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Marianne
12th August 2015, 05:08
This thread is to give recipes, menus and ideas for using preserved foods to make tasty, balanced, attractive meals.

There are various circumstances where this information could be useful; mainly loss of power or disruption in food supplies.

Snow or ice storms cut off power
Tornados/hurricanes down power lines
Power outages from overuse during peak times
Floods that impact power and transportation
Strikes or issues preventing just-in-time delivery to stores
Living off-grid
Using up preserved garden stash during winter months
etc.


WHITE BEAN SALAD
This salad uses canned and dehydrated foods. If you happen to have fresh herbs, onions and/or bell peppers, that's even better.

1 can cooked white beans, drained
1 tablespoon dried bell pepper bits, re-hydrated in a little hot water
1 teaspoon dried onion bits, re-hydrated in a little hot water

Mix beans, bell pepper, and onion in a small bowl. Pour about a half-cup of Italian salad dressing over and let sit a few minutes to blend flavors.

Here is a simple Italian salad dressing that makes about a half-cup.

Italian Salad Dressing:

1/2 teaspoon dried Italian seasoning
2 tablespoons vinegar
1 tablespoon water
1/3 cup salad oil

Whisk together ingredients.
Note: Add salt and pepper to taste.

This cold bean salad can be served with cooked rice or pan-fried rice-vegetable patties for complete protein. If you don't have a way to pan-fry, or to cook a pot of rice, you can serve it with crackers and it will still have a good amount of protein from the beans.

I'll post a recipe for rice-vegetable patties, and some pictures in the next few days. And add some more menus/recipes.

White Bean Salad using fresh vegetables. Substitute dried if fresh produce is not available. Dress with Italian Dressing or Raspberry Vinaigrette.

Marianne
12th August 2015, 22:33
I live in an area where we get tornadoes and severe seasonal storms. About four years ago we had a rash of tornadoes that devastated much of the state and left us without power for a number of days. It got me thinking of ways to use up the thawing/melting food in the freezer/refrigerator and how to eat as healthy as we could under difficult circumstances.

Raw things are good and healthy, but sometimes you crave the warmth of soft, cooked food and steamy soup. Finding a way to warm/cook food is important and worth some thought. You may already have a source, or be able to rig up something.

SOURCES OF HEAT FOR COOKING

Outdoor gas grill
Coleman camp stove
Wood stove with an iron skillet
Indoor gas stove with a propane gas tank hooked up. When electricity is off, burners need to be lit manually with long lighters. You can pan cook, boil food, and heat water for washing dishes and simple bathing.
A fire pit outdoors. Someone adept at it could cook in an iron skillet, making sure not to get burned. Safer would be to thread pieces of food onto long sticks and roast them in the fire. Think biscuit/bread dough wrapped around the end of the stick in a thin layer ... soft veggies like yellow squash, bell peppers, fresh mushrooms dipped in oil/marinade...
A rocket stove ... look on the internet for plans
Search in this subforum for ideas too

What have I forgotten? There are likely many other ways to find a heat source for cooking, especially other cultures outside the US where I am.

Selkie
12th August 2015, 22:41
"Outlaw ovens" (earth ovens) come to mind, too.

I really want to thank you for this thread, Marianne. I am deeply interested in this and similar subjects.

RunningDeer
13th August 2015, 00:04
"Outlaw ovens" (earth ovens) come to mind, too.

Thank you, Marianne. :wave:

Different videos on how to build an earth oven (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=earth+ovens) here.


Earthen Oven in 24 hours - 18th Century How-to Series
BPQVFQmwZMU

Published on Apr 9, 2012
How to make a simple earthen oven out of the least quantity of inexpensive materials in the shortest amount of time. Go from bare ground to a baked loaf of bread in less than 24 hours. Make sure to check out the companion blog to this series at http://savoringthepast.net/


Below: Include metal and rocks amongst the wood to retain the heat. In this video they cooked a large hunk of meat in 3 1/2 hours.


How to make a Hangi or Australian earth oven
q6HvgZD8lG8

Published on May 7, 2014

The process of making a Hangi my way.

You may notice at the end of the video that I sound a little surprised that it worked. That's because this was our third attempt after a couple of failures, so it felt good to get it right.

By the way, the meat was absolutely delicious with a hearty smoky flavour.

You can also cook the vegetables in the hangi, just put them above the meat, with the hot rocks below.

Experts tip: After digging the hole, it can help to "pre-heat" it by starting a fire in it early on, then removing as much of the embers and ash as possible. (hence the black ashes in the hole in the video)

Marianne
13th August 2015, 00:10
"Maori earth oven" by Earthoven_hangi.
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Maori_earth_oven.svg
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/62/Maori_earth_oven.svg/200px-Maori_earth_oven.svg.png

Selkie, thanks for that ... you inspired me to read about earth ovens, an ancient method of cooking. It reminds me of the way New Englanders do clam bakes on the beach, digging a pit in the sand, an ember fire and fire-heated rocks, layers of food covered with moist seaweed and sand on top to seal in the heat.

UPDATE: Wow, Paula, thanks for the info! That 18th century how-to series sounds so interesting.

Marianne
14th August 2015, 00:31
DRIED BEANS
On the subject of cooking beans, a couple of things … you want beans that are fully cooked, nice and soft (but not mushy/falling apart) and with enough thickened bean broth. And even more important, you want beans that are NOT GASSY.

Happily, these things are easy to do once you know how.

HOW TO COOK DRIED BEANS
Set a colander in the sink. Cut open your package of beans; pour about a quarter-cupful into your hand and examine, handful at a time, looking for rocks, blobs of dirt, half-beans, or badly-colored beans. Remove those, and place each handful into the colander. Run water over the colander to rinse the beans well.

Put them into a bowl, about 2 quart size, to allow for some expansion (1 cup dried makes 3 cups cooked). Cover with water, about 3 inches above the beans. Let sit overnight, or at least 8 hours.

In the morning, dump the beans back into the colander, and rinse. Put into a cooking pot and cover with water. Bring to a boil. Remove from heat and carefully pour beans into colander, and rinse.

Put beans back into the pot and cover with water, 3 inches above the beans. You can add aromatic elements if desired ... a bay leaf, garlic clove(s), chopped onion/shallots, chopped celery stalks/leaves are all nice additions.

This is where you add the ingredients that tenderize beans and remove gassy elements by making them more digestible. You can choose one of three ways:


Kombu is a highly nutritious sea vegetable that is not detectable in the cooked beans. For a pound of dried beans, use a piece of dried kombu about 3” long. It will add saltiness on its own, so you may want to reduce or eliminate other salt. Kombu is the method I use, and can say it works perfectly. Don't be put off by the fact that it's seaweed, aka kelp. No one I've served kombu beans to has ever guessed it was in there.
Epazote is an herb that has been used for a long time in native Mexican and South American cultures. Use 1-2 teaspoons dried herb for a pound of beans.*
Ajwain is a seed used in Indian / Middle Eastern cuisine. Its flavor is similar to thyme, and it has additional health benefits. Use ¾ teaspoon for a pound of dried beans. Its flavor goes well with lentils, split peas, and garbanzo beans.


*Some people use more epazote than I’ve indicated, up to 2-3 times as much. You may want to experiment using more if you find a lesser amount doesn’t work for you.

Add your choice of bean tenderizer and bring beans to a boil. Turn heat to a gentle simmer. Cook until beans are soft, and liquid has thickened and boiled down (1-3 hours, depending on the variety, size, and age of your beans). Stir occasionally, and more often as the liquid cooks down.

When beans are just barely tender, add salt if desired (2-3 teaspoons).

Add a little hot water if needed, if beans aren't tender yet but liquid has cooked down too much.

About Yields (and what to do with all those beans)
The smallest package of beans is a pound, about 2 cups in general. Two cups expands with soaking and cooking to make 6 cups cooked beans … that’s a potful. If you don’t have a family to feed, or don’t want bean leftovers for the whole week, consider freezing 1-2 cup portions in zip-lock freezer bags. You’ll have the convenience of canned beans and the quality control of homemade food. Plus it’s cheaper to cook your own, especially if you buy beans in bigger packages than a pound.

Resources
The Bean Institute has a chart of bean yields (dried vs canned)
http://beaninstitute.com/recipes/bean-yield-chart/

About ajwain
http://indianfood.about.com/od/thebasics/p/ajwain.htm

About epazote
http://www.thekitchn.com/ingredient-spotlight-epazote-152167

About kombu
This is the place I trust for quality sea vegetables.
http://www.seaveg.com/shop/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=21

Jesse
14th August 2015, 07:54
Solar Oven and or Parabolic Cookers – Unless you know how to make them parabolic cookers are still somewhat spendy but solar ovens can be easily made by most anyone and some even purchased rather inexpensively.

Volcano II Stove - This is a tri-fuel stove that people often use in conjunction with a Dutch oven. It collapses flat, is highly portable, a good alternative when cooking over a camp fire or heating up an entire backyard oven or burning in an indoor fireplace isn’t an option.

Fireplace – It takes some practice but if you have the right type of wood burning fireplace you can cook certain things indoors in one. Any kind of wood burning is polluting so some won’t burn wood in the home.

Low Wattage Microwave – Though some dislike them, refuse to use them for those who do a low wattage one can be run off a fairly simple, not all that unaffordable small solar panel set up. YouTube has some good videos. This same solar set up with a few tweaks can also be used to run other small appliances - some ice makers, air popcorn poppers and more.

