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View Full Version : Poll: when did the moon first begin its local orbit of planet earth?



wishinshow
14th November 2014, 23:52
I'm really curious to understand the avalon consensus opinion on this one.

ghostrider
15th November 2014, 00:07
The moon is over 4.5 billion years old and long before that earth had two moons ...http://www.futureofmankind.co.uk/Billy_Meier/File:2_moons_over_Prehistoric_Earth.jpg I believe NASA has even stated the moon is 4.5 billion years older than anything in our sol system ...

Kindred
15th November 2014, 01:31
According to the Thiaooubans (see the book “Thiaoouba Prophecy”), the offering by ghostrider / Billy Meier is correct. There were 2 smaller moons in Earth’s past, but they impacted upon Earth about 6 million years ago. The current Moon was ‘captured’ by Earth about 500,000 years ago.

According to their explanation:

Note: the black and yellow races arrived on Earth at the same time from their ‘home’ planet about 1.35 million years ago due to a self-imposed exodus, as their home planet was in the process of cooling down, and would become uninhabitable within 500 years.

“There was no “Moon” at the time when the ‘black race’ populated Australia [and the ‘yellow race’ populated the east-Asian peninsula] or for a very long time afterwards. There had been two very small moons much earlier – about six million years ago, which revolved around the Earth, eventually colliding with it. Earth was not inhabited at the time so, although terrible cataclysms followed, it didn’t really matter.”

“About 500,000 years ago, Earth ‘captured’ a much larger moon – the one which exists now. It was passing too close to your planet, and was attracted into an orbit. This often happens with moons. Further catastrophes were provoked by this event…”

“A moon is originally a small planet revolving around it’s sun in a spiral that becomes increasingly tight. The smaller planets spiral more rapidly that the larger ones because their inertial force is less.”

“Their spiral being faster, the smaller planets often catch up with the larger planets and, if they pass too closely, the gravitational attraction of the planet will be stronger than that of the sun. The smaller planet begins to orbit the larger one, still in a spiral, which will sooner or later result in a collision.”

{…one day our Moon will fall on our heads} “ … but not for about 195,000 years”

In Unity, Peace and Love

amor
15th November 2014, 02:15
According to David Icke, the South African Shaman Mutwa said their legends say it arrived thirty thousand years ago bearing the reptilian Annunaki, who had scooped out the insides and piloted it across the galaxy to our solar system.

TargeT
15th November 2014, 02:15
Since the earth is only 6,000 years old I can't answer this pole (or was it 7... damnit I always forget what I'm supposed to believe)

A Voice from the Mountains
15th November 2014, 03:01
There were Greek writers who wrote of peoples more ancient than themselves who remembered the Earth before there was a Moon.

Personally, I think something is definitely fishy with the Moon. It's pretty apparent to me from various things that it's not a natural object and it also was placed artificially into its orbit. It's the only "natural" satellite in the Solar System that will regularly block the Sun with almost perfect alignments, which is not as easy to accomplish as it might at first seem (getting the relative sizes of the Moon and the Sun correct in the sky to perform this feat is something that the odds are greatly against happening naturally).

Also the Moon does not rotate on its axis, it only rotates around the Earth. The conditions required for this to happen when the Moon first came into the Earth's orbit must have been so bizarre that scientists are still at a loss to explain this. To have the same face locked towards the Earth at all times is a rather bizarre and unique phenomenon. Can you imagine the Earth being absorbed into the orbit of another planet in a way that the Earth stops spinning and we stop having days or nights? Momentum is conserved outside of an external force acting to diminish it, and in this case it would have to not only diminish the rotational energy but reduce it to exactly 0 without making it spin in the opposite direction either.

When NASA "pinged" the Moon with a projectile it rang like a bell for an extended period of time, so it's probably hollow and/or a relatively thin shell, or the material its made of is simply not what we think it is.


So, I'm not sure how old it is, but probably not as old as we think, and in my view our Moon is definitely not a natural feature.

Silo
15th November 2014, 03:27
Also the Moon does not rotate on its axis, it only rotates around the Earth.







This isn't true. The moon rotates (http://youtu.be/VGnIuqYKnTE). The same side of the moon faces the planet at every point in its orbit.

