PDA

View Full Version : the man who planted trees



nenosema
21st September 2013, 17:38
Jean Giono, the author of the short story upon which the movie is based, wrote the story after American editors in 1953 asked him to write a few pages about an unforgettable character. They intended him to write about a real unforgettable character, but he created the fictional Elezeard Bouffier. When the editors objected that no Bouffier had died in Banon, he donated the story to all humanity. It was soon after published by Vogue in 1954. Many people have assumed that Bouffier is a real person.



v_7yEPNUXsU


Directed by Frederick Back and edited by Norbert Pickering, this is the full English language version translated by Jean Roberts and narrated by Christopher Plummer (the orginal version is in French language narrated by Philippe Noiret).

Winner of the Acadamy Award for Best Animated Short Film and Short Film Palme d'Or in 1987, this is a charming animated masterpiece about a man who devotes his life to planting trees.

it's a tearjerker :)..
withlove

sheme
21st September 2013, 18:45
If your light is bright the darkness will pass away from you.

Dawn
21st September 2013, 18:58
Yes! This is one of my favorite videos and I am delighted to see it posted again! Here is a wonderful series of videos of Jeff Lawton who is a modern day tree planter. This one is about how you can even turn the desert green. If you haven't heard about this or seen it before you are in for a real treat. When you are done looking at this video search out more Jeff Lawton videos on YouTube for more delightful stories and information:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xzTHjlueqFI

onawah
21st September 2013, 19:42
You can read about another planter of trees, David Milarch who plants Sequoias on the thread here:
http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?60086-Sequoia-seed-keeper-David-Milarch
and more about the healing energy of Sequoias and Redwood trees here:
http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?58028-Sequoia-Crystalline-Portals-of-Healing-The-Sacred-Energy-of-Trees-Lord-Metatron-via-James-Tyberonn

sheme
21st September 2013, 19:54
To date I have planted 10,000 mixed deciduous trees some have died but I will plant more to replace, can I ask you to find a place to plant your apple pips as these will be a brand NEW APPLE how fantastic to know you have assisted nature , I LOve pippins ,. The finest cooking apple was a pippin BRAMLEY revered to this day plant seeds some will make it throught to the fruit . Just like human beings. peace


Wiki ref:

The first 'Bramley's Seedling' tree grew from pips planted by Mary Ann Brailsford when she was a young girl in her garden in Southwell, Nottinghamshire, UK in 1809.[2] The tree in the garden was later included in the purchase of the cottage by a local butcher, Matthew Bramley in 1846. In 1856, a local nurseryman, Henry Merryweather asked if he could take cuttings from the tree and start to sell the apples. Bramley agreed but insisted that the apples should bear his name.

On 31 October 1862, the first recorded sale of a Bramley was noted in Merryweather's accounts. He sold "three Bramley apples for 2/- to Mr Geo Cooper of Upton Hall". On 6 December 1876, the Bramley was highly commended at the Royal Horticultural Society's Fruit Committee exhibition. In 1900, the original tree was knocked over during violent storms; it survived, however, and is still bearing fruit two centuries after it was planted. It is now the most important cooking apple in England and Wales, with 21.68 km≤, 95% of total culinary apple orchards in 2007.[5] The Bramley is almost exclusively a British variety; however it is also grown by a few United States farms,[6] and can be found in Canada and Japan. [

RunningDeer
22nd September 2013, 02:18
Thanks for the thread, Nenosema. "The Man Who Planted Trees" is on my top 10 list. Itís a perfect movie to watch when Iím overwhelmed with how to effect change. Am I doing enough? Does it even matter? Do I let it all go? Then I fold back into myself. Take stock of whatís important and the rest unfolds.