Flameless Ration Heaters – Though these won’t last indefinably, involve chemical reaction and need water to activate they are handy for heating up MREs (meals ready to eat). Also you can use them to warm up regular foods you normally eat. They are also available in drink pouch size to warm smaller things up fairly quickly.

Billy
14th August 2015, 11:05
Something i always keep in stock are vacuum packed vegetarian Indian meals. I can buy them at my local Asian store, In my store if i buy two i get one free, If you buy the right make, they are truly yummy. They are great for camping ect. free of artificial preservatives, colors and flavorings. a 2 - 5 yr shelf life. ready to heat up. Mild, medium or spicy.

I have not tried this brand, but for an example.
http://www.ishopindian.com/mtr-chana-masala-ready-to-eat-pr-22485.html

3080030799

With some Chapati or paratha bread and your ready to go. :hungry:

Sierra
14th August 2015, 16:11
Billy,

What is the make of the yummy Indian food you like?

:)

kanishk
14th August 2015, 17:48
Something i always keep in stock are vacuum packed vegetarian Indian meals. I can buy them at my local Asian store, In my store if i buy two i get one free, If you buy the right make, they are truly yummy. They are great for camping ect. free of artificial preservatives, colors and flavorings. a 2 - 5 yr shelf life.

Yes this brand is without any Artificial flavors, colors and preservatives. And they mention the shelf life for each item in packed form and opened form. But I never eat any ready to eat sabzees/vegetables.

kanishk
14th August 2015, 18:00
I use to eat red chilli powder with Chapati/bread.

In a small bowl take red chilli powder.
Add some salt
Add some oil
Heat the mixture.

Now this red chilli chuttny is ready to eat with any bread/ chapati/ paratha

kanishk
14th August 2015, 18:11
Thecha (Maharashtrian) green chilli

On frying pan
take some 10 green chillies
3 tomatos
4-5 garlic cloves
And Jeera
Heat them

After they are sufficiently cooked, add oil and any other masala if you want to add and smash everything.
Then add coriander leaves and salt. And smash everything well.

Now I like to tell you the secret ingredient, which is Basil leaves(tulsi)

People don't know about adding Basil leaves in this chutney. But is you add Basil leaves were great quantity of tomatoes are added you can add Basil leaves. It enhances the flavor. Two varieties of basil are added in tomato ketchup.

Paper mint also comes in the family of Basil, so they also enhance the flavor. So people who know its importance add paper-mint in Non-veg dishes.

kanishk
14th August 2015, 18:18
If you have a Mango tree and Mangoes are not ripe and are green.

You can either cut the mango in small 5-7 mm pieces and add red chilli powder and salt.

You can eat it as it is or with Chapatis, Rice, or anything else.

When you will make it only the thought of it will make your salivary gland secret lots of saliva next time.
...........

Some people add mustered seeds and oil in it after heating them.

kanishk
14th August 2015, 18:28
Chivda made from Rice flakes
(Maharashtrian Poha Chivda)

Either you can make it in large quantity and eat it whenever you want or just make it in small quantities.

http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/z/indian-food-chiwda-16746771.jpg

Marianne
14th August 2015, 23:36
Jesse, thanks for the excellent info on heat sources.

I noticed you posted twice, with slightly different wording on each, so I combined them into one and deleted the other, just to avoid confusion.

There's quite a bit of info on this subforum (Living off the grid) about heating/cooking in emergencies without power, so thought I'd list a few.

Offf grid cooking and heating
http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?12718-Off-the-Grid-Cooking-and-Heating

Beer/soft drink can stove
http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?67284-How-To-Turn-A-Beer-or-Soft-Drink-Can-Into-A-Stove

Rocket stoves
http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?2029-Rocket-Stoves

Another rocket stove thread
http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?50815-Rocket-Stoves

Lightweight stoves
http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?56569-Bug-out-bag-stove

Marianne
14th August 2015, 23:45
kanishk, that photo of chivda looks delicious!

Your recipes with chiles sound wonderful too, but sadly they would be too hot for me.

I too think basil and tomatoes are perfect together. I have both in the garden this year ... the basil is broad and lush, like small lettuce leaves.

-----

Billy, I had no idea there were such wonderful vegetarian Indian meals with long shelf lives. Definitely going to try to find them in my local ethnic markets.

-----

Fresh food is best, we know this ... but for emergencies and even occasional non-emergencies, quality packaged food has to be our source of nutrients and calories. The purpose of this thread is to bring ideas together to make this easier, and hopefully even tastier and more comforting in times of trouble.

Marianne
15th August 2015, 18:07
The recipes here will generally call for ingredients that need no refrigeration, and can be prepared in a kitchen without modern conveniences. Many call for being able to heat / cook on a stove top, and most can manage this. Baking is more tricky, but could be done, say in a dutch oven over a heat source, or in an alternative oven.

I've eliminated fresh eggs because you likely won't have them after the first 3 days without power ... unless you have hens or neighbors who do and share with you. There are acceptable egg substitutes for some uses. Dried egg white powder is available. Several vegetable starches can be egg replacers in baking. I'll talk about substitutes more as we post.

As I test each recipe, I'll take a photo and post it.

Some recipes I hope to share:

Vegetables:
Vegetable Sushi (nori make)
Asparagus Casserole

Pan fried little breads/starches:
Skillet English Muffins
Potato Pancakes
Oatmeal Pancakes
Hush Puppies (cornmeal cakes)
Corn Griddle Cakes (using canned cream corn)
Potato Puffs (using canned potatoes, Idahoan potato flakes, or fresh potatoes if you have them)
Pea Patties (vegetarian burgers)

Soups:
Creamy Potato Soup (using canned potatoes, Idahoan potato flakes, or fresh potatoes if you have them)
Cream of Tomato Soup (using canned tomatoes and evaporated milk)

Salads:
Three Bean Salad
Cranberry Relish

Starches
Spanish Rice
Vegetable Fried Rice
Stove top Corn Pudding
Stove top Stuffing with variations (fruit, nuts, veg)
Steamed Rice-Veg Ring
Scalloped Potatoes
Steamed Lentil Loaf

Sweets
Dutch oven Cracker Pie (a mock-apple pie that's very good)
Dutch oven Pumpkin Pie
Applesauce Gingerbread Pudding (a steamed cake)
Plum Pudding (a steamed cake)
Steamed Cranberry Pudding with Lemon Sauce
No-Bake Oatmeal Cookies

Meats:
Can-Can Chicken
Chicken & Dumplings
Stroganoff
Tuna or Salmon Patties

peterpam
15th August 2015, 18:59
My sister in law has become a master of cooking outside on a open flame with a dutch oven. It seems there is nothing she can't make with one. She makes great soups, dumplings and stews and even a sort of bread and cakes. Right now she does it while camping or just for the challenge of it, but it will be a great skill to have if the sh** ever hits the fan!!!!! There really is an art to using one correctly.

Marianne
16th August 2015, 15:11
If you can manage to home can or dry/dehydrate some vegetables, it gives you better options, and you control what's in your food.

Here's the USDA website with up to date information on safe home canning. Guidelines have changed in the last few years.
http://nchfp.uga.edu/publications/publications_usda.html

Here's Kari Lynn's thread on home canning meat, in this subforum.
http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?7863-Home-Canned

My canning kitchen:
http://projectavalon.net/forum4/attachment.php?attachmentid=30826&d=1439737391
My home canned vegetable soup
http://projectavalon.net/forum4/attachment.php?attachmentid=30827&thumb=1&d=1439737564

If you want to can meat and most vegetables, you'll need a pressure canner. I've found an online source in the US, that gives a good discount, and the one I want does NOT have a rubber gasket (a rubber gasket needs to be replaced periodically, and requires some strength to use). Here's the website.
http://www.everythingkitchens.com/all-american-pressure-cooker-930.html

Note you can get a basic one for around $100 on Amazon. Make sure it's a pressure canner, not a water/steam bath. The water bath ones work only for acidic vegetables and fruits.

Delight
16th August 2015, 16:55
This is a wonderful thread and I appreciate your information here.

There is an MLM http://www.thrivefreezedried.com/that has parties to taste their freeze dried food. One of my friends had one so I went and was surprised by the great taste of freeze dried food. It could provide some variety to the pantry?

I am adding here the concept of heat retention cooking (http://solarcooking.wikia.com/wiki/Heat-retention_cooking).

Billy
16th August 2015, 17:53
Billy,

What is the make of the yummy Indian food you like?

:)

Hi Sierra.
The makes i buy are "Kohinoor" and "Haldirams" Great for camping or emergencies, Heat in a sauce pan, Microwave. Or boil in the bag, which is what i do as you can heat two at the same time with less dishes to wash. :bigsmile:

Kohinoor
http://www.kohinoorfoods.co.uk/productDetails.asp?id=34

30828

Haldirams. (One of my favourites)
http://www.haldiramsonline.com/minute-khana.html

30829

Marianne
16th August 2015, 18:14
peterpam, it's wonderful to hear that your sister-in-law is so adept at Dutch oven/outdoor cooking. I've done a little but my results have been mixed!

I'm sure we'd love to hear any tips or recipes she might want to share through you. As I recall, it's regulating the heat that's tricky ... so the food is cooked through. It reminds me of cooking in an old wood-burning cook stove. I got pretty good at that, even baked bread ... but it took some experimenting.

Something like this ...
http://www.barnstablestove.com/images/stoveimages/sunnyglenwood.jpg

Delight, thanks for those two concepts ... heat retention cooking is new to me, going to look into it. Freeze dried food would be closer to fresh, and definitely fill in some gaps in pantry cooking. I'd focus most on vegetables, I think.

Please share more if you wish!

