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Bob
12th July 2015, 19:04
http://www.dailytimesgazette.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/whale-thinkstock.jpg

Now documented have been 115 endangered whales during a one-hour survey near the Farallon Islands last week.

Federal officials instructed recreational boaters, including fishermen, to stay at least 300 feet away to avoid the dangers of the vessels striking the whales. Large ships should also slow down their speed to 10 knots in boat traffic lanes approaching San Francisco.

Roger Thomas, 80, dean of the Bay Area salmon fleet and skipper of Sausalito fishing and boating company Salty Lady, said that there appears to be more whales near the shore compared to previous years. “It’s unbelievable,” Thomas said. “Whales are all over the place.”


http://www.alaska-in-pictures.com/data/media/3/humpback-whales-feeding_7321.jpg



During one of the whale watching trips, about 25 to 30 humpbacks and several blue whales were seen, with some going near the boat. “They come right up to you,” Thomas said, according to Marin County Independent Journal.

Only a mile from the shore, some onlookers at San Francisco’s Land’s End reported seeing 8 to 10 humpbacks, Nan Sincero of the Oceanic Society told the San Francisco Online. The whales were seen to do “pectoral fin slapping, lob tailing and both singular and serial breaching.”

“The humpbacks at the entrance to the bay have been hanging out for weeks,” said Sincero. “They are in heaven with all the food out there.”

Ted
12th July 2015, 19:27
They're here waiting for Captain Kirk to come back and save the world

Bob
12th July 2015, 19:35
http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/pgallery/atlasmaps/images/gf_2000.jpg

Cidersomerset
12th July 2015, 19:37
They're here waiting for Captain Kirk to come back and save the world

very good....

HYHfJks15jY


================================================

I was in the car yesterday and on the radio they mentioned Humpbacks
being seen off the UK coast which is unusual I think..........

Just had a look online......


Humpback whale spotted frolicking in the sea off Dartmouth Coast in this amazing footage
14:05, 1 July 2015
By Kelly-Ann Mills


The huge creature can be seen lifting its tail fin out of the water and splashing back down

EpDhS-YZ3HA

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/humpback-whale-spotted-frolicking-sea-5982216

================================================== ==
================================================== ==

http://static.bbci.co.uk/frameworks/barlesque/2.83.10/orb/4/img/bbc-blocks-dark.png

Rare sighting of humpback whale off coast of Liverpool

17 June 2015 Last updated at 08:19 BST


A humpback whale has been spotted off the coast of Liverpool for the first time in
more than 70 years.Local boat workers Lee Baron and Mark Harding saw the whale
in Liverpool Bay.The Sea Watch Foundation, which monitors ocean wildlife, says
there's been an increase in sightings of dolphins and porpoises in recent years
because the water quality has improved.

Short vid on link...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/33149036

Bob
12th July 2015, 19:51
They're here waiting for Captain Kirk to come back and save the world

KIRK: They say 'The sea is cold but the sea contains the hottest blood of all'

GILLIAN: 'Whales Weep Not', D.H. Lawrence.
KIRK: It's ironic. When man was killing these creatures, he was destroying his own future.

SCOTT: The beasties seem happy to see you, Doctor. I hope you like our little aquarium.
GILLIAN: A miracle, Mister Scott.
SCOTT: A miracle? That's yet to come.
GILLIAN: What does that mean?

KIRK: It means that our chances of getting home are not too good. You might have lived a longer life if you'd stayed where you belong.
GILLIAN: I belong here. I am a whale biologist. Suppose by some miracle you do get them through. ...Who in the twenty-third century knows anything about humpback whales?
KIRK: You have a point.

GILLIAN: What was that?
SCOTT: Admiral! I think you'd better get up there. We're having a power fall-off.
KIRK: Stay with them. I'm on my way.
SCOTT: Hold on tight, lassie. It gets bumpy from here.

[Bird-of-Prey bridge]

SCOTT (OC): Warp seven point five, ...Seven point nine,...
CHEKOV: Shields at Maximum!

[Bird-of-Prey cargo bay]

SCOTT: Mister Sulu, that's all I can give you!

[Bird-of-Prey bridge]

KIRK: Can we make breakaway speed?
SPOCK: Hardly, Admiral, I cannot even guarantee we will escape the sun's gravity! I shall attempt to compensate by altering our trajectory.
SULU: Warp eight. Eight point one... Maximum speed, sir!
SPOCK: Admiral, I need thruster control.
KIRK: Acceleration thrusters at Spock's command!
SPOCK: Steady. ...Steady. ...Now!

