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kaon
14th October 2015, 00:50
This is part one of two.

I wanted to share my story with my fellow Avalonians. I will spare everyone the gory details, but I feel that my experience may be of some value, especially to those who have severe dental problems.

My issues with my teeth go back to my early 20's. It was always something. Cavities, chipping teeth, sensitivity, etc etc. I was a dentist's dream. A good customer with perpetual problems. A crown here a crown there, but I was always returning.

As the years passed, the problems were getting worse. Now, I will also add that my maintenance and oral hygienic practice were not getting any better. Sure, a quick brush once a day, teeth whitening strips, and a cleaning every two years was still practiced, but for the most part it was inadequate. I consumed mints and chewed a lot of gum to help with my breath.

Fast forward to the recent present. Let me first off say that my health is pretty good for my age. BP 120/70 naturally muscled, but a little fatigued in the later part of the week between the stress of work and everything else going on in this world.
However, my mouth was becoming toxic. The chips kept getting repaired, the cavities kept getting filled, but my molars were gone, broken off down to the gum line. My dentist made a lower bridge so I could chew (before the upper molars broke) and that temporary fix lasted a while. When the bridge was no longer functional, I resorted chewing my food with the front set of teeth. Well, that compounded the problem. In the span of 2 months I had broken off three teeth, two on top (including one of my front teeth) and one on the bottom. I resorted to temporary plastic teeth in order to be able to speak clearly. At this point in time, I knew I had to resort to drastic measures.

I had begun researching full mouth restorations. I had some options. I could fix what I had and get crowns, veneers, more root canals, cosmetics, etc etc. Well, that option was going to be expensive, very expensive not to mention many visits in a dental chair.

My other option was to get the remaining teeth removed and go with dentures. That was a very depressing thought for me because of my age. Besides, the thought of all that hardware in my mouth was enough to make me gag, literally. Then the glues, maintenance, and the thought of choppers in a glass was enough to depress me. But hey, I was already depressed anyhow.

While researching, I have to thank God for YouTube. I was getting a little less depressed watching videos of people much younger then I getting dentures. The reasons for their necessary change ranged but I didn't feel so bad after watching most of them.

As I continued my 4 months of research, I discovered a procedure called All On Four. That is an implant procedure where the institution/dentist places four large implants in both your upper and lower gums. They then make a full mouth bridge which is attached to the 8 implants. This is a permanent solution which could last a life time.
I decided that I would get all of my remain teeth extracted and go with that procedure. There was still a problem though. Cost! The cost ranged from about $36,000 to about $56,000. I was floored! Another option I had was to have the implants but to have dentures that snapped on and off. That was better in price, about $20,000 to $24,000. Still, this was going to be cost prohibitive.

Further research took me to India, Thailand, Costa Rico and Mexico. Through a dental tourism company I found a clinic (one of many) in Mexico that was close to the US border and had 10+ years experience in this implant procedure. After discussing my problems with a dental technician, I was quoted a price of about $18,000 for everything. That included extractions and a temporary upper and lower denture.
I scheduled a flight to Yuma Arizona and the dental clinic picked me and my wife up at the airport and shuttled me back and forth to the clinic and included my hotel stay in the package.

Once at the clinic, I went through a battery of check ups, x-rays, CT scan and discussed the procedure with one of the dentists. The total was going to be $18,650. Right on the money with the quote. The extra $600 was for sedation, the $50 I didn't bother to figure out.

The next day was surgery day. I was not at all nervous, but I was ready to get this done. I was out for 5 hours, had all of my teeth removed and 8 implants inserted. What was really interesting was that when I looked in the mirror I was happy to see a full set of white teeth although my speech was not very good.
I flew home the next day with an antibiotic/anti inflammatory and ibuprofen at 800 mg for pain.
Over the course of the next 3 days I had experienced facial swelling and the pain was there but manageable. I lost 10 pounds from a change in my diet. Mashed potatoes and oatmeal for a week will do that, lol.

So, tomorrow will be two weeks. No swelling but denture discomfort is prevalent. My speech in much improved and I can smile with confidence now. Thus far, I am pleased in the decision I had made.

My next visit to Mexico will be in 6 months. The bone needs to heal and fuse with the implants. At that time, I will have a permanent upper and lower bridge which can only be removed by an implant specialist. I am looking forward to getting the finished set of choppers and moving on with more of a smile.

I will post part two after the 6 months.

If anyone has any questions, please feel free to post them. I am not posting links to this procedure, as Google or any other search engine will reveal many hits and I am not giving free advertising to the clinic either, lol.

Good Lord, take care of your teeth! You don't want to go through all of this.

