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UpToLight
24th January 2014, 10:52
Hi guys,

I want to get a master's degree in one of those countries. But my main aim isn't degree. I just want to live in one of those countries after earning master's. I have 3 options but I don't know where to apply. Which country is better to live, find job. I also want that place to be adventerous and exciting!

So which country do you recommend? Maybe someone lived in all 3 countries and can compare them better?

Thanks!

sheme
24th January 2014, 11:28
If you can -apply to all three, then you will have a better chance to know where you are meant to be.

Nanoo Nanoo
24th January 2014, 11:36
Australia is the most stable with work except its the most expensive place on the planet to live. All three are beautiful countries with lots of adventure.

N

hangel
24th January 2014, 11:47
England ;)

korgh
24th January 2014, 13:14
U.S.A. -> Florida ( i love that place)

Wookie
24th January 2014, 13:55
Depending on where you get your degree it could be worthless in another country. I have met a hand full of immigrants that were doctors and lawyers that working as labor because their degree was not valid in Canada. As far as studying in Canada it is quite expensive for an international student. I heard Australia was allot like Canada, and Canada is a kind of United States light. I would try all of them and see what ya get :)

Peaceful Journeys Wookie

UpToLight
24th January 2014, 14:48
Australia is the most stable with work except its the most expensive place on the planet to live. All three are beautiful countries with lots of adventure.

N

Yeah. I heard that it is expensive. But I think average income is enough to balance expenditure there, no? Because, in my country it is nearly impossible. For example, in my country, 2D movie ticket price is $6,42 while average monthly income is $490 (this is official report. It is actually more less than this). In comparison, in USA ticket is $8-10 (?) while monthly income is $3700-4000.

Fellow Aspirant
24th January 2014, 16:48
While all three could be excellent choices, I think it depends very much on your prospects of finding a job/career post degree. And that depends a lot on what field your degree is in. Unfortunately, having an arts degree is not as likely to land you a job as one in the fields of engineering (especially computing or electronics) or medicine. Many young, bright, well-educated Canadians are having to leave the country for careers. Australia and America are top choices, for various reasons.

I wish you well in your endeavours.

B.

bogeyman
24th January 2014, 16:54
Depends on how much money and resources you have, does it not? Then define what quality of life is, it maybe different for each of us.

TargeT
24th January 2014, 16:59
whats your degree in?

Mind living on the edge of an empire?

Come to the virgin islands, it's practically like being a pirate here... laws are rarely enforced, land is cheap ( on St Croix) and the weather is always amazing, plus we have a university here (Not sure about the masters degree programs)

oh, and it's technically still "the united states"

Carmody
24th January 2014, 16:59
With the world trying very hard to turn into crap, Australia is probably the safest bet of the three.

The USA is turning to a downslide situation, Canada would more than likely be steamrolled in that case/situation. In such a scenario, which has higher odds than anyone would like to see....Australia would be in a simple distant onlooker situation.

The level of turn around that the USA would have to move into, and into immediately, with no more hesitation, in order to avoid that direction they currently travel in (worse than the great depression situation, right now, notably worse).....is so great and apparently unlikely (no visible signs).... that I would personally recommend not moving to anywhere near the north American continent.

The components that are 'nasty' in the core of the USA are trying very hard to create their 'north American alliance/'fortress north America',and make one giant country from Mexico to the top of northern Canada.

They've had their man/people (presidents and prime minsters)in Mexico and in Canada, busy tearing those countries down and into economic and moral/ethical crap, for about the past 20 years, in the form of a high speed destruction/deconstruction program.

To tear the people so far down to the bone, that the people will accept everything thrust at them. To bleed them out slowly, so they don't erupt into social disorder and revolt. To break the population slow..and hard.

If I had to try and understand what is seen in North America (over the past 40+ years) as anything, this is what I would describe it as looking like.

UpToLight
24th January 2014, 17:54
My degree is in tourism. I think finding job isn't problem in any of them since they have pretty well developed industry.

Herbert
24th January 2014, 18:54
A lot of people who can afford it are leaving Australia and moving to New Zealand because Australia is turning into a desert through lack of rainfall and the resulting wildfires.

There are 7 HAARP stations in Australia and they are, of course, using solar power, as opposed to natural gas for the one in Alaska, to power them. It is these stations that are purposely turning Australia into a desert, and that is the reason food prices are so very high there.

Of course there is an agenda and I would not say you would be removed from the carnage by living there. It's just another kind of carnage.