Peace,
Paula


http://avalonlibrary.net/paula/Recovered/trees_zps5734c6ae.GIF

Bubu
23rd September 2013, 01:14
To date I have planted 10,000 mixed deciduous trees some have died but I will plant more to replace, [

That's a lot of trees Sheme.
May you be an inspiration to many
We need more of the actions.

nenosema
23rd September 2013, 02:57
The other day at a yard sale I came across this big plant book. I picked it up and started turning through the pages looking for some plants that I knew something about to see what it said about them..

turns out it's a wonderful book about climate zones for certain types of plants and where they'll grow the best..




I'll read you the first page....


`This book came about because Gardeners across the United states and Canada---familiar with Sunset's popular Western Garden Book---asked for it time and time again. Either they had moved east of the continental divide
from places like Los Angeles or Denver, or they had gardening friends or relatives in Nantucket, New Orleans, or places inbetween. But whether these gardeners with ties to the West live near palm-fringed beach in Florida, in the suburbs of Chicago, on a ranch in Texas, or amid a Forest of maples in Maine, they wanted information that addressed conditions specific too their regions. They wanted to understand the climates and soils in their own backyards.

They wanted to know which plants would grow best for them & at the same time, bring the most beauty to their gardens. Quite simply, they wanted Eastern, Midwestern, or Southeastern versions of the book they fondly called the "Bible" of western gardening.

What sets this book apart from others is its system of climate zones, developed with help from university climatologists, the National Weather service, and agricultural extension agents across North America. While other plant zoning schemes are based on winter minimums----a useful
plant hardiness index---the Sunset system recognizes that other factors are just as important in determining how well a particular plant will grow in a given region. Summer highs, humidity, rainfall patterns, elevation, land formations, length of growth seasons, and proximity to oceans or other large bodies of Water all play important roles.

The Sunset climate maps organize the United states and the southern part of Canada into 45 climate zones. For each entry on the A to Z Plant Encyclopedia , we note the zones that plant grows best---so once you've found your zone on the 23 regional maps, you can easily learn weather the plantss you want to grow will preform well for you--

The Encyclopedia contains detailed information about more than 6,000 plants---some widely available and commonly grown, others harder to find but worth seeking out. But this book also contains much more. The Plant selection guide will help you choose the right plants for special situations --- such as damp soils or deep shade---and for special purposes such as winter interest or attracting birds,butterflies and bees.The practical gardening dictionary contains the latest advice on everything from watering to fertilizing plants to managing gardening pests in environmentally friendly ways And the resource directory lists, among other things,outstanding botanical gardens and mail-order suppliers of seeds and plants.
Like its predecessors, the Sunset National Gardening Book recognizes gardening as an art, a science and an adventure in communing with the Natural World .

We hope that it will guide you faithfully in your gardening efforts for years to come



Also, a really good video by Paul Stamets ( I think in this one he mentions ways to use certain mushrooms as natural bug repellent..)

XI5frPV58tY



She looked at me and smiled, gave the book to me for free :o

Dawn
25th September 2013, 02:39
Ok, it is time for me to share a very personal story that I have only told one or 2 close friends up till now. I saved my apple seeds for a year and went out to do the wildcrafting which has always been part of my life. For so many years I had snipped a bit of this and that, and harvested wild foods ... always careful to leave enough for the animals in the woods and to allow the plants to propagate. However, I did not think about leaving something in exchange until the day I met the mushroom gardener. I'm going to see if I can find that post of mine on Avalon, but it is long ago and likely has been lost in the archives. Well, perhaps I will make a short story of it here... though it is not about seeds. Still the exchange I had with the mushroom gardener reminded me what working with the nature divas used to be like for all of us so long ago.

The Mushroom Gardener:

One day in 2006 I was home alone and sitting on the windowsill watching a rainstorm send rivulets of water down the window panes. The thought arose that I wish I had some warm homemade mushroom soup to eat on this cold wet January day. I could taste in my imagination how delicious this would be. A couple of hours later the rain paused, although the clouds were still dark and gray. I decided a little hike would be fun and donned a rain jacket to head into the nearby hills. As I left the house, a sudden urge turned me back to the shelf where I kept a little white stone I had gathered at the beach the year before... it seemed to want to come with me for some reason. I felt a little foolish listening to the stone call me, but I gathered up and put it into my pocket.

