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View Full Version : Whats a good water filter (that removes fluoride)



john.d
24th February 2014, 21:40
Ive been looking around for a while and see that reverse osmosis filters do the job . The problem i have is that i live in a truck so dont have mains pressure and power is an issue .
Ive also been looking at distilling water then adding minerals afterwards . There doesnt seem to be any stove top (non electric) distillers around though . There are a few plans for diy stills which is an option but i thought i would ask on here to see if anyone has a solution .
Any help would be much appreciated

Thanks

John

mpennery
24th February 2014, 22:03
I'm sure there are others but we use a Big Berkey. It's gravity fed so no worries about electricity or pressure. You have to purchase the extra fluoride filter attachments if you're filling it with tap. The nice thing about the Berkey is that you can put water from just about any source into it. We use rainwater. You can also just buy the filter elements and build your own filter with any two containers.
Matt

DeDukshyn
24th February 2014, 23:57
I've heard some mixed things about berky filters -- not that they aren't great, but just that they don't quite do what they claim they do (at least I have read this from people who have tested them). So look into it a little before making the decision to ensure the fluoride is actually being removed. Unfortunately, fluoride is very hard to remove from water completely, but most charcoal based filters should remove some of it and most of the chlorine.

Boiling or reducing fluoridated water greatly increases the fluoride concentration so also keep this in mind.

There should be someone here who can point you in the water distiller direction, but I'm not well versed in them.

PurpleLama
24th February 2014, 23:59
I've heard some mixed things about berky filters -- not that they aren't great, but just that they don't quite do what they claim they do (at least I have read this from people who have tested them). So look into it a little before making the decision to ensure the fluoride is actually being removed. Unfortunately, fluoride is very hard to remove from water completely, but most charcoal based filters should remove some of it and most of the chlorine.

Boiling or reducing fluoridated water greatly increases the fluoride concentration so also keep this in mind.

There should be someone here who can point you in the water distiller direction, but I'm well versed in them.

I have a Berkey, and I would be interested to hear about what you found out....

DeDukshyn
25th February 2014, 00:07
I've heard some mixed things about berky filters -- not that they aren't great, but just that they don't quite do what they claim they do (at least I have read this from people who have tested them). So look into it a little before making the decision to ensure the fluoride is actually being removed. Unfortunately, fluoride is very hard to remove from water completely, but most charcoal based filters should remove some of it and most of the chlorine.

Boiling or reducing fluoridated water greatly increases the fluoride concentration so also keep this in mind.

There should be someone here who can point you in the water distiller direction, but I'm well versed in them.

I have a Berkey, and I would be interested to hear about what you found out....

I won't be able to find the original content, but the overall context was a deep analysis of a few high end water filters -- Berky was one. The details weren't that concerning to me, but where the berky claimed to remove 100% of X, after testing it came out less than 100%, but in comparison to others, it was still in the top few.

My main point is before making a major decision look into bad reviews and basically the "other" side of the story, but most specifically look for a proper unbiased analysis, so you can decide whether it is still good enough for you, even if it is not perfect. I don't think there are any "perfect" filtration systems out there even that are remotely affordable.

Personally, after the review I saw I would still consider a Berky as one of my top choices.

Octavusprime
25th February 2014, 03:48
To remove fluoride you need more than a carbon filter. There are three main ways.

Reverse Osmosis Expensive initial investment and wastes a lot of water. Usually 2-4 gallons are wasted for every 1 gallon produced. Minerals/salts must be added back in.
Distillation. Time and energy intensive as you need heat to boil the liquid. Care must be taken to add minerals/salts back to the water.
The third way is to buy a filter containing activated aluminum, which is expensive and needs frequent changing. Most fluoride filters rely on this technology and don't remove half as much fluoride as they claim.

Other ways:
Bone Char Activated carbon. Activated carbon made using bones. Just like our bones pull in fluoride this carbon filter does the same. Make sure it is medical grade cause who knows where that bone came from..

Buy spring water. This is what I do. Fast, easy and fairly cheap. Here is a website of bottled water that don't contain fluoride. http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/salud/salud_fluor35.htm

I wish I had a better answer for you. Fluoride is a pain in the ass to remove unfortunately.
Cheers!

