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Paul
3rd December 2014, 22:22
I have just noticed a very interesting new technology that is coming forth on the Internet.

A chap named "David Irvine" has spent the last 8 years now bringing forth a ground up design of a technology to share and backup files on the Internet, with -no- central facility required and a very high level of privacy and anonymity.

He has hundreds involved by now, including several on payroll, thanks to a several million dollar crowd funding campaign early this year (2014).

This video is the best introduction to MaidSafe:
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Here is an interview with David Irvine from earlier this year:
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They are currently in pre-release testing phase, with a data network setup that they expect to tear down, and throw away any data on it, at the end of testing. It's not ready for "normal use" yet.

It appears to have serious potential for a variety of tasks, including supporting secure communication from whistleblowers.

Paul
3rd December 2014, 22:31
The main websites for MaidSafe are:

http://maidsafe.net -- The "Front Door"
http://www.maidsafe.org -- The place for everyone to discuss MaidSafe.
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/maidsafe-development -- Development Google Group
https://github.com/maidsafe -- The MaidSafe source code

All source code and documents have been released as open source, and all patents are openly available for anyone to use.

The best written overview to MaidSafe is provided by David, on the maidsafe.org FAQ and introduction page (https://www.maidsafe.org/t/welcome-to-maidsafe-org-faq-and-introduction/6)

Bitcoin Magazine had a good introduction in an April 2014 article: MaidSafe Makes Data Safe (http://bitcoinmagazine.com/12397/maidsafe-is-making-data-safe/).

yelik
3rd December 2014, 23:17
This will scupper the plans of David Cameron and Global Elites as they try to sensor and control the Internet. The Cabal will be really P***ed off if it worlks as claimed.

A Voice from the Mountains
3rd December 2014, 23:22
This stuff becomes so complicated, you'd need a solid education in programming and networking just to keep up with all this stuff and see if there are really any holes.

On one hand I think, "This seems like a good idea." On the other hand I think, "How long will it take the NSA to crack this, if they haven't already?" Though I suppose if it beats the music companies and everyone else against Pirate Bay, it'll at least be an advantage there, in the fight for total freedom of information (and music ... and don't worry, most musicians make their living from touring -- CDs sell for up to about $20 each and yet famous artists typically make only 10 cents per sale; even Metallica stopped complaining when they started getting requests to tour in the Middle East thanks to Napster).

I still feel most comfortable with hard, physical copies of important data. I can make multiple copies and bury them if I have to.

aranuk
4th December 2014, 00:11
Hi Paul thank you for the opening post. It sounds really good to me. Another fellow Scot doing the business! I will definitely check out the sites you posted too.

Stan

DarMar
4th December 2014, 00:38
Bad on so many levels..

divide and conquer

key was also always an illusion .. such small hole and such big door to bang down, why focusing on keyhole when bringing all doors down?
If that would ever step into practice, would be right time to stop internet experience..

stored information is safety? not when "traveling" ;)

Again .. gaming on fear factor of "safety" and drawing hexagons and cubes all along. Is this should be new to us?

Paul
4th December 2014, 00:39
Here is a good description of what MaidSafe is, from the internal document What it is (https://github.com/maidsafe/SystemDocs/tree/master/what_it_is):




The SAFE Network is a secure and fully decentralised data management service. The network is made up from the unused computer resources provided by the individual network users.

Each user of the SAFE Network provides a small part of their computer resources; hard-drive storage, CPU power, and bandwidth. This local resource is called a Vault. Each Vault is cryptographically secure and connects to other Vaults throughout the network.

The user's data is encrypted and broken up into chunks. These chunks are then distributed around other Vaults in the network. At no point do any of the other Vaults know anything about the data they have been asked to store other than anonymous network address information.

The result of the encryption and network-wide distribution of information is a highly secure and private data management and communication experience for all users.

The SAFE Network also supports applications and programs that can be accessed by network users. These applications may be free to use or paid for by using safecoins.

Safecoin is the currency of the SAFE Network and is the oil of the SAFE Network engine. This digital token can only exist on the SAFE Network and incentivises desirable behaviour. Users can earn safecoins by providing resource to the network. Similarly, application developers can earn safecoin by creating applications. Safecoins can be traded for any type of network service, or converted to other crypto currencies or traditional fiat currencies, after decentralised exchanges appear.

As the SAFE Network grows, it is anticipated that the value of the limited safecoins will grow. Safecoins are only generated by the network based on how much it is used, ensuring no over supply. Initially safecoin will be the only currency on the network and this utility will help to further drive it's value.

Xanth
4th December 2014, 01:35
Paul thanks for the info.
Technology looks interesting however I'll only be using it once world renouned security specialists like Bruce Schnieier and Jacob Appelbaum of the Tor network give their views on this. Getting security right is very tricky and when you've got it wrong there's plenty of people out there who would rather exploit you than tell you.

Googling for "Schneier Maidsafe" and "Appelbaum Maidsafe" only really turns up references to their work on the the MaidSafe site - and not any comment or opinion from the two guys themselves.

Paul
4th December 2014, 02:25
Paul thanks for the info.
Technology looks interesting however I'll only be using it once world renouned security specialists like Bruce Schnieier and Jacob Appelbaum of the Tor network give their views on this. Getting security right is very tricky and when you've got it wrong there's plenty of people out there who would rather exploit you than tell you.
Yes - interesting - at this point.

No one can use MaidSafe yet, as it is not up and running yet.

I agree that security audits and reviews by trusted outsiders are one important element of good security.

I also value open source, rather that proprietary source, and I also value distributed systems that do not rely on critical servers that could be exploited to expose the private data of many users.

Most of my secure software needs cannot be met by software that meets all three of these criteria. So I must compromise.

Anchor
4th December 2014, 04:38
Here is a similar project and hit has been around a lot longer https://freenetproject.org/ (since before 2000) which has distributed and secure storage. Its main failure is that it is not widely used.

MaidSAFE's key difference seems to be to do with the integration of a digital currency and blockchain that is used to reward people donating capacity. Pretty clever idea as running a node is never going to be free and there are not enough altruistic people who would support wide scale deployment for free.

Paul
4th December 2014, 07:45
Here is a similar project and hit has been around a lot longer https://freenetproject.org/ (since before 2000) which has distributed and secure storage. Its main failure is that it is not widely used.

MaidSAFE's key difference seems to be to do with the integration of a digital currency and blockchain that is used to reward people donating capacity. Pretty clever idea as running a node is never going to be free and there are not enough altruistic people who would support wide scale deployment for free.
From MaidSafe vs other initiatives for a decentralized internet (https://www.maidsafe.org/t/maidsafe-vs-other-initiatives-for-a-decentralized-internet/151):



Freenet is intended as a network for public sharing and broadcast of files and is not intended to limit access to those files. Therefore, it is not used for private storage of data and does not permit 'ownership' of data in the same way that users can (will) with the SAFE network, which permits both public and private data. AFAIK, Freenet also removes data which is not commonly accessed to save space, I don't think there are any deduplication mechanism in place.


Also Freenet is written in Java, and ends up being quite slow (according to the post here (https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=8080736)). The prototype MaidSafe was written in Python (so probably was slow too), but the current version, now in test, is written in C++, and (I am hopeful) should be substantially faster.

Anchor
4th December 2014, 08:04
Thanks Paul, I read that and agree, (also https://www.maidsafe.org/t/similar-projects/234/ )

I think the main reason freenet comes up again and again is that they nailed a good distributed storage model - but I see its a subset of what maidsafe wants to be able to do.

I know freenet was slow when I used to use it! Though that was a long time back.

I think Maidsafe will probably be quite slow too.