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bogeyman
5th January 2014, 07:47
Due to the short fall in the numbers of personnel in the Armed Services, the then Secretary of Defense Rumsfeld decided to loosen the criteria on who can serve in the armed services. In the so called War on Terror, the military employed white supremacists, neo Nazis, those with criminal convictions, people with drug and alcohol problems, and those with mental health issues.

It was considered an "experiment" by Rumsfeld, to tackle the criticism that they DOD wasn't meeting its targets of raw recruits. These individuals were serving in military intelligence, Military Police and front line combat operations.

Would you not think that these kind of people would contaminate other personnel and spread the gang land mentality and criminal behaviour like a virus? Also when these personnel are no longer required what do you think they are going to do with the training the military has taught them? Turn on the military, criminal activities and god knows what else.

It makes me think that those in the administration and political leadership are flawed in their judgement.

In the fifth century AD a military officer in the Roman Empire stated in his military manual the following: "An Army raised without proper regard to the choice of its recruits was never yet made good by length of time; and we are now convinced by fatal experience that this is the source of all our misfortunes." The Empire was in dramatic decline at the time.

Apparently we do not learn from history.

Rocky_Shorz
5th January 2014, 08:28
how does the UK choose their army?

bogeyman
5th January 2014, 16:25
how does the UK choose their army?

In general there is tight regulations concerning whom serves in the Armed Services. Of course they are bound to be exceptions, such as the troubles in Northern Ireland and the involvement and clandestine cooperation of the UK's military with paramilitary organizations such as the Ulster Defence Force and the Ulster Freedom fighters.

Rocky_Shorz
5th January 2014, 18:24
Men who have served in the UK Armed Forces are more likely to commit a violent offence during their lifetime than their civilian counterparts, according to new research by King's Centre for Military Health Research at King's College London.

The study was published today in a Lancet special issue on Iraq.

Most strikingly, the study found that the proportion of young servicemen (under 30 years old) with a conviction for violent offending was much higher than among men of a similar age in the general population (20.6% vs 6.7%).

“There has been a lot of media coverage and public debate about violence committed by veterans of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Our study, which used official criminal records, found that violent offending was most common among young men from the lower ranks of the Army and was strongly associated with a history of violent offending before joining the military. Serving in a combat role and traumatic experiences on deployment also increased the risk of violent behaviour”, explains Dr Deirdre MacManus from King’s College London, who led the research...

link (http://www.kcl.ac.uk/iop/news/records/2013/March/violent-offending-UK-military.aspx)

it's war, what doesn't work for society, is perfect for a soldier...

bogeyman
5th January 2014, 18:27
Men who have served in the UK Armed Forces are more likely to commit a violent offence during their lifetime than their civilian counterparts, according to new research by King's Centre for Military Health Research at King's College London.

The study was published today in a Lancet special issue on Iraq.

Most strikingly, the study found that the proportion of young servicemen (under 30 years old) with a conviction for violent offending was much higher than among men of a similar age in the general population (20.6% vs 6.7%).

“There has been a lot of media coverage and public debate about violence committed by veterans of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Our study, which used official criminal records, found that violent offending was most common among young men from the lower ranks of the Army and was strongly associated with a history of violent offending before joining the military. Serving in a combat role and traumatic experiences on deployment also increased the risk of violent behaviour”, explains Dr Deirdre MacManus from King’s College London, who led the research...

link (http://www.kcl.ac.uk/iop/news/records/2013/March/violent-offending-UK-military.aspx)

it's war, what doesn't work for society, is perfect for a soldier...

The problem with that is when the war is over what do you do with the left overs? The psychological make up of the former soldiers have to some how be conditioned into so called civilian life. And this has failed in numerous cases, but not all.

loungelizard
5th January 2014, 18:59
You might find this book interesting, bogeyman: Irregular Army: How the US Military Recruited Neo-Nazis, Gang Members,and Criminals to Fight the Ware on Terror" It's written by Matt Kennard who is an investigative journalist. Here's the blurb from the publisher:

Reveals the US military’s “don’t ask, don’t tell” approach to extremists in its ranks.
Since the launch of the Afghanistan and Iraq wars—now the longest wars in American history—the US military has struggled to recruit troops. It has responded, as Matt Kennard’s explosive investigative report makes clear, by opening its doors to neo-Nazis, white supremacists, gang members, criminals of all stripes, the overweight, and the mentally ill. Based on several years of reporting, Irregular Army includes extensive interviews with extremist veterans and leaders of far-right hate groups—who spoke openly of their eagerness to have their followers acquire military training for a coming domestic race war. As a report commissioned by the Department of Defense itself put it, “Effectively, the military has a ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’ policy pertaining to extremism.”

Irregular Army connects some of the War on Terror’s worst crimes to this opening-up of the US military. With millions of veterans now back in the US and domestic extremism on the rise, Kennard’s book is a stark warning about potential dangers facing Americans—from their own soldiers.

http://www.versobooks.com/books/1111-irregular-army

There's also an extract from the book in the Guardian - it makes chilling reading. Here's a taste:

The neo-Nazi movement has had a long and tense relationship with the US military. Since its inception, the leaders of the white supremacist movement have encouraged their members to enlist. They see it as a way for their followers to receive combat and weapons training, courtesy of the US government, and then to bring what they learn home to undertake a domestic race war. Not all far-right groups subscribe to this vision – some, such as the Ku Klux Klan, claim to prefer a democratic approach – but a large portion see themselves as insurrectionary forces. To that end, professional training in warfare is a must.

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2012/aug/31/us-army-racism-iraq-afghanistan