Sidney
25th February 2014, 03:59
I use a Berkey, it has an extra flouride attachment. MUCH cheaper than bottled. I love it. I do not sell, or am associated with the company in any way shape or form besides being a satisfied customer.
http://www.berkeyfilters.com/

john.d
25th February 2014, 14:40
Berkey does sound good but I'm not sure about how efficient it is with fluoride ?

AlaBil
25th February 2014, 14:44
To remove fluoride you need more than a carbon filter. There are three main ways.

Reverse Osmosis Expensive initial investment and wastes a lot of water. Usually 2-4 gallons are wasted for every 1 gallon produced. Minerals/salts must be added back in.
Distillation. Time and energy intensive as you need heat to boil the liquid. Care must be taken to add minerals/salts back to the water.
The third way is to buy a filter containing activated aluminum, which is expensive and needs frequent changing. Most fluoride filters rely on this technology and don't remove half as much fluoride as they claim.

Other ways:
Bone Char Activated carbon. Activated carbon made using bones. Just like our bones pull in fluoride this carbon filter does the same. Make sure it is medical grade cause who knows where that bone came from..

Buy spring water. This is what I do. Fast, easy and fairly cheap. Here is a website of bottled water that don't contain fluoride. http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/salud/salud_fluor35.htm

I wish I had a better answer for you. Fluoride is a pain in the ass to remove unfortunately.
Cheers!

Octavusprime... Thanks for the list of flouride free bottled water.

You are right about fluoride removal being a problem. I have been trying to find a way to remove it from the entire household water flow and it's almost impossible do. No one locally knows a thing about this.

genevieve
25th February 2014, 17:57
Check out the ProPur water filter system as seen on Infowars.com.
It filters out lots of chemicals along with fluoride.

I have one. I like it, but I have no idea how good it really is.

Happy hunting!


Peace Love Joy & Harmony,
Genevieve

Sidney
25th February 2014, 21:08
Berkey does sound good but I'm not sure about how efficient it is with fluoride ?

I have the large size berkey. I purchase two of the flouride filters about every 6 months or so. And I use a lot of water because I use the filtered water in my humidifier also. So I go through six gallons a day with cooking and drinking etc.

Strat
25th February 2014, 21:23
Kind of a side note: Make sure the water has fluoride in it in the first place.

I always assumed my city had fluoridated water but turns out it doesn't. We do have chlorine but I think that filters out easier (just a hunch though not sure).

13th Warrior
25th February 2014, 21:37
Most likely there is no sure method of fluoride removal...

A significant reduction is better then nothing...no?

You need to look at the data sheet for the reduction %'s for the given system you are using (looking to purchase). If there is no data sheet...buyer beware!

You're best bet is a water source without the halides in it.

An often overlooked component of R.O./distilled water is the removal of all the oxygen; an essential element.

PurpleLama
25th February 2014, 21:57
For the suggestion of bottled water, after drinking the Berkey water for a few months, all bottled water tastes like plastic, to me.

ROMANWKT
25th February 2014, 22:22
Adya Clarity -----Check this out on Google, add to water to be filtered, removes fluoride.


Regards

roman

DeDukshyn
25th February 2014, 23:38
Kind of a side note: Make sure the water has fluoride in it in the first place.

I always assumed my city had fluoridated water but turns out it doesn't. We do have chlorine but I think that filters out easier (just a hunch though not sure).

As far as I know, a basic charcoal filter will remove ~98% of chlorine. That's good enough for me, and I can't taste it at all anymore after filtering it. Like you, I am very pleased my city no longer fluoridates.

robertr2m
6th March 2014, 18:45
When dealing with removing flouride, it's a matter of contact. The Berkey filter has a built in restricter that slows the water down so it gets the maximum contact with the filter medium. The "optimal" fluoride levels recommended by the U.S. Public Health Service and CDC range from 0.7 parts per million (ppm) for warmer climates to 1.2 ppm for cooler climates. The Berkey used a solution of 20 to 30 ppm (alot more than the "optimal" levels) and still had a <1 ppm result. I'd say that was pretty good. Run it through twice if you really want to be sure.