VGnIuqYKnTE

OmeyocaN777
15th November 2014, 04:35
There must be a connection between gravity of Earth and our Moon and that affects our size.......
Maybe giants exist on Earth before Moon arrives......
For sure, Moon affects us in many parameters except size, like psychology and way of thinking.

Roisin
15th November 2014, 05:00
Fascinating facts about the moon from David Icke's book, The Perception Deception. pg. 182 and 184


• The Moon is 400 times smaller than the Sun, and at a solar eclipse it is 400 times closer to
Earth. This makes the Moon appear from Earth to be the same size as the Sun during a total
eclipse (Fig 215).
• The Sun is at its lowest and weakest in mid-winter when the Moon is at its highest and
brightest. The reverse happens in mid-summer. They set at the same point on the horizon at the
equinoxes and at the opposite point at the solstices.
• Earth rotates 366.259 times during one orbit of the Sun. The polar circumference of the Earth is
366.175 times bigger than that of the Moon. The polar circumference of the Moon is
27.31percent the size of Earth and the Moon makes 27.396 turns per orbit of the Earth.
• Multiply the circumference of the Moon by that of Earth and you get 436,669 kilometres. If
this number is divided by 100 it becomes 436,669 kilometres – the circumference of the Sun
correct to 99.9 percent.
• Divide the circumference of the Sun by that of the Moon and multiply by 100, and you get the
circumference of the Earth. Divide the size of the Sun by



The Moon is said to have next to no magnetic field, but Moon rocks are magnetised.
• Some rocks contain processed metals, such as brass and mica, and the elements neptunium 237
and uranium 236 which do not occur naturally. Neptunium 237 is a radioactive metallic element,
a by-product of nuclear reactors and the production of plutonium. Uranium 236 is a long-living
radioactive nuclear waste that is found in spent nuclear fuel and reprocessed uranium. What is
this doing on a ‘natural’ moon?
• The Moon is said once to have been part of the Earth, but some lunar rocks contain ten times
more titanium than found on Earth and Dr Harold C Urey, winner of the Nobel Prize for
Chemistry, said he was ‘terribly puzzled by the rocks from the Moon and in particular their
titanium content.’ He said that the rocks were ‘mind-blowers’.
• Geochemist Dr S Ross Taylor, who led the lunar chemical analysis team, said that areas of the
Moon the size of Texas were covered with melted rock containing fluid titanium and he could not
explain how the heat was generated to do this. Titanium just happens to be used in supersonic
jets, deep-diving submarines and spacecraft.
• Moon craters are extraordinarily shallow no matter what the size of the apparent impact and Dr
Don L Anderson, a professor of geophysics and director of the seismological laboratory at the
California Institute of Technology, once said that ‘the Moon is made inside out’. What is outside
should be inside.

TargeT
15th November 2014, 05:01
Lots of very strange things about that heavenly body...


1) There's actually four kinds of lunar months

Our months correspond approximately to the length of time it takes our natural satellite to go through a full cycle of phases. From excavated tally sticks, researchers have deduced that people from as early as the Paleolithic period counted days in relation to the moon's phases. But there are actually four different kinds of lunar months. The durations listed here are averages.

1. Anomalistic – the length of time it takes the moon to circle the Earth, measured from one perigee (the closest point in its orbit to Earth) to the next: 27 days, 13 hours, 18 minutes, 37.4 seconds.

2. Nodical – the length of time it takes the moon to pass through one of its nodes (where it crosses the plane of the Earth's orbit) and return to it: 27 days, 5 hours, 5 minutes, 35.9 seconds.

3. Sidereal – the length of time it takes the moon to circle the Earth, using the stars as a reference point: 27 days, 7 hours, 43 minutes, 11.5 seconds.

4. Synodical – the length of time it takes the moon to circle the Earth, using the sun as the reference point (that is, the time lapse between two successive conjunctions with the sun – going from new moon to new moon): 29 days, 12 hours, 44 minutes, 2.7 seconds. It is the synodic month that is the basis of many calendars today and is used to divide the year.

2) We see slightly more than half of the moon from Earth

Most reference books will note that because the moon rotates only once during each revolution about the Earth, we never see more than half of its total surface. The truth, however, is that we actually get to see more of it over the course of its elliptical orbit: 59 percent (almost three-fifths). ['Supermoon' Full Moons Explained]

The moon's rate of rotation is uniform but its rate of revolution is not, so we're able to see just around the edge of each limb from time to time. Put another way, the two motions do not keep perfectly in step, even though they come out together at the end of the month. We call this effect libration of longitude.