People from Canada, who have traveled a lot, say New Zealand is the most like Canada. They say Australia is more like America as far as the people go. I don't know about the University situation there.

I do agree with Carmody regarding the long term intention of making Canada another U.S state through control of our leaders (if you could call them that - they've never in their lives had a true vision the people could get behind) but that has been going on since the beginning, back in 1867.

Despite the poor leadership and pigs at the trough Senate, we Canadians are still about "sharing and cooperation for survival of all". The U.S. was founded on the principle of "competition for survival of the fittest" .

There are far less factions in Canada despite the masses of immigrants to the Toronto area. We have enough prime farmland to feed many more people, in fact so much food production that politicians are suggesting we start taxing meat!!

University of Toronto has a world class reputation, as does McGill University in Quebec. Our natural resources make the Canadian dollar realistically worth far more than the American dollar, once we rid ourselves of these traitor politicians.

In my experience, despite the high wages, Americans always seem to be poor or on the verge of bankruptcy. Maybe it's the high property taxes and medical care, I don't know. Here in Southern Ontario everyone seems quite comfortable.

But it goes without really saying for most countries, that they need to get rid of the American puppet leaders. That is going to happen very rapidly when the ball gets rolling, and it's not far off in my opinion.

Good Luck with "rolling the ball" UpToLight. You will go wherever your higher self sends you.

_I6Ej9HJVEQ

Nanoo Nanoo
24th January 2014, 19:22
Australia is by far the most expensive place on earth .. Sydney average rent is $550 pw for a 2 bed house or unit in the suburbs .. anywhere near the city you will be paying in excess of $700 pw for a one bedroom box.

Food , Transport , Services are all between 200 and 1500% more expensive than anywhere on the planet. Hint , if you want to work in tourism South America is the place to go , 50% of their GDP is tourism ( the other half is cocain and food export ) I wopuld look at Peru / Miraflores ( very nice area ) And let me tell you , when it comes to hospitality you cannot beat the South Americans ! my gods are they just the most amazingly thoughtful people i have ever had the pleasure to meet.

ill PM you a contact , you will love this guy !

N

UpToLight
24th January 2014, 20:44
Well, it seems I will skip Australia because of expensiveness. I like high temperature and that's why I optioned it. And also some students form my country went there before and they all praise it.

And Nanoo, I agree about South Americans! I've worked with people from Argentina, Columbia and Chile. They are really amazing!

enfoldedblue
24th January 2014, 21:20
I have lived in Canada and Australia. While it is true that Australia is expensive (though wages are significantly higher here), I don't know if I could ever go back to live in Canada. I am not a fan of the cold...and for me winter in Canada is unbearable. My moods are greatly affected by weather, and winter would inevitably bring me down. Possibly BC would be ok. If you are ok with the cold then there are a lot of good things about Canada. I think there are good things about both places and certainly good people.

I wouldn't worry about the fires and drought, yes there are big fires, but it is actually part of natural cycles (in fact many Australian plants only release seeds after they have been burnt). Canada and America also have big fires during the summer. The drought was real but I believe officially ended several years ago, and most people live along the coast where the effects were minimal anyway. Never heard of the mass exodus from OZ to NZ, though I have met many many New Zealanders living here who say while it is a very beautiful country, the economic conditions made them choose to immigrate to Australia.

Australia has beautiful beaches and rainforest and actually an incredibly diverse landscape. Canada has pristine lakes and majestic forests. Really both are great places.

If I were you I would explore all options as much as possible and look out for any distinct signs that may be leading you in a particular direction.

Plotus
25th January 2014, 13:10
Your wanting to get your 'act' together in a foreign place. Party, Babes, adventure. Only one choice really, which ever you can afford. Likely the US. As for the others, Australia is party and people, the rest quickly loose their appeal.

olddragon
25th January 2014, 15:19
If you come here to Aus to study you should make certain you can work as well. Remember wages are high so cost of living is balanced out. Also Aus is just a quarry, food bowl and tourist resort. We don't make anything anymore so tourism is the main draw card. As for Aus being a desert, well you are right but that happened long before white man got here.

UpToLight
25th January 2014, 18:42
Oh, thanks olddragon for reminding that. I forgot to add that I have a plan to work and study at the same time. Guys from my country who study in Australia say they have enough opportunity to work. Is it is easy to find job for students there?

