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badgerboy
6th October 2015, 18:12
From my blog this morn--thanks for reading.http://davidastuart.wordpress.com

In abandoning the world we are lost; we are lost again and again. We may speak poignantly of the experience of being lost; but we cannot be clear about ourselves and our situation in so far as our thinking is dominated by that experience. Disillusionment with the world knows nothing of the sacrament of co-existence. It can find no place for the sacramental act. It can conjure out of itself no philosophy of action, for its ultimate implication is inaction.

Henry Bugbee

Even when I was a very sick child with chronic asthma, I had no desire to transcend any portion of the world, of “human suffering.” I learned (out of necessity?) that although I was not my body but an infinite soul, I should want that body intact to engage the earth. Blessed with a rural setting, I was in the natural world daily and all the ecology spoke to me–literally. Every grass, sedge and rush. Every snake and the frogs they hunted. This was the 1970’s and my mom explored many ’70’s crunchy things, like Linus Pauling, Uri Geller,and the Findhorn Foundation, where original co-founder Dorothy Maclean was communing with ‘nature spirits,’ which she called devas, stemming from her study of Sufism. The farmers at Findhorn credited communing with the plant devas for their huge and early vegetables. Some locals said that the vigor was just due to horse manure.

As I gardened by my mom it became second nature to talk silently to the seeds planted, the seedlings first breaking ground and the mature crops when harvested–gently twisting off tomatoes, holding back the branches so they would not break. So I was already deeply in this mindset when I grew up and took mushrooms in the woods and on the beach. Taking the mushrooms was not necessary to fuel my resident ability to commune with plants but it nailed it down, with iron railroad spikes. The author feels a need for hyperbole here.

I kept my hands in the soil as much as locale afforded, over the years. In Montana, with wheelbarrow loads of potatoes, to Eugene Oregon, reclaiming hard-pan clay soils. The I went back to school, got a degree in science and went out into the rangelands of central Oregon to conduct massive plant inventories. Trend and health of the land–why are these plants here? What was/is historically here? What might happen, given what is here? What is the hard science, what is the nature of every spirit in these plants, what is the god/goddess within the ecology of this whole site? So when you see government ecologists in the field, know they are often more than “the man.” They are in church and getting paid for it.

This autumn, 2015, I am beginning the winter garden for the new farm I am partnering in. The relics from the first white people on this land go back to around 1900-1920’s. One of these is the rose “Harrison’s Yellow.” It originated as a cultivar from the garden of a lawyer in NYC named Harrison in the 19th century. Pioneers took it west along the Oregon Trail, where they planted it like crazy, because they wanted later folks to know they were the first white people. I found this Harrison’s Yellow choked by a young filbert tree, rooted in completely parched clay, with bricks and other pioneer garbage at its base. I took out the tree, broke open the clays and mounded horse manure. I watered the rose and it said more, that its roots were deep and could I just leave the hose going for a while until it was saturated.

Stewardship is an often used word within the teaching of “Natural Resource Management”. Coexistence is implied to a degree in the teaching of what is stewardship. We have to understand the wants, needs and desires of the ecology we strive to protect. How does our living daily partner with that? You can’t “manage” a marriage, or a love based partnership. Some people do (okay,probably many do) but then those situations if “manageable”, are probably low on passion. I think we should always give passion its due. I believe sustainable farmers are driven by healthy doses of passion and faith that they are coexisting the best they can with the ecology of their farm and garden. This not only results in food, but it extends to a world view and action that is both in and of the world. Disillusionment with the world knows nothing of the sacrament of co-existence. It can find no place for the sacramental act. It can conjure out of itself no philosophy of action, for its ultimate implication is inaction.

Selkie
6th October 2015, 19:02
I went to your blog, and I have to tell you that on my father's side, I come from farm people, Pennsylvania Dutch, although Lutheran and not Amish. One of my first memories is of picking potatoes at night by a harvest moon, probably in October or November of 1959, when I was 3 years old. My grandfather showed me a potato shaped like a little man :)

Delight
6th October 2015, 19:07
From my blog this morn--thanks for reading.http://davidastuart.wordpress.com

In abandoning the world we are lost; we are lost again and again. We may speak poignantly of the experience of being lost; but we cannot be clear about ourselves and our situation in so far as our thinking is dominated by that experience. Disillusionment with the world knows nothing of the sacrament of co-existence. It can find no place for the sacramental act. It can conjure out of itself no philosophy of action, for its ultimate implication is inaction.

Henry Bugbee

Even when I was a very sick child with chronic asthma, I had no desire to transcend any portion of the world, of “human suffering.” I learned (out of necessity?) that although I was not my body but an infinite soul, I should want that body intact to engage the earth. Blessed with a rural setting, I was in the natural world daily and all the ecology spoke to me–literally. Every grass, sedge and rush. Every snake and the frogs they hunted. This was the 1970’s and my mom explored many ’70’s crunchy things, like Linus Pauling, Uri Geller,and the Findhorn Foundation, where original co-founder Dorothy Maclean was communing with ‘nature spirits,’ which she called devas, stemming from her study of Sufism. The farmers at Findhorn credited communing with the plant devas for their huge and early vegetables. Some locals said that the vigor was just due to horse manure.

As I gardened by my mom it became second nature to talk silently to the seeds planted, the seedlings first breaking ground and the mature crops when harvested–gently twisting off tomatoes, holding back the branches so they would not break. So I was already deeply in this mindset when I grew up and took mushrooms in the woods and on the beach. Taking the mushrooms was not necessary to fuel my resident ability to commune with plants but it nailed it down, with iron railroad spikes. The author feels a need for hyperbole here.