So the moon "rocks" in the east and west direction, allowing us to see farther around in longitude at each edge than we otherwise could. The remaining 41 percent can never be seen from our vantage point; and if anyone were on that region of the moon, they would never see the Earth.

3) It would take hundreds of thousands of moons to equal the brightness of the sun

The full moon shines with a magnitude of -12.7, but the sun is 14 magnitudes brighter, at -26.7. The ratio of brightness of the sun versus the moon amounts to a difference of 398,110 to 1. So that's how many full moons you would need to equal the brightness of the sun. But this all a moot point, because there is no way that you could fit that many full moons in the sky.

The sky is 360 degrees around (including the half we can't see, below the horizon), so there are over 41,200 square degrees in the sky. The moon measures only a half degree across, which gives it an area of only 0.2 square degrees. So you could fill up the entire sky, including the half that lies below our feet, with 206,264 full moons — and still come up short by 191,836 in the effort to match the brightness of the sun.

4) The first- or last-quarter moon is not one half as bright as a full moon

If the moon's surface were like a perfectly smooth billiard ball, its surface brightness would be the same all over. In such a case, it would indeed appear half as bright.[Phases of the Moon Explained]

But the moon has a very rough topography. Especially near and along the day/night line (known as the terminator), the lunar landscape appears riddled with innumerable shadows cast by mountains, boulders and even tiny grains of lunar dust. Also, the moon's face is splotched with dark regions. The end result is that at first quarter, the moon appears only one eleventh as bright as when it's full.

The moon is actually a little brighter at first quarter than at last quarter, since at that phase some parts of the moon reflect sunlight better than others.
5) A 95-percent illuminated moon appears half as bright as a full moon

Believe it or not, the moon is half as bright as a full moon about 2.4 days before and after a full moon. Even though about 95 percent of the moon is illuminated at this time, and to most casual observers it might still look like a "full" moon, its brightness is roughly 0.7 magnitudes less than at full phase, making it appear one-half as bright.
6) The Earth, seen from the moon, also goes through phases

However, they are opposite to the lunar phases that we see from the Earth. It's a full Earth when it's new moon for us; last-quarter Earth when we're seeing a first-quarter moon; a crescent Earth when we're seeing a gibbous moon, and when the Earth is at new phase we're seeing a full moon.

From any spot on the moon (except on the far side, where you cannot see the Earth), the Earth would always be in the same place in the sky.

From the moon, our Earth appears nearly four times larger than a full moon appears to us, and – depending on the state of our atmosphere – shines anywhere from 45 to 100 times brighter than a full moon. So when a full (or nearly full) Earth appears in the lunar sky, it illuminates the surrounding lunar landscape with a bluish-gray glow.

From here on the Earth, we can see that glow when the moon appears to us as a crescent; sunlight illuminates but a sliver of the moon, while the rest of its outline is dimly visible by virtue of earthlight. Leonardo da Vinci was the first to figure out what that eerie glow appearing on the moon really was.

7) Eclipses are reversed when viewing from the moon

Phases aren't the only things that are seen in reverse from the moon. An eclipse of the moon for us is an eclipse of the sun from the moon. In this case, the disk of the Earth appears to block out the sun.

If it completely blocks the sun, a narrow ring of light surrounds the dark disk of the Earth; our atmosphere backlighted by the sun. The ring appears to have a ruddy hue, since it's the combined light of all the sunrises and sunsets occurring at that particular moment. That's why during a total lunar eclipse, the moon takes on a ruddy or coppery glow.

When a total eclipse of the sun is taking place here on Earth, an observer on the moon can watch over the course of two or three hours as a small, distinct patch of darkness works its way slowly across the surface of the Earth. It's the moon's dark shadow, called the umbra, that falls on the Earth, but unlike in a lunar eclipse, where the moon can be completely engulfed by the Earth's shadow, the moon's shadow is less than a couple of hundred miles wide when it touches the Earth, appearing only as a dark blotch.

8) There are rules for how the moon's craters are named

The lunar craters were formed by asteroids and comets that collided with the moon. Roughly 300,000 craters wider than 1 km (0.6 miles) are thought to be on the moon's near side alone.