Shannon
14th October 2015, 01:57
Hey kaon :)

I'm a dental assistant and work for an implant specialist...yes, I know what an insane price is on a single implant let alone upper and lower roundhouses.

I look forward to hearing how it's all going in time. The beginning is rough, but I've seen nothing but really happy people. Sure they would have preferred not having to lose their natural teeth at all but thats life, and now there's at least an alternative to dentures.

I wish you all the best and hope this helps give you something to be happy about :)

JChombre
14th October 2015, 04:26
Hi Kaon,

Thank you for sharing your dental experience with us. I know a retired physician who had extensive dental work in a clinic in Nogales, Mexico; and he highly recommended this clinic from a medical stand point. And of course, his cost was also (like yours) substantially lower than what he would have paid here in the US.

I am very much looking forward to hearing from you in six months or so...Meanwhile I am going to follow your advise and will be "diligently brushing and flossing my teeth" as my old dentist used to tell me.

Sincere regards,

JC

gripreaper
14th October 2015, 05:14
Can I relay my dental experience? About two years ago, my dentist was saying I had a tooth that was dying and would need to be extracted, while I had other teeth which needed to be root canaled. The dentist was also complaining about how far my gums had receded.

I decided I wanted to keep all of my teeth, so I did some research online and began taking the organic biometric cells salts from Hyland's http://www.interfarfacing.com/12homeopBioSalts.htm while getting my teeth cleaned four times a year. This seemed to help tremendously, but the process was too slow.

So, a few months ago I began taking the ORMUS concentrate, which is really a full spectrum organic mineral, both biometric as well as energetic. I am happy to report, I still have all my teeth, the one that was dying feels much better, and the one that needed to be extracted is healthy again. My receding gums have stopped and they are much healthier.

What I have learned, is the overall health of the body shows up in the teeth first. If the teeth are complaining, they are trying to warn us of systemic problems throughout the body, usually deficiencies in minerals and vitamins, and high toxicity.

I also now detox twice a year. These protocols are necessary due to the high levels of toxicity we are exposed to in our air, water and food, and the low level of nutrients available in our food supply.

This is not a cure all, but it is just what it takes nowadays to stay on top of our health. I might add, I never get colds of flu's or any other ailments.

Paul
14th October 2015, 07:54
I too was a dentist's dream ... fillings, caps, bridges, root canals, ... galore.

About 15 years ago, I got my first implanted tooth.

About 3 years ago, I had it removed, and am working on (when I can afford it) removing all the root canal treated teeth as well.

Removing the implant and the deep infection beneath it was the best thing, of many, that I've done for my health. The infection was entirely non-obvious - no pain, no swelling - just a cause of illnesses elsewhere in a body that was becoming overwhelmed with the toxic overload.

I still have enough real, living, teeth that I can get by with caps and bridges. If and when I don't, then it will be partials or plain old fashioned false teeth.

Most of the money I've spent at dentists in recent years has been removing the toxic treatments (heavy metals and hidden infections) that I spent decades installing.

Lifebringer
14th October 2015, 14:41
So pronamel didn't work for you. If you would have used baking soda at least to kill all those germs accumulated, you'd probably have been able to use the pronamel to fill in weak enamel cones in the teeth that keep cavities and germs out. A sort of recoat. Well either way, its done now and you appear to be happy despite mild discomfort, but keep an eye out on infection, okay.

conk
14th October 2015, 18:24
We take probiotics for good intestinal health, but we also need beneficial bacteria in our mouths. Mouthwashes are a terrible consideration for good dental health, as they kill off all bacteria, good and bad. There are excellent oral probiotic supplements/lozenges that greatly contribute toward good health.

I have spent around $15K over the last two years having amalgams and root canal teeth removed. Poison, pure poison. I'd wager most of my issues were created by the dentists themselves to enrich their wallets.

Reader's Digest examined a man and determined his dental health was excellent. They sent him across the USA seeking advice from 50 different dentists. I remember that he got 49 different opinions, ranging from minor to extremely major work in need of being done. Only one dentist told the man his oral health was good. 49 dentists lying through their greedy teeth! Amazing.

Shannon
14th October 2015, 18:44
We take probiotics for good intestinal health, but we also need beneficial bacteria in our mouths. Mouthwashes are a terrible consideration for good dental health, as they kill off all bacteria, good and bad. There are excellent oral probiotic supplements/lozenges that greatly contribute toward good health.

I have spent around $15K over the last two years having amalgams and root canal teeth removed. Poison, pure poison. I'd wager most of my issues were created by the dentists themselves to enrich their wallets.