Delight
17th August 2015, 04:44
Delight, thanks for those two concepts ... heat retention cooking is new to me, going to look into it. Freeze dried food would be closer to fresh, and definitely fill in some gaps in pantry cooking. I'd focus most on vegetables, I think.


What I have tried in freeze dried food when reconstituted tastes GREAT. I highly recommend it if one has the kind of disposable income to buy this kind of food.

I want to depend on sprouts. They cost way less than freeze dried food. The seeds last for years. I believe we could subsist on sprouts.


Sprouts are an excellent survival ration. Not only are they a dense source of proteins, vitamins, minerals, and enzymes, they provide a sustained source of energy in emergency situations. Sprouts are a “live” food and are a welcome addition to meals that primarily consist of prepackaged rations. When fresh vegetables are scarce, sprouts are an excellent substitute.

Seeds for sprouting should be included in every emergency kit. They have a long storage life and require very little space. There are many online sources for seeds or you can package them yourself after purchasing from a health food store. Just make sure they are put in a waterproof, airtight container with a tight seal and store them in a cool, dry place away from the light.

Neither sunshine nor soil is required for sprouting, and your “crop” will be ready in a matter of days, depending on the type of seed used. Sprouting requires very little space. Basic sprouting equipment is a simple as a Mason jar, a mesh screen to place over the top for rinsing, water, and a towel to cover the jar. Other methods include sprouting trays, sprouting bags, and even elaborate self-rinsing systems.

When you consider the volume of sprouts grown from a mere teaspoon of seeds, sprouts serve as a powerhouse of nutrition for a minimal investment. Upon germination (sprouting), the nutritional elements in the seeds increase dramatically. For example, a grain of wheat increases its vitamin E content 300% after only 2 days of growth and the B2 vitamin riboflavin jumps from 13 milligrams to 54 mg in the sprout. In general, B vitamins can increase 300% to 1400% depending on the variety.

Depending on the type of sprouting seed used, the process usually involves an initial period (several hours) of soaking. The seeds are then drained, rinsed, and then drained again. If using a jar, the jar is placed on its side and either covered with a towel or keep in the dark. Most seeds require rinsing and draining at least three times a day. When the sprouts are ready (usually 2-5 days, depending on the type), a final rinse is done and the sprouts are ready to eat – either fresh or lightly cooked. If refrigerated, sprouts will last several days, but rinsing will help prevent spoilage. Don’t use sprouts that have a slimy appearance or a suspicious odor.“Wonder Food” of Emergency Preparedness: Sprouts (http://americanpreppersnetwork.com/2012/03/wonder-food-of-emergency-preparedness-sprouts.html)


A word of caution: sprouts are not everyone’s dish and if members of your family are among those who need time to get used to them, it’s advisable to start now. The following are some commonly known and easy to grow variations of the sprouts:

Alfalfa: One of the best-known sprouts.
Beans: Bean sprouts are grown in a dark environment; mung beans are the bean that is most used to produce bean sprouts.
Broccoli: The healthiest of all commonly known sprouts.
Cabbage and Celery: Sprouts of these vegetables are commonly used in breads.
Mustard: This sprout calls for a warning: use it sparingly, as it is hot.
Radishes: Radish sprouts are also hot.
Wheat: Wheat sprouts can be used in breads, cereals, and salads.The Ultimate Urban Survival Food: Sprouts (http://www.prepperdome.com/the-ultimate-urban-survival-food-sprouts/)

RunningDeer
17th August 2015, 17:07
Thank you Everybody for all the valuable tips.

For starters, I ordered from Thrive (http://jodiandjulie.thrivelife.com/home), three fruits, three vegetables, quinoa and #10 lid cans. I sent the link to family members under the guise of “here’s a great site for easy shopping, time saving and healthy eating”.

Then I’m on to Billy’s quick meals. Nuts.com (https://nuts.com) is a good place to check out, and Amazing Grass organic green superfood (http://www.amazinggrass.com).

I have an artisan well. As a back-up plan, I’ve got 5 gallon buckets of water stacked up and for drinking water, liter glass jars that I rotate out. And back up filters for the Berkley filter system (http://www.berkeyfilters.com) in case I have to draw water from surrounding streams and ponds. The filters use a lot of water to prep them, so I’ve gone ahead with that step already.

I purchased The BioLite Camp Stove (http://www.biolitestove.com/products/biolite-campstove) and tinder wood. The stove also generates electricity for charging personal devices.

One of my two back-up power sources is a 2'X4' solar panel on wheels. It also has a battery back up and wall socket power source. I don't know how practical it’s long term, but my plan is to use the Vitamix blender which uses less than a minute of power.


Ron Mauer Sr
17th August 2015, 22:39
Thank you Everybody for all the valuable tips.

For starters, I ordered from Thrive (http://www.thrivelife.com/shop), three fruits, three vegetables, quinoa and #10 lid cans. I sent the link to family members under the guise of “here’s a great site for easy shopping, time saving and healthy eating”.

Then I’m on to Billy’s quick meals. Nuts.com (https://nuts.com) is a good place to check out, and Amazing Grass organic green superfood (http://www.amazinggrass.com).

I have an artisan well. As a back-up plan, I’ve got 5 gallon buckets of water stacked up and for drinking water, liter glass jars that I rotate out. And back up filters for the Berkley filter system (http://www.berkeyfilters.com) in case I have to draw water from surrounding streams and ponds. The filters use a lot of water to prep them, so I’ve gone ahead with that step already.

I purchased The BioLite Camp Stove (http://www.biolitestove.com/products/biolite-campstove) and tinder wood. The stove also generates electricity for charging personal devices.

One of my two back-up power sources is a 2'X4' solar panel on wheels. It also has a battery back up and wall socket power source. I don't know how practical it’s long term, but my plan is to use the Vitamix blender which uses less than a minute of power.


:idea:
Lookin' good

If there is an interruption in the food supply, soup will be a real help. When more people show up you can add more water to the mix.

Marianne
17th August 2015, 23:48
:idea:
Lookin' good

If there is an interruption in the food supply, soup will be a real help. When more people show up you can add more water to the mix.

LOL Ron, and true enough! My father-in-law used to say, in response to unexpected company arriving at dinner time ... that he was putting another pail of water in the soup.

Marianne
18th August 2015, 03:11
Sprouts and vegetable powders are important additions to the mix. Thanks Delight and Paula.

I want to mention protein powders too. Rice and pea protein powders are popular and easily located in health food stores.

I had to take in a large amount of protein in recovering from surgery, and didn't want anything I found on the shelf. Needed something with a lot of protein, non GMO, no additional garbage added, no sweetener (so many have aspartame derivatives--shudder) so I went looking online and found Naked Whey. It's just whey protein, grass fed, no soy, no gluten, no additives of any kind. No growth hormones. I ordered 5 pounds of it, which is 76 servings of 25 g protein each. It may seem pricey at $90 but it's a bunch of protein, and I was very pleased with it. I added cocoa powder to mine, and a little vanilla extract, ice cubes all pureed in the blender, and it was like a chocolate milkshake. Without power you'd have to whisk it or beat with an egg beater, sans ice.

http://nkdnutrition.com/products/grass-fed-whey-protein-powder
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/813OjJIqwsL._SX425_.jpg

Selkie
18th August 2015, 03:21
I like to store commercial canned goods, like tomatoes and all kinds of veggies and beans, plus meats, like beef. The reason I like canned goods is because canned foods are already cooked through, and can be eaten straight out of the can, without further cooking, so if cooking is not an option, it really doesn't matter. Plus, they can be made into all kinds tasty cooked soups and stews when cooking is possible.

Ron Mauer Sr
18th August 2015, 11:50
I like to store commercial canned goods, like tomatoes and all kinds of veggies and beans, plus meats, like beef. The reason I like canned goods is because canned foods are already cooked through, and can be eaten straight out of the can, without further cooking, so if cooking is not an option, it really doesn't matter. Plus, they can be made into all kinds tasty cooked soups and stews when cooking is possible.

Canned goods are good choices for those on a tight budget. Just purchase a little extra each trip to the grocery store.

Cans are also a good idea if one plans to help one's neighbor. Cans are portable and easy to give away.

Selkie
18th August 2015, 14:58
I like to store commercial canned goods, like tomatoes and all kinds of veggies and beans, plus meats, like beef. The reason I like canned goods is because canned foods are already cooked through, and can be eaten straight out of the can, without further cooking, so if cooking is not an option, it really doesn't matter. Plus, they can be made into all kinds tasty cooked soups and stews when cooking is possible.

Canned goods are good choices for those on a tight budget. Just purchase a little extra each trip to the grocery store.

Cans are also a good idea if one plans to help one's neighbor. Cans are portable and easy to give away.

That is what I do. I buy a few extra cans every trip, and before I know it, I have a full larder.

They say that you should not store things you don't normally eat, and I think that is good advice. By buying a few extra cans each trip, I don't waste money on things I really wouldn't eat in an emergency.

p.s. I often think of what my neighbors and I would do if the hammer came down. The first thing I think of is the children. Before all else, the children must be taken care of, fed and protected. I would give my last can of beans away to a family with children before I ate it myself.

RunningDeer
18th August 2015, 15:47
I purchased the Naked Whey Protein Powder (http://nkdnutrition.com/products/grass-fed-whey-protein-powder) and checked out their pea protein powder (http://nkdnutrition.com/products/pea-protein-powder). Then went to nuts.com (https://nuts.com) to purchase organic cacao powder (https://nuts.com/nuts/cacao/organic-powder.html) for Marianne's whey protein drink. I found certified gluten free pea soup flour (https://nuts.com/cookingbaking/flours/green-pea-gluten-free.html) and a simple recipe.