Nanoo Nanoo
25th January 2014, 21:27
There is plenty of work in Australia , there is no reason to be un employed here. The papers are full of full and part time positions. The study visa should have provision for work sustainance. If you are willing to do labour or menial tasks you can get by .. the only problem is while the wages are good comparitively .. on average 25 to 50% higher than elce where .. the cost of living is well over 200% more than anywhere so you are still at a disadvantage by a factor of 3:1

N

Milneman
25th January 2014, 21:42
Australia is the most stable with work except its the most expensive place on the planet to live. All three are beautiful countries with lots of adventure.

N

Yeah. I heard that it is expensive. But I think average income is enough to balance expenditure there, no? Because, in my country it is nearly impossible. For example, in my country, 2D movie ticket price is $6,42 while average monthly income is $490 (this is official report. It is actually more less than this). In comparison, in USA ticket is $8-10 (?) while monthly income is $3700-4000.

Depends on your field of study as well. I know arts are much cheaper than engineering (in my school at least).

Upside is if you do end up on the prairies, you're going to have a unique experience unlike anywhere else on the planet. A lot of students from overseas who come here to study end up going on to get landed immigrant status and then citizenship. What schools have you applied to?

UpToLight
25th January 2014, 22:22
There is plenty of work in Australia , there is no reason to be un employed here. The papers are full of full and part time positions. The study visa should have provision for work sustainance. If you are willing to do labour or menial tasks you can get by .. the only problem is while the wages are good comparitively .. on average 25 to 50% higher than elce where .. the cost of living is well over 200% more than anywhere so you are still at a disadvantage by a factor of 3:1

N

Thanks for info! Yeah, it seems in comparison with Canada and USA, in Australia that ratio is bigger.

UpToLight
25th January 2014, 22:31
Australia is the most stable with work except its the most expensive place on the planet to live. All three are beautiful countries with lots of adventure.

N

Yeah. I heard that it is expensive. But I think average income is enough to balance expenditure there, no? Because, in my country it is nearly impossible. For example, in my country, 2D movie ticket price is $6,42 while average monthly income is $490 (this is official report. It is actually more less than this). In comparison, in USA ticket is $8-10 (?) while monthly income is $3700-4000.

Depends on your field of study as well. I know arts are much cheaper than engineering (in my school at least).

Upside is if you do end up on the prairies, you're going to have a unique experience unlike anywhere else on the planet. A lot of students from overseas who come here to study end up going on to get landed immigrant status and then citizenship. What schools have you applied to?
Right now I'm preparing for IELTS exam. In March I'll take exam and after that I'll apply.

Tangri
25th January 2014, 23:36
Australia is the most stable with work except its the most expensive place on the planet to live. All three are beautiful countries with lots of adventure.

N

Yeah. I heard that it is expensive. But I think average income is enough to balance expenditure there, no? Because, in my country it is nearly impossible. For example, in my country, 2D movie ticket price is $6,42 while average monthly income is $490 (this is official report. It is actually more less than this). In comparison, in USA ticket is $8-10 (?) while monthly income is $3700-4000.

As a having master degree(MD) and leaving in chosen second home country. I would success you should not chose Canada.
But this statement is very moronic and primitive one. Because every person is different and his/her expectation is various in each person. Will is the most important part in satisfaction.
1- Are you willing to participate/play the whatever game on that country with some creatures which you never will be in touch in your country?
2-Are you willing to sacrifice your belief on fairness?
3- Are you ready to climb a stair's steps which is made with another being?

If your answers are ,Yes, then you should not be worry about U, C or A, you will be OK in any of them.
Opportunities are fluctuated, depends on correct time, place, contact person on various events.
Do not compare 3D movie or I phone prices, it is irrelevant on happiness.

Satisfaction of personal freedom must be the trigger motivation on choices. If one of the your 3 answers is NO , migration is not a solution.

panopticon
25th January 2014, 23:37
Well, it seems I will skip Australia because of expensiveness. I like high temperature and that's why I optioned it. And also some students form my country went there before and they all praise it.

And Nanoo, I agree about South Americans! I've worked with people from Argentina, Columbia and Chile. They are really amazing!

G'day UpToLight,

Sydney (New South Wales) is a major city and very expensive. Rental prices/cost of living vary drastically across the country, between suburbs and even within some suburbs. Perth (Western Australia) is quite expensive, as is Melbourne (Victoria) and Brisbane (Queensland). Darwin (Northern Territory) and Adelaide (South Australia) aren't that bad. Tasmania is quite cheap in rent but maybe higher in some other costs (due to transport costs across Bass Strait).

Problem with Tasmania is high unemployment (7.7%) and underemployment as opposed to mainland Australia, though as your degree is in tourism that is one of the main industries in Tassie so employment opportunities may be higher (though tourism tends to be seasonal here).