Reader's Digest examined a man and determined his dental health was excellent. They sent him across the USA seeking advice from 50 different dentists. I remember that he got 49 different opinions, ranging from minor to extremely major work in need of being done. Only one dentist told the man his oral health was good. 49 dentists lying through their greedy teeth! Amazing.


It's a business plain and simple.

I am currently working for a group that uses Scientologys business plan and they make so much money it's obscene.

onawah
14th October 2015, 19:38
I've had lots of dental problems most of my life, mostly. I would say, due to an addiction to sweets.
I was rewarded with sweet treats as a child and my nickname was "Candy", so lots of psychological reinforcement of my sweet tooth as well.
I shudder now when I see parents allowing their children sugary treats--sugar has been shown to be about as addicting as cocaine, and there is an epidemic of candida (which feeds on sugar) in the US especially, though it masquerades as other problems, so people don't recognize it as the cause of many illnesses and immune system dysfunction.
I had the good fortune to find an honest dentist when I was in my 20s and had serious cavities to deal with.
He told me straight out that he thought I would be saving myself a lot of pain and suffering and further expense down the road if I just had my teeth pulled and got dentures then and there.
He said there were problems with root canals that people were not paying enough attention to and which were not being disclosed nearly enough.
I wish I had listened to him!

I had been voted "best smile" in high school, despite my dental problems (which didn't show in the front) and it was probably mostly vanity on my part, coupled with the fact that I was so taken back by what he said that I couldn't quite believe it.
So I opted for root canals and had so many problems with them, I finally had to have all those teeth pulled and goet dentures, and felt so much better afterwards-- though I would have been much better off if I'd just done that to begin with.
My mouth still feels like the scene of a long battle because of all the invasive procedures over the years, but at least I'm not in so much pain anymore.
I have worse problems with candida now though, via inflammation in my mouth.
I think the natural teeth and roots must have acted as protection, but now that they're gone, inflammation is the problem. I'm taking a small amount of baking soda several times a day, which helps.
I keep it in my mouth for a few minutes, swish it around and finally wash it down with a sip of water to keep the candida under control. .
Of course, what I need to do is give up sweets completely. I've cut down a lot and I only use raw honey and raw coconut crystals now, which work the best for me of all the sweeteners I've tried (I can't abide stevia).

There's a thread about using gum of turpentine and kerosene to kill candida here: http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?63907-100-Pure-Gum-Turpentine-Kerosene-Kill-deadly-Candida-leave-healthy-bacteria-alone-
I haven't tried that yet, but my diet, supplementation, etc. are very good, so hopefully I won't have to.
I agree, good probiotics are essential!

I've heard lots of bad things about implants too--same problem as with root canals--infection sets in and though you don't see the results in your mouth, it manifests in your body in various ways.
Also very invasive, so I think eventually your mouth may feel like a war zone.
It's the nerve damage that causes that, I think, and that doesn't seem to heal, or at least, not quickly.

I've seen some reports that stem cell research might eventually result in people being able to re-grow teeth.
That would be amazing, but it won't be popular with dentists, no doubt.
I'm not all that surprised that 49 dentists were found to be lying through their teeth to the man with good oral health.
From what I have seen through my anti-fluoride activism, the American Dental Association is just as corrupt as the American Medical Assocation.

avid
14th October 2015, 21:06
It's finding a dentist who doesn't 'drill and fill' for profit, as happened to me for years, they stuffed me with mercury. I found a great dentist, who slowly transitioned my mouth and my confidence. Then came the corporate takeovers, with their 'Care Plans' - join or get no access to dentists. My mum paid a fortune monthly just to get access to a dentist, despite needing little treatment. I am now in that situation in the locale, bribery for 'service'. Now I have little faith in dentists, as they are profit, and not holistic-driven. Time for me to challenge this 'up-front payment' for treatment I may not need, and find a service provider who is professional, caring and holistic, being paid in full after positive results. Ask your dentist to provide you with fillings/treatments without fluoride leaching into your body - they don't even know themselves, as it's surreptitious.....

bettye198
14th October 2015, 23:11
I certainly feel the compassion for you Kaon. My greatest fear is dental. So, that said, with bad teeth from my Father because my Mom has really strong teeth, genetics was a downfall. Did you all know that the embryo develops the bones and teeth in the second month in utero? And guess what? Most women don't even know they are pregnant by then! I do want to offer some help in prevention. Dr. Weston Price was a grand dentist into dental and full body nutrition so please google that. What I do now and have done for 10 yrs is this. Go into the website of : http://www.behmnaturaldentistry.com/natural-dentistry/steps-to-save-your-teeth. Dr. Behm is in Florida, I am in CA so he will ship his mineral salts package, very very reasonable. I do not use the colloidal silver because I think there may be some fillings that would conflict, but I use the mineral salts mixed with organic baking soda. I use a Q tip and apply on my teeth and gums, followed by Oral Guard ( wonderful) http://www.ivlproducts.com/Dental-Health/Oral-Guard-8482---Revolutionary-Formula-to-Restore-Mouth-Teeth-and-Gums.axd which you can purchase from IVL products online. Read the ingredients! Then the no flouride, no anything toxic toothpaste. Frequent flossing. This has saved me in so many ways.