(the Bird-of-Prey slingshots around the sun)
KIRK: Did braking thrusters fire?
SPOCK: They did, Admiral.
KIRK: Then where the hell are we? ...The Probe! ...Condition report, Spock.
SPOCK: No data, Admiral. Computers are non-functional.

CHEKOV: The mains are down, sir! Aux. power is not responding.
KIRK: Switch to manual control, Mister Sulu.
SULU: I have no control, sir!

McCOY: My God, Jim, where are we?

KIRK: Out of control, and blind as a bat!


http://www.startrek.com/uploads/assets/articles/8659b26e9bc1919a9d166f200f27693c0f5d7238.jpg

3(C)+me
12th July 2015, 20:12
Well it's nice to know they haven't killed everything in the Pacific yet.

betoobig
12th July 2015, 21:38
They must be all there toghether for some pourpous, not just feeding.
I send love to them right now.
Thanks Bob.
Love Juan

Michael Moewes
12th July 2015, 21:50
Hey Bob, that's great news. so beautifull.
On the other side, down in New Zeeland, our friends from the Cook straight Whale watch spotted far over a hundred humpbacks including a very rare white one.

To be seen here https://www.facebook.com/CookStraitWhaleProject?fref=nf

https://www.facebook.com/CookStraitWhaleProject?fref=nf

Live Healthy, Live Vegan and save the planet

Bob
12th July 2015, 23:32
http://setsail.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/cbparker-d3-20090906-tonga-217.jpg

"Holographic Whales (Humpback + Dolphin)" apx. 2 min (sensory)

http://chanlo.com/images/Deep-Space-Whales.mp3

Cidersomerset
12th July 2015, 23:55
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9e/Humpback_stellwagen_edit.jpg

Humpback Whale Opera - The songs of the deep....

-oYIK6Bg6co

http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2015/4/20/1429551072832/f4572c56-8964-484f-acdc-c6258e4b7314-2060x1236.jpeg

Chrysalis
13th July 2015, 02:58
This has been reported by our local television news here in the SF Bay Area. It is cause for concern, largely because the whales are most likely coming into the bay seeking food. That would indicate a decline and/or contamination of the natural food sources for whales in the Pacific Ocean.

While an interesting thing to see these majestic creatures up close, I also see it as a red flag that there are some serious environmental issues affecting Earth and all of her inhabitants. Fukushima comes to mind, as well as geoengineering.

We as a species need to check ourselves when it comes to our role as caretakers of this fine and beautiful planet that we call home. Unfortunately, I suspect that those who are the major players are void of empathy, and focused only upon their greed-driven agenda.

Let us all keep the light of love alive and burning...

Peace,
Chrys

amor
13th July 2015, 04:59
I have connected some dots and come to a very unpleasant conclusion. We all know about Fukushima and its probably poisoning of the ocean and sea life. Then there was that awful apocalyptic sight of millions of fish dead off the west coast beaches of California. On ProjectCamelot.org I believe I read an article about the US Navy using deadly frequencies in the area of the Bay of Alaska. Elsewhere, I read that Navy Submarines were experimenting with deadly broadcast frequencies meant to dissolve the tissues of enemy submariners and that these frequencies were responsible for the beaching and deaths of whales and dolphins. This is bad enough; however, I have connected some dots and come up with another gruesome possibility.

Suppose the marine life passing Fukusmina and swimming on the currents of the north pacific, passing through the Bay of Alaska were all thought to be seriously contaminated and the Navy decided to kill them all with their frequencies before they could be consumed by other fish and/or humans. Just a thought. Here is another one, the NWO is killing off all food sources on the planet to finally kill off all humans.

Blue Mobius
13th July 2015, 05:15
My immediate reaction to this was Fukushima which is still not contained and has been leaking into the pacific since 2011. its nice to see the whales but its scary to wonder why they might be flocking so close to civilization when they have the whole ocean to navigate. i would honestly assume that it would take more than 4 years to contaminate the pacific to such a heavy degree that would merit mass migration of these whales. why is there so much silence regarding Fukushima and no practical solutions in site? The fear management that the Japanese government is orchestrating will soon back fire heavily. Its time they picked up the phone and made a call for help on an international and public level.

syrwong
13th July 2015, 13:42
My immediate reaction to this was Fukushima which is still not contained and has been leaking into the pacific since 2011. its nice to see the whales but its scary to wonder why they might be flocking so close to civilization when they have the whole ocean to navigate. i would honestly assume that it would take more than 4 years to contaminate the pacific to such a heavy degree that would merit mass migration of these whales. why is there so much silence regarding Fukushima and no practical solutions in site? The fear management that the Japanese government is orchestrating will soon back fire heavily. Its time they picked up the phone and made a call for help on an international and public level.