These are named for scholars, scientists, artists and explorers. For example, Copernicus Crater is named for Nicolaus Copernicus, a Polish astronomer who realized in the 1500s that the planets move about the sun. Archimedes Crater is named for the Greek mathematician Archimedes, who made many mathematical discoveries in the third century B.C.

The custom of applying personal names to the lunar formations began in 1645 with Michael van Langren, an engineer in Brussels who named the moon's principal features after kings and great people on the Earth. On his lunar map he named the largest lunar plain (now known as Oceanus Procellarum) after his patron, Phillip IV of Spain.

But just six years later, Giovanni Battista Riccioli of Bologna completed his own great lunar map, which removed the names bestowed by Van Langren and instead derived names chiefly from those of famous astronomers — the basis of the system which continues to this day. In 1939, the British Astronomical Association issued a catalog of officially named lunar formations, "Who's Who on the Moon," listing the names of all formations adopted by the International Astronomical Union.

Today the IAU continues to decide the names for craters on our moon, along with names for all astronomical objects. The IAU organizes the naming of each particular celestial feature around a particular theme.

The names of craters now tend to fall into two groups. Typically, moon craters have been named for deceased scientists, scholars, explorers, and artists who've become known for their contributions to their respective fields. The craters around the Apollo crater and the Mare Moscoviense are to be named after deceased American astronauts and Russian cosmonauts
9) The moon encompasses a huge temperature range

If you survey the Internet for temperature data on the moon, you're going to run into quite a bit of confusion. There's little consistency even within a given website in which temperature scale is quoted: Celsius, Fahrenheit, even Kelvin.

We have opted to use the figures that are quoted by NASA on its Website: The temperature at the lunar equator ranges from an extremely low minus 280 degrees F (minus 173 degrees C) at night to a very high 260 degrees F (127 degrees C) in the daytime. In some deep craters near the moon's poles, the temperature is always near minus 400 degrees F (minus 240 degrees C).

During a lunar eclipse, as the moon moves into the Earth's shadow, the surface temperature can plunge about 500 degrees F (300 degrees C) in less than 90 minutes.

10) The moon has its own time zone

It is possible to tell time on the moon. In fact, back in 1970, Helbros Watches asked Kenneth L. Franklin, who for many years was the chief astronomer at New York's Hayden Planetarium, to design a watch for moon walkers that measures time in what he called "lunations," the period it takes the moon to rotate and revolve around the Earth; each lunation is exactly 29.530589 Earth days.

For the moon, Franklin developed a system he called "lunar mean solar time," or Lunar Time (LT). He envisioned local lunar time zones similar to the standard time zones of Earth, but based on meridians that are 12-degrees wide (analogous to the 15-degree intervals on Earth). "They will be named unambiguously as '36-degree East Zone time,' etc., although 'Copernican time,' 'West Tranquillity time' and others may be adopted as convenient." A lunar hour was defined as a "lunour," and decilunours, centilunours and millilunours were also introduced.

Interestingly, one moon watch was sent to the president of the United States at the time, Richard M. Nixon, who sent a thank you note to Franklin. The note and another moon watch were kept in a display case at the Hayden Planetarium for several years.

Quite a few visitors would openly wonder why Nixon was presented with a wristwatch that could be used only on the moon.

Forty years have come and gone without the watch becoming a big seller.

http://www.space.com/11162-10-surprising-moon-facts-full-moons.html

betoobig
15th November 2014, 11:36
Perhaps we should also focus in why or which will be the purpous of puting an artificial moon in this planet?????
One might be for us to reproduce much faster, with out the moon woman will have period only once a year....
If you are ruling a prision planet you´ll need the best place for issolation of that planet... and a wachtower...
And a long etc...
Moon is much older than us, it may have been in other similar missions far away from here...
I do believe is going to be taken or it allready has been taken and we just see a hollogram.
Huge topic here. Thanks for the thread.
Love

Billy
15th November 2014, 11:51
I suppose the age of the Moon and how long it has been in this orbit are two different questions.

http://www.halexandria.org/dward200.htm

Plutarch, Hippolytus, Censorinus, and a doubting Lucian wrote of pre-Lunar people, as did Ovid, who said that the Arcadians possessed their land before the birth of Jove, and were older than the Moon. There are even Biblical references (Job 25:5 and Psalm 72:5) which allude to a Moonless Earth -- or at least can be so interpreted. Finally, the memory of a Moonless Earth is contained in the oral traditions of such Indians as those of the Bogota highlands in the eastern Cordilleras of Columbia, i.e. according to tribesmen of Chibchas, “In the earliest times, when the moon was not yet in the heavens.”