Have a good look at the cost of living in the various State capitals versus employment possibilities in Tourism in those States. Also look at the rural centres as they are usually cheaper to live in and may be closer to tourism "hotspots". Queensland and the Northern Territory have quite a few tourist attractions, so does Tassie. There are also a number of tourism based resorts on Islands off the East coast of Australia (eg Hamilton Island (http://www.tourismwhitsundays.com.au/destinations/hamilton-island/) part of the Whitsunday Islands (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whitsunday_Islands) in the Great Barrier Reef (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Barrier_Reef)).

In relation to the USA and Canada. I don't know as I've never lived in either of them. A couple of friends reckon Canada is great (but marine biologists are like that) and those who've been to the USA reckon "nice place to visit, wouldn't want to live there". I don't know how reliable that advice is. :)

Anyway, good luck with the IETLS course and Masters where ever you decide to take it.

-- Pan

Milneman
25th January 2014, 23:40
Australia is the most stable with work except its the most expensive place on the planet to live. All three are beautiful countries with lots of adventure.

N

Yeah. I heard that it is expensive. But I think average income is enough to balance expenditure there, no? Because, in my country it is nearly impossible. For example, in my country, 2D movie ticket price is $6,42 while average monthly income is $490 (this is official report. It is actually more less than this). In comparison, in USA ticket is $8-10 (?) while monthly income is $3700-4000.

Depends on your field of study as well. I know arts are much cheaper than engineering (in my school at least).

Upside is if you do end up on the prairies, you're going to have a unique experience unlike anywhere else on the planet. A lot of students from overseas who come here to study end up going on to get landed immigrant status and then citizenship. What schools have you applied to?
Right now I'm preparing for IELTS exam. In March I'll take exam and after that I'll apply.

If you want I can forward info for you about the two Universities here in Sask. Bigger schools out west and east, but it's a different experience here. Can you tell I'm a proud Canuck? :D

psydney
26th January 2014, 01:41
Hi UpToLight — I've lived in all three countries, and currently live in Australia, which says something. All three have much to offer, as well as downsides.

When I lived in the USA, I resented having a large portion of my tax dollars going toward invading countries, producing more and more weapons of mass destruction, and destructive systems, instead of going toward national health and other social services. Also, I was tired of the crime and social problems (but this may depend on where you live). That said, there are positives. There is a lot of innovation and creativity. Americans tend to have a "can do" attitude and are willing to tackle difficult issues and come up with solutions. You'll meet some interesting people and individuals with higher consciousness. The USA has some of the top universities as well as mediocre ones, and everything in between.

My impressions of Canada were very good. They do have decent social services, unlike the USA, and some good local environmental systems. There are problems, but they're small compared to those in the USA. The consciousness of the people is high, on the whole. Recycling is widespread and has been well developed for decades. And there has been a concerted effort to reduce packaging. These are only a few examples.

An example of Canadian ways in tourism is Algonquin Park, a large forested area of Ontario with thousands of lakes. Although it's a well-developed holiday destination, at a glance, it looks pristine and unspoilt by man. There are cottages, but they are required to blend in with nature, so you don't see them. Only the forestry service is allowed to use speedboats (eg for rescues). These and various other rules help to preserve the natural beauty and pristine wilderness of the park. Although there are problems, such as acid rain, it's still an amazing place.

I left Canada because my lungs were getting congested during the winter, and I was having difficulty getting rid of the condition. I needed to go to a warmer place. Canadian winters are seriously cold. I've experienced -25C in Toronto, and some places go down to the -40s. There are only a few places with mild winters (and that's down to -12C or so), such as Vancouver, Kelowna, St Catherines, and maybe parts of Vancouver Island. If you love cold weather, then it's the place for you.

Australia is a good place to be. The economy tends to be more stable than other parts of the world. There is employment, it's relatively safe, and there still are social services although shrinking. I think the Australians on the thread have summed it up well, so I won't repeat it. But will just comment briefly on a post above regarding prices across Australia. I was recently living in the Northern Territory and prices in Alice Springs and Darwin are some of the highest in the country. Rents in Alice are comparable to those in Sydney. I've heard Darwin is even higher. There are many employment opportunities in these two places, including in tourism. Now I'm back in Sydney and am reasonably happy here. It isn't perfect, but compared to many other parts of the world, a good choice.