Fear management is another kicking the can down the road. You need to manage fear only when the danger is real, but you always come face to face with it. Within hours after the disaster the prime minister discussed with his cabinet if Tokyo should be evacuated. I think they made the wrong decision.

Bob
13th July 2015, 14:28
Whale Sense

http://whalesense.org/

Whale watching "impact".

Interaction with ships (whales killed or injured) while in a protected Sanctuary. The Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary off the west coast of California which covers parts of the mainland of California, extends outwards to the islands. Birds, underwater marine features, whales and seals, and fish. An area for protection and preservation. Whales would certainly want to congregate in such an area.. From the warm waters south of the Bahah to give babies, heading northwards up to Alaska where food is abundant as well (summer feeding grounds).

An interesting note, See http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/shipwrecks/independence/

Although it may seem interesting the discussion of "Fukushima" appearing in a thread touching on the JOYS of Whales visiting in droves within a very well and healthy food stocked area off the California coast, thankyou for your thought and you can easily visit a Fuku discussion by doing a search: http://projectavalon.net/forum4/search.php enter your keyword there. Please focus the Fuku discussions in those threads which are more appropriate. (There are no "atomic reactors" discharging into the Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary off the west coast of California.)

Sea Shepherd - http://www.seashepherd.org/lightbox_pages/humpback_whale.php has a background page on the Humpback whale - a few excerpts:


Habitat

The habitat of humpback whales consists of polar to tropical waters, including the waters of the Arctic, Atlantic, and Pacific Oceans, as well as the waters surrounding Antarctica and the Bering Strait. During migration, they are found in coastal and deep oceanic waters. Generally, they do not come into coastal waters until they reach the latitudes of Long Island, New York, and Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

Humpbacks are divided into several populations. These are for the most part isolated, but with a little interchange in some cases. There are two stocks in the North Atlantic Ocean and two in the North Pacific. There are also seven isolated stocks in the southern hemisphere.

Migration

Found in all of the world's oceans, most populations of humpback whales follow a regular migration route, summering in temperate and polar waters for feeding, and wintering in tropical waters for mating and calving. In the Arabian Sea, a year-round non-migratory population of humpbacks appears not to follow this general rule. Humpbacks migrate at 3-9 mph (4.8-14 kph). They have incredible powers of endurance, traveling over 3,100 miles (5000 km) during each seasonal migration with almost no rest along the way. During migrations, they cover over 1,000 miles per month.


Population Numbers/status

Because their feeding, mating, and calving grounds are close to shore and because they are slow swimmers, the humpback whales were an easy target for early whalers. The International Whaling Commission (IWC) gave them worldwide protection status in 1966, but there were large illegal kills by the Soviets until the 1970's. It is believed they number about 30,000-40,000 at present, or about 30-35% of the original population.


http://www.seashepherd.org/images/stories/no-compromise/whale-facts/humpback/2009_05_23_fl08-4_0049642mOktay%20Kaya.jpg

However, briefly back to Japan - they are whale killers. Not by the "radioactive waters", but by a whaling fleet (http://www.seashepherd.org/commentary-and-editorials/2015/06/23/enduring-the-unendurable-suffering-the-insufferable-716) which has been saying it is their "right" to kill whales, for "research purposes" (a pretense to escape an international ban on whaling). Sea Shepherd has an extensive set of documentations and campaign on their efforts to block and interfere with Japan's whaling efforts (and others).


The International Whaling Commission (IWC) ruled Friday that Japan has not provided sufficient scientific data to support its ridiculous claim that the killing of whales in the Southern Ocean is legitimate scientific research.

They have asked Japan for further data to justify their request for IWC permission to kill whales under the pretense of scientific whaling.

Last year the International Court of Justice (ICJ) ruled that there was no scientific justification for Japanese so-called “research” whaling.

