never interrupted him before and I told him to answer the question,” Nate says. “He just blew up. You didn’t talk that way to him. He started screaming. And that was it: the only time I’ve talked to my old man since I left.”

Source (www.telegraph.co.uk/news/religion/9913463/My-father-the-hate-preacher-Nate-Phelps-on-escaping-Westboro-Baptist-Church.html)

778 neighbour of some guy
20th September 2013, 11:12
@ Pan

Very sad story, I feel so sorry for his poor kids, I hope they recover from this maniacs influence over their lives, especially the young ones who are still there, maybe there is still hope for them.

But daddy is just a prime example of a kid turned into a petty tyrant by the circumstances of his own upbringing, he should have known and done better by the time he fathered his own children.

panopticon
20th September 2013, 11:20
@ Pan

Very sad story, I feel so sorry for his poor kids, I hope they recover from this maniacs influence over their lives, especially the young ones who are still there, maybe there is still hope for them.

But daddy is just a prime example of a kid turned into a petty tyrant by the circumstances of his own upbringing, he should have known and done better by the time he fathered his own children.

Hey 778,

I must admit the whole Civil Rights thing is the bit of the story that really stands out.
A person who stands up for the down trodden and then laughs at them behind their back.
Typical behaviour though.
We see it in politicians all the time.
Phelps just went a preaching instead of politicking after he'd finished making money as an upstanding member of the community.

-- Pan

Lifebringer
20th September 2013, 13:03
He's what we call on material word description: "The old uncle off his rocker, that they keep the guns and matches from."

Another 13 killed just on the msn last night.

Blood on the hands of the NRA.

Star Mariner
20th September 2013, 13:32
Forget for a minute the real reason behind these shootings, but listen to what this reverend's perception of 'God' are. He's just got no clue at all about anything, has he? As a reverend he is meant to be upstanding member of the spiritual community, but he doesn't have the first clue... The first idea. In fact what he is just a spreader of poison and of hate.

And this is exactly why I have the stance on religion that I do. Every time I heard the word 'hate' as in God 'hates' from this guys mouth, it occurred to me that he has FAR more in common with what he perceives at 'Satan', the mythical man-made devil, than with God. Yes, I would say that this sort of religious lunatic, rife within fundamentalist circles, is more a satanist than a Christian.

Ask a pure, 6 or 8 year child about God, and you will hear about Love. You will get the uncorrupted truth, as opposed to the bile that pours out of the beak of this poor, misguided soul.

***

Of course that is just the perception of one's physical (and emotionally reactive) consciousness. My higher self intervened. This reverend is just another expression of an oversoul experiencing itself, in this reality through a facet of itself that is highly separated, and ignorant, and thus fearful. Very fearful. But he is just one tiny part of a far greater being. And he will learn that one day. Ultimately we are all just facets of The Whole, The One. And everything is okay.

Lifebringer
20th September 2013, 13:42
Perfect example of a 'maladjusted programming taught on the material world.'

This guy's gonna make a bright flame going out.

He's sowed some pretty hatefilled seeds of karma without repentance.

Guess he thinks Jesus said: "Jesus hates." Never heard of it before, but then, he's not right upstairs, on any given day. Poor children victims of religious ignorance and false preaching of Christ.

GK76
20th September 2013, 15:11
Post wiped (several times, lol). :biggrin:

Reason:
Everything is starting to sound like an insult, oh well, the trials of avoiding the sensitivity of ego.

Move along, nothing to see here.

778 neighbour of some guy
20th September 2013, 15:36
Lies! I don't hate gay people and Norway! That sick minded, ego driven Vatican puppet does though, what a wanker.

I did not mean to offend by posting the OP so.....

I beg your pardon?

Not sure how to interpret that to be honest.

Which ego driven Vatican puppet wanker do you refer to exactly?

Do you mean the message as brought to you by the rev is incorrect and we all heard wrong and you are a member of above mentioned church in the OP?

Or... do you mean, the rev lies, you don't share his views and have nothing against gays/Norway and you mean the pope is a tosser.

Not sure, if I am on the right path here but perhaps you could enlighten me us, I realize full well its an inflammatory subject especially with religion thrown in the mix but I tried to defuse that part ( perhaps unsuccessful ) by the intro in the OP, I don't take this chap very seriously at all, nobody should imo.

George Carlin once said, when your born on this planet you are on the freak show, when you are born in America you get a front row seat ( or something like that).

PurpleLama
20th September 2013, 15:47
A group of satanists say they’ve given the controversial Westboro Baptist Church a taste of its own medicine, performing a same-sex ritual at the grave of the mother of the church’s founder.

Members of the Satanist Temple performed on Sunday what its spokesman describes as a “pink mass” an admittedly made-up ritual, celebrating gay love, at the grave in Meridian, Miss.

Spokesman Lucien Greaves doffed a headdress made of horns as two male couples, and a female couple recited scripture, lit candles and made out over the grave.

Members then posthumously declared Catherine Johnston, the mother of Westboro’s founder Fred Phelps, a lesbian.

The ritual was designed to get a rise of the WBC, the satanists said, an organization that’s earned a national reputation for getting a rise out of others.

Phelps is the leader of the Westboro Baptist Church, a fundamentalist congregation infamous for picketing at the funerals of celebrities, victims of disaster and terrorism, and U.S. soldiers killed in combat.

The church, located in Topeka, Kan., believes that the whole of the United States is in a state of sin because of gays. Members often protest at funerals carrying signs that read “God hates fags.”

The idea to stage a counter-protest by the New York based Satanist Temple after WBC members threatened to picket at funerals for those killed in the Boston Marathon bombings, Greaves told ABCNews.com.