Green Pea Flour creates a wonderful creamy pea soup with garden fresh color in just three minutes and contains less than 2% fat.

Instructions: Green Pea Soup

Ingredients

• 3 Tbsp Green Pea Flour
• 2 cups Hot Water
• 2 tsp Chicken or Vegetable Bouillon

Stovetop: In a saucepan, heat 2 cups water to just about boiling. Reduce heat to medium and whisk in 3 Tbsp Green Pea Flour and 2 tsp of chicken or vegetable bouillon or soup base. Cook until mixture boils, then boil for 2 minutes.

Serves 2

Microwave: Using a 6-cup microwave bowl, whisk flour and bouillon into hot water. Cook 1 minute on high or until mixture boils. Stir well and cook for 2 additional minutes.

Serves 2

There are approximately 2 3/4 cups per pound.

Marianne
18th August 2015, 23:29
Selkie and Ron, very good points about canned goods. The recipes I'm sharing here depend on them quite a bit ... soups and stews made with canned carrots, peas, potatoes, and meats if desired, and using thickening like flour or cornstarch/arrowroot, with herbs and spices. I like having evaporated canned milk too ... it really expands the possibilities.

As you say, Selkie, you can just open and eat them cold if that's the only option.

Paula, now I have to get some green pea powder -- split pea soup is delicious and nourishing. Possible to do a stove top pot of it, but yours is so easy and quick. I've seen beet powder and carrot powder. I have powdered carrot ... have only used it in making 'carrot cake' soap (with carrot seed essential oil, very nice for skin conditions) -- makes soap a gorgeous peach color and adds a bit of gentle texture to exfoliate.

Speaking of that, putting aside some bars of soap is a good idea. Fels naptha is great for household soap (grate and mix with hot water for hands / dishes / laundry. Not the most gentle for skin, but it would do for bath soap in a pinch.

Thanks for all the contributions!

Ron Mauer Sr
18th August 2015, 23:47
Water is critical, more so than food. Three days without clean water to drink and you will need nothing else.

It is so important to have a plan to retrieve and filter water.

If the electric grid goes down so does the ability to pump water.

When unexpected guests show up, clean water is needed to extend the soup.

Water is needed to re-hydrate freeze dried and dehydrated food (http://ronmauer.net/blog/?page_id=4100).

Water - Filters, Purifiers and Pasteurization (http://ronmauer.net/blog/?page_id=178)

Water - Retrieval (http://ronmauer.net/blog/?page_id=4151)

And if one has food and but no water to flush, a homemade sawdust or composting toilet (http://ronmauer.net/blog/?page_id=216) will be a low cost luxury, especially for city dwellers.

Plan ahead. Those without a plan are likely to fail.

RunningDeer
19th August 2015, 02:03
I wasn’t aware of powders like beet, carrot and kale. I found a good place to begin my research called, ‘The Synergy Company (http://www.thesynergycompany.com)’. It offers pure vegetable powders.


http://i1262.photobucket.com/albums/ii610/WhiteCrowBlackDeer/pso-categoryall-v2_zpszkbokrnw.jpg

Ron Mauer Sr
19th August 2015, 02:15
I wasn’t aware of powders like beet, carrot and kale. I found a good place to begin my research called, ‘The Synergy Company (http://www.thesynergycompany.com)’. It offers pure vegetable powders.


http://i1262.photobucket.com/albums/ii610/WhiteCrowBlackDeer/pso-categoryall-v2_zpszkbokrnw.jpg


I wonder if the powders are simply dehydrated veggies that have been ground.
And I wonder what the shelf life is.

Elainie
19th August 2015, 03:21
Synergy is an excellent company BTW, I've used some of their products for years.

RunningDeer
19th August 2015, 12:07
I wonder if the powders are simply dehydrated veggies that have been ground.
And I wonder what the shelf life is.
I'm not sure of the shelf life. I ordered beet, carrot and kale. I'll check when it comes in.


Freeze-drying is considered the gold standard and is proven to preserve
the naturally occurring biochemical "actives" of a substance.

http://avalonlibrary.net/paula/Foods/quality_zpsuwk5ooqq.JPG



OUR DRYING AND PREPARATION METHODS (http://www.thesynergycompany.com/product-info/pure-vegetable-powders/about-juice-powder/#pso_about)


http://i1262.photobucket.com/albums/ii610/WhiteCrowBlackDeer/Foods/fresh_zps3iud3uk8.jpg


There is no one size fits all drying method. Each fresh grown ingredient is carefully assessed by Synergy to determine which specialty drying method will best produce a preserved, bioactive, fresh finished powder. The common denominator is the use of low temperatures in an environment that is free of oxygen and light, all elements that have the potential to destroy the vital nutrients within.


Fresh freeze-dried: Freeze-drying is considered the gold standard and is proven to preserve the naturally occurring biochemical "actives" of a substance. By uniquely bypassing the liquid and evaporative state (where destructive reactions can take place quickly) and going from "frozen" to "dried" in an oxygen-free and UV light-free environment, the bioactive particles of a fresh material are immediately locked into a stable matrix, in effect sealed off from the excessive nutrient losses that would normally take place in the much more common drying processes.

Vacuum low temperature-dried: Very similar to our fresh freeze-drying, this is a special, patented low temperature drying process that uses a vacuum to create a low pressure, oxygen-free/light-free, cold environment that maximizes nutrient retention.

CO2 low temperature-dried: A special low temperature drying process that uses a refrigerated and light-free chamber with natural carbon dioxide to create an oxygen-free, cold environment that maximizes nutrient retention.

Specialty-dried under low heat: For tomatoes, the application of very precise low levels of heat actually optimizes the release of beneficial phytonutrients (like lycopene) when creating our pure tomato juice powder.


OUR SYNERGIZED® PROTOCOL

http://avalonlibrary.net/paula/Foods/cycle_zpspothrciv.JPG

We have always understood the absolute necessity of keeping a plant's "life force" intact-appreciating that it was the "synergy" of the whole plant that endowed it with its special health-promoting qualities. We discovered that this required unwavering care and attention to the process, down to every last detail-from the special heirloom seeds we plant, the rich organic soil we cultivate and care for, our hard-working organic farmers who grow all of our plants, our uniquely developed harvesting schedule and techniques, our proprietary cold temperature drying techniques, our custom designed cold-milling process, all the way to our vacuum-sealed packaging and 100% cold storage. We call this fastidious set of steps our "Synergized®" process. We are completely committed to following each and every step for all of our products and ingredients, while so many other companies fail to understand that even one misstep or compromise along the way diminishes the essence of what makes the plants so valuable for us all.

RunningDeer
19th August 2015, 21:53
http://www.pic4ever.com/images/computer3.gif
That was fast. The ‘Naked Whey’ just arrived. It’s huge! Big enough to use as a foot stool.

The cacao powder hasn’t come in, so I tossed in a blender a little a this and a little a that. It’s frothy and refreshing:


2 c water
1 1/2 scoops of whey
frozen banana
4 dried apple slices
1/8 c coconut
1 t vanilla
1/4 t cinnamon




:offtopic:

GrnEggsNHam
20th August 2015, 11:55
Sprouts and vegetable powders are important additions to the mix. Thanks Delight and Paula.

I want to mention protein powders too. Rice and pea protein powders are popular and easily located in health food stores.

I had to take in a large amount of protein in recovering from surgery, and didn't want anything I found on the shelf. Needed something with a lot of protein, non GMO, no additional garbage added, no sweetener (so many have aspartame derivatives--shudder) so I went looking online and found Naked Whey. It's just whey protein, grass fed, no soy, no gluten, no additives of any kind. No growth hormones. I ordered 5 pounds of it, which is 76 servings of 25 g protein each. It may seem pricey at $90 but it's a bunch of protein, and I was very pleased with it. I added cocoa powder to mine, and a little vanilla extract, ice cubes all pureed in the blender, and it was like a chocolate milkshake. Without power you'd have to whisk it or beat with an egg beater, sans ice.

http://nkdnutrition.com/products/grass-fed-whey-protein-powder
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/813OjJIqwsL._SX425_.jpg

Here is a cheaper alternative for anyone that is interested. I've been consuming it on a daily basis for about 2 years. When I started buying it he didn't have his own website and the price was a bit higher because he was using Amazon to process the orders. I think it was recommended by someone else here on the forum so I decided to give it a shot.
http://mikesmixrecoverydrink.com/natural-unflavored-whey-protein-concentrate-4lb.html

RunningDeer
20th August 2015, 13:59
wrong tone...

Marianne
20th August 2015, 23:33
Thanks for that alternative whey powder, GrnEggsNHam. I checked out Mike's whey, and noticed it contains soy. For some that's not a problem, but it's something to note.

Mike's is certainly streaks ahead of what's found on most store shelves, but I think not the high quality of Naked Whey.

I guess it depends on why you're buying whey powder -- if it's a medical issue then the best quality would be crucial. If it's to feed a lot of people when protein sources might be scarce, then Mike's would be the better choice.

If others have sources (shelf-stable whey or protein sources) to share, I'd love to hear about them.

Thanks again for opening up other protein sources, GrnEggsNHam.