As I drove towards the nearby hills to hike, I felt drawn to turn and drive towards the more distant Coastal Mountains instead. Driving through the winding road up into the mountains, I broke through the low lying clouds into the clear cold sunny sky above them, walked into the wet dripping forest on foot. I was overcome with gratitude that these silent woods always welcomed me, and I uttered a prayer of gratitude to them for allowing me to enter their shady protective enclave. I began to walk through the dripping foliage. About an hour into my walk I noticed a dead tree trunk covered in oyster mushrooms and began to harvest them with delight (yum! wild mushroom soup). Within a few minutes I could feel someone behind me, and I paused to turn and look. I found myself communicating with a very irritated and angry nature spirit. I knew there was a cave about 20 feet away and somehow I was made aware that this being used it as a portal from 'there' to 'here' in order to grow these mushrooms. What really made this being so angry, was that I was taking them without even asking or saying,"Thank You". I apologised and he grumpily agreed I could have a certain number of them, but he was not appeased and I could feel his upset. He grumbled under his breath and repeated the phrase over and over... 'Always taking without giving'. As I started to walk further up the trail, it suddenly dawned on me that I had something to give as a thank you gift. I turned and offered him my little round white beach agate stone. To my total and utter surprise his entire countenance changed. He not only instructed me exactly where he wanted it placed, but he also suddenly 'blessed' the mushrooms in my pouch with some sort of energy which he threw at them from his hands. Then something really extraordinary happened, as I left him, he called out to the entire forest, "Here comes one who walks in the old way! Welcome her, she is a blessing to us all". Suddenly I started to cry as I realized how far separated from nature and these spirits we modern humans have become.

OK... you think I am strange? Well, when one's 2nd site is fully open lots of unusual things are seen and experienced.

Planting Seeds:
After meeting the mushroom gardener, I began to feel really strange when I harvested anything. I no longer wanted to take without giving back. So, I started saving seeds. When I harvested something I always planted a seed... and I took pains to see that it had a chance of growing (ie an area with enough water and so on). I saved all my apple seeds, and my family's apple seeds, flower seeds, peach seeds and so on.

That was the year I harvested dandelion roots for my friend who had cancer. [Dried and pounded into a powder without washing these are a cancer cure extraordinaire. You can purchase dandelion powder commercially, however the fungus is washed off the roots so it is not a good medicinal.] Hunting for dandelions growing in clean forest soil took me to many places, and in one of these I met another nature elemental. She was nasty and angry that I wanted to harvest her dandelions, until I told her I would plant apple seeds in return. I didn't have any more seeds on me when I found her so I drove home and got my stash to bring back. She was really surprised that I had kept my word, and directed me to exactly where each seed was to be planted. After that she greeted me when ever I was in her area, and would even guide me to places where her dandelions were thickly growing and luxurious. I always made sure that I left the healthiest and largest dandelions, leaving them to make seeds for the generations to come.


It has been a long time since we behaved like stewards of this earth. If one person can remember how to do it then others can too.

RunningDeer
25th September 2013, 03:04
...but he also suddenly 'blessed' the mushrooms in my pouch with some sort of energy which he threw at them from his hands. Then something really extraordinary happened, as I left him, he called out to the entire forest, "Here comes one who walks in the old way! Welcome her, she is a blessing to us all". Suddenly I started to cry as I realized how far separated from nature and these spirits we modern humans have become.

Chills. And still chills running from the top of the right side of my head all the way down to the bottom of my right foot.

Beautiful account, Dawn. Thanks for sharing it. :wave:

Paul
25th September 2013, 03:24
However, I did not think about leaving something in exchange until the day I met the mushroom gardener. I'm going to see if I can find that post of mine on Avalon, but it is long ago and likely has been lost in the archives.
Here 'ya go: An experience that changed my life -- Post #104 (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?14157-An-experience-that-changed-my-life&p=305123&viewfull=1#post305123).