The ritual took place at Magnolia Cemetery near a busy road, but Greaves said no one bothered the group of Satanists.

“Our right to believe that Fred Phelps now must believe that his mother is gay is inviolable,” said Greaves. “No one can question our beliefs,” he said, mocking a Westboro talking point that was recently at the heart of Supreme Court case, which the church won.

A spokesman for Westboro, which has never shirked from publicity, told ABC that the “pink mass” only gave the church another moment to preach against gay people.

“I don’t care whether you’re dancing on a grave, in a hot air balloon, or standing on Mt. Kiliminjaro, homosexuality is a sin. And the punishment fixed for that sin is the death penalty,” said Westboro spokesman Steve Drain.

http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2013/07/satanists-perform-gay-ritual-at-westboro-gravesite/

viscountvlad
20th September 2013, 16:29
I feel so sorry for the people blinded by this cult leader. I feel sorry for him too, he is so full of anger. God doesn't hate anyone.

I'm not one for quoting the bible but hey here goes anyway!

His hate fueled rant put me in mind of this:

Corinthians 13
1 If I speak in the tongues of men or of angels, but do not have love, I am only a resounding gong or a clanging cymbal.
2 If I have the gift of prophecy and can fathom all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have a faith that can move mountains, but do not have love, I am nothing.

3 If I give all I possess to the poor and give over my body to hardship that I may boast, but do not have love, I gain nothing.
4 Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud.
5 It does not dishonor others, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs.
6 Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth.
7 It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.
8 Love never fails...

So, hard as it is, lets send him and his congregation our love

GK76
20th September 2013, 17:33
Lies! I don't hate gay people and Norway! That sick minded, ego driven Vatican puppet does though, what a wanker.

I did not mean to offend by posting the OP so.....

I beg your pardon?

Not sure how to interpret that to be honest.

Which ego driven Vatican puppet wanker do you refer to exactly?

Do you mean the message as brought to you by the rev is incorrect and we all heard wrong and you are a member of above mentioned church in the OP?

Or... do you mean, the rev lies, you don't share his views and have nothing against gays/Norway and you mean the pope is a tosser.

Not sure, if I am on the right path here but perhaps you could enlighten me us, I realize full well its an inflammatory subject especially with religion thrown in the mix but I tried to defuse that part ( perhaps unsuccessful ) by the intro in the OP, I don't take this chap very seriously at all, nobody should imo.

George Carlin once said, when your born on this planet you are on the freak show, when you are born in America you get a front row seat ( or something like that).

Heh, no offence taken my friend, my intent was not aimed at you personally, and certainly not to offend you as your words and intent was clear to me. The thing I dislike about this questionable work is the perpetuation of this fool's words of hate and general ignorance... sadly many think like this and happily persecute others through hate. To post it gives it more life, whether you are for or against it... these things are designed to cause the rift... divide and conquer - it's best to leave it to die slowly in obscurity.

The Vatican is a very sick organisation disguised as a religion. There is no divide between church and state, there never has been, it's all corporate. The agenda is for the state to be the nanny (feminine) and the church to be the father (masculine) to replace the parents. This is done at birth with the registration, where parents are coerced with threat of the law and kidnap of the child into state custody - this is fraud, but a physical and spiritual contract non-the-less. "Ignorance of the law is no defence" as they (the law makers) love to repeat. To mock a deluded, lost soul is not the way forward.

I'm glad you don't take him seriously and was never under that impression, it's just the devious little sods (church and state) know about physical and spiritual contracts and are very happy to be in the consciousness to grab any and all into their saviour programme, and to generally sow the seed of hate.

Whether the guy in the video is serious or not, whomever he works for or whether he's working on his own intent, it's something we should be looking out to avoid if you have a spiritual path or at very least to return to a world of true free will.

Anyway... I haven't got time to do this subject justice so I'll just say: There is a place for refuse like this man's work, it's not on a website aimed to advance the positive and spiritual.

As for the George Carlin quote, I understand what he means, but, when you are in the audience of the freakshow it's best not to jump on stage and become part of the act.

As always it's just an opinion which I hope is more clear for you, and I'm kinda perplexed as to your interpretation which was very clearly stated, ho-hum, time to move on as I'm just going to start waffling on. Oh yup, we are the gods he is making claims about, and I'm not standing in his lies, I stand in my truth.

Good luck on your personal path.

P.S. Sorry for my (in some cases) harsh wording in my original statement, but, I've become a little unhappy at the lack of effort shown by humanity into fixing this mess we've been duped into joining. This is my problem to deal with, the ego just wants to have its say.

donk
20th September 2013, 17:37
These people are real life trolls, and only exist because of the energy and attention directed toward them.

As soon as you see the word "hates" next to "god", it's safe to say your best bet is to ignore the rest.

AutumnW
20th September 2013, 23:30
Mean hate spewing reverend by day; rides in drag, with the Hell's grannies by night.

MaroonLagoon
21st September 2013, 01:39
Why would anyone hate someone for loving someone??

I can't believe this guy has gotten away with being so abusive for so long. For his own sake I hope he comes to his senses before he dies while he still has the opportunity to do something about all the hurt he's causing people.

meeradas
21st September 2013, 08:13
God hates guys who wear hats on cam to hide their baldness also.

Damn. I didn't ask for proof.

donk
21st September 2013, 13:25
Why would anyone hate someone for loving someone??



Bill maher was asked something like this by Larry King when he Outed then RNC Chairman Ken Mehlman back in the day, Larry said something like "why would he be hating them when he's one of them?"...Maher tells him "cuz hating yourself, is the greatest love all".

They never replayed it, you may find it on YouTube..