spade
11th August 2018, 10:45
http://www.sci-news.com/medicine/biogenic-dental-product-05912.html

A team of scientists at the University of Washington has developed a new dental product that uses protein amelogenin-derived peptides to remineralize tooth enamel and treat cavities.

Dental cavities affect nearly every age group and they are accompanied by serious health concerns, according to the World Health Organization.

Additionally, direct and indirect costs of treating dental cavities and related diseases have been a huge economic burden for individuals and health care systems.

“Bacteria metabolize sugar and other fermentable carbohydrates in oral environments and acid, as a by-product, will demineralize the dental enamel,” said study co-author Dr. Sami Dogan, from the Department of Restorative Dentistry at the University of Washington’s School of Dentistry.

Although tooth decay is relatively harmless in its earliest stages, once the cavity progresses through the tooth’s enamel, serious health concerns arise. If left untreated, tooth decay can lead to tooth loss. This can present adverse consequences on the remaining teeth and supporting tissues and on the patient’s general health, including life-threating conditions.

Good oral hygiene is the best prevention, and over the past half-century, brushing and flossing have reduced significantly the impact of cavities for many Americans. Still, some socio-economic groups suffer disproportionately from this disease.

The prevalence of dental cavities in Americans is again on the rise, suggesting a regression in the progress of combating this disease.

Schematic illustration of peptide-guided biomimetic tooth repair technology. Image credit: Dogan et al, doi: 10.1021/acsbiomaterials.7b00959.
Schematic illustration of peptide-guided biomimetic tooth repair technology. Image credit: Dogan et al, doi: 10.1021/acsbiomaterials.7b00959.

Taking inspiration from the body’s own natural tooth-forming proteins, the team has come up with a way to repair the tooth enamel.

The study authors accomplished this by capturing the essence of amelogenin — a protein crucial to forming the hard crown enamel — to design amelogenin-derived peptides that biomineralize and are the key active ingredient in the new technology.

The bioinspired repair process restores the mineral structure found in native tooth enamel.

“These peptides are proven to bind onto tooth surfaces and recruit calcium and phosphate ions,” said study co-author Deniz Yucesoy, a doctoral student at the University of Washington.

The peptide-enabled technology allows the deposition of 10 to 50 micrometers of new enamel on the teeth after each use.

Once fully developed, the technology can be used in both private and public health settings, in biomimetic toothpaste, gels, solutions and composites as a safe alternative to existing dental procedures and treatments.

The technology enables people to rebuild and strengthen tooth enamel on a daily basis as part of a preventive dental care routine. It is expected to be safe for use by adults and children.

“Remineralization guided by peptides is a healthy alternative to current dental health care,” said study’s lead author Professor Mehmet Sarikaya, from the Department of Chemical Engineering and the Department of Oral Health Sciences at the University of Washington.

White spot lesions (WSL) and incipient caries on enamel surfaces are the earliest clinical outcomes for demineralization and caries. If left untreated, the caries can progress and may cause complex restorative procedures or even tooth extraction which destroys soft and hard tissue architecture as a consequence of connective tissue and bone loss. Current clinical practices are insufficient in treating dental caries. A long-standing practical challenge associated with demineralization related to dental diseases is incorporating a functional mineral microlayer which is fully integrated into the molecular structure of the tooth in repairing damaged enamel.

This study demonstrates that small peptide domains derived from native protein amelogenin can be utilized to construct a mineral layer on damaged human enamel in vitro. Six groups were prepared to carry out remineralization on artificially created lesions on enamel:

(1) no treatment,
(2) Ca2+ and PO43– only,
(3) 1100 ppm fluoride (F),
(4) 20 000 ppm F,
(5) 1100 ppm F and peptide, and
(6) peptide alone.