Last year the International Whaling Commission followed up on this ruling and said no to Japan’s pretense to kill whales. No whales were killed by Japan in the Southern Ocean for the 2014-2015 season, the first time zero whales were slain in Antarctic waters since 1945.

Will Japan now spit in the face of international law and public opinion? Will they attempt to send their highly subsidized whaling fleet south again in December to target 333 Minke whales in the internationally established Southern Ocean Whale Sanctuary? Will they do so in violation of the international moratorium on commercial whaling? Will they continue to be in contempt of the Australian Federal Court?


Japan’s previous whaling program (known as “JARPA II”) violated international law. JARPA II authorized the killing of as many as 935 minke whales, 50 endangered fin whales, and 50 humpback whales every year in the Southern Ocean. Between 2005 and 2014, Japan killed about 3,600 minke whales and 18 fin whales under JARPA II.

Whaling or the killing of dolphins and whales for "research or food or industrial products" is stupid. Society doesn't need whale oil, nor trophies of these creatures.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HYHfJks15jY

Bob
13th July 2015, 14:52
Helping an entangled humpback whale -



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tcXU7G6zhjU


Sea of Cortez - gill net entanglement, an effort by a family to remove the net.

Michael Moewes
13th July 2015, 19:32
Right spoted Chrysalis, The radiation coming from Fukushima is killing all life in the Pacific ocean. It had already reached parts of the westcoast.


This has been reported by our local television news here in the SF Bay Area. It is cause for concern, largely because the whales are most likely coming into the bay seeking food. That would indicate a decline and/or contamination of the natural food sources for whales in the Pacific Ocean.

While an interesting thing to see these majestic creatures up close, I also see it as a red flag that there are some serious environmental issues affecting Earth and all of her inhabitants. Fukushima comes to mind, as well as geoengineering.

We as a species need to check ourselves when it comes to our role as caretakers of this fine and beautiful planet that we call home. Unfortunately, I suspect that those who are the major players are void of empathy, and focused only upon their greed-driven agenda.

Let us all keep the light of love alive and burning...

Peace,
Chrys

Michael Moewes
13th July 2015, 19:38
Fear management is another kicking the can down the road. You need to manage fear only when the danger is real, but you always come face to face with it. Within hours after the disaster the prime minister discussed with his cabinet if Tokyo should be evacuated. I think they made the wrong decision.

Because Japanese government lies. They perfected the art of lying since more than 1000 years. It's the mentality of the shogun his samurais and the flock of sheep called peasants.

Bob
13th July 2015, 20:03
An interesting note, See http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/shipwrecks/independence/

From post above: http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?83573-Hundreds-of-Humpback-Whales-off-San-Francisco-area&p=977927&viewfull=1#post977927

Although it may seem interesting the discussion of "Fukushima" appearing in a thread touching on the JOYS of Whales visiting in droves within a very well and healthy food stocked area off the California coast, thankyou for your thought and you can easily visit a Fuku discussion by doing a search: http://projectavalon.net/forum4/search.php enter your keyword there. Please focus the Fuku discussions in those threads which are more appropriate. (There are no "atomic reactors" discharging into the Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary off the west coast of California.)

------------------------

Back on topic - whales congregating off San Francisco Area :focus:

Bob
13th July 2015, 20:11
An abundance of healthy food is supporting the ecosystem off the Farallon islands

http://www.sfgate.com/outdoors/article/Whales-feeding-frenzy-at-Farallones-a-feast-6373733.php


In one magic hour Sunday, researchers stationed at the South Farallon Islands counted 93 humpback whales, 21 blue whales and one fin whale, according to Mary Jane Schramm of the Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary.

There hasn’t been anything like this verified in modern times.

At the same time, on a whale-watching trip with the Oceanic Society on the Salty Lady out of San Francisco, Capt. Roger Thomas said he sighted 25 humpbacks and three blue whales, most within range of Southeast Farallon Island.

“It’s like an eating contest out there,” Schramm said.


A vast amount of krill has brought in the blue whales. Large schools of anchovies and mackerel have attracted the humpbacks.

“One blue can consume up to four tons of krill per day when in maximum feeding mode,” Schramm said. “That’s right now, apparently, and right here.”

Blue whales are the biggest air-breathing mammals on Earth.

KRILL - are sensitive to environmental damage. If there is something harming them, they WON'T BE THERE

definition: a small shrimplike planktonic crustacean of the open seas. It is eaten by a number of larger animals, notably the baleen whales. Humpbacks are baleen whales.

