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TelosianEmbrace
17th December 2014, 05:05
My paternal ancestors were upper middle class. Henry Carter and his family lived in Carlton House Terrace in Central London and had a holiday house, The Lake Country House, LLangammarch Wells. www.lakecountryhouse.co.uk I have a photocopy of the census report, and while at Carlton House Terrace they had something like thirty servants in the household.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carlton_House_Terrace

The men were London Freemasons and over a number of generations, served in the army as officers. One of them was an alderman of the city of London, and next in line to be the Lord Mayor of London before he died of a heart attack.

Below is an image of the Carter Crest, which has passed to my older brother.

http://i57.tinypic.com/xpabuh.jpg[/IMG]

All I know is the division and distrust in my family, the control and lack of love that goes with prestige and authority. My father was looked after by a virtual parade of nannies. He was never shown love and affection by his mother, and only remembers sitting on his father's lap as his most intimate memory. He was abused by catholic priests as a child. Despite a moderate intelligence he made it into Sandhurst Military Academy, where he spent only a term, before following his dream of becoming a farmer.

I just wanted to share this information and to see if there was anyone who could interpret the Coat of Arms or offer insightful comments, or help me to trace any of the names or places.

Azt
17th December 2014, 05:12
AUDEO from Latin : Verb
present active audeō, present infinitive audēre, perfect active ausus sum (semi-deponent)

I dare, venture, risk  [quotations ▼]
(poetic) I am eager for battle.

TelosianEmbrace
17th December 2014, 05:39
Thanks, Azt! And there I was thinking that all it meant was 'Listen'! The interpretations you have found are far more descriptive!

giovonni
17th December 2014, 06:35
note the canine (dog) on top of the crown = fidelity, courage or loyalty to ...

The dueling two lions (obviously) merit the meaning of a fierce courage, often used to represent a great warrior or a chief ...

The shields colours of gold and blue and argent (white represent) respectively ~ generosity, loyalty, with peace and sincerity ...

And most often shield/crest in the family crest also contain specific markings that have their own relevance such as the tinted coloured trim at the bottom of the crest with opposite roses ...

Note the other white panel pattern is hard to make out ... perhaps a cross/steeple ~ representing the Church/Christianity ...

:)

TelosianEmbrace
17th December 2014, 10:19
note the canine (dog) on top of the crown = fidelity, courage or loyalty to ...

The dueling two lions (obviously) merit the meaning of a fierce courage, often used to represent a great warrior or a chief ...

The shields colours of gold and blue and argent (white represent) respectively ~ generosity, loyalty, with peace and sincerity ...

And most often shield/crest in the family crest also contain specific markings that have their own relevance such as the tinted coloured trim at the bottom of the crest with opposite roses ...

Note the other white panel pattern is hard to make out ... perhaps a cross/steeple ~ representing the Church/Christianity ...

:)

Two of the panels I'm assuming are fluers-de-lis, 16 in each panel. I don't know how old the Coat of Arms is. I am assuming that the helmet, for example, is simply decorative and that there was never a standing army wearing helmets such as is depicted.

giovonni
17th December 2014, 15:05
note the canine (dog) on top of the crown = fidelity, courage or loyalty to ...

The dueling two lions (obviously) merit the meaning of a fierce courage, often used to represent a great warrior or a chief ...

The shields colours of gold and blue and argent (white represent) respectively ~ generosity, loyalty, with peace and sincerity ...

And most often shield/crest in the family crest also contain specific markings that have their own relevance such as the tinted coloured trim at the bottom of the crest with opposite roses ...

Note the other white panel pattern is hard to make out ... perhaps a cross/steeple ~ representing the Church/Christianity ...

:)

Two of the panels I'm assuming are fluers-de-lis, 16 in each panel. I don't know how old the Coat of Arms is. I am assuming that the helmet, for example, is simply decorative and that there was never a standing army wearing helmets such as is depicted.

That being, it is considered markings emulating a prominent position with dignity ...
BTW ~ a handsomely attractive design.