While the 1100 ppm F sample (indicative of common F content of toothpaste for homecare) did not deliver F to the thinly deposited mineral layer, high F test sample (indicative of clinical varnish treatment) formed mainly CaF2 nanoparticles on the surface. Fluoride, however, was deposited in the presence of the peptide, which also formed a thin mineral layer which was partially crystallized as fluorapatite. Among the test groups, only the peptide-alone sample resulted in remineralization of fairly thick (10 μm) dense mineralized layer containing HAp mineral, resembling the structure of the healthy enamel. The newly formed mineralized layer exhibited integration with the underlying enamel as evident by cross-sectional imaging. The peptide-guided remineralization approach sets the foundation for future development of biomimetic products and treatments for dental health care.

PRODUCTS TO BE AVAILABLE IN THE FORM OF A PASTE OR GEL
The idea is that products would be available in the form of a paste or gel that would be applied to the teeth much like toothpaste is currently used.

AMELOGENIN-DERIVED PEPTIDES

kaon
12th February 2019, 16:18
I am long past due in updating this thread, so here goes.

The implants are holding out well, and the teeth look absolutely phenomenal. I couldn't believe how nice my mouth looked when I left the clinic.

For the first two years, I had no problems at all. Then one day I chomped into a chicken bone and heard a sort of cracking noise. The top right canine had broken off. Now, about every 3 months it becomes loose and I just reset it with dental cement. Then I had a problem with the rear "molar". It too had broken and I resort to periotic self repair.

I wanted to return to Mexico to have them repaired, but due to the border situations, I am reluctant to go back. Eventually, I will.

Aside from the two breakage issues, I am glad I took this route. It was money well spent and if I had to do it all over again, I would.

What to expect? A beautiful set of teeth that are about 75% functional as your real set of teeth. Why 75%? The teeth don't grind as well as real teeth, but mine are acrylic not porcelain. Perhaps that would make a difference. In addition, I just don't feel as if I have the same bite force. The forward bite force for eating corn on the cob just feels funny, but I have no problems with it.
I cannot chew gum. It sticks to the gum material.

Lastly, I would suggest not pushing your teeth to the limit. Don't go out and buy jaw breaker candy and hard nuts. These are not as strong as real healthy teeth.
Properly maintain then and keep them clean. Most importantly, keep your gums healthy. You need to use a good mouthwash. If your gums deteriorate the implants can become loose or unstable. Swish the mouthwash with vigor and if you don't have mouthwash, use water after each meal.

Don't forget to exercise a little, because you may be eating more, and will probably put on a few pounds. :bigsmile:

TargeT
12th February 2019, 19:28
Amalgam fillings expand and contract slightly which can cause tooth cracking.

I recently had a filling spot crack my tooth, but it split virtically (a rear molar, split down through a root) and I had to have an extraction.

Now I'm looking at having all my fillings converted to ceramic or composite and I guess a bridge? I was thinking about the implant route but I've always wondered about deep set infections.

avid
12th February 2019, 21:18
Anything offered as replacement in Uk, either NHS or privately, despite asking for guaranteed absolutely no fluoride-leaching product, no fixative, no composite, apparently everything offered included leaching fluoride, some at very high toxicity. I have researched all products available to practitioners, very very rarely no fluoride integral...
Therefore, my visits to dentists are rare, only for emergencies, and when I did go for normal cleaning, they pulled my crowns so aggressively, they came out. If you aren’t a regular idiot customer, they make sure you come back. Mega money. I’ve had it with dentists, they are purveyors of toxins, innocently or otherwise. Just clean teeth naturally, don’t vibrate fillings loose with an electric toothbrush, use salt, rinse well, massage gums. Fed up with advertising scams, so disappointed. My olde dentist was paid by the extraction or filling, therefore us kids were always having ‘crowded’ teeth pulled, and riddled with mercury fillings....

onawah
12th February 2019, 22:49
This may be of interest: All “silver” dental filling are poisoned with mercury and it was covered up for 30 years
http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?75012-The-Fluoride-Thread&p=1275208&viewfull=1#post1275208

Denise/Dizi
12th February 2019, 23:36
This is part one of two.


If anyone has any questions, please feel free to post them. I am not posting links to this procedure, as Google or any other search engine will reveal many hits and I am not giving free advertising to the clinic either, lol.

Good Lord, take care of your teeth! You don't want to go through all of this.


I for one, cannot wait to hear the entire story, and then follow up as to how well they lasted, etc. I have MS, for many years I had to give myself injections for the treatment of the symptoms, etc. My teeth were not healthy to begin with, they never have been. My entire life has been marked with horrible teeth issues and when I would go to have them fixed I would be told they wanted to break my jaw.