Jesse
21st August 2015, 14:03
-As multiple people have expressed an interest in shelf stable Indian entrees I thought I’d include Tasty Bite for those who haven’t heard of them. This page shows all of their Indian meals but on the red banner across the top you can click to see just their gluten free dishes or only their vegan meals – http://tastybite.com/product_type/indian-entrees/#all

They also offer retort packaging rice - http://tastybite.com/product_type/rices/#glutten-free and a nice selection of 60 second MSG free Asian noodles for those looking for variety however no gluten-free noodle options yet - http://tastybite.com/product_type/asian-noodles/

-Though I don’t use protein powders I found a list of soy free powders two of which are whey concentrate based. For those who are gluten free they might be a good choice but for those who don’t need gluten free it might be worth a more exhaustive search because GF versions are always so much more expensive - http://oregaknow.com/fitness/best-gl...n-powder-list/

Dr. Mercola’s is also soy free whey based http://proteinpowder.mercola.com/pure-protein.html

-The other day while meal planning for a camping trip I came across a site I thought others here might enjoy. The creator shows how to make healthier versions of backpacking meals similar to Mountain House, Back Packer’s Pantry, Gourmet Reserves... Granted these won’t keep as long as because these recipes make use of dehydrated foods, whole grains and they are only packaged in Ziplock bags but most people purchasing freeze dried foods for backpacking, camping, day hiking whatever don’t need, aren’t looking for a 20+ year shelf life Just something lightweight, tasty and easy to prepare that needs no refrigeration - http://www.theyummylife.com/recipes/...26_Backpacking

This same link takes you to her money saving copycat Kind Bar Recipes most of which would do well on the trail in cool weather and even in warm weather if the chocolate were left off. She also includes instructions for making a vegan version of them.

Marianne
22nd August 2015, 17:27
GrnEggsNHam's post got me thinking of other sources of proteins. I remembered a website I'd visited awhile back when looking for maca powder. I never ordered anything from here, mainly because I wanted some of nearly all they had and didn't reduce it to a reasonable sized order. So, looking again today, with pantry foods in mind, there's so much there! I wanted to share it with others.

Z Natural Foods located in Florida.
http://www.znaturalfoods.com/

They have unusual things like mushroom powder, vanilla bean powder, and vegetarian sources of protein (pea and brown rice), and goat milk whey. Their cow milk whey sounds like a very high quality; similar to Naked Whey. It's made from raw milk -- not sure if Naked Whey is... a quick search didn't turn up yes or no. (Paula? Feel like researching that? :)

All sorts of vegetable, fruit, herb and root powders. And raw cacao nibs, cacao in several forms, and oh my, chocolate covered goji berries.

Their prices seem reasonable, and shipping is free in the continental US for orders $75 and over. I'll be placing an order soon.

On another subject, the garden is starting to yield sweet potatoes. One was a monster size that a burrowing critter had started to eat. I cut that part away and am baking it in the oven, going to make a pantry-worthy sweet potato pie using shelf-stable ingredients. If it's good, I'll post the recipe and a photo. If not, I'll try again ... lots of sweet potatoes coming my way. Going to can some in a non-sweet liquid.

Jesse, it sounds like you know a lot about camping... thanks for sharing those resources. I'm especially interested in the copy cat Kind Bars.

Selkie
22nd August 2015, 17:37
For some reason, that reminds me that in Spain, eggs are treated as a shelf-stable item. They do not wash them, they still have the bloom on them when you buy them, and they don't refrigerate them in the stores. Plus, I had no refrigerator in my Spanish little half-ruin because I had no electricity, and yet the eggs never spoiled, even in the heat of the Spanish summer in a kitchen that faced South. I kept them on a low shelf, in the shade, near the floor, where it was cool.

p.s. I never got sick from eating unrefrigerated eggs.

Marianne
22nd August 2015, 17:50
Very interesting, Selkie.

What was the longest time you kept the eggs unrefrigerated?

That means if someone had hens, they could keep the eggs for a reasonable amount of time before using them.

Selkie
22nd August 2015, 17:52
Very interesting, Selkie.
What was the longest time you kept the eggs unrefrigerated?

At least a couple of weeks, sometimes more. Seriously.

addition I only went for groceries once every couple of weeks or so.

RunningDeer
22nd August 2015, 19:33
Their cow milk whey sounds like a very high quality; similar to Naked Whey. It's made from raw milk -- not sure if Naked Whey is... a quick search didn't turn up yes or no. (Paula? Feel like researching that? :)

The short answer - Naked Whey is high quality. ♡

Question: Is Naked Whey made from raw milk?
Answer: Raw milk didn’t come up, but the descriptor “non-denatured whey” is used.

“Using pasture-fed cows’ milk from small dairy farms, we use careful manufacturing processes to create a non-denatured whey loaded with … from Naked Whey (http://nkdnutrition.com/products/grass-fed-whey-protein-powder) site.

Which is defined at evolutionhealth.com (https://www.evolutionhealth.com/wheyprotein-facts) as: Non-denatured - The same structure and proportion as in the original substance with full biological activity. (Never damaged.)


Nondenatured Whey Protein
Definitions of terms used:

Native Protein: The naturally occurring conformation of a protein. Unaltered by heat, chemicals, enzyme action or processing. (Native is the same structure and proportion as in the original substance.)

Denatured: To cause the tertiary structure of (a protein) to unfold, as with heat, alkali, or acid, so that some of its original properties, especially its biological activity, are diminished or eliminated. (It means damaged.)

Undenatured: To undamage. (A term that is used without discretion in the industry and is misleading. It is not possible for a protein to be undenatured.)

Non-denatured: The same structure and proportion as in the original substance with full biological activity. (Never damaged.)

Snippets from article and I color-coded for quick reference:

“…Non-denatured whey protein has the highest biological value of any protein. It is a complete protein, unlike soy, and provides all the essential amino acids in the correct balance. The five major active proteins of whey are…”

“…The public is now becoming more aware of the value of quality protein and is choosing whey protein for many good reasons. Not only does non-denatured whey have a wide range of immune-enhancing properties, it also has the ability to act as an antioxidant, antihypertensive, antitumor, antiviral and antibacterial. A number of clinical trials have successfully been performed using whey as an antimicrobial agent and in the treatment of cancer, HIV, hepatitis B & C, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis. It has a major role in red blood cell production, support in chemotherapy treatment, safe binding and detoxification of heavy metals, wound healing, growth of new muscle, weight regulation and the support of numerous immune functions. It is used by populations that have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), Fibromyalgia, Hepatitis, Cancer, HIV/AIDS, Respiratory disease, cognitive disorder from nutritional compromise and for any sports performance improvement.  


Here’s a second article on the three primary types of whey protein from medicalnewstoday.com (http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/263371.php)

- Naked Whey ingredients: Whey protein concentrate
- Contains: Milk


Whey Protein: Health Benefits and Side Effects
[snippets]

- Milk is made of two proteins, casein and whey. Whey protein can be separated from the casein in milk or formed as a by-product of cheese making.

- Whey protein is considered a complete protein and contains all 9 essential amino acids and is low in lactose content.

Composition and forms of whey protein

There are three primary types of whey protein : whey protein concentrate (WPC), whey protein isolate (WPI), and whey protein hydrolysate (WPH):

• Whey protein concentrate (Naked Whey) - WPC contains low levels of fat and low levels of carbohydrates (lactose). The percentage of protein in WPC depends on how concentrated it is. Lower end concentrates tend to have 30% protein and higher end up to 90%
• Whey protein isolate - WPIs are further processed to remove all the fat and lactose. WPI is usually at least 90% protein
• Whey protein hydrolysate - WPH is considered to be the "predigested" form of whey protein as it has already undergone partial hydrolysis - a process necessary for the body to absorb protein. WPH doesn't require as much digestion as the other two forms of whey protein. In addition, it is commonly used in medical protein supplements and infant formulas because of it's improved digestibility and reduced allergen potential.

Possible health benefits of whey protein


Losing weight
Anti-cancer properties
Lower cholesterol
Asthma - (improve immune response in children)
Lowering blood pressure


Possible side effects of whey protein (milk allergies)

• Stomach pains
• Cramps
• Reduced appetite
• Nausea
• Headache
• Fatigue

Selkie
22nd August 2015, 21:47
You know what? It strikes me that it would be a good thing to have some bottles of champagne around (although Spanish cava is just as good and not nearly as expensive). Because if/when the fecal matter hits the fan, amidst the tragedy and sadness, there are going to be some beautiful moments, and those are the times when it would be great to be able to pop open a bottle of bubbly and have a little celebration :dancing:

p.s. Store them cork-down, so that the corks don't dry out.

sort of off-topic, I know :focus:

Marianne
22nd August 2015, 22:38
You know what? It strikes me that it would be a good thing to have some bottles of champagne around (although Spanish cava is just as good and not nearly as expensive). Because if/when the fecal matter hits the fan, amidst the tragedy and sadness, there are going to be some beautiful moments, and those are the times when it would be great to be able to pop open a bottle of bubbly and have a little celebration :dancing:

p.s. Store them cork-down, so that the corks don't dry out.

sort of off-topic, I know :focus:

Not off topic at all, Selkie!

Things that contribute to a sense of comfort and better peace of mind, food-wise, are welcome here.

For the past few weeks, I've been slowly building a small home bar. I've never had any interest in it before, but suddenly now I do. Perhaps the same idea as yours, of small celebrations along the way.

And many cocktails call for bitters ... herbal blends preserved in alcohol, used in drop/dash amounts. Originally bitters were used as digestive aids, and so from that point of view, cocktails in moderation can be a healthy-ish thing. Especially when you consider they have relaxing qualities.

Alcohol can be a depressive ... something to be aware of. And apologies to those who don't wish to/can't imbibe. I honor that and understand.