That's as brief as I can make it. All the best UpToLight — I'm sure you'll find enough positives wherever you choose to go.

panopticon
26th January 2014, 02:04
Australia is a good place to be. The economy tends to be more stable than other parts of the world. There is employment, it's relatively safe, and there still are social services although shrinking. I think the Australians on the thread have summed it up well, so I won't repeat it. But will just comment briefly on a post above regarding prices across Australia. I was recently living in the Northern Territory and prices in Alice Springs and Darwin are some of the highest in the country. Rents in Alice are comparable to those in Sydney. I've heard Darwin is even higher. There are many employment opportunities in these two places, including in tourism. Now I'm back in Sydney and am reasonably happy here. It isn't perfect, but compared to many other parts of the world, a good choice.


Fair cop PSydney. Haven't been to the NT in a few decades and admit that I didn't spend much time in Darwin when I was there. Do you reckon it's cause of the mining boom like in WA? Tassie is cheap and not as hot as the rest of Oz which is one of the main reasons we decided to shift here from WA. One of the young fellas was living in Cairns (he's back in WA now for work) and reckoned it was very pricey, but further inland not so bad.
Thanks for catching my error. :)

-- Pan

psydney
26th January 2014, 02:53
G'day Pan — yes, mining is a big part of it. But Alice, in particular, has also become a federal government town of sorts, a mini Canberra. It's full of federal services and projects (including indigenous services, land and environmental projects, and some unusual orgs like the Joint Geological and Geographical Research Station down the road from us, which monitors natural and man-made seismic activity globally), and public servants. And there's Pine Gap (another interesting story, but way off topic), which also employs a fair number of people. There's a large American contingent, although, for once, they tend to keep a low profile. Then there's tourism, outback tours, etc, which attract a large international crowd. Immigrants are coming to Alice as well — Sudanese, East Indians, Pacific Islanders. So it's a colourful scene, with Aussies from all over the country, a number of indigenous groups, as well as Americans, Europeans, Africans, Indians and others. It's an interesting phenomenon, but will keep this short as it's digressing from the topic of the thread. Btw, Tassie's a great choice, I love it there.

161803398
26th January 2014, 08:03
http://www.youtube.com/watch?Vxgmuw1SFnM There's lots of potential adventure in B.C., Canada but, of course, at the moment, the evil are doing their best to try to mess us up.

UpToLight
26th January 2014, 09:07
Australia is the most stable with work except its the most expensive place on the planet to live. All three are beautiful countries with lots of adventure.

N

Yeah. I heard that it is expensive. But I think average income is enough to balance expenditure there, no? Because, in my country it is nearly impossible. For example, in my country, 2D movie ticket price is $6,42 while average monthly income is $490 (this is official report. It is actually more less than this). In comparison, in USA ticket is $8-10 (?) while monthly income is $3700-4000.

Depends on your field of study as well. I know arts are much cheaper than engineering (in my school at least).

Upside is if you do end up on the prairies, you're going to have a unique experience unlike anywhere else on the planet. A lot of students from overseas who come here to study end up going on to get landed immigrant status and then citizenship. What schools have you applied to?
Right now I'm preparing for IELTS exam. In March I'll take exam and after that I'll apply.

If you want I can forward info for you about the two Universities here in Sask. Bigger schools out west and east, but it's a different experience here. Can you tell I'm a proud Canuck? :D

Yes, please! I would be thankful.

UpToLight
26th January 2014, 09:21
Hi UpToLight — I've lived in all three countries, and currently live in Australia, which says something. All three have much to offer, as well as downsides.

When I lived in the USA, I resented having a large portion of my tax dollars going toward invading countries, producing more and more weapons of mass destruction, and destructive systems, instead of going toward national health and other social services. Also, I was tired of the crime and social problems (but this may depend on where you live). That said, there are positives. There is a lot of innovation and creativity. Americans tend to have a "can do" attitude and are willing to tackle difficult issues and come up with solutions. You'll meet some interesting people and individuals with higher consciousness. The USA has some of the top universities as well as mediocre ones, and everything in between.

My impressions of Canada were very good. They do have decent social services, unlike the USA, and some good local environmental systems. There are problems, but they're small compared to those in the USA. The consciousness of the people is high, on the whole. Recycling is widespread and has been well developed for decades. And there has been a concerted effort to reduce packaging. These are only a few examples.

An example of Canadian ways in tourism is Algonquin Park, a large forested area of Ontario with thousands of lakes. Although it's a well-developed holiday destination, at a glance, it looks pristine and unspoilt by man. There are cottages, but they are required to blend in with nature, so you don't see them. Only the forestry service is allowed to use speedboats (eg for rescues). These and various other rules help to preserve the natural beauty and pristine wilderness of the park. Although there are problems, such as acid rain, it's still an amazing place.