I kept my hands in the soil as much as locale afforded, over the years. In Montana, with wheelbarrow loads of potatoes, to Eugene Oregon, reclaiming hard-pan clay soils. The I went back to school, got a degree in science and went out into the rangelands of central Oregon to conduct massive plant inventories. Trend and health of the land–why are these plants here? What was/is historically here? What might happen, given what is here? What is the hard science, what is the nature of every spirit in these plants, what is the god/goddess within the ecology of this whole site? So when you see government ecologists in the field, know they are often more than “the man.” They are in church and getting paid for it.

This autumn, 2015, I am beginning the winter garden for the new farm I am partnering in. The relics from the first white people on this land go back to around 1900-1920’s. One of these is the rose “Harrison’s Yellow.” It originated as a cultivar from the garden of a lawyer in NYC named Harrison in the 19th century. Pioneers took it west along the Oregon Trail, where they planted it like crazy, because they wanted later folks to know they were the first white people. I found this Harrison’s Yellow choked by a young filbert tree, rooted in completely parched clay, with bricks and other pioneer garbage at its base. I took out the tree, broke open the clays and mounded horse manure. I watered the rose and it said more, that its roots were deep and could I just leave the hose going for a while until it was saturated.

Stewardship is an often used word within the teaching of “Natural Resource Management”. Coexistence is implied to a degree in the teaching of what is stewardship. We have to understand the wants, needs and desires of the ecology we strive to protect. How does our living daily partner with that? You can’t “manage” a marriage, or a love based partnership. Some people do (okay,probably many do) but then those situations if “manageable”, are probably low on passion. I think we should always give passion its due. I believe sustainable farmers are driven by healthy doses of passion and faith that they are coexisting the best they can with the ecology of their farm and garden. This not only results in food, but it extends to a world view and action that is both in and of the world. Disillusionment with the world knows nothing of the sacrament of co-existence. It can find no place for the sacramental act. It can conjure out of itself no philosophy of action, for its ultimate implication is inaction.


I don't know if spirituality is a just members thread site but your thread belongs where many can see it.

two things here stand out.
1. "Stewardship is an often used word within the teaching of “Natural Resource Management”. Coexistence is implied to a degree in the teaching of what is stewardship. We have to understand the wants, needs and desires of the ecology we strive to protect. How does our living daily partner with that? You can’t “manage” a marriage, or a love based partnership."

yes, how to live in co-existance with honoring what each partner requires.

2. "Trend and health of the land–why are these plants here? What was/is historically here? What might happen, given what is here? What is the hard science, what is the nature of every spirit in these plants, what is the god/goddess within the ecology of this whole site? So when you see government ecologists in the field, know they are often more than “the man.” They are in church and getting paid for it."

I know that people who are in systems have a much larger vantage point than the system...as in healers IN the medical profession. But it is very difficult to be in the confines...especially when we have deep sensibility about what might be harmful. Also, one is forced to do certain actions to keep a job. Is that a compromise that we can afford for co-existance when people IN their paradigms like allopathy or "Global warming as climate change" 100% BELIEVE it is true.

Thanks, and by the way, MY mother was a wayshower in her way for me to be where I am now in my understanding. We were introduced to the new age before it was new. She stopped to dig weeds and always had her own Findhorn gardens...so I am very appreciative of this gift she had and the truth that we Coop-exist with many realms in our own backyard.

Thanks again, Maggie

greybeard
6th October 2015, 19:33
The spiritual section of Avalon is viewed by thousands of guests every week Delight.

Chris

badgerboy
7th October 2015, 13:50
I don't know if spirituality is a just members thread site but your thread belongs where many can see it.

I am just now learning how to navigate this forum, so any help is appreciated!

two things here stand out.
1. "Stewardship is an often used word within the teaching of “Natural Resource Management”. Coexistence is implied to a degree in the teaching of what is stewardship. We have to understand the wants, needs and desires of the ecology we strive to protect. How does our living daily partner with that? You can’t “manage” a marriage, or a love based partnership."

yes, how to live in co-existence with honoring what each partner requires.

2. "Trend and health of the land–why are these plants here? What was/is historically here? What might happen, given what is here? What is the hard science, what is the nature of every spirit in these plants, what is the god/goddess within the ecology of this whole site? So when you see government ecologists in the field, know they are often more than “the man.” They are in church and getting paid for it."

I know that people who are in systems have a much larger vantage point than the system...as in healers IN the medical profession. But it is very difficult to be in the confines...especially when we have deep sensibility about what might be harmful. Also, one is forced to do certain actions to keep a job. Is that a compromise that we can afford for co-existence when people IN their paradigms like allopathy or "Global warming as climate change" 100% BELIEVE it is true.

Thanks, and by the way, MY mother was a wayshower in her way for me to be where I am now in my understanding. We were introduced to the new age before it was new. She stopped to dig weeds and always had her own Findhorn gardens...so I am very appreciative of this gift she had and the truth that we Coop-exist with many realms in our own backyard.

Thanks again, Maggie

Maggie, I'm happy to hear of your time with your mom in the garden. In a way, I think this partly plays into Bill's thread on the new counter-culture, or what was "learned" from past social change. I'd like to think that we are now generally more empowered, agriculturally and in turn spiritually. We've managed to make the living of life a very complex thing, away from the basic needs of shelter, food, love and art. And how those four work together symbiotically. Work is a difficult one--because we want the work to apply to our "real" world. But then work often dominates, becoming a world apart. The biggest trade-off I had was driving for the environment as an ecologist. I was putting in 500 miles a week in a full size truck. I'm hoping farming right now proves a lesser impact.