Berkey Technical Information
Testing was performed with a flow rate of less than 3gpm per cu.ft. of the Berkey KDF filtering medium at 20 - 30 parts per million (ppm) of the ion in the solution liquid. Results of < 1ppm of the fluoride ion in the effluent were typical for the filter media (>95% reduction). Under optimum laboratory conditions, effluent concentrations of less than 50 part per billion (ppb) were readily achieved which equates to a >99.75% reduction.

Also, if you want to know what your particular water source has in it, goto http://thyroid.about.com/library/articles/blfluoridefinder.htm

Breaks it down to the water treatment plant your source is coming from.

Be safe, R2

13th Warrior
7th March 2014, 16:37
As far as I know; KDF is not rated for fluoride removal...

How much KDF material is used in the Berkey filter system?

KDF is an ion-exchange media that is great for reducing the chlorine load on the carbon media which, improves the filtration life of the carbon element.

In my experience KDF does very little to reduce TDS.

robertr2m
7th March 2014, 17:06
As far as I know; KDF is not rated for fluoride removal...

How much KDF material is used in the Berkey filter system?

KDF is an ion-exchange media that is great for reducing the chlorine load on the carbon media which, improves the filtration life of the carbon element.

In my experience KDF does very little to reduce TDS.

Berkey uses Activated Alumina (which is granulated form of aluminum oxide) as the medium in it's flouride filters.

13th Warrior
7th March 2014, 17:19
Robert,

Your post clearly identified KDF as the fluoride reduction agent...

What is the rated capacity for activated alumina...probably a couple hundred gallons?

sheme
7th March 2014, 17:23
Ive been looking around for a while and see that reverse osmosis filters do the job . The problem i have is that i live in a truck so dont have mains pressure and power is an issue .
Ive also been looking at distilling water then adding minerals afterwards . There doesnt seem to be any stove top (non electric) distillers around though . There are a few plans for diy stills which is an option but i thought i would ask on here to see if anyone has a solution .
Any help would be much appreciated

Thanks

John

Phone your water company you may find you don't even have fluoride added, I was surprised to find my water did not have fluoride and I am in Herefordshire,,,

robertr2m
7th March 2014, 18:04
Robert,

Your post clearly identified KDF as the fluoride reduction agent...

What is the rated capacity for activated alumina...probably a couple hundred gallons?

The flouride filter is in addition to the KDF filter. Sorry I wasn't clear. That was a direct cut and paste from Berkey Tech sheet.

To be clear... the water is prefiltered through the KDF and then through the flouride filters that are Activated Alumina. Berkey claims 1000 gallons which may be less if higher than "optimal" levels are filtered.

Be safe, R2

13th Warrior
7th March 2014, 18:20
If that is Berkey's statement; they should be more careful to not make misleading statements.

robertr2m
7th March 2014, 18:45
If that is Berkey's statement; they should be more careful to not make misleading statements.

Not sure how it's misleading, seemed pretty clear to me but here's a link on the tech.

http://www.berkeyfilters.com/berkey-water-filters/fluoride.html

Be safe, R2

Mu2143
7th March 2014, 19:26
...................

13th Warrior
7th March 2014, 19:28
Robert,

Berkey is claiming fluoride reduction by KDF media.

You say Berkley uses activated alumina; I followed the link and there is no mention of alumina...

Something is rotten in Denmark...

Berkley shows two K series filter housings; I know of no such media available, in the quantity that a K series body can hold that would be remotely close to being able to reduce fluoride at a capacity of 1000 gal.

...a KDF/GAC for chlorine reduction, YES....no way for fluoride.

Also, correct me if i'm wrong but, I don't see any third party verification for their test results.

robertr2m
7th March 2014, 20:11
Robert,

Berkey is claiming fluoride reduction by KDF media.

You say Berkley uses activated alumina; I followed the link and there is no mention of alumina...

Something is rotten in Denmark...

Berkley shows two K series filter housings; I know of no such media available, in the quantity that a K series body can hold that would be remotely close to being able to reduce fluoride at a capacity of 1000 gal.

...a KDF/GAC for chlorine reduction, YES....no way for fluoride.

Also, correct me if i'm wrong but, I don't see any third party verification for their test results.