I left Canada because my lungs were getting congested during the winter, and I was having difficulty getting rid of the condition. I needed to go to a warmer place. Canadian winters are seriously cold. I've experienced -25C in Toronto, and some places go down to the -40s. There are only a few places with mild winters (and that's down to -12C or so), such as Vancouver, Kelowna, St Catherines, and maybe parts of Vancouver Island. If you love cold weather, then it's the place for you.

Australia is a good place to be. The economy tends to be more stable than other parts of the world. There is employment, it's relatively safe, and there still are social services although shrinking. I think the Australians on the thread have summed it up well, so I won't repeat it. But will just comment briefly on a post above regarding prices across Australia. I was recently living in the Northern Territory and prices in Alice Springs and Darwin are some of the highest in the country. Rents in Alice are comparable to those in Sydney. I've heard Darwin is even higher. There are many employment opportunities in these two places, including in tourism. Now I'm back in Sydney and am reasonably happy here. It isn't perfect, but compared to many other parts of the world, a good choice.

That's as brief as I can make it. All the best UpToLight — I'm sure you'll find enough positives wherever you choose to go.

Thank you for information, psydney! Yes, my main problem is weather. In my country, apart from 4-5 spring-summer months, weather is always grey, boring and in winter weather is windy and cold which I hate (My city Baku is called "the city of wind"). I love snow but here, in my city it rarely snows and if it snows, even a little, all transport and communal services are disabled. Because of low government care. Anyway, I don't think one can face this type of problem in one of those countries (at least not in whole country like my since Baku is capital and best developed city in country and it faces all those problems)

Milneman
26th January 2014, 22:57
Okie doke! From west - east....here's the web pages to some great schools.

UBC in Vancouver: http://www.ubc.ca/
Univerity of Alberta in Edmonton: http://www.ualberta.ca/

Saskatoon and Regina, Saskatoon is a real artsy kind of city...in competition with Winnipeg for title "Paris of the Prairies" hehe

U of S: http://www.usask.ca/
U of R: http://www.uregina.ca/ <--biased, my university. :D

U of M (Winnipeg): http://umanitoba.ca/

U of T (Toronto, BIG city, VERY cosmopolitan): http://www.utoronto.ca/

York University, also Toronto: http://www.yorku.ca/web/index.htm

Probably one of the best schools in Canada, McGill in Montreal...just by virtue of it being Montreal, I'd recommend this one. Ask Flash. Her neck of the woods. :D

McGill: https://www.mcgill.ca/

And this link will give you an overview of some of the other schools I haven't mentioned.

http://www.aucc.ca/canadian-universities/

Good luck with your exams! :)

GreenGuy
26th January 2014, 23:29
The level of turn around that the USA would have to move into, and into immediately, with no more hesitation, in order to avoid that direction they currently travel in (worse than the great depression situation, right now, notably worse).....is so great and apparently unlikely (no visible signs).... that I would personally recommend not moving to anywhere near the north American continent.

I have to regretfully echo this. For all its fantastic places and opportunities, moving to the US at this time could be asking for all kinds of disappointment and trouble. Worst case scenario, it'd be like moving to Germany in 1933.

UpToLight
27th January 2014, 13:57
Okie doke! From west - east....here's the web pages to some great schools.

UBC in Vancouver: http://www.ubc.ca/
Univerity of Alberta in Edmonton: http://www.ualberta.ca/

Saskatoon and Regina, Saskatoon is a real artsy kind of city...in competition with Winnipeg for title "Paris of the Prairies" hehe

U of S: http://www.usask.ca/
U of R: http://www.uregina.ca/ <--biased, my university. :D

U of M (Winnipeg): http://umanitoba.ca/

U of T (Toronto, BIG city, VERY cosmopolitan): http://www.utoronto.ca/

York University, also Toronto: http://www.yorku.ca/web/index.htm

Probably one of the best schools in Canada, McGill in Montreal...just by virtue of it being Montreal, I'd recommend this one. Ask Flash. Her neck of the woods. :D

McGill: https://www.mcgill.ca/

And this link will give you an overview of some of the other schools I haven't mentioned.

http://www.aucc.ca/canadian-universities/

Good luck with your exams! :)

Thank you, Milneman! I will read the information on those links with pleasure! I have also to advice with the man who will help me with university choice and documents. I will send these links to him too.