The Krill population in the sanctuary is staggering right now, above all previous recorded history.. And the Whales are taking advantage of that. The Pacific is NOT dying in this area.

Bob
13th July 2015, 20:27
http://farallones.noaa.gov/manage/pdf/expansion/maps/Expansion_150514_v17.pdf

3, 295 square miles of a marine sanctuary.


The Greater Farallones is a complex region with high biological diversity; nationally significant wildlife breeding and foraging areas; significant commercial and recreational fishing; estuarine habitats; numerous federally, state and locally protected marine and estuarine waters; watershed influences and impacts from eight million San Francisco Bay Area residents.

Conservation Science will help solve specific management problems, enhance ecosystem protection efforts, and assist in the interpretation of the ecosystem for the general public.

The Conservation Science program will ensure that science activities address management issues and are effectively integrated into the education and ecosystem protection programs of the sanctuary and those of other resource trustee agencies.

Implementing an effective conservation science program is a primary management goal of the Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary (GFNMS).

Characterization, monitoring, and research assist protection of sanctuary natural resources by promoting understanding of ecosystem structure and function, detecting environmental problems, tracking health and trends of the various habitats and resources in the sanctuary, and contributing to solutions to management issues throughout the GFNMS.

The deeper sea area off the Farallon islands themselves is the focus - in this fly by video one can take a look what it is like:



http://farallones.noaa.gov/science/media/flythru.mp4

Akasha
13th July 2015, 20:35
.....

Sea Shepherd - http://www.seashepherd.org/lightbox_pages/humpback_whale.php has a background page on the Humpback whale - a few excerpts:


Habitat

The habitat of humpback whales consists of polar to tropical waters, including the waters of the Arctic, Atlantic, and Pacific Oceans, as well as the waters surrounding Antarctica and the Bering Strait. During migration, they are found in coastal and deep oceanic waters. Generally, they do not come into coastal waters until they reach the latitudes of Long Island, New York, and Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

Humpbacks are divided into several populations. These are for the most part isolated, but with a little interchange in some cases. There are two stocks in the North Atlantic Ocean and two in the North Pacific. There are also seven isolated stocks in the southern hemisphere.

Migration

Found in all of the world's oceans, most populations of humpback whales follow a regular migration route, summering in temperate and polar waters for feeding, and wintering in tropical waters for mating and calving. In the Arabian Sea, a year-round non-migratory population of humpbacks appears not to follow this general rule. Humpbacks migrate at 3-9 mph (4.8-14 kph). They have incredible powers of endurance, traveling over 3,100 miles (5000 km) during each seasonal migration with almost no rest along the way. During migrations, they cover over 1,000 miles per month.


Population Numbers/status

Because their feeding, mating, and calving grounds are close to shore and because they are slow swimmers, the humpback whales were an easy target for early whalers. The International Whaling Commission (IWC) gave them worldwide protection status in 1966, but there were large illegal kills by the Soviets until the 1970's. It is believed they number about 30,000-40,000 at present, or about 30-35% of the original population.


http://www.seashepherd.org/images/stories/no-compromise/whale-facts/humpback/2009_05_23_fl08-4_0049642mOktay%20Kaya.jpg

However, briefly back to Japan - they are whale killers. Not by the "radioactive waters", but by a whaling fleet (http://www.seashepherd.org/commentary-and-editorials/2015/06/23/enduring-the-unendurable-suffering-the-insufferable-716) which has been saying it is their "right" to kill whales, for "research purposes" (a pretense to escape an international ban on whaling). Sea Shepherd has an extensive set of documentations and campaign on their efforts to block and interfere with Japan's whaling efforts (and others).


The International Whaling Commission (IWC) ruled Friday that Japan has not provided sufficient scientific data to support its ridiculous claim that the killing of whales in the Southern Ocean is legitimate scientific research.

They have asked Japan for further data to justify their request for IWC permission to kill whales under the pretense of scientific whaling.

Last year the International Court of Justice (ICJ) ruled that there was no scientific justification for Japanese so-called “research” whaling.

Last year the International Whaling Commission followed up on this ruling and said no to Japan’s pretense to kill whales. No whales were killed by Japan in the Southern Ocean for the 2014-2015 season, the first time zero whales were slain in Antarctic waters since 1945.