I'm sure if you read through the Berkey information or even contacted them, they would be more than happy to verify what I have already stated since I have repeated their product information.

http://www.berkeyfilters.com/about-berkey/contact/

And I agree with you 100% that KDF will not filter flouride.

I don't think the K series body would hold 1000 gallons either. That would pretty big. I think I said (per Berkey) that the filters would treat 1000 gallons. When you stated "What is the rated capacity for activated alumina...probably a couple hundred gallons?", I assumed you meant how many gallons the filter would effectively treat, not what the housing would store. As far as I know, they don't have a housing that will hold a couple hundred gallons either.

Another tech sheet that is more specific...

http://www.berkeyfilters.com/pf2fluoride.pdf

3. The media used within the PF-2 water filter elements contained high grade activated alumina
oxide, which currently is the most efficient media available for extracting fluoride from the water.

As far as third party verification, I would like to see this as well now that you mention it. I think I may use the contact link and ask them or maybe even the 800 number. Ahhhh... just noticed a live chat button... Let's both ask them so they know we are serious in our inquiries about getting the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth :attention: ;)

Be safe, R2

13th Warrior
7th March 2014, 20:47
Robert,

I know who manufactures the filter cartridges that Berkey is using. I personally have conversed with representatives of both the filter company and the manufacture of the KDF material; I used to work in this industry.

robertr2m
7th March 2014, 20:53
Robert,

I know who manufactures the filter cartridges that Berkey is using. I personally have conversed with representatives of both the filter company and the manufacture of the KDF material; I used to work in this industry.

Do they manufacture activated alumina medium as well? That's actually what we are discussing... right? I have agreed and still agree that KDF will not filter flouride. It's essentially the first stage in the filter then the activated alumina filter is the second. Two different filters. A KDF and a activated alumina. Per Berkey, of course.

I'm assuming my last tech link was acceptable?

Be safe, R2

13th Warrior
7th March 2014, 21:11
I'm not questioning the filter manufacturer; they make quality filters.

It's Berkey's claims that i find suspect.

It's all about the media bed and contact time...so, if the cartridges contained 100% alumina; they could only reduce fluoride for a couple hundred gallons.

robertr2m
7th March 2014, 21:23
I did email them and ask if they had an independant testing lab confirm results. If they get back with me, I'll post their reply.

If they used a projection instead of an actual flow test, I would be highly suspect of the results as well. Now that I'm thinking about it... how would you know when the filter was loaded up? Reduction of flow???

Be safe, R2

sheme
7th March 2014, 21:42
According to the Daily Mail the plan is to fluoridate the rest of the UK. I must object to our Government while there is still a chance they do not make it law.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-180373/Anger-fluoride-plans.html

I have a distiller I will distill my water if I have to. I bet they drink bottled spring water with nothing added in the Houses of Parliament

STR
10th March 2014, 23:00
The cheapest and fastest, easiest, safest way to do this was to buy a couple de-humidifiers and a Katadyne water pump to extract the water into my jugs for the fridge or whatever I wish to use it for. Using it for tea and such I never add the minerals I just eat extras of things that would contain those. For the coming times you all should have one of these anyways and its the best. It can filter 12,000 to 14,000 gallons of water before the ceramic filter goes bad in these and they really do work. I have used mine to get drinking water from puddles, holes I dug near water like lakes, ponds, or rivers and then let that little puddle depression fill up. It pumps clear clean water. Great item. Description reads: The classic. This robust water filter made of heavy duty materials is ideal for long lasting continuous use even under extreme circumstances. The silver impregnated ceramic element is effective against bacteria and protozoa. The Katadyn Pocket is the only water filter with a 20 year warranty. Includes: Prefilter, bottle clip and carry bag

Article number: 2010000

The one I have is the Katadyne Pocket. Look it up on Amazon. I've drank and used water this way for us and the pets for years. I never bothered to look for reasons not to and if the container to collect bothers you on a dehumidifier you can simply fix the machine so the safety preventing the things from working if the original is not in there. Just use Gorilla tape to keep it depressed and collect the water in an approved of container. That is what we do actually. We bought similar size approved of drinking containers from Emergency Essentials