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Gaia
6th October 2015, 19:46
Court Invalidates EU/US Safe Harbor Data Deal:

The European Court of Justice has ruled regulations that allow U.S. companies to handle the personal data of EU citizens are invalid. At issue is the question of privacy. The EU has some of the strictest rules on privacy, and companies operating inside the 28 member bloc are barred from sending personal information outside its borders without certain guarantees of protection.

The Safe Harbor rules, negotiated by the U.S. and the EU in 2000, allowed tech giants such as Amazon, Facebook, and Google to handle the personal information of millions of people in the EU and move them to the U.S., if they meet certain requirements.

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-34442618

The case began with an Austrian citizen and Facebook user, Maximilian Schrems, who in 2013 lodged a complaint with the Irish data protection commissioner alleging that his Facebook data, which is transferred from Facebook’s Irish subsidiary to servers in the United States, was inadequately protected. He based his allegations on news reports that summer describing the NSA’s surveillance reach based on documents leaked by Snowden.

All in all, this is a huge victory for the privacy of EU citizen.

Aurelius
6th October 2015, 23:01
i think comments like this from the EU (and others) are just "PR fluff", they are all in bed together, they have overarching "national security" laws that undermine & overrule the "PR fluff", let's not forget this (http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2011/feb/19/census-boycott-lockheed-martin) / this (http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2012/jan/17/man-fined-census-lockheed-martin) actually happened a few years ago ...

GaelVictor
6th October 2015, 23:37
i think comments like this from the EU (and others) are just "PR fluff", they are all in bed together, they have overarching "national security" laws that undermine & overrule the "PR fluff",

The ruling by the EU court says that privacy of EU citizens can not be trusted in the hands of the United States of America and therefore the sending of any personal information to the U.S., and US based companies must be stopped immediately. This ruling is final and cannot be contested.

I see golden times coming for datacenters and cloud hosting in Europe.

Gaia
6th October 2015, 23:49
The NSA has destroyed trust in even connecting with US systems. This is overdue, honestly.

Aurelius
7th October 2015, 01:25
The ruling by the EU court says that privacy of EU citizens can not be trusted in the hands of the United States of America and therefore the sending of any personal information to the U.S., and US based companies must be stopped immediately. This ruling is final and cannot be contested.

I see golden times coming for datacenters and cloud hosting in Europe.

What you fail to understand is the EU and the key member states were fully complicit in building the spy systems together with the USA in the first place. This law doesn't say anything about dismantling / removing those systems that are already in place. Data will continue to be collected and data continue to be shared. When they announce something along the lines of ... these system are being dismantled, or products sold to EU citizens made by Apple / Microsoft / Google etc. must have all back-doors / data collection handles disabled or they will be banned ... then we are talking! I'm not hearing anything along these lines, on any front.

It's the same old game, the systems continue to exist, they continue to be used, and the lines between terrorists and the innocent will continue to be perverted.

This new law, forcing US companies to keep EU data local to the EU and not in the USA, in light of the spy systems, that are already in place, not sure what we achieve.

cursichella1
7th October 2015, 04:37
Right, they absolutely were complicit. It was set up this way in order to bypass the partner countries (esp the U.S.) laws regarding domestic spying, eavesdropping, collecting info on their own citizens without a warrant. So all info travels out of the country...If foreign partner country were to eavesdrop (and they always do, that's the deal) on everything coming out of the citizen's country and then pass the information back to the citizen's country, privacy restrictions are bypassed and they couldn't be accused of illegal, domestic spying on their own citizens.

The Court's ruling is good but I'm guessing the system described above is ancient history. By now, you can bet the 'partners' are on to something much more sophisticated.

GaelVictor
7th October 2015, 12:36
It's not complicated; many battles were lost when nobody knew a war was going on, but now the USA have been exposed as a spying, manipulative controlfreak rogue nation, the people in the EU are beginning to fight back.

This new law is a battle won and marks a turning point. The next thing that will fail is the TTIP free trade agreement with the U.S.

Gaia
7th October 2015, 16:04
Facebook deserved this. Hopefully the company will now learn a lesson in decency by losing considerable amounts of money.

The Internet was originally designed as a tool for democracy, a haven for free-wheeling, raucous controversy and expression, backed by anonymity and plurality of every sort.

Along came priggish Facebook, gathering personal information and requiring people to use their real names under the pretext of the puritanical "new honesty" of America, a land whose ruling social forces are gradually transforming themselves into a semi-fascist police-state system where heroes like Snowden are branded "traitors".


In such circumstances, the European Court did the right thing. The genteel American fascism, the new, limp version of liberty, will still win, but it will at least be slowed down a bit.