Will Japan now spit in the face of international law and public opinion? Will they attempt to send their highly subsidized whaling fleet south again in December to target 333 Minke whales in the internationally established Southern Ocean Whale Sanctuary? Will they do so in violation of the international moratorium on commercial whaling? Will they continue to be in contempt of the Australian Federal Court?


Japan’s previous whaling program (known as “JARPA II”) violated international law. JARPA II authorized the killing of as many as 935 minke whales, 50 endangered fin whales, and 50 humpback whales every year in the Southern Ocean. Between 2005 and 2014, Japan killed about 3,600 minke whales and 18 fin whales under JARPA II.

Whaling or the killing of dolphins and whales for "research or food or industrial products" is stupid. Society doesn't need whale oil, nor trophies of these creatures.



A haaa! I just posted on Sea Shepherd a few days ago in the vegan thread (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?83021-All-Things-Vegan-&p=975105&viewfull=1#post975105) (click to go to post). Check it out. There are a couple of top documentaries on the organisation and its founder, Paul Watson, there.

HYHfJks15jY

No doubt, he'll already have put in for first dibs once Kirk and co' are done with it.

Akasha
13th July 2015, 20:42
They must be all there toghether for some pourpous, not just feeding.
I send love to them right now.
Thanks Bob.
Love Juan

Don't you mean porpoise (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porpoise)?

Bob
13th July 2015, 21:24
To hunt a species to extinction is not logical...

Nobody's perfect..

Seriously though.. to hunt a species to extinction is not acceptable..

---levity..

see here..



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iZhuErqAf8A?t=13

it is OK to focus on the JOY that the whales bring..

Ted
13th July 2015, 21:46
Humpback whales come to San Francisco... There's a tasteless joke in there somewhere...

jake gittes
13th July 2015, 22:26
This has been reported by our local television news here in the SF Bay Area. It is cause for concern, largely because the whales are most likely coming into the bay seeking food. That would indicate a decline and/or contamination of the natural food sources for whales in the Pacific Ocean.

While an interesting thing to see these majestic creatures up close, I also see it as a red flag that there are some serious environmental issues affecting Earth and all of her inhabitants. Fukushima comes to mind, as well as geoengineering.

We as a species need to check ourselves when it comes to our role as caretakers of this fine and beautiful planet that we call home. Unfortunately, I suspect that those who are the major players are void of empathy, and focused only upon their greed-driven agenda.

Let us all keep the light of love alive and burning...

Peace,
Chrys

I was wondering if that was the cause, Chrysalis. Sad if true, and would not be surprising with all the filth that's been pumped into the oceans - much we don't even know about.

Bob
13th July 2015, 23:21
Why the derailing? The humpbacks are QUITE happy to be having good food in the Farallons.. Something about attacking that which is Joy?

Cidersomerset
13th July 2015, 23:35
Hi all there is a thread on Fukushima , which is very important
and the contamination of sea life and health to humans is very
important.

This thread is dedicated to the beauty and serenity of these
majestic beings and I know you mean well , but it would be
nice to get back in the spirit of the original post...


Re: Japan nuclear agency upgrades Fukushima alert level

http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?62507-Japan-nuclear-agency-upgrades-Fukushima-alert-level/page26

========================================



xo2bVbDtiX8

Bob
13th July 2015, 23:47
Just a simple message - - Find the joy, nothing much more complicated than that..;)

Chrysalis
14th July 2015, 06:13
It is out of concern that I posted on this subject. I am by no means an expert on aquatic life, but the whales are coming into the Bay for some reason. We have had the occasional stray, "Humphrey" who came into the bay in the late 90's.

There is no question that Earth changes are happening, whether one subscribes to Mother Nature taking her course, or Mankind being a negligent, perhaps even an engaged part of what we see and experience and breathe every day. Just watching and hoping for the best...for all of us.

Peace,
Chrys

Cidersomerset
14th July 2015, 22:06
Striking all-white humpback whale spotted off Australia's coast

8PnSQiMTo4I


Published on 19 Jun 2014


On Tuesday, a rare white albino whale was witnessed off the coast of Australia. His
name is 'Migaloo' and he was spotted along the Green Cape in New South Wales
during part of his annual migration.