Herbert
15th November 2014, 16:14
The time for the Moon to go around the Earth is exactly equal to the time it takes the Moon to rotate on its axis. This “locking” of periods between revolution (going around the parent body) and rotation is common throughout the Solar System.

The so-called anomalies only seem that way because science has not yet understood that this is a conscious Universe, meaning every planet and the moon and sun are conscious beings with souls. It is true the moon has not always existed as such because it is the remnants of a planet that exploded itself 3 million nine hundred thousand years ago. The largest "chunk" from one of those two exploding planets became our moon quite consciously because the exploding planet left one quarter of its consciousness in the moon. The moon does not have a hot molten core because it is a fragment of a planet.

There is no such thing as gravity which is why , when you ask a cosmologist what the power source for gravity is he will tell you "it exists as a potential". Einstein said it was because mass bends space/time. What it actually is according to the Akashic, as read by Chris Thomas, is that all planetary souls attract in proportion to their own consciousness. The moon attracts less because it has one quarter the consciousness of Earth.

The moon is not a space ship, nor is it hollow.

A Voice from the Mountains
16th November 2014, 04:22
This isn't true. The moon rotates (http://youtu.be/VGnIuqYKnTE). The same side of the moon faces the planet at every point in its orbit.

It doesn't rotate relative to the Earth is what I meant. I said in my own post that the same face of the Moon is always locked on the Earth. That's what's unusual about it.

betoobig
16th November 2014, 17:11
Strange moon facts (from http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/luna/esp_luna_16.htm)
"The moon is the Rosetta stone of the planets."
—Robert Jastrow
First Chairman, NASA Lunar Exploration Committee
After hundreds of years of detailed observation and study, our closest companion in the vast universe, Earth’s moon, remains an enigma. Six moon landings and hundreds of experiments have resulted in more questions being asked than answered. Among them:
1. Moon’s Age: The moon is far older than previously expected. Maybe even older than the Earth or the Sun. The oldest age for the Earth is estimated to be 4.6 billion years old; moon rocks were dated at 5.3 billion years old, and the dust upon which they were resting was at least another billion years older.

2. Rock’s Origin: The chemical composition of the dust upon which the rocks sat differed remarkably from the rocks themselves, contrary to accepted theories that the dust resulted from weathering and breakup of the rocks themselves. The rocks had to have come from somewhere else.

3. Heavier Elements on Surface: Normal planetary composition results in heavier elements in the core and lighter materials at the surface; not so with the moon. According to Wilson,
"The abundance of refractory elements like titanium in the surface areas is so pronounced that several geologists proposed the refractory compounds were brought to the moon’s surface in great quantity in some unknown way. They don’t know how, but that it was done cannot be questioned."
4. Water Vapor: On March 7, 1971, lunar instruments placed by the astronauts recorded a vapor cloud of water passing across the surface of the moon. The cloud lasted 14 hours and covered an area of about 100 square miles.

5. Magnetic Rocks: Moon rocks were magnetized. This is odd because there is no magnetic field on the moon itself. This could not have originated from a "close call" with Earth—such an encounter would have ripped the moon apart.

6. No Volcanoes: Some of the moon’s craters originated internally, yet there is no indication that the moon was ever hot enough to produce volcanic eruptions.

7. Moon Mascons: Mascons, which are large, dense, circular masses lying twenty to forty miles beneath the centers of the moon’s maria,
"are broad, disk-shaped objects that could be possibly some kind of artificial construction. For huge circular disks are not likely to be beneath each huge maria, centered like bull’s-eyes in the middle of each, by coincidence or accident."
8. Seismic Activity: Hundreds of "moonquakes" are recorded each year that cannot be attributed to meteor strikes. In November, 1958, Soviet astronomer Nikolay A. Kozyrev of the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory photographed a gaseous eruption of the moon near the crater Alphonsus. He also detected a reddish glow that lasted for about an hour. In 1963, astronomers at the Lowell Observatory also saw reddish glows on the crests of ridges in the Aristarchus region. These observations have proved to be precisely identical and periodical, repeating themselves as the moon moves closer to the Earth. These are probably not natural phenomena.