Years after stopping the MS medications, injections, and such I found that while my symptoms had subsided, I now faced another issue. The medications ate my teeth from the inside out. I would not have even noticed, had not one but TWO or my wisdom teeth broken off while eating a meal, and when I pulled them out of my mouth they were both HOLLOW.. I was floored! What the HECK? As time went on, many more started to break so I tried to figure out what was going on, and I thought really hard about it. I pulled out old pamphlets that came with the medications that I had been taking, and there is was.. MAY CAUSE EXTREME TOOTH/BONE DAMAGE... It is a daily struggle now to save money and HOPE that the remaining teeth in my mouth stay put long enough for me to go get this done. And I am not all that happy about it at all! I NEVER smile in my photos, and I rarely leave my house. My teeth are rotting from the BELOW the gumline down.. By the time it is noticable, it is too late, and there is no way to fix it. You're losing the tooth.

I thought the biggest challenge I was going to face with my teeth was crowding. NOPE... So I will be following this thread with interest. And if any of you see me at the UfoMegaCon, and I don't say anything but just smile. Now you know why... It is going to ake me quite some time to save up THAT kind of money...

Ratszinger
12th February 2019, 23:39
This may be of interest: All “silver” dental filling are poisoned with mercury and it was covered up for 30 years
http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?75012-The-Fluoride-Thread&p=1275208&viewfull=1#post1275208

As someone that worked in dentistry all my life I need to point out that dentists used what was approved and thought to be state of the art medicine to heal your problem. When I got into dental it was because I didn't want to deal with death and I actually wanted to help someone.

Amalgam fillings are in my mouth and my wife's and we both were dental professionals all our lives and we both graduated dental school and worked in the mouth all our careers so I need to point out a few things erroneous here in some statements.

Number one: It is fact that dentistry has a filling material composed of silver and metal using mercury to make it soft to allow it to be molded to fit and packed into place and shaped to fit the tooth prep area. We all know this. What you don't know is that metal allergy was promoted to put that into all your minds so you'd all start thinking just what you've all spelled out here! Oh I know I know. No one tells you what to think or feel. Okay fine. Oh my it's poison it must go became the mantra of many dental offices though. Well fine I won't argue that mercury is dangerous and I was bothered by having to use it but let me explain something about it to tell you why we used it and loved it so and why the military still uses it to this day in gov. employees although the stuff they use now is inferior silver compared to the old. Let me explain what dental did.

There are two silver filling materials out there in dentistry. The old silver filling amalgam material and there is the new silver being sold now and since oh, around the mid 90s I think it was. Early to mid 90s.. The old silver is what is in my mouth. Some of my fillings are 46 or more years old at this writing and still holding up. Why? I'll tell you why and it may gross you out but it's truth. Here is the story of how dentistry went about trying to remove this old silver material from the market to use tooth colored materials and it wasn't because the tooth colored materials were better it was simply higher profit for everyone in the industry for a number of reasons. It was less to make and create from scratch and it did not last as long as silver so it needed replaced more often and by quite a bit more. One of the weaknesses of the tooth colored composite material was it only lasts on average five to seven years before they need replaced or some sort of attention to fix them. This in contrast to the silver (old) that was used which would last your entire lifetime and even if you bit down on a sugar daddy or hard nut and cracked that filling right down the middle guess what? It healed itself shut and sealed up in short order! How? Corrosion. You see silver corrodes and it was that corrosion that sealed it up locking it up tight from bacteria getting down in the margins of where the tooth structure and the filling material meet. That little line there where they meet is critical to seal. If you use glass ionmer cement like we did it washes out in time making a gap and bacteria can get down in under the filling eating out a cavity and you need to have it fixed.

What we experienced in the early years of dentistry doing dentistry in the Air Force at Scott AFB when composite (tooth colored) materials started showing up as try to talk patients into letting us use it when possible because of shade match to look like a real tooth! People liked that but what they didn't like was the leaking and cavities they were seeing and many had us take the composite filling out to replace it with silver again because they just got tired of having them leak.

They improved the cements and did some other advances in material composition to improve things but we still could not beat the average life expectancy of the old silver that corroded in the mouth and sealed shut. In time the dental manufacturing end got involved and decided to help things along by bringing the materials closer to the same life expectancy. So how did they do this? They simply took the silver and made it so it has so much chromium in it now that the new silver doesn't corrode! So it leaks just like the tooth colored materials and lasts about as long now as that material. Most of the younger dentists don't even know there were two silvers the old and the new but you can test this easily by finding old dispersalloy by Caulk Dentsply and compare it to the new and see for yourself.