Flash
27th January 2014, 14:52
Thank you, Milneman! I will read the information on those links with pleasure! I have also to advice with the man who will help me with university choice and documents. I will send these links to him too.

you can also look at Concordia University in Montréal.

UpToLight, when I saw this phrase, "I have also to advice with the man who willhelp me with university choice and documents", the right light lit up right away. PLEASE BE VERY CAREFUL. If this person is not a relative, be careful

There is full of teenagers and young adults whose trip is paid for from deemed "benevolent" people when in fact it is the mafia and they end up in America forced to prostitute, as sex slave. At least half of these in Canada are from Russia, western Asia and Ukraine. And there is a looot in Montréal alone, and in every large North American city. I met a mother once in Russia who was looking for her daughter in supposedly California, sent there to "study" but who had disappeared.

Those Young never see the light of the day when in America, forget the studies. And I mean it, they are sex slaves, in closed down buildings/rooms, with 20 clients a day and survive this treatment for about 4 years before dying.

Others are obliged to dance naked and prostitute themselves in sex clubs.

How do I know this: the police told me and I met a few who had escaped and were actively seached by the Russian mafia.

Please be careful, nobody will pay you such a trip without expecting much much more than the real cost in exchange.

However, if you are from the few rich oïl, political or other rich families in Azerbaïdjan, then no problems, you can go where you want.

Flash
27th January 2014, 15:03
I forgot to add: whomever organise your trip, please, confirm your admission at the university by yourself, as well as your renting for lodgment. To this avoid theft and be caught in a foreign coutry at the mercy of the organiser of your trip. In fact, you can ask for admission into ESL studies by yourself for example and then go, by yourself, to the Canadian embassy or its representative in your country. If you are given any visa, verify the validity of it in the Canadian embassy, or its representative, in your country. Never assume that the papers you are given by a third party are legal and true.

I have traveled a lot and have seen quite a few irregularities in papers as well, and people turned back at the airport because of wrong papers.

Flash
27th January 2014, 15:19
this video is about girls, but traffic of boys is as flourishing too.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VJyYEQbDIEo



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=171jCPjxeXE

And here from the Uzbek trafficking ring in Thailand and around the world


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_iNBKlBcXkY

jackovesk
27th January 2014, 15:29
If you come here to Aus to study you should make certain you can work as well. Remember wages are high so cost of living is balanced out. Also Aus is just a quarry, food bowl and tourist resort. We don't make anything anymore so tourism is the main draw card. As for Aus being a desert, well you are right but that happened long before white man got here.


Also Aus is just a quarry, food bowl and tourist resort.

Hey there olddragon,

You should get a job promoting (Australian Tourism)...:pound:

UpToLight
27th January 2014, 15:42
Thank you, Flash. Yes, I know there are many fake people who "help" young boys/girls for different purposes. The man who helps me is (in fact, we are three friends who want to go overseas to work and live) quite reliable. He is doing this job many years now. He helped many students who live in many fooreign countires now. And he is also our IELTS course tutor.

Like you I also recommend people to check the authenticity of people they work with.

Flash
27th January 2014, 15:49
I am happy you are in safe hands.

But please, just in case, check that you are truly inscribed to the univesity in question, it only need internet back and forth with the department you are inscribed in. And your heart wlll be flying in peace with joy.

UpToLight
27th January 2014, 16:00
I am happy you are in safe hands.

But please, just in case, check that you are truly inscribed to the univesity in question, it only need internet back and forth with the department you are inscribed in. And your heart wlll be flying in peace with joy.

Of course! Thank you for your guidance!

Tesseract
27th January 2014, 23:24
I would recommend Australia, having lived in Aus and the USA and having been to Canada a couple of times.

About the cost of living in Australia - mostly it is high due to the price of housing as people have mentioned here - but the answer is very simple - just get a room in a share-house.

I studied in Melbourne and lived in a share house for two years. You can expect to pay $500/month (not including electricity).

Other comparisons between usa and aus;


petrol:

USA: $3.50/gal
Australia: $5.70/gal

Rent: Capital city in Australia, $300 to $400 pw for apt or very cheap house.
USA: Rent, $400 week for average apartment in Boston (expensive city), or $200 week for apartment in a college town outside a big city.

Wage for basic work: USA $8 to $12 an hour
Australia: $15 to $20 an hour

Food price is about the same in both countries.