RunningDeer
25th August 2015, 19:17
A couple of orders arrive in the next day or two. I’ll post Ron’s question on the shelf life of the Pure Organic Synergy Vegetable Powders (http://www.thesynergycompany.com/product-info/pure-vegetable-powders/). The Thrive (http://www.thrivelife.com/shop) foods have a shelf life of 25 years and one year after opening. In the meantime, I’m reading up on freeze-dried vs. fresh fruits and vegetables because freeze-dried is new to me. I’m reminded that not all freeze-drying processes are alike. Some use chemicals.

Some bullet points:

“How Healthy Is Freeze-Dried Fruit?” (http://www.livestrong.com/article/409794-how-healthy-is-freeze-dried-fruit/)

Antioxidants - Freeze drying fruit concentrates the antioxidants it contains, which means a bigger impact on your health. Antioxidants are compounds found in most plant foods, and they work by fighting free radical damage in your body that comes from the environment and unhealthy foods. Eating foods high in antioxidants helps your body fight illnesses that include heart disease and cancer. Just 2 tbsp. of freeze-dried black raspberries offer as many antioxidants as an entire cup of fresh ones.

Nutrients - Freeze-dried fruit contains similar amounts of nutrients when compared with fresh fruit. Some are lost during the freeze-drying process, but you still increase your intake for vitamins A and C, iron and potassium when you eat it. These vitamins and minerals protect your immunity, help your blood stay adequately oxygenated and regulate your blood pressure. Freeze-dried fruit is lighter in weight than fresh fruit, making it a good choice to carry along on a hike or marathon.

Do freeze-dried fruits have the same nutritional value as fresh fruits? (https://www.reddit.com/r/askscience/comments/2grjcg/do_freezedried_fruits_have_the_same_nutritional/)

- The freeze-drying process simply removes water from the tissue, so it should have no direct impact on the either the inorganic or organic components at the moment of removal. The process sort of locks in what is there by removing the water, which may have otherwise fostered an environment in which degradation of the organic compounds would have been more favored. However, it is also important to note that many nutritionally-relevant compounds continue to be synthesized in fruit throughout the ripening process, and freeze-drying would also put a halt to that.

- In freeze-drying, the water is removed in a low energy system through the process of sublimation. Because no additional energy is added, no additional reactions altering the nutritional contents of the fruit (or other food). Compare that to heated drying (or even cooking!), where energy is added and water leaves through boiling, a system favoring additional chemical reactions. These reactions may well destroy some of the desired nutritional components, though on the other hand they create other compounds with desired properties, such as flavor.

How do freeze-dried vegetables and fruits compare with fresh ones in nutrition? (http://goaskalice.columbia.edu/answered-questions/nutrition-freeze-dried-vs-raw-fruits-and-vegetables)

- Just remember that if you’re eating a lot of freeze-dried foods, you want to stay extra hydrated to make up for their lack of water. Also keep in mind that the freeze-drying process involves chemical treatments. While most of the chemicals used in these processes are FDA approved and regulated, it is good to be aware that some chemicals may have adverse health effects, particularly for those who have a sulfite sensitivity.

- Are freeze-dried fruits and veggies good for you? Research has shown that while freeze-dried fruits and vegetables contain slightly lower amounts of certain vitamins, they are rich in antioxidants and fiber. Most researchers agree that the amount of nutrients lost from freeze-drying is miniscule.

- What about calories? Because freeze-dried fruits and vegetables lack water, they are highly concentrated, which means they contain more calories than their original form. Confused? Think about it like this — if one cup of a particular fresh fruit is 100 calories, when you freeze dry that same amount of fruit it will shrink in size. So, one cup of freeze-dried fruit will contain more pieces of fruit than one cup of fresh fruit. This translates to more calories.

- In any form, fruits and vegetables provide you with vitamins and nutrients that are essential to your health. Whether you choose fresh or freeze-dried, it’s a good idea to include plenty of fruits and vegetables in your daily diet.

RunningDeer
26th August 2015, 19:39
I wasn’t aware of powders like beet, carrot and kale. I found a good place to begin my research called, ‘The Synergy Company (http://www.thesynergycompany.com)’. It offers pure vegetable powders.


http://i1262.photobucket.com/albums/ii610/WhiteCrowBlackDeer/pso-categoryall-v2_zpszkbokrnw.jpg


I wonder if the powders are simply dehydrated veggies that have been ground.
And I wonder what the shelf life is.
Hi Ron,

The shelf life of the organic carrot and beet vegetable powders from TheSynergyCompany.com (http://www.thesynergycompany.com/product-info/pure-vegetable-powders/) are 2-3 months once opened. The kale didn’t state it nor did I find it on the site. I’ll assume it’s the same.

Note: there was no date stamped on the bottles as to when they were filled. :noidea:

Selkie
26th August 2015, 19:55
You know what? It strikes me that it would be a good thing to have some bottles of champagne around (although Spanish cava is just as good and not nearly as expensive). Because if/when the fecal matter hits the fan, amidst the tragedy and sadness, there are going to be some beautiful moments, and those are the times when it would be great to be able to pop open a bottle of bubbly and have a little celebration :dancing:

p.s. Store them cork-down, so that the corks don't dry out.

sort of off-topic, I know :focus:

Not off topic at all, Selkie!

Things that contribute to a sense of comfort and better peace of mind, food-wise, are welcome here.

For the past few weeks, I've been slowly building a small home bar. I've never had any interest in it before, but suddenly now I do. Perhaps the same idea as yours, of small celebrations along the way.

And many cocktails call for bitters ... herbal blends preserved in alcohol, used in drop/dash amounts. Originally bitters were used as digestive aids, and so from that point of view, cocktails in moderation can be a healthy-ish thing. Especially when you consider they have relaxing qualities.

Alcohol can be a depressive ... something to be aware of. And apologies to those who don't wish to/can't imbibe. I honor that and understand.

Alcohol is also really important for making herbal tinctures for medicinal purposes. The feds don't allow us to legally make distilled spirits, but even mead or wine, which are allowed, are better at extracting the medicinal properties of plants than plain water is.

Ron Mauer Sr
26th August 2015, 20:14
I wasn’t aware of powders like beet, carrot and kale. I found a good place to begin my research called, ‘The Synergy Company (http://www.thesynergycompany.com)’. It offers pure vegetable powders.


http://i1262.photobucket.com/albums/ii610/WhiteCrowBlackDeer/pso-categoryall-v2_zpszkbokrnw.jpg



I wonder if the powders are simply dehydrated veggies that have been ground.
And I wonder what the shelf life is.
Hi Ron,

The shelf life of the organic carrot and beet vegetable powders from TheSynergyCompany.com (http://www.thesynergycompany.com/product-info/pure-vegetable-powders/) are 2-3 months once opened. The kale didn’t state it nor did I find it on the site. I’ll assume it’s the same.

Note: there was no date stamped on the bottles as to when they were filled. :noidea:

Shelf life, once opened, should be dramatically increased if the container can be vacuum sealed. Once a vacuum seal is established (oxygen and moisture removed) the remaining shelf life should not be reduced.

If the original jar will fit inside a Mason jar, these methods can be applied.

Vacuum packing using a Pump-N-Seal (http://www.pump-n-seal.com/) or a ZipLock bag vacuum pump (http://www.walmart.com/ip/Ziploc-Vacuum-Starter-Kit-1-kt/12443047) (no electricity or batteries needed).

These methods can be used with Mason jars, P.E.T.E. jars or other glass jars with gasket-ed lids.

Method #1: Put a small hole in the lid with a thumb tack. Cover the hole with a Pump-N-Seal tab check (http://www.pump-n-seal.com/), or with the homemade version as described by Judy Of The Woods (http://www.judyofthewoods.net/diy/pump.html). Cover the tab check with the vacuum pump and go.

Method #2: Purchase a Foodsaver regular (http://smile.amazon.com/FoodSaver-T03-0006-02P-Regular-Mouth-Jar-Sealer/dp/B0000CFFS6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1440620343&sr=8-1&keywords=foodsaver+regular+jar+sealer) or wide mouth (http://smile.amazon.com/FoodSaver-T03-0023-01-Wide-Mouth-Jar-Sealer/dp/B00005TN7H/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1440620250&sr=8-1&keywords=foodsaver+jar+lid) jar sealer and use the manual pumps (above) or a Foodsaver vacuum packer (electricity required).


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NsUl8WJ9ztI

RunningDeer
26th August 2015, 21:04
These methods can be used with Mason jars, P.E.T.E. jars or other glass jars with gasket-ed lids.

Method #1: Put a small hole in the lid with a thumb tack. Cover the hole with a Pump-N-Seal tab check (http://www.pump-n-seal.com/), or with the homemade version as described by Judy Of The Woods (http://www.judyofthewoods.net/diy/pump.html). Cover the tab check with the vacuum pump and go.

Method #2: Purchase a Foodsaver regular (http://smile.amazon.com/FoodSaver-T03-0006-02P-Regular-Mouth-Jar-Sealer/dp/B0000CFFS6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1440620343&sr=8-1&keywords=foodsaver+regular+jar+sealer) or wide mouth (http://smile.amazon.com/FoodSaver-T03-0023-01-Wide-Mouth-Jar-Sealer/dp/B00005TN7H/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1440620250&sr=8-1&keywords=foodsaver+jar+lid) jar sealer and use the manual pumps (above) or a Foodsaver vacuum packer (electricity required).
Thanks, Ron. I've gone through three Foodsavers. Not because their poor quality. I've use them for a long time. The unit takes up prime real-estate space and I stopped using the plastic seal bags. I'm researching a model that vacuums mason jars only. I wasn't please with the public's feedback, so I'm still in research phase. Thanks for the links. I'll check them out. :wave:

I found that the wide mouth jars seal better than the regular size. I read where people had trouble with the seal. People advised to double up and it sounded like they added the screw top as well. I found that sometimes you get a faulty one, so toss it.