9. Hollow Moon: The moon’s mean density is 3.34 gm/cm3 (3.34 times an equal volume of water) whereas the Earth’s is 5.5. What does this mean? In 1962, NASA scientist Dr. Gordon MacDonald stated,
"If the astronomical data are reduced, it is found that the data require that the interior of the moon is more like a hollow than a homogeneous sphere."
Nobel chemist Dr. Harold Urey suggested the moon’s reduced density is because of large areas inside the moon where is "simply a cavity."

MIT’s Dr. Sean C. Solomon wrote,
"the Lunar Orbiter experiments vastly improved our knowledge of the moon’s gravitational field... indicating the frightening possibility that the moon might be hollow."
In Carl Sagan’s treatise, Intelligent Life in the Universe, the famous astronomer stated, "A natural satellite cannot be a hollow object."

10. Moon Echoes: On November 20, 1969, the Apollo 12 crew jettisoned the lunar module ascent stage causing it to crash onto the moon. The LM’s impact (about 40 miles from the Apollo 12 landing site) created an artificial moonquake with startling characteristics—the moon reverberated like a bell for more than an hour.

This phenomenon was repeated with Apollo 13 (intentionally commanding the third stage to impact the moon), with even more startling results. Seismic instruments recorded that the reverberations lasted for three hours and twenty minutes and traveled to a depth of twenty-five miles, leading to the conclusion that the moon has an unusually light—or even no—core.

11. Unusual Metals: The moon’s crust is much harder than presumed. Remember the extreme difficulty the astronauts encountered when they tried to drill into the maria? Surprise! The maria is composed primarily illeminite, a mineral containing large amounts of titanium, the same metal used to fabricate the hulls of deep-diving submarines and the skin of the SR-71 "Blackbird". Uranium 236 and neptunium 237 (elements not found in nature on Earth) were discovered in lunar rocks, as were rustproof iron particles.

12. Moon’s Origin: Before the astronauts’ moon rocks conclusively disproved the theory, the moon was believed to have originated when a chunk of Earth broke off eons ago (who knows from where?). Another theory was that the moon was created from leftover "space dust" remaining after the Earth was created. Analysis of the composition of moon rocks disproved this theory also.

Another popular theory is that the moon was somehow "captured" by the Earth’s gravitational attraction. But no evidence exists to support this theory. Isaac Asimov, stated,
"It’s too big to have been captured by the Earth. The chances of such a capture having been effected and the moon then having taken up nearly circular orbit around our Earth are too small to make such an eventuality credible."
13. Weird Orbit: Our moon is the only moon in the solar system that has a stationary, near-perfect circular orbit. Stranger still, the moon’s center of mass is about 6000 feet closer to the Earth than its geometric center (which should cause wobbling), but the moon’s bulge is on the far side of the moon, away from the Earth. "Something" had to put the moon in orbit with its precise altitude, course, and speed.

14. Moon Diameter: How does one explain the "coincidence" that the moon is just the right distance, coupled with just the right diameter, to completely cover the sun during an eclipse? Again, Isaac Asimov responds,
"There is no astronomical reason why the moon and the sun should fit so well. It is the sheerest of coincidences, and only the Earth among all the planets is blessed in this fashion."
15. Spaceship Moon: As outrageous as the Moon-Is-a-Spaceship Theory is, all of the above items are resolved if one assumes that the moon is a gigantic extraterrestrial craft, brought here eons ago by intelligent beings. This is the only theory that is supported by all of the data, and there are no data that contradict this theory.