The dental material called amalgam that was the old silver mix did work and still works quite well for millions of people and while I can appreciate the people feeling relief from the extracting of these poisons from their body if that is how they feel but simply think a lot of that was programming by the elite in dental wanting to switch the mindset of the public against the material so they could bring a more likely to fail material into the market. The new silver is worthless. Unless I knew someone like my friends that still keep and can use the old silver for those of us not the least bit concerned about a filling being replaced I would not bother with the new silver today but that is the truth of what happened.

Kerr Mfg. took their Tytin alloy and made it spherical alloy so understand me here they took the old mix of silver alloy and instead of pack and crunch layers of silver going into your tooth to fill the space of the cavity and made it a bunch of spherical balls that have gaps all around because as you know when you pack a bunch of steel balls you can see in and around spaces between right? Well yeah and that is why Tytin sent people through the roof after it was used because sensitivity was heightened due to those balls of alloy! They had to come up with new liner to put in under it just to use the stuff and we actually hated it after they changed it. What dental did was cheat to sway public opinion against what was to date the best most long lasting material we can use to correct a tooth cavity in your mouth.

It is sad so many think their dentist just wanted to cheat them. You all have no idea and half of the things said here are unsympathetic to the dental professionals using materials still approved for use by the ADA to repair your mouth.

Dentistry is expensive. Some think they did great getting rid of those silver fillings that although old and with mercury in many cases were just fine until some dentist put the idea in their head that it was poison. If any money grubbing was going on here it was in talking the patients out of those life lasting fillings to replace them with high chromium planned obsolete fillings in five to seven years or a tooth colored material lasting about the same length of time. Now that is the average patient. Some, if they floss and brush as they should can make them last a very long time but it will take more work and these new fillings are far less forgiving than the old for neglect. While it may be sickening to some to think of metal corroding in their mouths the fact is that corrosion is the secret to their longevity and self healing ability. I can't tell you how many patients we sat back in the chair and saw fillings that they had cracked and they healed shut and never leaked to cause a cavity and the patients never even knew they broke the filling! It cracked and healed shut and they never even had symptom in many cases. This will not be the case on any of the new.

Denise/Dizi
12th February 2019, 23:48
Amalgam fillings expand and contract slightly which can cause tooth cracking.

I recently had a filling spot crack my tooth, but it split virtically (a rear molar, split down through a root) and I had to have an extraction.

Now I'm looking at having all my fillings converted to ceramic or composite and I guess a bridge? I was thinking about the implant route but I've always wondered about deep set infections.

I had this happen to me as well. The tooth is still there but the damage to the root was so bad that the tooth is dying. And I am going to have to have it removed, which is sad because of all the other tooth problems that I have. I didn't even know the tooth was cracked and by the time I went back to have it repaired the dentist had retired. But then I immediately ran into other more serious issues as i noted above, making that one tooth minor in comparison. I am going to have to lose them all... You're fortunate that you just had the one issue

Denise/Dizi
13th February 2019, 00:24
This may be of interest: All “silver” dental filling are poisoned with mercury and it was covered up for 30 years
http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?75012-The-Fluoride-Thread&p=1275208&viewfull=1#post1275208

I can't tell you how many patients we sat back in the chair and saw fillings that they had cracked and they healed shut and never leaked to cause a cavity and the patients never even knew they broke the filling! It cracked and healed shut and they never even had symptom in many cases. This will not be the case on any of the new.

I was one of those patients, with MANY fillings in my mouth. (Amalgam) from my childhood.. forty years later they're still holding up.. But I DID also have one of those old fillings break.. and I never would have known it, had my dentist not told me as much... As it indeed DID repair itself.. The tooth needs to be removed because of other reasons, and the tooth is dying as a result.. but the filling kept the tooth from being attacked at the surface just as you claim...

My teeth overall have been suffering from something else entirely however... They're breaking off and shockingly, when I pull them out of my mouth, they're completely hollow! (These are teeth that have never been drilled.... It wasn't because of any metal being used... (So far as I can tell now... The damage to my teeth was from HEAVY medication regimes to treat Multiple Sclerosis, eroding my teeth from inside out, under the gums..and a few that are being damaged because I have crooked teeth that are creating POCKETS.. ).. But that's an entirely different story.. Short of braking my jaw to straighten them and get the gums to better lay against the teeth, this was predicted, but it is still sad to live through it... Between the two, I want to feel sorry for myself but we all have burdons to carry.. anyway...

I am now going to be faced with removing all of my teeth and seeking options, but I think it very nice of you to note what you know from behind the scenes. Truth be told, you're limited to using only that which is APPROVED.. And like any other industry, dentistry and more importantly COSMETIC dentistry has raised a lot of hype for "Pretty"... And people tend to want the next best thing that is put into the field, even if it isn't the ULTIMATE best thing...