"The albino humpback called Migaloo has been sighted off Sydney." [Via Seven Network]

On Tuesday, a rare white albino whale was witnessed off the coast of Australia. He
was spotted along the Green Cape in New South Wales during part of his annual
migration. The past few years have been good ones for observers, as this makes it
the third consecutive year he's been seen. Those who are lucky enough to witness
him get the sight of a lifetime. The stark white humpback is absolutely stunning.
The founder of the White Whale Research Centre, Oskar Peterson describes him as
a glowing presence underneath the water.

Anticipating viewers in Australia have a two week window to catch a glimpse of him
from the last week of June to the first week of July. 'Migaloo' was first noticed in
1991 and since then his movements have been tracked. It was previously
thought ' Migaloo' was the only albino humpback in existence, but in 2011, another
one nicknamed 'Migaloo Junior' was spotted.

Peterson remarked "We have photos of a junior Migaloo from a few years ago, but
we haven't seen him since so we don't know if he survived the South Ocean. But
there is a 100% white whale we've seen photographic proof of in Norway, so
Migaloo isn't quite as unique as we once thought."

================================================== =======
================================================== =======

Keeping with the Star Trek , whale connection..........



Picard's White Whale

oeGMHbK4NlA


================================================== =======

Later Patrick Stewart played Capt Ahab, though Moby Dick was a sperm whale not
a humpback .........Moby had his revenge in this classic.


xdvhw5XcQqg

Uploaded on 10 Jul 2011


The ambition ; it's essence is a bad feature,looks like secret of success in short term,but in
fact the cause of destruction and disaster.Transmitted such as diseases, those with ambition
,Captain Ahab's ambition to spread Ismahel and all the team,ultimately, no one earns.
spanish Subtitle:music is unique and has been assembled by me Moby Dick Herman Melville
whale Captain Ahab Ishmael CBC Television Moby Dick Patrick Stewart 1998

Desire
15th July 2015, 01:48
They're here waiting for Captain Kirk to come back and save the world

Not funny Ted

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Humpback whales come to San Francisco... There's a tasteless joke in there somewhere...

Not Funny Ted

Ted
15th July 2015, 13:49
They're here waiting for Captain Kirk to come back and save the world

Not funny Ted

¤=[Post Update]=¤


Humpback whales come to San Francisco... There's a tasteless joke in there somewhere...

Not Funny TedI apologize if I offended you Desire. I forget sometimes that other people take this world seriously.

Ted
16th July 2015, 01:38
Not funny Ted



I suppose you don't like whale riding either?

http://i.imgur.com/cRdh5VJ.jpg

Desire
17th July 2015, 00:19
Not funny Ted



I suppose you don't like whale riding either?

http://i.imgur.com/cRdh5VJ.jpg

OK Ted Thanks for the apology, and maybe I would like whale riding only if the whale thought it was a good idea!

Bob
17th July 2015, 00:24
Ted - please stop trying to derail this thread. Your comments are not healthy nor appreciated.

Bob
17th July 2015, 00:30
in 2005 a humback whale was rescued in the Farallones tangled up in "fishing gear".

http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/Daring-rescue-of-whale-off-Farallones-Humpback-2557146.php


http://ww1.hdnux.com/photos/12/23/03/2699480/6/920x920.jpg

Although the sanctuary exists in the Farallones, it is still not safe for migrant whales and dolphin.


2005 - Sunday's daring rescue was the first successful attempt on the West Coast to free an entangled humpback, said Shelbi Stoudt, stranding manager for the Marine Mammal Center in Marin County.

The 45- to 50-foot female humpback, estimated to weigh 50 tons, was on the humpbacks' usual migratory route between the Northern California coast and Baja California when it became entangled in the nylon ropes that link crab pots.

It was spotted by a crab fisherman at 8:30 a.m. Sunday in the open water east of the Farallones, about 18 miles off the coast of San Francisco.

Desire
17th July 2015, 00:44
Bob
Many of us appreciate the effort you put into this post.Keep it up.

Those that want to joke, start a jokster sight and go at it.But not about whales please.

Bob
18th January 2018, 21:19
Baja Mexico - grays blues humpbacks



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_gmNBQ8WawM


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u5W0NeFqPHg


While I was in awe of the trust in these whales to approach people and boats (less than 100 years ago people were in the lagoons killing them) and amazed to be so close that we could see the hair on the rostrum (head region)...

https://www.oceanicsociety.org/blog/1569/close-encounters-with-bajas-gray-whales


http://www.bajainsider.com/sites/default/files/styles/node-detail/public/field/media/gray-whale-close-up.jpg?itok=eVN3jOBH