A Voice from the Mountains
16th November 2014, 20:57
The Earth Without the Moon

The period when the Earth was Moonless is probably the most remote recollection of mankind. Democritus and Anaxagoras taught that there was a time when the Earth was without the Moon.(1) Aristotle wrote that Arcadia in Greece, before being inhabited by the Hellenes, had a population of Pelasgians, and that these aborigines occupied the land already before there was a moon in the sky above the Earth; for this reason they were called Proselenes.(2)

Apollonius of Rhodes mentioned the time “when not all the orbs were yet in the heavens, before the Danai and Deukalion races came into existence, and only the Arcadians lived, of whom it is said that they dwelt on mountains and fed on acorns, before there was a moon.” (3)

Plutarch wrote in The Roman Questions: “There were Arcadians of Evander’s following, the so-called pre-Lunar people.”(4) Similarly wrote Ovid: “The Arcadians are said to have possessed their land before the birth of Jove, and the folk is older than the Moon.” (5) Hippolytus refers to a legend that “Arcadia brought forth Pelasgus, of greater antiquity than the moon.”(6) Lucian in his Astrology says that “the Arcadians affirm in their folly that they are older than the moon.”(7)

Censorinus also alludes to the time in the past when there was no moon in the sky.(8)

Some allusions to the time before there was a Moon may be found also in the Scriptures. In Job 25:5 the grandeur of the Lord who “Makes peace in the heights” is praised and the time is mentioned “before [there was] a moon and it did not shine.” Also in Psalm 72:5 it is said: “Thou wast feared since [the time of] the sun and before [the time of] the moon, a generation of generations.” A “generation of generations” means a very long time. Of course, it is of no use to counter this psalm with the myth of the first chapter of Genesis, a tale brought down from exotic and later sources.

The memory of a world without a moon lives in oral tradition among the Indians. The Indians of the Bogota highlands in the eastern Cordilleras of Colombia relate some of their tribal reminiscences to the time before there was a moon. “In the earliest times, when the moon was not yet in the heavens,” say the tribesmen of Chibchas.(9)

http://www.varchive.org/itb/sansmoon.htm

betoobig
17th November 2014, 11:21
Credo Mutwa talks also about when there was no moon and woman had the period once a year.

Love

wishinshow
27th November 2014, 20:15
@betoobig it would be quite something to find out that the moon was put there to make it 12 times more likely that women conceive in a year! A lot less need for those contraceptives we all find difficult.

Observer1964
27th November 2014, 21:51
@betoobig it would be quite something to find out that the moon was put there to make it 12 times more likely that women conceive in a year! A lot less need for those contraceptives we all find difficult.

Maybe we also age 12 times faster.

naste.de.lumina
19th September 2015, 10:07
The Earth Without the Moon

The period when the Earth was Moonless is probably the most remote recollection of mankind.

Democritus and Anaxagoras taught that there was a time when the Earth was without the Moon.(1)

Aristotle wrote that Arcadia in Greece, before being inhabited by the Hellenes, had a population of Pelasgians, and that these aborigines occupied the land already before there was a moon in the sky above the Earth; for this reason they were called Proselenes.(2)

Apollonius of Rhodes mentioned the time “when not all the orbs were yet in the heavens, before the Danai and Deukalion races came into existence, and only the Arcadians lived, of whom it is said that they dwelt on mountains and fed on acorns, before there was a moon.”(3)

Plutarch wrote in The Roman Questions: “There were Arcadians of Evander’s following, the so-called pre-Lunar people.”(4)

Similarly wrote Ovid: “The Arcadians are said to have possessed their land before the birth of Jove, and the folk is older than the Moon.” (5)

Hippolytus refers to a legend that “Arcadia brought forth Pelasgus, of greater antiquity than the moon.”(6)

Lucian in his Astrology says that “the Arcadians affirm in their folly that they are older than the moon.”(7)

Censorinus also alludes to the time in the past when there was no moon in the sky.(8)

Some allusions to the time before there was a Moon may be found also in the Scriptures. In Job 25:5 the grandeur of the Lord who “Makes peace in the heights” is praised and the time is mentioned “before [there was] a moon and it did not shine.” Also in Psalm 72:5 it is said: “Thou wast feared since [the time of] the sun and before [the time of] the moon, a generation of generations.” A “generation of generations” means a very long time. Of course, it is of no use to counter this psalm with the myth of the first chapter of Genesis, a tale brought down from exotic and later sources.

The memory of a world without a moon lives in oral tradition among the Indians. The Indians of the Bogota highlands in the eastern Cordilleras of Colombia relate some of their tribal reminiscences to the time before there was a moon. “In the earliest times, when the moon was not yet in the heavens,” say the tribesmen of Chibchas.(9)

Source: http://www.varchive.org/itb/sansmoon.htm