Dennis Leahy
27th January 2014, 23:51
If you could avoid the utterly insane US federal government, the Security State, the Police State, the Prison-Industrial-Complex (we're number 1 in the world. We're #1! U.S.A! U.S.A.!) the fact that the worst corporations in the world call the US home with their major headquarters here, the high cost of schooling, the extremely low minimum wage, the extremely high infant mortality rate, the worlds most expensive health care and lousy health care-giving, a high percentage of religious fanatics, television and "reality stars" instead of culture, the extremely high stress rate, the extremely high percentage of GMO food, the high percentage of fluoridated water, millions of people that watch fast cars going around in circles and idolize the heroic drivers that do it, well then sure, come on in to the US. It's a great place to die, er, I mean live. Did I mention we're about to collapse?

And yes, if you can avoid all that, the US also has some awesome people, gorgeous scenery, and every climate from tropical to arctic.

Dennis



If you come here to Aus to study you should make certain you can work as well. Remember wages are high so cost of living is balanced out. Also Aus is just a quarry, food bowl and tourist resort. We don't make anything anymore so tourism is the main draw card. As for Aus being a desert, well you are right but that happened long before white man got here.


Also Aus is just a quarry, food bowl and tourist resort.Hey there olddragon,

You should get a job promoting (Australian Tourism)...:pound:
I've got dibs on promoting the US! :~)

Dennis

TargeT
28th January 2014, 01:39
Rent: Capital city in Australia, $300 to $400 pw for apt or very cheap house.
USA: Rent, $400 week for average apartment in Boston (expensive city), or $200 week for apartment in a college town outside a big city.


200 a week?

I spend (in the Caribbean mind you) per month 1,600 (house loan) 500 (electric) for a 4 bed 4 bath house on 2 acres, about the same as i spent in Alaska (though there was water/natural gas bills, waste removal and a much lower electric bill, still was about 400-500 for utilities).

in the states it's highly dependent on where you are, what college you are attending etc... your numbers are not very good for the US; you could attend UofO (university of Oregon) and live very cheaply (though good luck getting a job in that state) you could attend a college in South Carolina and live for 500$ a month in a big house, you could go to Standford and pay 3,500 a month for a one room studio apartment.

the US has tons of variety, our "poor" live better than 80% of the planet; but, as Dennis said, it has it's downsides....

Tesseract
28th January 2014, 02:07
I agree that there is a lot of variation in rent/cost of living in the US, which is why I contrasted somewhere like Boston with a much cheaper college town. I am giving and comparing mid level examples, naturally there are options at the extreme of both ends.

I would advise the OP to just look on Craigslist to get an idea of what to expect.

Flash
28th January 2014, 03:25
Why don't we ask UpToLight budget??? to start with.

You may be surprised here. Then we can offer alternatives going within his budget.

Flash
28th January 2014, 03:33
My degree is in tourism. I think finding job isn't problem in any of them since they have pretty well developed industry.

Yes it is a pretty well developed industry which is also pretty well covered in terms of workforce. In other words, lost of people in the field and lots of competition. At least in Canada, do not expect a job in this field to start with, a job that pays well. Most of the time, the pay is not that great in that field. And Canada won't give you any point for having a degree in an industry that is saturated and does not need more Manpower.

This is the harsh reality of immigration here. A computer degree would have gotten you an immediate job.

UpToLight
28th January 2014, 15:16
Why don't we ask UpToLight budget??? to start with.

You may be surprised here. Then we can offer alternatives going within his budget.

It is a government programme. They will fund my education for two years while I study in university. The problem begins after that. That's why I want to find a job to continue live there after I get master's.

UpToLight
22nd April 2014, 15:34
Dear Australians, which city would you advice to live. I have to choose either Monash University in Melbourne or University of Queensland in Brisbane. In short, Melbourne or Brisbane? Thanks!

leavesoftrees
23rd April 2014, 08:21
Dear Australians, which city would you advice to live. I have to choose either Monash University in Melbourne or University of Queensland in Brisbane. In short, Melbourne or Brisbane? Thanks!
Melbourne is a great place to live but cold winters. Brisbane is warmer - take your pick

enfoldedblue
23rd April 2014, 22:49
I live in Australia...but have never been to Melbourne. I have been to Brisbane. From what i hear Melbourne is culturally richer...with a vibrant art and music scene. But as mentioned above it is cold in winter...but then Brisbane is stinking hot in the summer. They say Brisbane is like a big country town.
Both have pros and cons....personally i would base my decision on the university and what they offer.

Good luck with whatever you choose. :-)

UpToLight
24th April 2014, 15:09
Thanks guys! I have read many comments on different sites too and most people say Melbourne is better. I guess it would be more suitable for me.