I had many people tell me.. "You have MS, get that mercury out of your mouth!"... To which I replied, It's doing it's job, and I DOUBT that the mercury had anything to do with my MS, as I am able to relapse free and STILL have the dental fillings in my mouth. I didn't want to fix something that wasn't broken honestly.. And I can't afford to keep getting the same thing fixed over and over...

The larger issue here...

The population has been groomed to "Find a cause" and battle it. Most times it is stemmed to launch a product as we all know.. Sad actually. If people are so worried they would get the flouride out of our water supplies. And decide for themselves if they want flouride treatments.. It's all hat tricks sadly. In the end those fighting for the next best thing are really begging for garbage without even knowing it. Buy a new coffee pot and tell me how long it lasts, while you still have one that is 50 years old in a distant cupboard that makes coffee just fine. Truth is, they used to make things that lasted, but that didn't help an economy that needed to grow if financial gain, and supremacy was the ultimate goal... WE fed into that by not being aware of what we were seeing. We allowed the government to control what we feel is "True education".. When the truth is.. common sense is far more valuable than anything they can teach you in the public education system.. That's why they call these school "Trade Schools" because they're only teachin you something that will help you TRADE in the economy even better..

Critical thinking skills are what people are lacking these days, and it isn't a direct result of the population being dumbed down, it is a deliberate result of them being ran like rag dolls, and people not being able to properly educate themselves.. Or pass on the benefit of their knowledge to the next generation, because they're worn out at the end of the day. Perhaps this is not deliberate, but it is a unfortunate side effect of the systems that we have in place... It is up to US to recognize it and make sure we self correct.

But most don't have the time or energy to do so these days. They're too busy dancing in yoga circles preaching self enlightenment.. Or holding picket signs that blame someone else for everything, to actually DO anything about it.

Thank you for helping so many people eat better, look better, feel better about themselves, I wish you had been my dentist. Are you still practicing?

Constance
13th February 2019, 00:39
Amalgam fillings expand and contract slightly which can cause tooth cracking.

I recently had a filling spot crack my tooth, but it split virtically (a rear molar, split down through a root) and I had to have an extraction.

Now I'm looking at having all my fillings converted to ceramic or composite and I guess a bridge? I was thinking about the implant route but I've always wondered about deep set infections.

I had this happen to me as well. The tooth is still there but the damage to the root was so bad that the tooth is dying. And I am going to have to have it removed, which is sad because of all the other tooth problems that I have. I didn't even know the tooth was cracked and by the time I went back to have it repaired the dentist had retired. But then I immediately ran into other more serious issues as i noted above, making that one tooth minor in comparison. I am going to have to lose them all... You're fortunate that you just had the one issue

I hear you sister,

If you can find a really good natural wholistic dentist, you may be able to save the rest of your teeth. I found a really great dentist here, and he is worth his weight in gold. He helped me get my oral health right back on track and he also helped my son correct a dental problem naturally that usually requires surgery.


I discovered that using a tooth blotter instead of a toothbrush can heal many issues with gum inflammation and gum pockets. I don't use a toothbrush anymore!
I get my teeth checked every six months by a dental hygienist and she was quite incredulous that I didn't use a toothbrush, and that my gums were so healthy?

In India, it used to be a common practise to use neem twigs for oral health. The soft ends of the twig were used to scrub the gums and in-between the teeth.

I don't know if you can get this product in the USA but there is an old Indian Ayurvedic herb called Vajradanti (https://www.dabur.com/in/en-us/about/science-of-ayurveda/herbal-medicinal-plants/vajradanti-plant)


J07g5W8oSLM

I should also mention that there is another natural process for bringing oral health back to an individual and this is called Mewing (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HUi2nnzpnL4) which is a form of self-correcting of the jaw and muscles.

I would love to start a separate thread about this because it could potentially save people thousands of dollars in dentist bills, help with snoring issues, sleep apnoea and a score of other issues.

TomKat
13th February 2019, 12:23
[QUOTE=conk;1009821]I am currently working for a group that uses Scientologys business plan and they make so much money it's obscene.

In the 1980s Scientologists were instrumental in corrupting the dental and chiropractic professions, implementing something called Practice Management. Now, even dentists who haven't studied or contracted for practice management tend to follow at least some of the principles. I have found that Chinese dentists tend NOT to be as corrupt as other dentists, who have no problem doing unnecessary work to max out your insurance for the year.

¤=[Post Update]=¤


This is part one of two.

I wanted to share my story with my fellow Avalonians. I will spare everyone the gory details, but I feel that my experience may be of some value, especially to those who have severe dental problems. .

Did you go to Los Algodones? Which clinic did you use?