I added to my mason jar collection this season. I have as many liter size as the quart size. They've got a quart size, wide mouth that's slightly taller and much thinner. Which is perfect if you have limited space.

Selkie
26th August 2015, 21:12
These methods can be used with Mason jars, P.E.T.E. jars or other glass jars with gasket-ed lids.

Method #1: Put a small hole in the lid with a thumb tack. Cover the hole with a Pump-N-Seal tab check (http://www.pump-n-seal.com/), or with the homemade version as described by Judy Of The Woods (http://www.judyofthewoods.net/diy/pump.html). Cover the tab check with the vacuum pump and go.

Method #2: Purchase a Foodsaver regular (http://smile.amazon.com/FoodSaver-T03-0006-02P-Regular-Mouth-Jar-Sealer/dp/B0000CFFS6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1440620343&sr=8-1&keywords=foodsaver+regular+jar+sealer) or wide mouth (http://smile.amazon.com/FoodSaver-T03-0023-01-Wide-Mouth-Jar-Sealer/dp/B00005TN7H/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1440620250&sr=8-1&keywords=foodsaver+jar+lid) jar sealer and use the manual pumps (above) or a Foodsaver vacuum packer (electricity required).
Thanks, Ron. I've gone through three Foodsavers. Not because their poor quality. I've use them for a long time. The unit takes up prime real-estate space and I stopped using the plastic seal bags. I'm researching a model that vacuums mason jars only. I wasn't please with the public's feedback, so I'm still in research phase. Thanks for the links. I'll check them out. :wave:

I found that the wide mouth jars seal better than the regular size. I read where people had trouble with the seal. People advised to double up and it sounded like they added the screw top as well. I found that sometimes you get a faulty one, so toss it.

I added to my mason jar collection this season. I have as many liter size as the quart size. They've got a quart size, wide mouth that's slightly taller and much thinner. Which is perfect if you have limited space.

I live in a humid part of the country, and when I go to store dehydrated stuff, I turn my oven on low and heat the Mason jars for a couple of minutes, to drive off any damp. I fill them while they are still warm with cooled, dehydrated stuff, and I notice that they often seal. So I wonder if I heated them a little more, if they would all seal?

Just an observation...for an experiment the next time I dehydrate something.

RunningDeer
26th August 2015, 21:22
I live in a humid part of the country, and when I go to store dehydrated stuff, I turn my oven on low and heat the Mason jars for a couple of minutes, to drive off any damp. I fill them while they are still warm with cooled, dehydrated stuff, and I notice that they often seal. So I wonder if I heated them a little more, if they would all seal?

Just an observation...for an experiment the next time I dehydrate something.

That's the same principle I found when I'd fill the jars with the extra foods/soups. They'd created a bit of a vacuum because it was still warm. I'd still seal them with the Foodsaver because it vacuumed out 100% of the air.

Ron Mauer Sr
26th August 2015, 21:49
I've used the Ziplock pump (http://www.walmart.com/ip/12443047?reviews_limit=7&) ($4.23) with both the Foodsaver Jar Sealers and the simple check valves sold by Pump-N-Seal.

The Ziplock pump is so inexpensive it might not be as durable as others. But I love simplicity, and I have spares.

I've not measured the actual vacuum created with each option (electric Foodsaver, Ziplock pump, Pump-N-Seal). That is on my to do list.

My electric Foodsaver was put away to reclaim counter space but it can be retrieved if needed.

The Foodsaver plastic bags are not 100% air tight as are Mylar bags, but vacuuming Mylar bags requires additional techniques.

(update) All the electric Foodsavers that I've seen can vacuum pack Mason jars with the proper attachments (plastic hose and jar sealer lid).

Marianne
29th August 2015, 16:30
In different scenarios, we could find ourselves with varying resources. For example, the food supply could be interrupted but the grid still be up and our ovens still working.

In which case we'd have reason for happiness in the form of warm biscuits with peppered white gravy....

In the southern US, biscuits are a sort of holy grail. The fluffy bread sort of biscuit, not the British cookie-type of biscuit. Southern biscuits are not too healthy, being made with white flour and butter/lard, but they are so delicious and a definite comfort food to enjoy occasionally. You can make biscuits from pantry staples if you use oil instead of butter, and buttermilk powder/water or canned evaporated milk instead of fresh milk/buttermilk. I don't have a biscuit recipe ... if you need one, best to google allrecipes.com or cooks.com. I 'measure' according to the size bowl, etc.

One important note if you're making biscuits... use soft winter wheat flour, which has less protein and lower gluten. One brand that's widely sold in my area is White Lily. It rises appreciably higher, is light, makes a lovely crust and a soft tender inside. You can order it through Amazon if it's not sold in your area.

Peppered White Gravy Recipe (bottom right image on purple check tablecloth)

1/4 cup flour
2 1/2 cups milk
1/4 cup butter
Salt and pepper to taste

Whisk flour and cold milk together in a pan. Slice butter into pats and add to pan. Heat until thickened, stirring constantly. Season to taste. Pour over hot biscuits.

NOTE: Peppered white gravy mix is available in packets, for convenience and folks who don't care to cook. It has some additives, but is very easy and shelf stable.
------------------
Biscuits with Other Sorts of Gravy

I didn't make tomato gravy today, so am borrowing an image from Tara Cooks (taracooks.com) -- a lovely blog you may want to visit for good recipes.

http://taracooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/tomato-gravy.jpg

Tomato Gravy Recipe (bacon drippings optional)

2 cups canned tomatoes, diced, not drained (1 16-oz can)
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
2 tablespoons bacon drippings or butter or oil

Melt butter or place drippings/oil into a skillet/pan. Mix flour into tomatoes with a wire whisk and add to fat. Stir frequently as it heats to just boiling and thickens. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Pour over biscuits, meatloaf/bean loaf/lentil loaf, or noodles.
-----------------
Chocolate Gravy
No chocolate gravy today either, so the image below is from roadfoods.com (left image below)

Chocolate Gravy Recipe

3 tablespoons cocoa powder
2 tablespoons flour
1 cup sugar
1 1/2 cups milk
2-3 tablespoons butter or oil

Stir together dry ingredients in a skillet/pan and whisk in milk. Cook until thickened, stirring constantly. Add butter and stir to melt. Pour over hot biscuits, pancakes, waffles, or cake.
-----------------
Red-Eye Gravy Recipe (no photo)
This is the easiest of gravies to make, with just two ingredients (three counting the biscuits you pour it on)

A skillet where you've cooked ham
Strong hot black coffee (1/4 cup to 1 cup)

Pour the coffee into the ham-encrusted skillet and slowly simmer for a couple of minutes. Pour over hot biscuits.
-----------------

Marianne
29th August 2015, 22:48
Alcohol is also really important for making herbal tinctures for medicinal purposes. The feds don't allow us to legally make distilled spirits, but even mead or wine, which are allowed, are better at extracting the medicinal properties of plants than plain water is.

Good point about herbal tinctures. Alcohol is also a great item for barter.

I use the cheapest vodka to make tinctures, but to get the most medicinal extraction, Everclear is best, having the highest proof. Tinctures are taken in drop amounts (10 - 20 drops daily is typical) so a little goes a long way.

Hot water does extract quite a bit of the medicine too, so a hot tea or broth is a great way too. Leaves/flowers should steep 3-10 minutes, and berries 20-30 minutes, and roots/bark should sit in hot water for at least a couple of hours.

There's one exception -- chamomile tea. If you want the calming, sleep-inducing qualities, steep it under 3 minutes. After that, the bitter constituents come out and it becomes an excellent digestive tea. Let it steep up to 10 minutes or so. If you are drinking it for digestive qualities, don't add any sweetener. Part of the process involves bitterness on the tongue, to begin bile production.

I started an herbal tea thread awhile back, with a few recipes.
http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?31726-Herbal-Tea-Recipes

Constance
30th August 2015, 05:03
Hello everyone :yo:
For Melbun Australian conditions let me see what I have in store here...
Combustion heater with oven lid: for cooking on and baking in
Sun oven: for baking and stewing in and boiling water (I haven't got a good recipe for rice cooking yet - anyone, anyone?)
Water: water tank
water purifier: a straw that you filter your water through and then you can drink the water from the water tank. It filters out all the nasty bugs and heavy metals. The tank is gravity fed. I still need to get a kit that will allow me to do a whole container load. Thanks for this thread because it is now going on my list.
dehydrator: for drying and storing fruit and vegetable produce. I keep these stored in glass containers.
Blender with mill attachment: For making vegetable powders from the dehydrated vegetables.
Pressure cooker: for dried beans and pulses
cast iron enamelled pots: for stews and rice and anything else you can think of
cast iron enamelled panini maker: for roast vegetable toasties
Permaculture garden and neighbours with all their permaculture produce: eating as much leafy greens and fruit for moisture content.
Sprouts: I can grow nutrient dense food inside.
Bottled spring water: If we get caught in a flood, no drinking water is available. Same with droughts and bushfire. There are only two ways out of our property and we may be trapped for any number of reasons...

recipe for the sun oven - it can also go on the combustion heater
My Ginger, pear and almond cake
(If no pears available, canned or otherwise then just replace with whatever fruit you do have and omit the ginger)

2 tspns ginger powder
1 pear
3 tspns baking powder
2 tspns no egg replacer or similar product
2 cups spelt flour
2 cups coconut sugar
1/2 cup coconut oil
1 cup almond meal
1 cup water
1/2 cup chia seeds

Method
In a bowl, mix all the dry ingredients together until well mixed. Set aside.
In the meantime, melt the coconut oil (if it needs it) in a bowl and place it in the sun oven until liquid.
Mash the pear and then add this to the dry mix. Slowly add the water and then lastly add the oil. Mix until well combined.
Place in the sun oven for as long as it takes!
The sun oven holds all the moisture so you wil find that this cake is incredibly moist.

Marianne
30th August 2015, 14:49
breal, that cake sounds wonderful, and healthy besides. Spelt flour, coconut oil and sugar, chia seeds, all the best. Thanks for sharing!

Do you suppose canned pear halves would work as well? In the cases where fresh pears are not in season, available, etc.

I hadn't tried coconut sugar. Barley malt or brown rice syrup are ones I've used successfully in baking. Barley malt is nice for cookies, giving a nice crunch. Brown rice syrup is wonderful in sauces, like teriyaki / orange sauce, etc.

I wanted to say, about baking powder... Rumford brand is the one that does not have aluminum in it. It may not rise quite as much as the other brands, but it's my preference because of no aluminum, and it has a nicer taste. The ones with aluminum have a ever-so-slight metallic taste to the baked goods. Somewhere I have a recipe for making your own baking powder, which I'll dig out and post here in an update.

Today I'm making angel food cake, and going to make a citrus sauce to put on it. I'll post the sauce recipe, since it's pantry worthy (made of shelf stable ingredients). The recipe uses cornstarch, and it's a concern to get non GMO cornstarch. You could substitute arrowroot starch, or even spelt flour though the flour would make a cloudy sauce rather than translucent. It would still taste good.

UPDATE
Okay, I found a source for non-GMO cornstarch. I haven't seen it in stores, but it's online. Surprise, it's my old friend Rumford who makes it. http://www.amazon.com/Rumford-Cornstarch-Non-12-Ounce-Pack/dp/B001HTP6Q6

Citrus Sweet Sauce

2 tablespoons thickener (non-GMO cornstarch, arrowroot starch, or spelt flour)
2 cups liquid (citrus juice if you have it, or water plus drops of orange/lemon extract)
1/2 cup brown rice syrup, barley malt, coconut sugar, or other sweetener
1-2 tablespoons citrus zest (fresh grated off fruit, or dried)
1/8 teaspoon salt
1-2 tablespoons butter or oil

Whisk together thickener with cold liquid in a small saucepan. Add sweetener, citrus zest and salt. Heat to a low boil, stirring constantly. Continue to cook gently a minute or two until thickened. Add butter or oil and stir in.

Marianne
30th August 2015, 14:50
Paula and Ron, your conversations about food savers are enlightening to me. I've only ever used a food saver for the garden corn this year. It's on my list to check out ... love the idea of re-usable Mason jars instead of the bags you buy new each time.

Do you suppose the lids (the flat ones with a rubber sealing ring) are re-usable with the food saver sealer, or would they need to be bought new each time, as you do in canning?

Marianne
30th August 2015, 15:26
Vegetable sushi, aka Nori Make (nori=the seaweed wrap; maki=roll) is on my list to make soon, and I'll take some photos to show you how easy it is.
I made a pdf of the recipe and process.
http://projectavalon.net/forum4/attachment.php?attachmentid=9539&d=1314132655

If you are a fan, you already know how wonderful it tastes ... a perfect blend of flavors, spicy ginger in shiso pickle brine, hot wasabi paste spread on just right so you get the right amount, salty tamari sauce, and the perfect ratio of toasted nori sea vegetable to sweet rice/sushi rice (a very short grain that cooks up really soft). And it's good for you! Well, the white sushi rice would be better if brown rice but I've never been able to find it. If you wanted to, you could use the shortest grain brown rice you can find, and add extra water to make it a bit gummy, and it would be a satisfactory substitute.

Important to spread the rice very thin on the nori sheet -- a one-grain layer is perfect.

If you want photos, please check this post again later this week.

PS: if you don't have fresh vegetables, you can make this without anything in the center.

Delight
30th August 2015, 16:27
Alcohol is also really important for making herbal tinctures for medicinal purposes. The feds don't allow us to legally make distilled spirits, but even mead or wine, which are allowed, are better at extracting the medicinal properties of plants than plain water is.

Good point about herbal tinctures. Alcohol is also a great item for barter.

I use the cheapest vodka to make tinctures, but to get the most medicinal extraction, Everclear is best, having the highest proof. Tinctures are taken in drop amounts (10 - 20 drops daily is typical) so a little goes a long way.

Hot water does extract quite a bit of the medicine too, so a hot tea or broth is a great way too. Leaves/flowers should steep 3-10 minutes, and berries 20-30 minutes, and roots/bark should sit in hot water for at least a couple of hours.

There's one exception -- chamomile tea. If you want the calming, sleep-inducing qualities, steep it under 3 minutes. After that, the bitter constituents come out and it becomes an excellent digestive tea. Let it steep up to 10 minutes or so. If you are drinking it for digestive qualities, don't add any sweetener. Part of the process involves bitterness on the tongue, to begin bile production.

I started an herbal tea thread awhile back, with a few recipes.
http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?31726-Herbal-Tea-Recipes

I know this is off topic slightly but where I live, there is the long tradition of distilling and the barter aspect of alcohol was significant. One could grow food and have meat and eggs but for commodities like cloth, coffee, tea, and other things, alcohol was trade able.

I use vodka to make extracts. One of my significant finds is Usnea.I live in the mountains of North Georgia in a temperate rain forest. We (knock on wood) have been blessed by rain and every time it rains, small limbs break off with Usnea to harvest.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/bc/Usnea_australis.jpg/240px-Usnea_australis.jpg.


The pale green lichen Usnea, also known as Old Man’s Beard (http://firstways.com/2011/03/13/old-mans-beard-rise-of-the-lichens/), is a familiar face in the forests of the Pacific Northwest. It hangs on tree branches and sometimes falls along footpaths. Technically, lichens are not really plants — instead, they’re a marriage of two separate organisms: fungus and algae.

Usnea has been important in ancient Greek and Chinese medicine, documented as a respiratory antibiotic since 1600 B.C. Usnea’s anti-microbial properties also mean it can be directly applied to an open wound to stave off infection as a kind of wilderness gauze.

Usnea is distinguished from other similar-looking lichens by a tell-tale trait: a thin, stretchy white cord that you can see when you pull it apart with your fingers. Above is my attempt at a close-up. You can see a more magnified photo here.

You can make a tea or tincture out of Usnea and use it to treat lung infections. However, water does not extract its medicinal compounds as well as alcohol, so a tincture would be most effective if you are choosing between the two.

It works for many symptoms.

Also, a home distillery (http://homedistiller.org/) is on my wish list

http://homedistiller.org/graphics/alembic2.jpg

Marianne
30th August 2015, 16:53
Delight, I consider herbs to definitely be part of the conversation here. They are a kind of food, because they are a source of vitamins and minerals. (I will post on this aspect later, with a recipe for a daily vitamin in the form of herbal tea/tincture.) Food is medicine, medicine is food, and we know herbs are significant. The dried form and tinctures are two of the best forms of pantry sustenance.

You are so fortunate to wild harvest Usnea! I have looked for it, but not been lucky yet. Thanks for the description of how to tell it from other lichens.

And that brass distillery ... just awesome. I've long wanted a small one too, to extract essential oils in small amounts. I've read that women in India, for example, often have one in their kitchen to make orange water and rose water to use in their cooking. Here's wishing you a shiny brass 'surprise' as your next gift.

RunningDeer
30th August 2015, 17:22
Paula and Ron, your conversations about food savers are enlightening to me. I've only ever used a food saver for the garden corn this year. It's on my list to check out ... love the idea of re-usable Mason jars instead of the bags you buy new each time.

Do you suppose the lids (the flat ones with a rubber sealing ring) are re-usable with the food saver sealer, or would they need to be bought new each time, as you do in canning?

Unlike canning, the lids are reusable. You know there's a seal right away. It takes a small turn from a screw driver or butter knife to break the vacuum seal.

You also don't need to add the ring that screws over the sealed cap. Like in canning, before you vacuum seal, wipe it clean if you've not used a funnel.

Selkie
30th August 2015, 22:24
Easy Fruit Bread

Ingredients:

--1 recipe Your Favorite Cornbread, made extra-sweet, or not.
--1 can Peaches or Pears, drained and cubed.

Mix the cubed peaches or pears into the cornbread recipe. Bake as usual.

This also works with bananas. Just slice up 2 large bananas and mix them into the corn bread before you bake it. But store in the 'fridge, or it will go bad.

p.s. When making cornbread, I use a can of cream-style corn in place of the liquid called for in the recipe. If the batter seems a bit dry, you can always add a bit of milk or something to make as wet as you think it should be.

Constance
31st August 2015, 00:16
Hi Marianne :hug: Right back at ya kiddo!
Thanks for sharing your citrus sweet sauce. It looks very very yummy. I'm going to try this the next time I make a cake.
I think that canned pears would be okay, however upon saying that, I haven't bought a can in over 15 years so I could be very wrong.
I think it is a combination of the taste and the moistness that makes pears a winner. You could experiment and if it doesn't work out, make a trifle! :bigsmile:
I found Bob's mill baking powder is free from aluminium as well.
:dog: