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Paul
23rd February 2016, 05:04
Almost two years ago, Hervé posted the thread Ketogenic Diet Beats Chemo For Almost All Cancers (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?72429-Ketogenic-Diet-Beats-Chemo-For-Almost-All-Cancers).

The research continues to roll in. A ketogenic (high fat, low carb) diet is not just for cancer; it's also for most other chronic diseases that are our major killers, including heart disease, diabetes, and Alzheimer's. Our grain and carb based diet is the major cause of our poor health. Such a diet may be "good business", lots of cheap food with long shelf life, and lots of sick patients to keep the medical and drug companies profitable. But the evidence is becoming well known and compelling: Cut the grains and carbs way back if you want a good chance of living a long and healthy and mentally alert life. Switch to a high fat (various healthy fats) for one's main energy source.

It's time for a thread covering this topic again, from a wider perspective beyond just cancer.

I encourage you to listen to Dr Mercola interview Travis Christofferson on this topic:
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I am quite sure that Travis Christofferson, and probably Dr Mercola too, are on a ketogenic diet. They are good examples that one can be healthy and mentally sharp on such a diet <grin>.

Notice toward the end of this Mercola interview that Travis Christofferson says that excess glucose can directly damage cell mitochondria. It's the damaged mitochondria that switch to generating the enzyme hexokinase II form of hexokinase. Travis quoting Young Hee Ko at 1:05:27:
"If you give too much sugar to cells, they start exhibiting all the phenotypes of cancer." Travis then goes on to describe his reaction to Young's (apparently not yet published) results
"So I was very surprised that glucose by itself, at least within that model, can start to shift the cell towards ... what it does is it upregulates the expression of this super important enzyme called "hexokinase II" which by itself is responsible for the Warburg effect and responsible for a large degree of the immortalization of the cancer cell."

As type 1 diabetics learn the hard way, controlling glucose levels in the blood is essential to health. If they do not methodically manage their blood glucose levels, then they suffer all manner of ailments, including blindness, circulation failing leading to limb amputations, cancer and heart disease.

I encourage you to read Travis Christofferson's important and readable book, Tripping Over the Truth: The Return of the Metabolic Theory of Cancer Illuminates a New and Hopeful Path to a Cure (http://smile.amazon.com/dp/1500600318). This book is currently Number One in Amazon's Oncology section (http://smile.amazon.com/gp/bestsellers/books/689753011/ref=zg_b_bs_689753011_1).

I also recommend David Perlmutter's two books Grain Brain (http://smile.amazon.com/dp/B00BAXFCPO) and Brain Maker (http://smile.amazon.com/dp/B00MEMMS9I). Perlmutter goes into considerable detail of the importance of using some means, such as exercise, fasting and/or a low carb, high fat, diet to keep the body more ketonic, and avoid the wide variety of chronic illnesses caused by high glucose levels in the body. These two books are currently Number One and Two in Amazon's Nervous System Diseases section (http://smile.amazon.com/gp/bestsellers/digital-text/156476011/ref=sr_bs_1) .

My summation of the science behind this:


Almost all cancers are caused by a metabolic, not a genetic, disorder. By that I mean, they are not caused by some damage to your DNA; they are caused by too much damage to your mitochondria, which are the cell's primary energy generator, converting glucose or ketones to the cell's primary fuel, ATP. The usual DNA damage comes later in the process.

It is well established that the cells in cancer tumors have significantly fewer, seriously damaged, mitochondria. It has also been suspected since Nobel laureate Otto Heinrich Warburg postulated what's called the Warburg effect (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warburg_effect) in 1926, that cancer cells are voracious consumers of glucose, and that they produce lactic acid in large amounts. Studies in the last decade have demonstrated that the Warburg effect manifests in more or less all cancers. The common cause of cancer is metabolic, and manifests these metabolic changes.

The form (isozyme) of the hexokinase enzyme called "hexokinase II", which damaged cells start to generate, is the key initial indicator of a cell turned cancerous. "Hexokinase II" by itself causes a chain reaction of changes that convert the cell to an "immortal" (cell aptosis, aka cell death, disabled) glucose fermenting, lactic acid generating (which kills neighboring healthy cells or turns them cancerous too) cell. Healthy cells use other forms of the hexokinase enzyme, not the "hexokinase II" form.

That one variant of the hexokinase enzyme radically changes the cells metabolism ... the sequence of chemical reactions by which it carries out its essential operations. Healthy cells use other forms of the hexokinase enzyme; cancer cells use the "hexokinase II" form

Too much sugar, for too long, weakens the cell's mitochondria, causing the cell to convert its metabolish to generating the "hexokinase II" isozyme of hexokinase enzyme, which turns that cell cancerous.

Once a cell's metabolism has converted from using oxidation (whether ketones or glucose) to using fermentation, then this causes a cascade of other internal damage to the cell, including DNA mutations. The DNA mutations found in cancer cells are a side-effect, not the cause, in most cases.

If it's just a few such cells, and the body is healthy enough, that cancerous cell will be destroyed. We all likely have thousands of such cells in our body. But if some tissue of the body is weakened perhaps by some other injury or toxin, then the cancerous cells start to win the battle..

Ways to maintain the body's ability to manage its glucose levels:

Intense exercise to burn off excess glucose
Fasting, which periodically draws down existing glucose stores in the body (and therefore, in my estimation, thereby enables the body to continue to manage it's blood glucose levels better.)
Ketogenic diet, which switches diet to fat/ketone combustion instead of carbohydrate/glucose combustion
Caloric restriction ... chronic near-starvation


All the major chronic illnesses afflicting humans on a "modern" diet are significantly or substantially healed or impacted by this, including ,most cancers, heart and cardio-vascular diseases, hypertension, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, epilepsy, diabetes, ...

My personal immediate plans to adapt my diet:


Personally, I intend to do a one time fast of perhaps 5 to 7 days (I've never done a fast for more than a day before), and then switch to a ketogenic diet. Currently I am figuring out what foods I enjoy eating that fit in a ketogenic diet and acquiring them. I will already be comfortable with and accustomed to a high fat diet, before starting the fast. I am also about to get some blood tests done, so that I can get some before and after metrics. Life Extension Institute, lef.com, sells blood tests for those in the US who don't have their own regular doctor, which is my situation. I will also start tracking my weight, waist size, blood glucose (many economical means to do so, sold to a large market of diabetics), and blood ketones (more expensive ... but doable with good accuracy at home for about $5/test with a Precision Xtra meter and test strips.) The initial fast is supposed to be a good way to get one's body transitioning from carbohydrate/glucose based energy to fat/ketone based energy, except for a few places where the body still needs to use glucose. My diet will still have 10 or 20 % of its calories from carbs (difficult to get lower than that), and the liver will convert fat to glucose, when needed by some tissue that requires glucose. Apparently the brain runs just fine on ketones, once it has converted. The conversion process takes 3 or 4 weeks, but apparently once one gets through the first few days of the week long fast, the rest is easier.

As Dr Mercola points out in the above Youtube video interview of Travis Christofferson, ketones are much cleaner burning than glucose. When mitochondria burns glucose to make ATP, the reaction creates various Reactive Oxidative Species (ROS), which are harmful to the cell, and require anti-oxidants in ample supply to neutralize. Ketone burning has no such harmful by-products.

Here's a good article that explains in more detail why ketones are better than glucose for our primary fuel: A Metabolic Paradigm Shift, or Why Fat is the Preferred Fuel for Human Metabolism (http://www.marksdailyapple.com/a-metabolic-paradigm-shift-fat-carbs-human-body-metabolism/). As noted in one of the comments to this article, our heart actually prefers ketones over glucose, so long as it has a choice. I guess that's why, when I was a long distance running in my youth (long, long ago), even if I ran so far and hard that my leg muscles could barely walk, tired from the lactic acid built up, I never had to worry that my heart would get too tired to beat.

Paul
23rd February 2016, 05:38
The form (isozyme) of the hexokinase enzyme called "hexokinase II", which damaged cells start to generate, is the key initial indicator of a cell turned cancerous.
Here's the Abstract from the 2006 paper Hexokinase II: Cancer's double-edged sword acting as both facilitator and gatekeeper of malignancy when bound to mitochondria" (http://www.nature.com/onc/journal/v25/n34/full/1209603a.html) by three key researchers in this area that provide more detail of this:

A key hallmark of many cancers, particularly the most aggressive, is the capacity to metabolize glucose at an elevated rate, a phenotype detected clinically using positron emission tomography (PET). This phenotype provides cancer cells, including those that participate in metastasis, a distinct competitive edge over normal cells.

Specifically, after rapid entry of glucose into cancer cells on the glucose transporter, the highly glycolytic phenotype is supported by hexokinase (primarily HK II) that is overexpressed and bound to the outer mitochondrial membrane via the porin-like protein voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC). This protein and the adenine nucleotide transporter move ATP, newly synthesized by the inner membrane located ATP synthase, to active sites on HK II.

The abundant amounts of HK II bind both the ATP and the incoming glucose producing the product glucose-6-phosphate, also at an elevated rate. This critical metabolite then serves both as a biosynthetic precursor to support cell proliferation and as a precursor for lactic acid, the latter exiting cancer cells causing an unfavorable environment for normal cells.

Although helping facilitate this chemical warfare, HK II via its mitochondrial location also suppresses the death of cancer cells, thus increasing their possibility for metastasis and the ultimate death of the human host.

For these reasons, targeting this key enzyme is currently being investigated in several laboratories in a strategy to develop novel therapies that may turn the tide on the continuing struggle to find effective cures for cancer. One such candidate is 3-bromopyruvate that has been shown recently to eradicate advanced stage, PET positive hepatocellular carcinomas in an animal model without apparent harm to the animals.

Paul
23rd February 2016, 05:53
My summation of the science behind this:
Here's a talk by Thomas Seyfried with more detail into this science. Travis Christofferson, mentioned above, writes more for a wider audience, whereas Thomas Seyfried is more focused on the research details, especially in brain cancer. Christofferson gives much credit to Seyfried for the science behind his work.

Thomas Seyfried, Ph.D. presenting at the 2nd Annual Ancestral Health Symposium, January 2013: Targeting Energy Metabolism in Brain Cancer
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Here's a Dr Mercola article, explaining Dr Seyfried's work to a wider audience: The Benefits of a Ketogenic Diet and Its Role in Cancer Treatment (http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/06/16/ketogenic-diet-benefits.aspx)

Paul
23rd February 2016, 06:00
I encourage you to read Travis Christofferson's important and readable book, Tripping Over the Truth: The Return of the Metabolic Theory of Cancer Illuminates a New and Hopeful Path to a Cure (http://smile.amazon.com/dp/1500600318). This book is currently Number One in Amazon's Oncology section (http://smile.amazon.com/gp/bestsellers/books/689753011/ref=zg_b_bs_689753011_1).
Here are couple of articles by Travis Christofferson that covers some of the same material as his book, that can be read far more quickly than his book:
What Is The Origin of Cancer? (http://robbwolf.com/2013/09/19/origin-cancer/)
Tripping Over the Truth: The Metabolic Theory of Cancer (http://pastpresentpaleo.com/tripping-over-the-truth-by-travis-christofferson/)

Paul
23rd February 2016, 06:06
This website explains how ketogenic diets address a number of major chronic illnesses and goes into details and recipes for such a diet: Ketogenic Diet Resource (http://www.ketogenic-diet-resource.com/). The site is the work of Ellen Davis. She has a Master's degree in Applied Clinical Nutrition,

Paul
23rd February 2016, 06:34
As Dr Mercola points out in the above Youtube video interview of Travis Christofferson, ketones are much cleaner burning than glucose. When mitochondria burns glucose to make ATP, the reaction creates various Reactive Oxidative Species (ROS), which are harmful to the cell, and require anti-oxidants in ample supply to neutralize. Ketone burning has no such harmful by-products.
A research paper from 2003 further highlights the harm caused by burning glucose, rather than ketones, as the body's primary source of energy. Glucose burning generates various harmful Reactive Oxidative Species (ROS), which may be the common cause of both diabetes and cardiovascular disease, as well as the other chronic illnesses that I have further documented above, such as cancer and various brain diseases, for example epilepsy and Alzheimer's. The paper is Is Oxidative Stress the Pathogenic Mechanism Underlying Insulin Resistance, Diabetes, and Cardiovascular Disease? The Common Soil Hypothesis Revisited (http://atvb.ahajournals.org/content/24/5/816.full).

All those anti-oxidants that we've been encouraged to eat ... apparently the main oxidizers they have to counter-act are the ROS by-products of burning glucose.

A major cause of aging ... reduced mitochondria capacity ... may be caused by the ROS by-products of burning glucose, harming the mitochondria doing the burning.

Burning ketones instead, from a predominantly fat based diet, may avoid these problems. Ketone burning doesn't have toxic oxidizing by-products,

Paul
23rd February 2016, 06:42
Here's another paper, this one from 2014, that comes to similar conclusions. The paper is Long-term models of oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in insulin resistance progression. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24076453).

It's abstract reads in part:

=========


Oxidative stress, which develops through an accumulation of toxic reactive oxygen species generated by mitochondria, is believed to contribute to insulin resistance in certain tissues. We develop mathematical models of feedback between reactive oxygen species production and dysfunction in mitochondria to provide insight into the role of oxidative stress in insulin resistance. Our models indicate that oxidative stress generated by glucose overload accelerates irreversible mitochondrial dysfunction.
=========

Notice the part I marked with bold: "... oxidative stress generated by glucose overload accelerates irreversible mitochondrial dysfunction."

thunder24
23rd February 2016, 06:47
what is everyone trying to extend life for?

Paul
23rd February 2016, 06:56
So ... the main cancer sequence is this:

When mitochondria burn glucose to make ATP, they create toxic ROS (oxidative) by-products.
These ROS by-products eventually destroy the mitochondria.
The cell then switches to the hexokinase enzyme called "hexokinase II", which in turn switches the cell to using fermentation to make ATP. Mitochondria are not needed for that. A cell without functioning mitochondria must switch to fermentation, or die for lack of its essential fuel, ATP.
Fermenting cells, using the enzyme called "hexokinase II", change into cancerous cells (multiply rapidly, never die, greedy for glucose to feed the fermentation, and killing healthy neighboring cells with the lactic acid produced by the fermentation.)
The random DNA damage seen in some cancerous cells is just part of the damage caused by the fermentation and its toxic by-products, such as lactic acid.

The main sequence for most other major chronic diseases starts with the same first three steps.

Burning ketones, which most cells in the body can adapt to just fine, stops this sequence at the first step - no toxic by-products.

Paul
23rd February 2016, 07:06
what is everyone trying to extend life for?

This is not just about how many years we live, but how many years we are healthy, of clear mind and able to tend to our own affairs.

This is not just about my personal life, but is about working with others to understand how to live better, and to resist the toxic medical practices of the bastards currently in charge of main stream "medicine"

thunder24
23rd February 2016, 07:24
dealing with someone who is dying of lung, liver and brain cancer at the moment i can tell you...goodluck, and quit breathing the air its toxic, that might help extend it...

Calz
23rd February 2016, 07:49
I can chime in that I'm about 90% certain I cured myself of (male) breast cancer by this method.

I say 90% because I never confirmed getting or ridding myself of it ... why bother with western medicine as far as "maintenance"?

Couple years back I had pain and lumps in both breasts lasting several months.

I started with a 2 week fast (lemonade diet) and followed the advice in the book "The Cantin Ketogenic Diet" by Elaine Cantin.

After about 4 months I was fine. Have not noticed any reoccurrence since.

Napping
23rd February 2016, 09:59
Some seriously shaky research trying to link carbs with cancer, I'm not buying that. I do certainly agree that our propensity to eat too much carbs and being sedentary slobs is highly correlated with a number of chronic diseases.

I've suffered chronic fatigue syndrome or something of its variety for many years and since reducing processed carbohydrate and commencing intermittent fasting I've noted remarkable improvements including improved clarity of thought, improved sleep patterns, refreshed sleep, marked increase in energy and labido and improved ability to tolerate exercise of any type.

I simply skip breakfast, drink a black coffee for morning tea, lime favoured soda water around midday followed by a protein and salad based lunch and a protein and salad based dinner. Limiting the processed carbs means I have no craving for them and are no longer ruled by them. I also do heavy weights as bouts of high intensity exercise, but only a couple of times per week.

At the end of the day if a fear of processed carbs causing cancer helps you to reduce their intake and gets you off the lounge, then great. I just see flawed evidence depicting that link. There's plenty of other worthwhile reasons to do it. Eg increased abdominal fat is directly correlated with cancer, as is being sedentary.

Matt

Paul
23rd February 2016, 14:25
Some seriously shaky research trying to link carbs with cancer, I'm not buying that. I do certainly agree that our propensity to eat too much carbs and being sedentary slobs is highly correlated with a number of chronic diseases.

... chronic fatigue syndrome ... increased abdominal fat ... sedentary.

Yes, chronic fatigue syndrome and the similar "metabolic syndrome" are two of the many chronic illnesses mentioned in the material I linked above.

Yes, abdominal fat is also a symptom of this. The body deals for a long time with excess carb intake by storing it as fat. Like bears fattening up for their long hibernation, this can be a useful means of surviving cold winters. This is why I will "start tracking my weight, waist size" (as I noted in the opening Post #1, above).

Yes, intense exercise is one way to handle a high carb intake, that burns off the carbs, instead of storing them. Such does cause tissue damage, both from the physical activity itself, and from burning glucose in the tissues of the joints and muscles doing the exercise. But one can remain quite healthy and alert for a long time this way, as the rest of one's body, not directly involved in the activity, enjoys a low carb, more ketogenic, environment.

If however we don't exercise enough to burn off the carbs we eat, we then store the carbs in our cells. Eventually our fat stores become full, our insulin mechanism that enables this storage becomes overworked even as our cells become resistant to the increasing levels of insulin, and the burning of glucose (from carbs) rather than ketones (from fats, especially healthy saturated fats) has caused massive damage to our mitochondria.

Cells switch to fermentation when their mitochondria have become too devastated from burning glucose to continue producing (whether by burning glucose or burning ketones) the ATP our cells require.

As Otto Warburg observed almost a century ago, and as has been closely validated by research over the last decade, cell fermentation is a hallmark of almost all cancers.

In other words, everything that you report from your personal experience, as best as I understand your post, is entirely consistent with what I've been reporting in this thread.

Just add in a wee bit of research that has been well demonstrated over the last decade, and you can see where that leads to cancer, in (more or less) all its variant forms.

As best as I can tell, that wee bit of research, repeated by multiple researchers in multiple ways around the world, is not "seriously shaky" ... not even a wee bit shaky <grin>.

Baby Steps
23rd February 2016, 14:44
THIS IS REALLY EXCELLENT

1. If one is over weight, then by definition we have excess insulin (due to insulin resistance) that stimulates excess fat deposition. The insulin resistance is partly a chromium/vanadium deficiency, and partly that the cells cannot import glucose due to the receptors being clogged with fat. The body's response is to make more insulin, but due to the resistance, blood glucose is over the top. I believe ketosis is the key to reversing this as it gets us off the glucose/fat merry-go-round and increases glucose sensitivity.
2. Excessive blood glucose helps cancer cells to thrive, it may give them the edge over the immune system.Any strategy to maintain lower blood glucose will assist, so any weight loss/anti diabetes regime may help. Metformin is being looked at:

https://www.mdanderson.org/publications/oncolog/november-december-2014/beyond-diabetes-metformin-may-have-broad-utility-in-cancer.html

Cinnamon is cyto-toxic to cancer cells & assists with glucose uptake (I wonder if that is a coincidence?)

3. There has been research indicating that a crash diet for a brief time can reverse type 2 diabetes, because fatty deposits around the liver and pancreas are implicated

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/8594293/Crash-course-diet-reverses-Type-2-diabetes-in-a-week.html

4. I believe that oxygen is part of the complex. If the cells are drowning they resort to anoxic fermentation of glucose.

http://drsircus.com/medicine/cancer/the-key-drivers-of-cancer-growth-are

So strategies to get tissue oxygen levels up, starting with a brisk walk might be good.

5. Research suggests that cancerous cells can revert if the mitochondria can be re-activated.

PQQ with coenzyme Q10 are very good for mitochondria.

http://doctormurray.com/pqq-the-next-nutrient-superstar/

6. A brief fast stimulates the body to replace/reproduce its mitochondria:

http://www.lmreview.com/articles/view/beyond-the-mitochondrial-tune-up-part-III/

7. If you take in a glucose analogue molecule-that cells cannot use to metabolise - but recognise as glucose - this may be cyto toxic to cancer:

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2FBF02618247

8. Insulin Potentiation Therapy is well established. You take insulin, blood glucose falls, healthy cells switch to ketosis, whereas cancer cells starve and are more vulnerable to the chemo (or any other cytotoxic agent)

http://www.euro-med.us/cancer-treatment/insulin-potentiation-therapy.cfm

God bless

Paul
23rd February 2016, 15:30
On a side note ... one might wonder if we went heavily ketogenic in our diet and metabolism, then why could we not live forever?

There's at least one other, separate, process that limits our body's lifetime. As explained in Can Science Make Us Immortal? (http://www.viewzone.com/aging.html) and Are Telomeres The Key To Aging And Cancer? (http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/chromosomes/telomeres/), the telomeres which protect the ends of our DNA get shorter each time a cell divides. Eventually, the telomeres get too short, and too much DNA is lost.

(Though I disagree with the implications of the "and Cancer" part of that second article's title ... cancer is primarily a metabolic disease, not a genetic disease ... cancer causes more rapid shortening of our telomeres, and other random genetic damage due to the highly toxic environment within and around a cancerous cell. In other words, usually cancer causes damage to DNA, not the other way around. Actually, if you read what that second article says about telomeres and cancer, you'll see that it agrees with me.)

TargeT
23rd February 2016, 15:47
what is everyone trying to extend life for?

quality of life & life extension are two very different things ;)


FWIW: I practice caloric restriction, for the past 8 months or so (since I was injured and not burning many calories) I've eaten once a day with maybe a light snack mixed in... I've slowly been loosing weight (fat for sure, but probably some muscle mass as well). And for me this works perfectly fine, plus it's a hell of a lot cheaper since I like to eat out... I just had a full panel blood test; my testosterone was a touch low (I tribute this to head trauma, not diet), but other than that my numbers were great (though at 36, this isn't too much of a surprise).

Logically 3 meals a day makes no sense to me if our body is designed to be a (or functions as a) hunter/gather consumer; ie periodic influxes of food, not consistent influxes; so I started periodically fasting & found it was easy to go a couple of days with out food once I got used to the "hunger discomfort" and now that I've set this pattern I don't even get very hungry at all & am satisfied VERY quickly when eating.



who ever said breakfast is the most important meal of they day was crazy.. I haven't eaten breakfast for years, and now I'm skipping lunch or dinner too (I avoid sugar as much as possible, and grain... well grains are really hard to avoid, I'm not the best at that).

Paul
23rd February 2016, 15:54
Metformin is being looked at
Here's another article on metformin (which I found in the footnotes of Travis Christofferson's "Tripping over the truth" book): Metformin and Cancer (http://www.healthyfellow.com/308/metformin-and-cancer/).

Paul
23rd February 2016, 16:08
3. There has been research indicating that a crash diet for a brief time can reverse type 2 diabetes, because fatty deposits around the liver and pancreas are implicated

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/8594293/Crash-course-diet-reverses-Type-2-diabetes-in-a-week.html

That article says they are reversing type 2 diabetes by restricting calories to 600 ... which is a very low level and would be difficult for most patients to sustain over a long time.

I wonder if they could get similar results by restricting calories from carbohydrates to 600, but allowing unlimited, high quality, saturated fat calories. That would be much easier to sustain over a long time.

Baby Steps
23rd February 2016, 16:56
3. There has been research indicating that a crash diet for a brief time can reverse type 2 diabetes, because fatty deposits around the liver and pancreas are implicated

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/8594293/Crash-course-diet-reverses-Type-2-diabetes-in-a-week.html

That article says they are reversing type 2 diabetes by restricting calories to 600 ... which is a very low level and would be difficult for most patients to sustain over a long time.

I wonder if they could get similar results by restricting calories from carbohydrates to 600, but allowing unlimited, high quality, saturated fat calories. That would be much easier to sustain over a long time.

Hi, I have to fall back on personal experience there, I started getting high morning sugar readings 5 years ago. I have been killing the carb cravings off with fat, & it has done the trick. Touch wood.

RunningDeer
23rd February 2016, 17:00
I wanted to add a thanks for the thread, Paul, and for the book recommendations (post added below) from Carmody’s thread (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?88891-Sweet-discovery-in-leafy-greens-holds-key-to-gut-health&p=1046600&viewfull=1#post1046600). The first book is the discussion in the OP video and linked already. I'm switching between the two.

I agree about living a quality life which includes: clear mental faculties, prescription free, less to no aches and pains, and flexibility of mind and body.

It’s easy to slip into fears of what the tricksters brew up for our wellbeing by way of the environment and all. Bruce Lipton’s books (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_c_0_12?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=bruce+lipton&sprefix=Bruce+Lipton%2Caps%2C323) are a quick, easy read to get one back on track in terms of realigning one's beliefs. For new members, check out this thread that included snippets and quick links with the video for those short on time: "We deprogram our ability to heal ourselves (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?72141---We-deprogram-our-ability-to-heal-ourselves----says-Dr.-Bruce-Lipton&p=843203&viewfull=1#post843203),” says Dr. Bruce Lipton.




Most importantly, gut health is mental health is bodily health. The three are very intertwined.
... and mitochondrial health, the other essential bacteria in the body, in addition to our gut bacteria.

Mitochrondria are our cells main energy source. They are apparently bacteria with their own, distinct, genetic history, that became adapted to living inside our cells, in a symbiotic relation. They provide cells with energy (ATP) much more efficiently than basic fermentation, in exchange for having "room and board" (nutrients, safe accommodations and other cellular services.)

Life - The Epic Story of Our Mitochondria: How the Original Probiotic Dictates Your Health, Illness, Ageing, and Even Life Itself, by Lee Know Nd (http://smile.amazon.com/dp/1460251806)
Tripping Over the Truth: The Return of the Metabolic Theory of Cancer Illuminates a New and Hopeful Path to a Cure, by Travis Christofferson (http://smile.amazon.com/dp/1500600318)

thunder24
23rd February 2016, 17:36
what is everyone trying to extend life for?

quality of life & life extension are two very different things ;) .

agreed

paul i appologize for being terse...

RunningDeer
23rd February 2016, 18:40
agreed
paul i appologize for being terse...


dealing with someone who is dying of lung, liver and brain cancer at the moment i can tell you...goodluck, and quit breathing the air its toxic, that might help extend it...

Going through this now, and no doubt it's brought up the journey with your Dad before and after his passing (IIRC). It's understandable that you have these questions and feelings.

Thunder, don't forget to take care of yourself, too. http://avalonlibrary.net/paula/Recovered/smileys-hugs-765537_zpso1eaenyy.gif

:offtopic:

Ewan
23rd February 2016, 20:40
what is everyone trying to extend life for?

quality of life & life extension are two very different things ;) .

agreed

paul i appologize for being terse...

FWIW I never read your post as terse, merely a funny quip. (Maybe it is my sense of humour that is askew. :) )

ErtheVessel
23rd February 2016, 22:02
Thank you for this information, Paul.

I just wanted to add that I believe a lot of the craving for carbs and sugar comes from intestinal parasites. I think that as a modern culture we are massively infested with parasites and within the mainstream this is taboo to talk about. Supposedly we are too "clean" to have them in our modern culture.

As far as I can tell, most cultures until quite recently (maybe the last 50 years) integrated some kind of annual parasite purge with their diet. All animals have parasites - it is part of the circle of life. They must be purged.

In my own experience, the lower my parasite load, the more I seem to naturally crave what is being called the ketogenic diet. I used to eat sugar, chocolate and carbs constantly, but now have very little craving for any of that.

I know the topic of parasites is discussed in other threads, so I don't want to derail your important discussion on this diet, but I wanted to offer a perspective on why so many people intensely crave sweets and carbs. Maybe the parasites are demanding to be fed.

:focus:

DeDukshyn
23rd February 2016, 23:48
...
I just wanted to add that I believe a lot of the craving for carbs and sugar comes from intestinal parasites.

In the case of Candida infection (a multi cell fungus), this is certainly the case. The fungus has a way of getting you to feed it. Weird, but not as weird as the "zombie ant fungus", thank goodness :)


(in case one is curious ...)
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/03/pictures/110303-zombie-ants-fungus-new-species-fungi-bugs-science-brazil/

DeDukshyn
24th February 2016, 00:19
 

There are two nutrients that can mimic the effects of caloric restriction. Those effects are the activation of certain genes and the deactivation of others (350+ gene changes actually), something the body does when overall calorie intake is reduced (fairly substantially - by 40%+) in order to facilitate the reduced caloric intake, and still function properly. The result of this change in gene activation leads to:

1) longer life - this is the only proven way to extend the life of an organism by any measureable amount
2) Less illness -- age related disease are reduced, or their onset greatly delayed - better health into older age.

Those two substances are resveratrol and thermally stabilized oxaloacetate . There may be others, but these two are known as caloric restriction mimics - as they have the ability to change over 350 different gene expressions that also happen when calories are reduced by 40%+.

Also, one must consider that a body creating energy as ATP also create free radicals that cause damage and the "aging" effect. You age slower, the less you eat / the less sugar you ingest and convert into ATP.

Both those substances can be bought from the supplement store, however resveratrol is quite unstable, and the efficacy in a supplement form is questionable. Where I work, we take extreme measures to guard against this rapid degradation (while manufacturing), using red colour lighting in all the processing rooms to cut out the light frequencies most responsible for the degradation, and then putting them in darkened capsules to add extra protection vs UV. Even then, I wouldn't buy it unless just made. Most of the resveratrol on the market is likely not even close to the potency claimed, due to this instability.

Unfortunately, one would need to drink several bottles of red wine a day to get a 'useful" amount of resveratrol from that :)

Oxaloacetate however, can be stabilized, but it's discovery as a CR mimic, is fairly recent, so research and studies are still ongoing, but so far it is looking pretty good. A thermally stabilized version is called BenaGene, and yes the company I work for sells it (although we didn't do the research, we just looked at the research, and safety, and decided that it was a novel enough product with some decent studies behind it (animal studies looked pretty good, human studies are still ongoing -- obviously these are long term). I can't get it for anyone so don't bother asking me :) I can however, provide info and a few research links if requested. There are other "me too!" brands, but I can't say whether any of them are thermally stabilized. Fun fact, I actually met the man who did all the animal studies - a bit of an odd fella, but a nice guy who's very passionate about his research.

Anyway, my point was just to bring up some interesting facts about caloric restriction, gene activation, and even how our nutrients can activate gene expressions in regards to overall health and longevity -- we really must take care with our bodies, the synergy between diet and gene expression, can be very powerful, either in appositive way or a negative way, as certain gene expression actually induce an increase aging and disease.

Selene
24th February 2016, 02:12
Okay, friends. I have been both fasting regularly (for overall health) and doing a ketogenic diet once a year-ish (to lose that famous fatal last five pounds) for the past 40 years. My normal daily diet for the past 30 years is what would be called Mediterranean these days: lots of fresh fruits, veggies, grilled fish, legumes, nuts, and very little wheat, dairy, refined sugars, meats or packaged brand-name snacks or fast foods. (Prior to that I was a vegan for ten years, long before the word had even been invented.)

At age 60+ (plus!) I have the medical stats of a healthy 20-something. No cholesterol issues, ‘perfect’ blood pressure, no insulin resistance, no arthritis, no meds of any kind…. No aging issues beyond the graying hair of someone twenty years younger. Whenever I go in for a routine checkup, if the medical tech or doctor doesn’t know me, they invariably do a double-take and confusedly check my chart with “Ummm… what year were you born..?” When I go through passport control, agents always look twice and I have to reassure them - yes, that’s actually me. (One French passport officer once handed me back my passport, bowed gallantly and said: “Madame, my congratulations…”)

So I am comfortable speaking from experience here.

Yes, both fasting and the ketogenic diet are absolutely wonderful and safe if properly observed. Yes, they are highly protective of your health. And ketogenic - relatively high protein and fats - diets can be observed for long periods if you can keep your carb intake down. Personally, I can’t – I love my fresh fruits and veggies too much, but that’s another mode, so I prefer another menu. It works for me.

There’s no “one size fits all” when it comes to nutrition. You must be guided by what feels best for your body. You must listen to your body’s health – not your mind or appetite or someone else’s opinion - and adjust accordingly.

Everyone’s body is unique. A unique combination of genetics, environmental influences, stress, food availability and intangibles. Your body decides; no guru or method can dictate.

Now, a few pointers:

I don’t know if this is you, Paul, or you are quoting someone here:


My personal immediate plans to adapt my diet:

Personally, I intend to do a one time fast of perhaps 5 to 7 days (I've never done a fast for more than a day before), and then switch to a ketogenic diet…. The conversion process takes 3 or 4 weeks, but apparently once one gets through the first few days of the week-long fast, the rest is easier.


Woah. Woah my dear friend. You’re going wa-a-a-a-y too intensely for comfort or lasting results here.

At your age (that’s anything over, say, 21 or so) digging into a major 5-7 day fast at the outset with no prior basic detoxing is simply a guaranteed way to fail painfully and give up any further progress in disgust and self-defeat.

Start simply with a series of one-day-a-week fasts before embarking on anything longer and more ambitious.

Your body has now stored decades of accumulated crap, heavy metals, sequestered toxins and garbage that will be dumped into your bloodstream all at once and make you sick, sick, sick. This is simply unnecessary. You will absolutely hate every minute of a longer fast, and more. All the caffeine, sugar, cigarettes, alcohol, junk food and crap you’ve ever ingested will rebound. You will be physically hammered – and you don’t need that. No one is strong enough – I mean that. No one is. You don’t need that right now.

Be gentle with yourself. Your body is your best friend. Why hammer it now?

Much better and wiser to begin this welcome change with a one-day-a week cleansing fast, continued weekly, say, every Thursday for as many weeks or months that it takes to discharge these old poisons, until you can juice or water fast for a day – or two - without any ill effects. No headaches, no nausea or vomiting, no painful joints, no emotional blowups or brain fog, no diarrhea, constipation or tremors. Just nice, bright clarity and more and better energy, better skin, brighter eyes and a clearer mind. Wait for the clarity.

Once you’re good to go – then, of course, go for it. Do the 5-7 day fast next; you’ll be a pro. Evolve into your new diet, absolutely. You won’t be hampered by old issues; you’ll be in better control and awareness of your body and mind.

After all, you’ve spent – what? – 40+ years getting into this situation. Why do you expect to undo it in a week? That stuff is now stored in your bones – it will take time to chelate out.

No one should have to endure the physical horror of sustained detoxing in one go. A 5-7 day fast is for nuns, monks and devotees who are accustomed to doing the same four times a year at the turning of the seasons and for whom a week is no problem. It’s actually a very intense regimen, one that even I don’t do often.

I know: people selling the books and miracle cures want you to see “instant” and dramatic results – if you can do that – but please, don’t set yourself up for failure. Ease into this.

One day a week on a simple single-juice fast is a good way to start. Doesn’t matter what kind of juice – orange, watermelon, spinach, celery - just one ingredient plus water as needed. Drink all you want.

A few more hints:

• Don’t tell anyone what you’re doing when you fast. Just show up for work as usual, dress well, and carry a thermos of your juice like nothing. Be too busy for lunch out that day, maybe, if you’d rather. But don’t draw attention. Fast in silence. Go shopping.

• Expect to feel utterly crappy the first time, or two or three or more sessions. Just cope. It will get easier each time.

• And if by evening you can’t cope, have some vegetable soup or a salad on standby as a recourse. Don’t hit the burger bar.

• Congratulate yourself for whatever you’ve accomplished that day. Next Thursday, start again; it all counts for good.

• Be secure in the knowledge that once these accumulated toxins have left your body, they have gone for good. Period. It will never again be so difficult to detox. Whatever progress you make here is real progress. Start somewhere.

And then, yes, go for it! Your new life awaits.

:thumbsup:

All my very best wishes,

Selene

Paul
24th February 2016, 07:47
I don’t know if this is you, Paul, or you are quoting someone here:


My personal immediate plans to adapt my diet:

Personally, I intend to do a one time fast of perhaps 5 to 7 days (I've never done a fast for more than a day before), and then switch to a ketogenic diet…. The conversion process takes 3 or 4 weeks, but apparently once one gets through the first few days of the week-long fast, the rest is easier.


Woah. Woah my dear friend. You’re going wa-a-a-a-y too intensely for comfort or lasting results here.

At your age (that’s anything over, say, 21 or so) digging into a major 5-7 day fast at the outset with no prior basic detoxing is simply a guaranteed way to fail painfully and give up any further progress in disgust and self-defeat.

Start simply with a series of one-day-a-week fasts before embarking on anything longer and more ambitious.

That was me, describing my personal immediate plans.

I understand that one's body and organ fats store toxins. It's sort of the body's way of "sweeping unwanted stuff under the rug", if it can't otherwise neutralize or excrete it.

If one goes on a fast, then fat is burnt, and any toxins that were trapped in that fat are released into the body. If more toxins are released this way than the liver, kidneys and other detox mechanisms can handle, then one gets sick. A variant of this is called the Herxheimer (Detox) Reaction.

Whether or not this will soon be a critical problem for me ... guess I'll figure that out ... I have reasons to suspect that I'll manage, one way or another.

Each person's situation is different.

Napping
24th February 2016, 10:26
"As best as I can tell, that wee bit of research, repeated by multiple researchers in multiple ways around the world, is not "seriously shaky" ... not even a wee bit shaky" <grin>.[/QUOTE]

The authors of this research are drawing long bows Paul, as you are.

Your going to detest this article, but it adds balance - and when you wade through more of the research, makes a hell of a lot more sense.

https://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/ketogenic-diets-for-cancer-hype-versus-science/

Ah sucks to be the naysayer when its so much more satisfying to blame the evils of big pharma hiding the cure to cancer.

(I feel I'm arguing to a crowd that will refuse to see beyond the coverup, conspiracy etc etc on these health threads....I'm as open to conspiracy as anyone, but when you actually have a fair idea about a topic and are willing to invest reasonable energy in both ends of the argument without bias - this and some of the other health threads get very difficult to read.)

I'll stick to the esoteric stuff I have minimal knowledge about and enjoy contemplating...this stuff does my head in as a health professional....plus, I'm not great with conflict....lover not a fighter!

Olam
24th February 2016, 10:55
I can chime in that I'm about 90% certain I cured myself of (male) breast cancer by this method.

I say 90% because I never confirmed getting or ridding myself of it ... why bother with western medicine as far as "maintenance"?

Couple years back I had pain and lumps in both breasts lasting several months.

I started with a 2 week fast (lemonade diet) and followed the advice in the book "The Cantin Ketogenic Diet" by Elaine Cantin.

After about 4 months I was fine. Have not noticed any reoccurrence since.

Nice to read you just now.
I did that myself , started with a 20 day lemonade fast and then jumped into keto mode.
Its been 3 weeks now and I can't say I am fully adapted yet but I feel great!.
I just can't wait to have my body go fulltime keto though as I have put back 4 pounds since the fast!
:-)

TargeT
24th February 2016, 14:03
Whether or not this will soon be a critical problem for me ... guess I'll figure that out ... I have reasons to suspect that I'll manage, one way or another.

Each person's situation is different.

I've done some pretty extreme body hacking experiments on my self (lived in Alaska for 13 years... you get pretty bored in the winters).

I once did a month of 200-500 cal per day with H.C.G. (I.M.)... it's pretty crazy what your body can do; I even did some Jujitsu training during this period (though that turned out to be a bad idea.. haha I got exhausted super fast).

I took an ATP enhancer for a couple of weeks & turned into a human heater (but my body core temp was staying uncomfortably high so I quit due to comfort/concern).


I've done some extended fasts too, just water and tea for 7 days, I've tried all sorts of fun ways to kick my body into shape... but in the end I never changed my base habits, I'm trying to alter my base habits now & see how that does.


You never know until you try ;)

Paul
24th February 2016, 20:54
I'll stick to the esoteric stuff I have minimal knowledge about and enjoy contemplating...this stuff does my head in as a health professional....plus, I'm not great with conflict....lover not a fighter!
May your healing work succeed well, and perhaps you could throw a little bit of love to

us big-pharma conspiracy theory lunatics,
us Über-quack Dr. Mercola fans, and
us sympathisizers of such rank quackeries, as homeopathy, acupuncture, reflexology, craniosacral therapy, Hulda Clark’s “zapper,” the Gerson therapy and Gonzalez protocol for cancer, and reiki.

Clearly we are in need of some love :).

(above phrases and terms mostly quoted from your post and the post you linked to.)

Paul
24th February 2016, 21:02
I've done some extended fasts too, just water and tea for 7 days, I've tried all sorts of fun ways to kick my body into shape... but in the end I never changed my base habits, I'm trying to alter my base habits now & see how that does.
As the ravages of age have snuck up on me, I've found it much easier, the motivations much more compelling, to make dramatic changes in my diet.

I had no time for such nonsense, far less than you apparently have now, when I was your age :).

Paul
24th February 2016, 21:37
(above phrases and terms mostly quoted from your post and the post you linked to.)
For those who might be confused, my reply to Napping was sarcastic.

My honest position is that I have little patience with those whose basic arguments consist of

a few, minimally substantiated claims on the topic at hand,
rank ridicule of the rooters for the "alternative" viewpoints, and
sympathy seeking for their own "poor, humble, caring" selves.

... very little patience :).

Jules
25th February 2016, 00:25
what is everyone trying to extend life for?

It is difficult to imagine wanting to live on and on in the world as it is at this time, so corrupt, poisoned, and not enough love. However if I was in a beautiful world with healthy challenges, love, and less of the evil I wouldn't mind enjoying that world a little longer. The truth is that whether I live for one more day or a thousand years, the only thing that I have that matters is now. To look around and be thankful for the good and do best I can do at this time until further notice is really all I can do. I hope things get better for you, as well as for humanity as a whole. Peace be with you.

Paul
25th February 2016, 18:23
On a side note ... one might wonder if we went heavily ketogenic in our diet and metabolism, then why could we not live forever?

There's at least one other, separate, process that limits our body's lifetime. As explained in Can Science Make Us Immortal? (http://www.viewzone.com/aging.html) and Are Telomeres The Key To Aging And Cancer? (http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/chromosomes/telomeres/), the telomeres which protect the ends of our DNA get shorter each time a cell divides. Eventually, the telomeres get too short, and too much DNA is lost.
Here is a series of three articles, posted apparently back in 2010 (from the date on the one reply comment), that gives substantial more detail into the aging process, involving the main actor of this thread, mitochondria, not DNA chromosomes telomeres.

The articles use, with comfortable familiarity, many technical medical terms, so they are slow reading for most of us, myself included.

Here is the conclusion, at the end of the third article:

===========


Autophagy, the body’s mechanism for the removal and recycling of cellular waste, is key to rejuvenation, especially in the mitochondria, and is allowed to proceed only in the postabsorptive state, in which insulin signaling ebbs to its lowest (basal) level. With age, ROS-induced aberrant triggering of the insulin signaling mechanism in the postabsorptive state inhibits autophagy, preventing maintenance of plasma cysteine and intracellular glutathione levels throughout the night and early morning hours, and initiating a vicious cycle of progressively increasing oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Since accumulation of cellular waste, decreased cellular glutathione concentrations and increased oxidative stress are common hallmarks of aging in a broad range of species, while lowered insulin signaling that promotes autophagy, whether resulting from genetic mutation or caloric restriction (with adequate nutrition), has been shown to extend lifespan in virtually all species tested to date, it seems likely that human life- and health-span may be extended by a protocol designed to re-establish youthful levels of mitophagy and postabsorptive cysteine concentrations, such as the one proposed by Dröge and outlined in this article.
===========

Here's my "broken English" translation of that conclusion, into something I can understand better:

===========


A key to a long and healthy life is cleaning up (autophagy) of cellular waste, especially in the mitochondria.

This cleaning mostly occurs when the body has not eaten for a few hours (postabsorptive state), when insulin levels are low. However high insulin levels aren't the only thing that inhibit this cleaning. The presence of too much oxidized and damaged (ROS stands for Reactive Oxygen Species) tissue also inhibits this cleaning.

This can create a viscious cycle ... with too much damaged tissue, the damaged tissue inhibits the body's self-cleaning of that damaged tissue. (Sounds like my desktop ... too much clutter gets in the way of cleaning up the clutter.)

Both insulin and damaged tissue suppress the levels of cysteine in the blood (plasma) and glutathione within the cells (intracellular), which can prevent cleaning up waste that would normally occur at night and in the early morning hours, or otherwise after not eating for a few hours or more.

In virtually all species tested, lowering insulin levels, between meals, extends lifespan, while increasing oxidative stress and lowering intracellular glutathione levels shortens lifespan.

Therefore it seems likely that human health and lifespan may be extended by improving the cleaning up of oxidized tissue, such as by raising cysteine levels in the blood while resting, hours after haven eaten, when insulin levels are also (should also be) low.

===========

The third of these articles (Part III, below) further reports that relatively small doses of N-acetyl cysteine (200 mg NAC, three times a day, for a total of 600 mg/day, for 8 weeks) reduced the insulin receptor activity (that suppresses cleaning up).

===

As a result of reading these three articles, which seem to fit well with the other results reported in this thread, I have just ordered CoQ10 + Alpha Lipoic Acid + Acetyl L-Carnitine HCl (Vitacost) (http://www.vitacost.com/vitacost-coq10-alpha-lipoic-acid-acetyl-l-carnitine-hcl-120-capsules-3), which I intend to take three times a day, on rising with my morning glass of mineral water, mid-day, and before going to bed. Each dose contains:

Acetyl L-Carnitine HCl -- 250 mg
Alpha-Lipoic Acid -- 250 mg
Coenzyme Q10 -- 200 mg


I'm also going to take Acetyl-Glutathione (Vitacost) (http://www.vitacost.com/nutricology-acetyl-glutathione-100-mg-60-tablets) for a month. It is the first convenient oral form of glutathione that I have found. When I had a health problem a few years ago, I took a few rounds of glutathione added to coffee enemas (inconvenient), and in homemade liposomes (of uncertain effectiveness). Most oral forms of glutathione are both (1) expensive and (2) useless, as the stomach acid destroys them. It's really the glutathione levels inside the cells that matter, not the levels in the blood or outside the cells (in the inter-cellular fluids), and there is risk that supplementing glutathione will suppress the body's own production of it, leaving one with excess glutathione where you don't need it, and even less glutathione where you do need it. But a short term regimen of glutathione can be (as best as I can tell) a useful boost at times.

On Dec 9, 2015, I quipped to some of the other moderators that I was "eating chocolate and sugar, on my new high carb diet". That diet was a failure. If I had wanted to explore the progression to pre-diabetic, then to diabetes 2, failing health and an earlier demise, then I suspect it would have done the job ... but I'd rather not travel down that path. Those mint chocolate honey patties from Heavenly Organics sure were yummy though <grin>.

===

Here are links to the three articles in this series (put your thinking cap on before tackling them):

Beyond the Mitochondrial Tune Up: Part I: Delaying the Mitochondrial Decay of Aging (http://www.lmreview.com/articles/view/beyond-the-mitochondrial-tune-up-part-I/)
Beyond the Mitochondrial Tune Up: Part II: The Methylation – Transsulfuration Connection to Mitochondria (http://www.lmreview.com/articles/view/beyond-the-mitochondrial-tune-up-part-II/)
Beyond the Mitochondrial Tune Up: Part III: Restoring Mitophagy – the Key To Mitochondrial Rejuvenation (http://www.lmreview.com/articles/view/beyond-the-mitochondrial-tune-up-part-III/[/url)

Napping
25th February 2016, 20:00
Fighting for the same cause Paul, just through different lenses. The difference is, I always consider your lens, whereas you threw mine out with the bath water years ago. Your heart's in the right place, but steering people from best practice was my only concern. Ultimately most people faced with potential life ending cancer wil do a little more than reducing their carb intake I would hope, even you. Carry on.....

Paul
26th February 2016, 01:08
Fighting for the same cause Paul, just through different lenses. The difference is, I always consider your lens, whereas you threw mine out with the bath water years ago. Your heart's in the right place, but steering people from best practice was my only concern. Ultimately most people faced with potential life ending cancer wil do a little more than reducing their carb intake I would hope, even you. Carry on.....
We disagree as to what constitutes best health care practice. We also disagree as to what constitutes best rhetorical practice in discussions by well intentioned people on a forum such as this. I could explain further what I mean by that second disagreement, but that would get us further off the topic of this thread, and I doubt it would be of any use for me to do so.

===

Back to the topic of cancer, one of the illnesses that we're less likely to get on a ketogenic diet, I enjoy listening to Dr John Bergman (owners-guide.com) talk on this and other health topics. He's got lots of clinical experience, a delightful sense of humor, and keen insights into how both our bodies, and our medical profession and their (no longer our) government, work.

Here are some of Bergman's talks on such topics. I added the length in minutes and seconds to my title for each one. Feel free to start with the shortest one to see if he tickles your interest. Be prepared to end up listening to several of his videos.



Cancer Revolution, Health Renaissance (49m02s):
NqUUlhdd1Vk

How to Heal from Cancer & Prevention (40m23s):
IjhbxT0T9Sk

Woman's Cancer Revolution, Health Renaissance (48m44s):
YYj4OoPpBi4


The first two videos above were previously posted on Avalon by OBwan here (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?76409-Help-for-prostate-cancer-needed&p=922185&highlight=NqUUlhdd1Vk#post922185).

===

This thread is fundamentally about ketogenic diets and the metabolic (not genetic) reasons that they work. The reason that ketogenic diets work, and the causes for the dominant chronic illnesses of our time, are both found more in our mitochondria (metabolism) than in our DNA (genetics).

A key application of this research and clinical work is in understanding, avoiding and treating the major chronic diseases of our time, such as cancer, heart disease, coronary disease, Alzheimer's, diabetes, autism, and so forth.

Dr John Bergman, the one in the above videos, is more of a clinician than a researcher. He is focused on getting his patients well, not on the theoretical underpinnings or on experiments on rats in a laboratory. So far as I have seen, he does not go into depth to explain the basis for his methods in the metabolism of mitochondria or other such scientific research.

The research and clinical work both lead me in the same direction here ... and as might be expected, different people are choosing to take leading roles in each such approach. The researcher endeavors to explain how and why it works as it does, and to suggest new approaches. The clinician endeavors to heal his patients, choosing whatever approaches he can obtain, based on what works best.

Personally, I approach this discussion more as a researcher, and my personal health more as a clinician ... a clinician with a clientele of one.

DeDukshyn
26th February 2016, 01:15
A note on fasting / detox ...

When fasting, drink 10-20 cups of clean fresh water per day. Food is usually about 90% water, once you break it all down into molecular components. Even a dry piece of bread is about 70% water. Thus one does not realize how much water one gets from their normal food diet. When fasting, you are cut off from this water source, and you really have to drink a lot more water, especially if during the process your body switches to aerobic energy, which assists in the fat burning process, that fat burning will release toxins that will require a very well hydrated system to remove effectively.

A high end multi, and maybe a little milk thistle, calcium d-glucarate, or SGS (sulphoraphane) supplementation to maximize detox effects will be very helpful, and reduce the stress on your liver. Also remember that detox really only happens at the cellular level, hence the supplements I recommended.

Napping
26th February 2016, 01:48
There's a big difference between stating your less likely to get cancer on a ketogenic diet and pushing such a diet as the Primary treatment of such, which is essentially what you and these clinicians and researchers are referring.

I don't agree with you Paul, im OK with it, you're struggling with it.

Paul
26th February 2016, 01:51
A note on fasting / detox ...

When fasting, drink 10-20 cups of clean fresh water per day.
Yes, good point.

When fasting, one not only needs to replace the water that had been hidden in one's food, but one should also consume even more water than that.

Just as you describe, fasting causes changes in one's body chemistry, such as releasing toxins and salts that had been buried in one's fat stores. This additional toxin and salt burden in one's blood and other fluids will require extra water to dilute and excrete.

So - yes - plenty of water (so I am told; I don't speak from experience yet.)

"Fresh clean" water is one of my specialties. Someday I should write a thread on the many, many steps that I take to turn my incoming, electrically dead, chlorinated, fluoridated, toxified, municipal water into pure, re-mineralized and energized delicious water.

I worry that relating it all would seem too much like bragging. But if I think of it more as offering up several suggestions, that others might find gets them to thinking about ways that they could improve their own water, then such a thread might make more sense.

Hym
26th February 2016, 02:37
Then let me put in a request, Paul, for that thread on making water fresh and clean. I would appreciate it, as would many others.

Paul
26th February 2016, 02:46
A high end multi, and maybe a little milk thistle, calcium d-glucarate, or SGS (sulphoraphane) supplementation to maximize detox effects will be very helpful, and reduce the stress on your liver. Also remember that detox really only happens at the cellular level, hence the supplements I recommended.
Very interesting ... glucarate or SGS are new to me.

The product AOR, Cellular Detox (http://www.cureself.com/AOR-Cellular-Detox.aspx") includes these, as well as the probiotic Bifidobacterium longum, for detox, which it explains by saying:



Bifidobacterium longum (BB-536)

This highly beneficial probiotic strain has been shown to help promote carcinogen detoxification and to help prevent certain types of cancers. Evidence has shown that this bacteria acts to enhance the immune system, suppress the growth of harmful bacteria that secrete toxic substances, bind and eliminate toxic substances and potential carcinogens and secrete anti-tumor compounds. Many probiotics have been shown to reduce beta- glucuronidase activity in the colon, thereby preventing the reactivation of dangerous compounds.
These, along with the good multi-vitamin (my current favorite - Life Extension Mix Powder (http://www.lifeextension.com/vitamins-supplements/item02056/life-extension-mix-powder)) and the milk thistle that you mention, and frequent coffee enemas (with a couple grams of glutathione powder added), should be worth considering.

Thanks!

DeDukshyn
26th February 2016, 03:22
A high end multi, and maybe a little milk thistle, calcium d-glucarate, or SGS (sulphoraphane) supplementation to maximize detox effects will be very helpful, and reduce the stress on your liver. Also remember that detox really only happens at the cellular level, hence the supplements I recommended.
Very interesting ... glucarate or SGS are new to me.

The product AOR, Cellular Detox (http://www.cureself.com/AOR-Cellular-Detox.aspx") includes these, as well as the probiotic Bifidobacterium longum, for detox, which it explains by saying:



Bifidobacterium longum (BB-536)

This highly beneficial probiotic strain has been shown to help promote carcinogen detoxification and to help prevent certain types of cancers. Evidence has shown that this bacteria acts to enhance the immune system, suppress the growth of harmful bacteria that secrete toxic substances, bind and eliminate toxic substances and potential carcinogens and secrete anti-tumor compounds. Many probiotics have been shown to reduce beta- glucuronidase activity in the colon, thereby preventing the reactivation of dangerous compounds.
These, along with the good multi-vitamin (my current favorite - Life Extension Mix Powder (http://www.lifeextension.com/vitamins-supplements/item02056/life-extension-mix-powder)) and the milk thistle that you mention, and frequent coffee enemas (with a couple grams of glutathione powder added), should be worth considering.

Thanks!

I actually just started not long ago on a bottle of Cellular Detox, along with AOR's Liver Support. I have some minor liver issues, (the doctor seemed to think my liver was slightly enlarged, but indicated nothing of concern on an enzyme test) - anyway, anecdotally on how I overall feel, I think these two products are doing their job. I seem to have better energy and somewhat improved mood since starting on these. Hard to tell though for many supplements, so I also try to really dig into the research as well, just to give me some confidence that if I am going to take a supplement, there's evidence it does what it is supposed to.

Paul
26th February 2016, 03:34
I actually just started not long ago on a bottle of Cellular Detox, along with AOR's Liver Support. I have some minor liver issues, (the doctor seemed to think my liver was slightly enlarged, but indicated nothing of concern on an enzyme test) - anyway, anecdotally on how I overall feel, I think these two products are doing their job. I seem to have better energy and somewhat improved mood since starting on these.
Of course, as you know I'm sure, there's always the Andreas Moritz Liver Flush (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?6528-Liver-detox-Liver-flush&p=56839&viewfull=1#post56839) :). Like quite a few members here, back when it was being actively discussed, I flushed my share of weird looking fatty globules out of my liver that way.

DeDukshyn
26th February 2016, 03:37
I actually just started not long ago on a bottle of Cellular Detox, along with AOR's Liver Support. I have some minor liver issues, (the doctor seemed to think my liver was slightly enlarged, but indicated nothing of concern on an enzyme test) - anyway, anecdotally on how I overall feel, I think these two products are doing their job. I seem to have better energy and somewhat improved mood since starting on these.
Of course, as you know I'm sure, there's always the Andreas Moritz Liver Flush (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?6528-Liver-detox-Liver-flush&p=56839&viewfull=1#post56839) :). Like quite a few members here, back when it was being actively discussed, I flushed my share of weird looking fatty globules out of my liver that way.

Liver flush has been on the back of my mind for some time ... it keeps getting brought to the forefront ... I should take heed the message, I assume. :) Thanks for the reminder and link.

TargeT
26th February 2016, 13:38
[
"Fresh clean" water is one of my specialties. Someday I should write a thread on the many, many steps that I take to turn my incoming, electrically dead, chlorinated, fluoridated, toxified, municipal water into pure, re-mineralized and energized delicious water.

I worry that relating it all would seem too much like bragging. But if I think of it more as offering up several suggestions, that others might find gets them to thinking about ways that they could improve their own water, then such a thread might make more sense.

I'll break the ice:

I only drink rain water (which varies from ~7/7.2 ph @ 2-4 PPM during the winter & 15-30 PPM during the summer (when the Sahara dusts migrate across the Atlantic)) I'm not sure on it's electrical properties, I do run it through a paper (wood pulp) filter for larger particles since it's stored in large tanks that are fed from my roof & can pick up sediment.

Going from that to bottled water is hard, it's almost as good as the well water I had in Alaska (that stuff was a solid 8/8.5 PH & a nice 120-130 PPM with great mineral content). I want to add a floating colloidal silver generator in both my cisterns (15,000 gal each) but I've got so many projects going right now... I need to finish whats on my plate first.

so, what's your healthy water approach?

Paul
28th February 2016, 04:15
Here's more on mitochondrial damage, this time as caused by glyphosate (as in Roundup), rather than a carb dominated diet, rather than a fat dominated ketogenic diet.

The list of ailments, most of our "modern" chronic diseases, caused by RoundUp are much the same as, and closely related to, the list of ailments caused by consuming more than a minimal amount of carbs and sugars, including autism, Alzheimers, chronic fatigue syndrome, cancers, fibromyalgia, Parkinson's, diabetes, metabolic syndromes, hypertension, high triglycerides, inflammation, heart diseases, autoimmune diseases, allergies, Lupus, asthma, depression, ...

Mitochondria not only produce the cell's energy fuel, ATP, but are also closely involved with both producing and utilizing insulin, and other critical functions.



Mitrochondrial Dysfuntion and GMOs
Jeffrey Smith interviews Dr. Alex Vasquez and Stephanie Seneff about the effects of glyphosate on human health.
MFX6vgVugew

The interview concludes with suggestions as to what people can do to heal their mitochondria:

A low carbohydrate diet, with a lot of fruits and veggies, such as paleo or paleo-Mediterranean diet.
Moderate exercise.
Nutrient intake adequate, such as with vitamin and mineral supplements, CoQ10, NAC, chlorella, ...
Sunlight exposure.
Organic good, GMO's bad.


Dr. Alex Vasquez's website is http://inflammationmastery.com/.

Dr. Stephanie Seneff's MIT page is http://people.csail.mit.edu/seneff/

RunningDeer
28th February 2016, 20:13
Jeffrey Smith interviews Dr. Alex Vasquez and Stephanie Seneff about the effects of glyphosate on human health.

Mitrochondrial Dysfuntion and GMOs
MFX6vgVugew
Great video. Thanks, Paul. Some additional notes and a sidetrack to another video by Dr. Stephanie Seneff from the link you provided:

- For insulin to be received, it needs proper functioning mitochondria. Insulin opens the doors to the cells so that the sugar can come in. Without that the doors are closed and the sugar causes problems. The blood sugar gets too high and we call that diabetes or insulin resistance which is a metabolic syndrome.

- The mitochondria makes sure the doors are unlocked. It insures that insulin is secreted and received appropriately.

- Those with type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome and hypertension have mitochondrial disfunction.

- What the mitochondria does is ATP is the battery, it’s how you get the energy into the cells. It’s also related to sugar metabolism through insulin door opening and door closing. The mitochondria also controls the inflammatory balance within the body. And cells death.

- What is inflammation? Metabolic disruption and tissue injury. It can exist in three forms: metabolic inflammation (hypertension, diabetes), allergic inflammation, autoimmune inflammation. The chronic (persistent, long-lasting) low-grade, low level inflammation is defined as metabolic disturbance with cellular injury.

- Metabolic inflammation is seen on a continuum. So the three different types of inflammation are overlapping. Other examples from mitochondrial disfunction are Paul’s list: autism, Alzheimers, chronic fatigue syndrome, cancers, fibromyalgia, Parkinson's, diabetes, metabolic syndromes, hypertension, high triglycerides, inflammation, heart diseases, autoimmune diseases, allergies, Lupus, asthma, depression.

Next is the mechanics of the mitochondria and how it related to the continuum of disease.

- What does Roundup, i.e. it’s active ingredient glyphosate do to mitochondrial function?

- Studies showed that roundup/glyphosate fed cows had high levels in the urine and low levels of manganese (see below for ‘manganese benefits’) in the blood. Glyphosate chelates manganese and all other minerals.

- Chelation is good in terms of how it gets rid of heavy metals. Chelation is molecules hugging each other at the molecular level and these chelators don’t let go. But in the case of glyphosate, it’s a molecule the hugs all these trace minerals and it doesn’t let go. Hence, it’s worthless because it’s not getting into the blood. Roundup depletes manganese in the crops.

- The ADP & ATP is the energy we use. We take in food and it becomes energy. It takes a very specific metabolic pathway. If it’s broken down there’s a problem with the production of the energy from glucose and insulin at the same time.

- Glyphosate also effects the membrane surrounding the mitochondria and that also interferes with ATP production.

- There’s a lot of public debate about Roundup and glyphosate because they haven’t checked the data. When the data is so consistent the question is “Why is there a question about this?”. There’s no controversy in the research. It’s very clear, very consistent.

@ 30:00 (https://youtu.be/MFX6vgVugew?t=30m6s) - List of disease and disorders possibly related to mitochondrial dysfunction caused by Roundup and glyphosate:

(from Paul’s post) The list of ailments, most of our "modern" chronic diseases, caused by RoundUp are much the same as, and closely related to, the list of ailments caused by consuming more than a minimal amount of carbs and sugars, including autism, Alzheimers, chronic fatigue syndrome, cancers, fibromyalgia, Parkinson's, diabetes, metabolic syndromes, hypertension, high triglycerides, inflammation, heart diseases, autoimmune diseases, allergies, Lupus, asthma, depression,

- Important to understand also is it’s not only Roundup or glyphosate that’s poisoning our mitochondria. Research consistently points to what’s termed as ‘persistent organic pollutants’. The global population is polluted with multiple chemicals such as solvents, pesticides, herbicides, flame retardants, other industrial chemicals, rocket propellants, mercury, etc.

@ 33:00 (https://youtu.be/MFX6vgVugew?t=30m20s) - How glyphosate can be synergistic with these other toxins?

Action steps we can take to avoid mitochondrial dysfunction @ 41:39 (https://youtu.be/MFX6vgVugew?t=41m39s).

- Living clean in general, i.e. avoid through environment or food intake.

How to avoid exposure to Roundup

Don’t use the products around the home. Eat organic. Recent study showed that after one week of an organic diet, people’s pesticide levels dropped by 90%.
With proper nutrition promote/support those detoxification pathways.
To avoid nutritional deficiencies take a multivitamin.
Exercise.
Avoid the new sources of glyphosate exposure because of the new environmental protection agency’s decision(s) which means we are exposed to more than Roundup crops, soy, corn, cotton, canola, sugar beets, and alpha. All of those are sprayed with Roundup and the sugar beet pulp is fed to animals. In addition to the genetically engineered crops mentioned there’s also exposure to spraying other crops. Where the strategy is to spray Roundup a few days before harvest. And these are crops that are not Roundup ready. So they die when they are exposed to Roundup. Why? It causes the plant to immediately go to seed as an acute reaction to the toxic exposure and that synchronizes production and increases yield. Hence, a much lower residual to clear up for next season and a head start on next year’s crop and weeds. There’s a direct correlation of wheat spraying and an increase to Celiac disease, which is a wheat glutton intolerance. Also with barley and sugar beets and possibly with other types of crops. They are not Roundup ready, the intention is to kills the plant. They’re not even measuring how much glyphosate is going into the seed.


@ 46:34 (https://youtu.be/MFX6vgVugew?t=46m34s) - General recommendations for improved mitochondrial function (from Paul’s post):

Plant based diet. It’s doesn’t have to be a 100% vegetarian diet. Make sure you get a lot of fruits and vegetables in it and adequate protein.
Low carbohydrate diet.
Too much sugar impairs the mitochondrial function, so low carbohydrate diet, i.e. paleo-Mediterranean diet.
Low grade to moderate exercise. Benefits are aerobic and detox through sweating.
Nutrient intake adequate, such as with vitamin and mineral supplements, CoQ10, NAC, chlorella, ...
Sunlight exposure.



* Additional reinforce/review notes.

Manganese benefits include:

healthy bone structure, bone metabolism, assist in creating essential enzymes for building bones
important for the normal functioning of the brain and proper activity of our nervous system throughout the body
formation of connective tissues, absorption of calcium, proper functioning of the thyroid gland and sex hormones, regulation of blood sugar level, and metabolism of fats and carbohydrates

[manganese link (https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/minerals/health-benefits-of-manganese.html)]

What are mitochondria?

Mitochondria are tiny compartments found within cells. They perform lots of different and important functions to keep us healthy.
The most crucial role that mitochondria perform is to convert energy locked in food into energy that the cell can use. In that respect they act like miniature batteries providing power to the cell when required. In fact, the main reason we breathe oxygen is so that this process of energy conversion can take place in mitochondria!

What do mitochondria do?

They make energy. Mitochondria are often referred to as the powerhouses of the cells. They generate the energy that our cells need to do their jobs.

[article (http://www.newcastle-mitochondria.com/public-patient/what-is-mitochondria/)]


*****************

The New Food Order: How Glyphosate,
Herbicides & GMO’s Are Shaping Our Future


Two quick points from the end:

- They also spray glyphosate right before the harvest. Worst than GMOs is glyphosate. It’s doing even more harm. There is no laws that mandate that glyphosate be labeled.

- Dr. Stephanie Seneff says forget about GMOs and go straight to glyphosate because it’s a much more serious problem. Just the GMO labeling is not enough. It has to say organic. Glyphosate does more harm than Roundup. Glyphosate is the poison within it. The glyphosate is much clearer. Because it is a poison and you know exactly what it’s disrupting physiologically and you can predict what it’s going to cause and it matches everything that’s happening.


ELj0ebuqdgk

Published on Nov 13, 2014

Guest: Dr. Stephanie Seneff, Ph.D., Senior Research Scientist at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. Dr. Seneff Holds Multiple Degrees from MIT including: B.S. in Biophysics, M.S. and E.E. in Electrical Engineering, Ph.D in Electrical Engineering & Computer Science. Her Approach Includes Analysis and Synthesis of Data from the Research Literature & Web-Based Epidemiological Data


Pigs’ Stomach on GMO Roundup Corn and Soy Diet
http://i1262.photobucket.com/albums/ii610/WhiteCrowBlackDeer/pigs-GMO-Roundup-corn-and-soy-diet_zpsyz2ltwbf.jpg

Paul
28th February 2016, 21:03
Great video. Thanks, Paul. Some additional notes and a sidetrack to another video by Dr. Stephanie Seneff from the link you provided:
Very informative post. Thanks, RunningDeer.

Here's a video interview of one person's experience changing to a ketogenic diet that I just enjoyed listening to.

Peter Attia (website: EatingAcademy.com (http://eatingacademy.com/)) is a medical doctor who is also a high performance endurance athlete, who is very articulate about his change to a ketogenic diet.

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Towards the end of the interview, he notes that those who seem to benefit more from a ketogenic diet are endurance athletes (as I was in my youth), and those looking for optimum mental acuity throughout the day (as I wish I had now.) On the other hand, those doing short, high intensity events such as sprints or weight lifting seem not to benefit as much.

I feel like I've lost much of the last 20 years of potential mental productivity to feeling groggy in the afternoon ... I want that mental alertness back. When I was in high school, being on a low carb diet (too poor to afford most store bought carbs) and running hours a day (such as doing a manual labor job all day, and then going for some serious exercise for a couple of hours), my mind was non-stop clear. With the improved income and conversion to a more typical American diet, I got dumber, and had fewer hours of productivity. Enough caffeine and adrenaline pushed past that for a few years, but that's a self-limiting approach.

Anyway, do listen to Peter Attia, above ... he's far more engaging and informed in this than I am (and likely better eye candy for the ladies as well.)

The book that Peter refers to near the end of the interview is The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living: An Expert Guide to Making the Life-Saving Benefits of Carbohydrate Restriction Sustainable and Enjoyable, by Jeff Volek and Stephen Phinney (http://smile.amazon.com/dp/B005CVV2AE)

Alan
28th February 2016, 21:18
"Fresh clean" water is one of my specialties. Someday I should write a thread on the many, many steps that I take to turn my incoming, electrically dead, chlorinated, fluoridated, toxified, municipal water into pure, re-mineralized and energized delicious water.

I for one would be very interested in hearing more about this. I currently filter tap water with a Berkey filter + fluoride filter.

Hervé
28th February 2016, 22:56
On fasts and diets, if one can get one's hands on it, here is one very interesting study from the beginning of last century when Rockefeller's AMA wasn't yet fully consolidated:

"Health via Food" by William H. Hay (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Howard_Hay).

PDF of "Health via Food" here: http://soilandhealth.org/wp-content/uploads/02/0201hyglibcat/020165.hay.pdf

TargeT
7th March 2016, 16:56
Organic good, GMO's bad.



I think this is debatable, honestly I think it's too new to say "bad" just yet.

MknnRPk8eRE

Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) are often demonized - but what does the latest science say about their safety and benefit to society? John Entine from the Genetic Literacy Project joins Stefan Molyneux to discuss the propaganda about GMOs and whether the fear around genetic engineering is warranted.

Jon Entine is founder of Genetic Literacy Project and author of seven books, including Taboo: Why Black Athletes Dominate Sports and Why We are Afraid to Talk About It. Get the book here: http://www.fdrurl.com/taboo-book

Crop Chemophobia: Will Precaution Kill the Green Revolution
http://www.fdrurl.com/crop-chemophobia

For more from Jon Entine please check out: http://www.jonentine.com and http://www.geneticliteracyproject.org

Paul
8th March 2016, 01:52
Organic good, GMO's bad.



I think this is debatable, honestly I think it's too new to say "bad" just yet.
In general, yes, Genetic Modification could be used for good or bad.

Presently however, it seems to be mostly used to improve resistance to herbicides such as Monsanto's glyphosate.

TargeT
9th March 2016, 14:36
Pretty good overview on the topic:



Fasting Diets Are Gaining Acceptance
Mark Mattson, a neuroscientist at the National Institute on Aging in Maryland, has not had breakfast in 35 years. Most days he practices a form of fasting — skipping lunch, taking a midafternoon run, and then eating all of his daily calories (about 2,000) in a six-hour window starting in the afternoon.

“Once you get used to it, it’s not a big deal,” said Dr. Mattson, chief of the institute’s laboratory of neurosciences. “I’m not hungry at all in the morning, and this is other people’s experience as well. It’s just a matter of getting adapted to it.”

In a culture in which it’s customary to eat three large meals a day while snacking from morning to midnight, the idea of regularly skipping meals may sound extreme. But in recent years intermittent fasting has been gaining popular attention and scientific endorsement.
http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/03/07/intermittent-fasting-diets-are-gaining-acceptance/

Paul
17th March 2016, 11:08
Another good article on the benefits of high fat diets, especially saturated fats, with a balance of Omega 3 and 6 oils, especially avoiding industrially processed the excess of processed Omega 6 oils in a conventional "modern" diet: Could Eating Saturated Fats Save 1 Million Lives per Year? (Dr. Mercola) (http://healthimpactnews.com/2016/could-eating-saturated-fats-save-1-million-lives-per-year/)

RunningDeer
17th March 2016, 13:56
I finished this book, “Low Carb, High Fat Food Revolution: Advice and Recipes to Improve Your Health and Reduce Your Weight (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1629145459?keywords=Low%20Carb%20High%20Fat&qid=1458221216&ref_=sr_1_3&sr=8-3),” by Andreas Eenfeldt. You can get most of the information from Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt’s 39 minute presentation, “The Food Revolution (http://www.dietdoctor.com/the-food-revolution-2016)”. It’s a short video with convincing data and graphics. I’m experimenting which includes ridding a long held belief system.


The Food Revolution 2016
l55OjWS9pEc

Published on Mar 11, 2016

It starts with a truck driver getting arrested for smuggling... butter. Why?

Perhaps it has something to do with why the whole world started getting obese and diabetic in 1984. And why these epidemics keep getting worse all the time, with new records broken every year.

Could people get lose weight and reverse diabetes type 2 by ignoring the dietary guidelines and doing the opposite instead? Eating delicious foods?

In this 2016 talk Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt talks about how to empower people everywhere to revolutionize their health – before it's too late.

Learn more:
http://www.dietdoctor.com

Paul
17th March 2016, 16:19
I finished this book, “Low Carb, High Fat Food Revolution: Advice and Recipes to Improve Your Health and Reduce Your Weight (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1629145459?keywords=Low%20Carb%20High%20Fat&qid=1458221216&ref_=sr_1_3&sr=8-3),” by Andreas Eenfeldt. You can get most of the information from Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt’s 39 minute presentation, “The Food Revolution (http://www.dietdoctor.com/the-food-revolution-2016)”. It’s a short video with convincing data and graphics. I’m experimenting which includes ridding a long held belief system.
He's good - thanks!

seah
19th March 2016, 03:11
A high end multi, and maybe a little milk thistle, calcium d-glucarate, or SGS (sulphoraphane) supplementation to maximize detox effects will be very helpful, and reduce the stress on your liver. Also remember that detox really only happens at the cellular level, hence the supplements I recommended.
Very interesting ... glucarate or SGS are new to me.

The product AOR, Cellular Detox (http://www.cureself.com/AOR-Cellular-Detox.aspx") includes these, as well as the probiotic Bifidobacterium longum, for detox, which it explains by saying:



Bifidobacterium longum (BB-536)

This highly beneficial probiotic strain has been shown to help promote carcinogen detoxification and to help prevent certain types of cancers. Evidence has shown that this bacteria acts to enhance the immune system, suppress the growth of harmful bacteria that secrete toxic substances, bind and eliminate toxic substances and potential carcinogens and secrete anti-tumor compounds. Many probiotics have been shown to reduce beta- glucuronidase activity in the colon, thereby preventing the reactivation of dangerous compounds.
These, along with the good multi-vitamin (my current favorite - Life Extension Mix Powder (http://www.lifeextension.com/vitamins-supplements/item02056/life-extension-mix-powder)) and the milk thistle that you mention, and frequent coffee enemas (with a couple grams of glutathione powder added), should be worth considering.

Thanks!

I wonder what your opinion is on the information that as we age, our stomach's ability to break down and absorb supplements becomes an issue, unless the supplement is in liquid form.
I have found this to be true for me with some vitamins, such as D and some B's, the problem is that many don't come in that format...what then?

Paul
19th March 2016, 07:32
I wonder what your opinion is on the information that as we age, our stomach's ability to break down and absorb supplements becomes an issue, unless the supplement is in liquid form.
I have found this to be true for me with some vitamins, such as D and some B's, the problem is that many don't come in that format...what then?
Some people may have more trouble than others digesting supplements, and some forms of supplements may be more difficult to digest.

I would expect (and personally experience) that some people well into the second half of their life can easily digest some supplements, in a variety of physical formats - tablets, capsules and liquid.

Your mileage may vary, and eventually we each have to figure out for ourselves which supplement forms work for us.

Just as important, perhaps more important, than the physical format is the choice of molecular compounds. Most interesting isolated supplements come in the form of molecules, bound to something else. For example, magnesium might come in the form of magnesium bicarbonate, magnesium chloride, magnesium carbonate, magnesium oxide, magnesium amino acid chelate, magnesium malate, magnesium taurinate, magnesium citrate, magnesium sulphate, magnesium hydroxide, magnesium phosphate, magnesium lactate, magnesium malate, magnesium orotate, ... and likely a few others I didn't list. Some forms are liquid only, some are almost useless to anyone as they do not dissolve, some make for larger pills, some are more expensive, ... there are various tradeoffs.

Going liquid only, while it may be necessary for some, also costs more and substantially limits the variety of supplements available. It's a tradeoff we each have to make, and simply looking at one's age is not going to determine what's right for anyone of us.

Demeisen
4th April 2016, 08:33
I have to say I’m a bit skeptic about the low carb/high fat diet. I wish to specifically comment on the diet versus blood sugar phenomena based on what I currently know (which may or may not be much).

As I understand it, the problem with many studies is that they are generally too short to make final conclusions.

I just read about one research that compared normal diabetic diet (low fat) versus low carb high fat diet. The study was exceptionally 2 years, instead of usual 6 months or something. At the 6 months mark there was a clear improvement in blood sugar levels for those with low carb diet. But after that the results started to decline. At the end of the study the low carb diet was not undeniably better than low fat diet. And this is pretty much the argument I have heard from other sources too: You may get initial improvement, but within longer period the situation declines again.

Some time ago I watched a program about two physiologically identical twin brothers comparing low carb high fat diet with high carb high sugar diet. I’m sorry I don’t know the name of the program, but it was British. Perhaps some here have seen it. Unexpectedly the brother with low carb high fat diet started to show increased insulin resistance, while the other brother with high carb high sugar did not. Also the one with low carb suffered tiredness and low physical performance. There was also noted a loss of muscle tissue which was the actual reason for weight loss. The conclusion was that avoiding carbs actually declined the body's ability to handle them. However, it was also mentioned that it was just one specific case of study and should not be considered as definitive conclusion.

My personal experience with low carb diet couple of years back was not successful either. After 3 weeks I became so ill that I simply couldn’t go on with it any longer. I believe it was that my body went to ketosis (which is apparently the goal for low carb diet), but for me it just caused suffering, which I couldn’t handle on top of my other issues. So, to summarize all this, in my opinion the low carb diet is not a perfect fit for everybody. As it it with everything that has anything to do with human diet: for every promising study, there is one that counters it. There does not seem to be conclusive truth, which is a real bummer.

TargeT
4th April 2016, 13:18
Some time ago I watched a program about two physiologically identical twin brothers comparing low carb high fat diet with high carb high sugar diet. I’m sorry I don’t know the name of the program, but it was British. Perhaps some here have seen it. Unexpectedly the brother with low carb high fat diet started to show increased insulin resistance, while the other brother with high carb high sugar did not. Also the one with low carb suffered tiredness and low physical performance. There was also noted a loss of muscle tissue which was the actual reason for weight loss. The conclusion was that avoiding carbs actually declined the body's ability to handle them. However, it was also mentioned that it was just one specific case of study and should not be considered as definitive conclusion.


That sounds pretty much like exactly the opposite of the experiences I've read of and had myself.

The theory here is that constant bombardment by high levels of glucose cause cells to become insulin resistant (diabetes) which causes obesity, heart disease etc etc etc... basically too much sugar is bad, too much sugar through out your entire life can very well kill you.

here's a good 15 min ted talk on the topic:
UMhLBPPtlrY

RunningDeer
4th April 2016, 14:03
Some time ago I watched a program about two physiologically identical twin brothers comparing low carb high fat diet with high carb high sugar diet. I’m sorry I don’t know the name of the program, but it was British. Perhaps some here have seen it. Unexpectedly the brother with low carb high fat diet started to show increased insulin resistance, while the other brother with high carb high sugar did not. Also the one with low carb suffered tiredness and low physical performance. There was also noted a loss of muscle tissue which was the actual reason for weight loss. The conclusion was that avoiding carbs actually declined the body's ability to handle them. However, it was also mentioned that it was just one specific case of study and should not be considered as definitive conclusion.


That sounds pretty much like exactly the opposite of the experiences I've read of and had myself.

The theory here is that constant bombardment by high levels of glucose cause cells to become insulin resistant (diabetes) which causes obesity, heart disease etc etc etc... basically too much sugar is bad, too much sugar through out your entire life can very well kill you.

here's a good 15 min ted talk on the topic:

UMhLBPPtlrY

Powerful video on several levels. Here’s the summary in case folks want to check out more from Peter Attia.

"Peter Attia: What if we're wrong about diabetes?"

Published on Jun 25, 2013

As a young ER doctor, Peter Attia felt contempt for a patient with diabetes. She was overweight, he thought, and thus responsible for the fact that she needed a foot amputation. But years later, Attia received an unpleasant medical surprise that led him to wonder: is our understanding of diabetes right? Could the precursors to diabetes cause obesity, and not the other way around? A look at how assumptions may be leading us to wage the wrong medical war.

Paul
6th April 2016, 06:44
My personal experience with low carb diet couple of years back was not successful either. After 3 weeks I became so ill that I simply couldn’t go on with it any longer. I believe it was that my body went to ketosis (which is apparently the goal for low carb diet), but for me it just caused suffering, which I couldn’t handle on top of my other issues. So, to summarize all this, in my opinion the low carb diet is not a perfect fit for everybody. As it it with everything that has anything to do with human diet: for every promising study, there is one that counters it. There does not seem to be conclusive truth, which is a real bummer.

Yes - ketosis is the goal, in some cases.

I would distinguish between high fat diets that don't put one in ketosis, versus one's that do. Typically some sort of monitoring, at least lower cost urine ketone strips for the first month, or more accurately and expensively Abbott Labs Precision Xtra blood ketone strips (about $5/test), are quite useful.

Research trials of high fat, low carb diets that don't indicate whether or not the subjects went into ketosis are missing a key detail, and so difficult to draw conclusions from.

The goal of going into ketosis is to stop using glucose (from sugars and carbohydrates) as one's primary fuel. Burning ketones in the body, where that's doable (most muscle and much brain energy can be gotten that way) is cleaner than burning glucose. In my present view, the oxidative byproducts thrown off by burning glucose (the typical energy source for almost anyone on a "Western" diet) are a major source of the stress and damage to our body that results in various chronic illnesses, depending on what one's weak link(s) are.

It's like switching one's car from burning petro to electric ... it's cleaner.

Yes, one can get sick, especially in the first month, of going into ketosis. Such a major change in diet can result in too much or too little of something that one's body needs, or can cause too much of a detox reaction as toxins buried in one's fat stores are released into the blood stream when that fat is burned. I'm sure that ketosis is the wrong answer for some people.

Ketosis is sure working for me however :).

It's more expensive ... good fats are not as cheap as all the junk food in the major grocery stores or fast food restaurants. If hard times come, I'll have to fall back to rice and beans or some such, and go off ketosis. But while I can, I intend to remain in ketosis. My ability to do prolonged mental work, with focused, productive, attention for hours on end, is better than it has been in perhaps 20 years, and other signs of good health are showing up as well. Weight is becoming more ideal, blood glucose is nice and low, and blood pressure is down to approx 115/68. I took a full blood panel before I started, and expect to take another in a few months, when I hope to see nicely lowered levels for Hemoglobin A1C, Homocysteine, and C-Reactive Protein (CRP), all of which correlate with reduced oxidative or glycogenic stress on tissues.

TargeT
6th April 2016, 13:46
Ketosis is sure working for me however :).

It's more expensive ... good fats are not as cheap as all the junk food in the major grocery stores or fast food restaurants.

Mix in regular periodic fasting (who came up with this 3 meals a day crap anyway? or that breakfast is the most important meal of the day... ) and it balances it out quite nicely. Caloric restriction is a great companion to L.C.H.F. when seeking Ketosis (this forces your body to "burn off" the easy fast sugars.. glucose and the like).

don't forget to put a half stick of (unsalted -grass fed) butter in your cup of coffee with a touch of stevia and mix well (creamy deliciousness will follow).

Olam
6th April 2016, 14:16
My personal experience with low carb diet couple of years back was not successful either. After 3 weeks I became so ill that I simply couldn’t go on with it any longer. I believe it was that my body went to ketosis (which is apparently the goal for low carb diet), but for me it just caused suffering, which I couldn’t handle on top of my other issues. So, to summarize all this, in my opinion the low carb diet is not a perfect fit for everybody. As it it with everything that has anything to do with human diet: for every promising study, there is one that counters it. There does not seem to be conclusive truth, which is a real bummer.

Yes - ketosis is the goal, in some cases.

I would distinguish between high fat diets that don't put one in ketosis, versus one's that do. Typically some sort of monitoring, at least lower cost urine ketone strips for the first month, or more accurately and expensively Abbott Labs Precision Xtra blood ketone strips (about $5/test), are quite useful.

Research trials of high fat, low carb diets that don't indicate whether or not the subjects went into ketosis are missing a key detail, and so difficult to draw conclusions from.

The goal of going into ketosis is to stop using glucose (from sugars and carbohydrates) as one's primary fuel. Burning ketones in the body, where that's doable (most muscle and much brain energy can be gotten that way) is cleaner than burning glucose. In my present view, the oxidative byproducts thrown off by burning glucose (the typical energy source for almost anyone on a "Western" diet) are a major source of the stress and damage to our body that results in various chronic illnesses, depending on what one's weak link(s) are.

It's like switching one's car from burning petro to electric ... it's cleaner.

Yes, one can get sick, especially in the first month, of going into ketosis. Such a major change in diet can result in too much or too little of something that one's body needs, or can cause too much of a detox reaction as toxins buried in one's fat stores are released into the blood stream when that fat is burned. I'm sure that ketosis is the wrong answer for some people.

Ketosis is sure working for me however :).

It's more expensive ... good fats are not as cheap as all the junk food in the major grocery stores or fast food restaurants. If hard times come, I'll have to fall back to rice and beans or some such, and go off ketosis. But while I can, I intend to remain in ketosis. My ability to do prolonged mental work, with focused, productive, attention for hours on end, is better than it has been in perhaps 20 years, and other signs of good health are showing up as well. Weight is becoming more ideal, blood glucose is nice and low, and blood pressure is down to approx 115/68. I took a full blood panel before I started, and expect to take another in a few months, when I hope to see nicely lowered levels for Hemoglobin A1C, Homocysteine, and C-Reactive Protein (CRP), all of which correlate with reduced oxidative or glycogenic stress on tissues.

This is good info, one detail though , I would mention that ketone urine strips are not a very good way to monitor since your body eliminates unused ketones via the urine.
If your body eliminates the ketones its because your are not really in ketosis. It eliminates because it has glucose it can use..
Just like monitoring your acid levels with urine strips is not good either as the body eliminates acidity thru the urine.
So if you have alkaline urine, then it means you are mainly acid as the body did not eliminate the acidity!

A blood glucose/ketone meter is the best way to go.
You want your glucose to be below 4.5 mmol/l and your ketones to be at least 1.5 mmol/l.
Thats in a fasted state. Its normal for glucose levels to creep up after a meal, but it should not be very high and you should go back to the mentioned levels after mabe 2-3 hours after the meal.
Then the next indication after that to see if you are really keto adapted is to see if at those levels you have energy all day and are not crashing out after a meal.

Personally, I have just reached this keto adapted level after 2 months of working on it.
I now sleep better and lost 4 pounds in a month eating fat..!!

cheers

TargeT
6th April 2016, 19:46
Certainly these two aren't related.......



Number of adults with diabetes has quadrupled since 1980: WHO
ENEVA (AFP) -
http://scd.france24.com/en/files/imagecache/aef_ct_wire_image_620/images/afp/658932e419f3673de6361c666ca584da776a81c1.jpg
The number of adults estimated to be living with diabetes surged to 422 million by 2014, a nearly four-fold increase on 1980 figures, the World Health Organization (WHO) said Wednesday, in its first-ever global report on the disease.

"Globally, an estimated 422 million adults were living with diabetes in 2014, compared to 108 million in 1980," the UN health agency said, warning that the condition had spread because of worldwide changes "in the way people eat, move and live."
http://www.france24.com/en/20160406-number-adults-with-diabetes-has-quadrupled-1980-who

Hmm.....


High fructose corn syrup
After being classified as "generally recognized as safe" (GRAS) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 1976,[24] HFCS began to replace sucrose as the main sweetener of soft drinks in the United States. At the same time, rates of obesity rose.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_fructose_corn_syrup

Demeisen
8th April 2016, 11:21
Thanks for good comments. How would you see low carb diet suit for a person who is little on the under-weighted side? Limiting carbs intake certainly makes you lose weight, but what if that's not desirable? The problem for me is the constant hunger which no other snacks seem to alleviate but bread. Being hungry and under-weighted is not a good combination, I think.

TargeT
8th April 2016, 12:57
Limiting carbs intake certainly makes you lose weight, but what if that's not desirable? The problem for me is the constant hunger which no other snacks seem to alleviate but bread. Being hungry and under-weighted is not a good combination, I think.

At least switch to a whole food carb , potatoes, yams, yukka root, plantains, bread fruit etc... (btw they all taste like variants of each other... haha) but honestly increasing your protein intake should help satisfy as well once you've weaned your self off sugars err.. "carbs". your body is likely only satisfied with bread because it knows it's easy sugar and your running like a humming bird right now (did you know they often add HFCS to bread?).

This is all a guess based on FAR too little info, so grain of salt and all that....

Sounds like you have a high metabolism and maybe are insulin resistant; so you don't have to worry about carbs since the insulin mechanism isn't an issue for you and you are probably metabolically overly active instead of under like those of us who look into LCHF.

The common thought on weight is, for the ‘average’ person, you need around 3500 calories to gain a pound. That’s 3500 calories over and above your maintenance weight!(which will be a higher caloric need to begin with due to your metabolism) Likewise, for every 3500 calories of deficit your body has, you will potentially lose a pound of fat reserves.

One of the simplest ways to intentionally increase your caloric intake is to add a mass gainer to your daily routine (find them at GNC, walmart etc...).

Anywhere you can, try to put some extra calories in your food, particularly foods you already eat and enjoy, the key here you'll notice I$ eating a lot... haha.

• If you’re eating pasta, for example, put an extra two tablespoons of a healthy oil (say olive) in your pasta sauce. You probably won’t notice the difference.

• If you eat cereal for breakfast, try adding a sliced up banana and a spoon full of peanut butter to your routine.

• Drink a glass of milk with your meals, rather than a glass of water.

• If you eat a salad, make sure there’s some dressing on it, or maybe something tasty like goat cheese.


eat two or three large meals a day (L A R G E ) and don't eat in between, this can help put a damper on your metabolism (Sumo wrestlers only eat 2 large meals a day).

But really, experiment & keep a food log... it will help you fine tune your diet to your body.

TargeT
8th April 2016, 14:17
From the coconut oil thread (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?89916-The-Miracle-of-Coconut-Oil)... Looks like a Ketone based diet can prevent or even cure Alzheimer's?:


A few studies about the potential use of medium chain triglycerides or ketone bodies to not only treat but prevent Alzheimer’s disease caught Dr. Newport’s eye. Medium chain triglycerides are also regarded as a potential treatment for Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, multiple sclerosis, drug resistant epilepsy, and diabetes. Dr. Newport explains, “Ketone bodies may help the brain recover after a loss of oxygen in newborns through adults, may help the heart recover after an acute attack, and may shrink cancerous tumors. Children with drug resistant epilepsy sometimes respond to an extremely low carbohydrate ketogenic diet.”

The body’s cells may be able to use ketone bodies as an alternative fuel when glucose is unavailable. Ketone bodies do not normally circulate in the body unless it has been starving for a few days, or if one is on a very low-carb diet, such as Atkins. Dr. Newport explains, “In Alzheimer’s disease, the neurons in certain areas of the brain are unable to take in glucose due to insulin resistance, and slowly die off… if these cells had access to ketone bodies, they could potentially stay alive and continue to function.”
http://www.davidwolfe.com/2-tbs-coconut-oil-60-days-brain/

Olam
8th April 2016, 14:42
Thanks for good comments. How would you see low carb diet suit for a person who is little on the under-weighted side? Limiting carbs intake certainly makes you lose weight, but what if that's not desirable? The problem for me is the constant hunger which no other snacks seem to alleviate but bread. Being hungry and under-weighted is not a good combination, I think.

Loosing weight on Keto is not guaranteed. In fact some people gain weight..
Everybody has a different metabolic system and so its up to you to adjust the fat intake to suit your needs.
For me for example, I have weight to loose, and so I eat fat, to a point, but to create a deficit of what I really need, forcing my body to use my fat as energy.
Once I get to a desired weight, I will adjust my fat intake, will take a bit more and this way I will be even with what I take and what my body needs.
There are tons of websites that help you calculate your macros, how much to take in protein and fat to fit your needs.

Frenchy
17th April 2016, 21:18
From Target = I only drink rain water I do run it through a paper (wood pulp) filter for larger particles since it's stored in large tanks that are fed from my roof & can pick up sediment. end Quote
( Hah Hah, Who's forgetting about those planes overhead ! )

Like your Avatar, but need new glasses ! btw listened to two Dutch guys promoting benefits of Mono-Atomic Gold....... My instinctiveness told me they were used car salesmen , retired from the Security Services ( pls don't say cia, they get blamed for enough !) [There ar others, ask Mr Icke 1]

As a potential aly, Targ, condisder the ' Antenna ' effcet of extra-Radio-phonic components in our bodies...... remember ' The Time Machine - bbc JulesVerne ? ) Buggering Boys & Children , as it's known in the UK !

Frenchy
17th April 2016, 21:22
Hi, Constant Hunger might suggest , you've un-invited guest ?

Frenchy
17th April 2016, 21:33
Hello Alan,
s eeing that tptb have so much control, would it be un-reasonable to presume that they have provided the Water filter industry , with Smart - Dust Technology, thereby fore-stalling , any ' Clean thinking Technologies of ours ?... such that the Filters we Trust, already have the Morgellons or other Body-Antenna creating tech within ? ( They ARE millions of years ahead of us... )

TargeT
22nd April 2016, 16:11
Great sources for info:
https://www.reddit.com/r/keto

https://www.reddit.com/r/ketogains

I mean... L O T S of info...

bettye198
24th April 2016, 19:02
I have read all these posts and do have a comment. Our practice is mostly nutrition based with customized energetic and muscle testing. There is no guessing and it is a scientific preciseness that never lies. Not kinesiology. More advanced. That said, webinars from Doctors all over the globe are tapped into every week and studies are shown that have results. Understand this is out of the medical modality box but with full knowledge of how the biologic and neurobiology works.
The mitochondria was mentioned here and yes, it is the fuel of the cell ( it has its own DNA received from mother by the way) but what good is the mitochondria if the cell membrane is a hot mess? There are over 650 hormones that run the body and if disrupted at the cell wall, nothing gets thru and nothing gets out. This is the first red flag. Chronic illness.
Our goal is to nourish the cells, not starve them. All the fasting and ketoacidosis is like a child playing with a lit match. We think we get results but at what internal cost? Our body except for the stomach, needs alkaline foods. Almonds, vegies and fruits that appear acid but create an alkaline ash in the system. Cancer cannot exist in the presence of high potassium. Meaning more greens! Cancer needs fresh fruit because the fiber, pulp and meat of the fruit is anti cancer and anti viral. Meat should be sparingly consumed as it makes all the organs work harder, especially the kidney and without that function in 24 hrs we are all dead.
I am being simplistic but I understand the complexity of the workings of the human body. Gut is the second brain. Brain and heart accept disruptions elsewhere more than you know. If the kidneys are struggling you will have back up and brain fog. If the liver is in a toxic state, the heart can struggle.
I think the whole idea of detox and flushing the system is to take the first step judiciously. If your system is impaired all approaches must be cautious, not tactical. The reason why so many people who try this and get sick over it is reason enough. We don't need to feel awful. And healing crisis's can be managed at a low level.
We listen to the body's instructions of what it can handle through testing.
We need the antioxidants to prepare to rebuild the cell membrane coupled with clean eating. Then we can proceed with detox. Fasting will put the body into starvation. What can possibly nourish the cells during that time? Glucose in moderation with fresh fruit is needed for cellular exchange. Not fruit juices or soda pop or sugary foods.
A kind reminder would be in the book Medical Medium by Anthony William. He only accents what we already know with our patients.

Paul
24th April 2016, 20:48
I am now about 2 months into a ketogenic diet - it's working very well. Basic signs of body health, such as blood pressure and weight are much better. Hours of mental alertness and productivity each day are way up. It's my diet and I'm sticking to it. I anticipate that I've added many years of good health to my life.

P.S. -- weight just went below 200 pounds, for the first time in perhaps 35 years :).

TargeT
24th April 2016, 22:17
P.S. -- weight just went below 200 pounds, for the first time in perhaps 35 years :).

I just got down to 205,, looking to break the 200 barrier myself :)

Oh, and I don't exercise AT ALL ( knee hurts too much still). I've lost weight while being physically barely able to walk (knee shattered in June of last summer, I can now walk probably 1/4 mile a day in total distance traveled).

as soon as I'm more mobile I'll mix in some plyometric exercises.... I can't imagine what exercise ON TOP of this diet will do!

Akasha
24th May 2016, 14:14
I am now about 2 months into a ketogenic diet - it's working very well. Basic signs of body health, such as blood pressure and weight are much better. Hours of mental alertness and productivity each day are way up. It's my diet and I'm sticking to it. I anticipate that I've added many years of good health to my life.

P.S. -- weight just went below 200 pounds, for the first time in perhaps 35 years :).

Hi Paul. As it's now one month later (May 24th), could you share another update as well as going into detail about what you actually eat specifically from meal to meal in a typical day?

Many thanks.

Paul
24th May 2016, 18:55
Hi Paul. As it's now one month later (May 24th), could you share another update as well as going into detail about what you actually eat specifically from meal to meal in a typical day?

Many thanks.

Ok :)

My main sources of a variety of nutrients are:

my specially prepared water (see below),
a blender smoothie,
paleo-like fats and proteins,
some particular vitamin supplements, and
Steve Gibson's Healthy Sleep Formula (https://www.grc.com/health/sleep/healthy_sleep_formula.htm).


I have made one significant change in this last month - removing krill and cod liver oil, in line with Brian Peskin's work on what he terms parent-essential oils (http://brianpeskin.com/). He observes that omega-6 linoleic acid (LA) and omega-3 alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) are essential fatty acids in the construction of cell and mitochondria membranes, and that they play an essential role in the transport of oxygen across the membrane walls. These two fatty acids are, in his view, the only two essential fatty acids for the human body that the body must get from outside food. We can convert whatever other so-called "essential" fatty acids, such as DHA and EPA, from LA and ALA, as needed. The conventional medical view is that our body is inefficient at this conversion, so it is usually recommended to supplement with additional DHA and EPA, such as obtained from the oil of fish and krill that live in cold water. Peskin's view is that DHA and EPA are dangerous supplements and should be studiously avoided, because they turn rancid (oxidize) rapidly in warm, oxygen rich environments, such as within any living human body. Only fish adapted to living in ice cold water require high concentrations of DHA and EPA. To Peskin it makes no more sense to supplement with DHA and EPA than it does to supplement with automobile antifreeze.

My specially prepared water goes through a number of steps to remove toxins, add a variety of water soluble minerals and restructure the water. First the water passes through (1) a whole house chlorine filter, (2) an under the sink reverse osmosis unit and (3) a counter top distiller. Then a separate nearly saturated concentrate (aka "sole") is prepared, with various minerals. These minerals include "Real Salt" (from Utah, similar to pink Himalayan salt), sodium bicarbonate, potassium bicarbonate, Lugol's iodine, a wee bit of borax, some home prepared ionic silver (using the excellent Silver Puppy colloidal silver generator), Willard water, MSM (http://amzn.com/B0001TNVEM), magnesium bicarbonate (the making of which is in itself an interesting procedure), and Epsom salts. The concentrate is then spun for several hours in a vortex (*) using a Lab Companion Magnetic Stirrer (http://amzn.com/B00CF3H2VA), while playing classical music over some headphones outside the large glass jar, and shining an LED grow light down onto it. Since it's a concentrate, the sole concentrate can sit out on a shelf at room temperature. The final drinkable water is made with about 10 parts of the distilled water and 1 part of the concentrate. That drinking water is kept in a glass jug in the refrigerator, as it is perishable.

My blender smoothie is quite a concoction of various items, in an ever changing variety. Here's a list I made recently of what's in it:

ground flax seeds
soaked chia seeds
kale leaves
spinach leaves
broccoli
asparagus
carrots
red beet root
safflower oil
sunflower oil
walnut oil
flax oil
hemp oil
pumpkin oil
chorella
coconut oil
olive oil
red palm oil
raw egg, from properly fed, cage free, hens
Vitamineral Green superfood powder
Boku superfood powder
Life Extension Mix multivitamin powder
Green Vibrance superfood powder
turmeric spice
curcumin
ginger
cayenne
cinnamon


My paleo-like fats and proteins include grass fed butter, avacodo, "Bullet coffee" (coffee, butter and MCT oil), organic uncured bacon, beef jerky from grass fed cows (be careful to avoid the many jerky's with some hidden MSG (http://mamavation.com/2015/04/90-hidden-msg-ingredients.html) in the ingredients), and some wonderful Amish raw milk cheddar cheese from Heinis (http://heinis.com/).

My present supplements include

liposomal spray of vitamin D-3 and K-2,
sublingual vitamin B-12 (methylcobalamin),
transdermal magnesium,
Lugol's iodine (about 1 gm/day of the 5% solution provides about 50 mg/day of the potassium iodide and iodine mix)
several grams of chewable Vitamin C each day (sweetened with sorbitol and/or xylitol, not with fructose),
various probiotic tablets,
lithium orotate,
chelated manganese,
chelated zinc,
folic acid,
a B-100 vitamin B complex,
quercetin,
Evening Primrose Oil,
Nutrition Essentials "Neuro Clarity",
Christopher's Kidney formula,
benfotiamine,
Vitacost's N-Acetyl L-Carnitine, Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) & CoQ10 mix,
500 mg niacin (will give a strong flush the first few times),
Essiac herbal extract,
European milk thistle, and
Vitacost AdvanC (C with quercetin and bioflavonoids).


I wash down the vitamins, and the healthy sleep formula, with a glass of organic unfiltered apple juice that has an ounce or two of Bragg's Apple Cider Vinegar (with the "mother") added.

The purified remineralized, re-energized water should be drunk on an empty stomach, such as when first arising in the morning, as it doesn't work well with the stomach acids needed in the digestion of many of the other foods above.

I try to get to the Bullet coffee early in the day, as it's a drink I like, but I often find that I have been busy productively doing stuff, from the moment I stand up, and just don't get to the coffee until it would be too close to bed time.

(*) P.S. - The vortex spins inside a large 2 gallon glass sun tea jar with six very strong magnets taped to the outside, in an alternating hexagonal pattern.

Akasha
24th May 2016, 19:06
Thanks for that detailed reply. Have you lost any more weight?

Paul
24th May 2016, 19:42
Thanks for that detailed reply. Have you lost any more weight?

Weight and other such vitals are holding steady. Removing the cold fish oils might lower my "pulse pressure" (systolic minus diastolic) over the next 2 or 3 months, as the lipid composition of my vascular cells improves.

Akasha
24th May 2016, 21:04
You listed plenty of sources of simple carb's in your blender smoothie recipe (spinach, broccoli, beetroot, kale etc...). Do these undermine the efforts to remain in / achieve ketosis?

Also, the thread has focused on avoiding the second largest killer, namely cancer, but is there not a very real risk that in so doing via animal fats the number one killer is being invited in?

Paul
25th May 2016, 00:12
You listed plenty of sources of simple carb's in your blender smoothie recipe (spinach, broccoli, beetroot, kale etc...). Do these undermine the efforts to remain in / achieve ketosis?

Also, the thread has focused on avoiding the second largest killer, namely cancer, but is there not a very real risk that in so doing via animal fats the number one killer is being invited in?

My most recent blood ketone measurement was 1.7 mmol/L, which is well into ketosis. My diet has quite a variety of carbs and fruits (and even some peppermint patties with honey instead of sugar filling), but the significant majority of energy comes from the saturated and mono-unsaturated fats and medium chain triglycerices (MCT), not the sugars or carbs. It's a variety of carbs, but less of a quantity of carbs.

I don't consider saturated animal fats, whether from meat, eggs, or dairy, to be a significant cause of disease, so long as the animals in turn had healthy diets, such as grass on healthy soil without glyphosate or the other "inert" (yeah, right) ingredients on Monstersanto's Round-Up. The choice of whether to eat such foods is more of an ethical question, in my view. Animals fed unhealthy diets, with toxins and damaged or deficient fats, will provide unhealthy meat, milk and eggs.

In my view, saturated fats are not the problem. Rather processed, oxidized, rancid, heated, hydrogenated, and otherwise damaged poly-unsaturated fats are a key to the problem. They replace the healthy omega-6 and omega-3 fats used to construct critical membranes of all cells, impairing the cells ability to transport oxygen across the cell wall, leading to the wide panoply of chronic illnesses.

See for example Saturated fats: do they cause heart disease? (http://www.nutrition-coalition.org/saturated-fats-do-they-cause-heart-disease/). Some of the meta-studies quoted on that page indicate that replacing saturated fats with poly-unsaturated fats provide cardiovascular benefits, but I do not see off-hand whether it was the lowering of saturated fats, or the increasing of (unspecified) poly-unsaturated fats that provided this benefit. That some other studies that replaced saturated fats with increased carbohydrates did not provide cardiovascular benefits is however consistent with my current working hypothesis that the increased poly-unsaturated fats were the critical element to the provided benefits. Such studies are difficult to draw conclusions from, because one has to dig carefully to determine, if it is even possible to do so at all, which poly-unsaturated fats were used in the testing, and whether they were fresh, unheated, undamaged oils, or somehow damaged oils -- there's an essential difference between the two. Other critical co-factors, such as a variety of essential minerals, also need to be controlled for in such experiments, in order to provide a firm basis for any conclusions.

Akasha
25th May 2016, 18:46
.....In my view, saturated fats are not the problem. Rather processed, oxidized, rancid, heated, hydrogenated, and otherwise damaged poly-unsaturated fats are a key to the problem. They replace the healthy omega-6 and omega-3 fats used to construct critical membranes of all cells, impairing the cells ability to transport oxygen across the cell wall, leading to the wide panoply of chronic illnesses.

See for example Saturated fats: do they cause heart disease? (http://www.nutrition-coalition.org/saturated-fats-do-they-cause-heart-disease/). Some of the meta-studies quoted on that page indicate that replacing saturated fats with poly-unsaturated fats provide cardiovascular benefits, but I do not see off-hand whether it was the lowering of saturated fats, or the increasing of (unspecified) poly-unsaturated fats that provided this benefit. That some other studies that replaced saturated fats with increased carbohydrates did not provide cardiovascular benefits is however consistent with my current working hypothesis that the increased poly-unsaturated fats were the critical element to the provided benefits. Such studies are difficult to draw conclusions from, because one has to dig carefully to determine, if it is even possible to do so at all, which poly-unsaturated fats were used in the testing, and whether they were fresh, unheated, undamaged oils, or somehow damaged oils -- there's an essential difference between the two. Other critical co-factors, such as a variety of essential minerals, also need to be controlled for in such experiments, in order to provide a firm basis for any conclusions.

I certainly agree with your comments about processed oils as well as your advice to dig carefully.

I dug as deeply as I could through the Saturated fats: do they cause heart disease? article you linked to and it was interesting and revealing.

Several of the trials mentioned in the article were behind pay-walls. However, a handful of (free) sentences did stand out in contrast to the theme of the article:

(from the second referenced trial) …..Saturated fats were not associated with total CHD, but we found a trend for association with CHD mortality…..(!!!)

…..replacement of saturated fats with either MUFA or carbohydrate improved indices of glucose homeostasis…..(the balance of insulin and glucagon to maintain blood glucose)

….and... from the conclusion of the ninth trial: …..Reducing saturated fat by reducing and/or modifying dietary fat reduced the risk of cardiovascular events by 14%…..

Somewhat relevant to this topic, there was an interesting discussion between Dave "Bulletproof" Asprey, Dr. Garth Davies and ultra athlete, Rich Roll recently. here (http://www.mindbodygreen.com/revitalize/video/body-hacking-yay-or-nay)'s the full video. Below is a YouTube snippet. Dr. Davies claims that since 2008 there has been a drive by the meat, dairy and egg industry to take control of the data.

yYUb3Q9QqyU

This (http://nutritionfacts.org/2016/04/28/egg-consumption-and-ldl-cholesterol-size/) article by Dr. Michael Greger M.D highlights how this kind of misrepresentation can take place although it is by no means the only method.

Any way, I'll leave it there except suffice it to say I don't want you (or anyone else) to have a heart attack!

TargeT
6th September 2016, 19:26
I came onto eating once a day by accident, this guy comes up with some great reasons for it:

Why I eat once a day....
PKfR6bAXr-c

RunningDeer
6th September 2016, 21:11
I came onto eating once a day by accident, this guy comes up with some great reasons for it:

Why I eat once a day....
This book dovetails nicely with your video. The pdf is locked, so if hi-lighting and/or cut and paste notes helps to retain information, the $9.95 Kindle edition is worth the price. The hard cover new & used is almost $60.


http://i1262.photobucket.com/albums/ii610/WhiteCrowBlackDeer/health-Food_zpsimhhegpa.jpg


pdf - “Health via Food (http://soilandhealth.org/wp-content/uploads/02/0201hyglibcat/020165.hay.pdf),” by: Hay, William Howard
Kindle - “Health via Food (https://www.amazon.com/Health-via-Food-William-Howard-ebook/dp/B00JRGBN9U?ie=UTF8&keywords=health%20via%20food&qid=1464263723&ref_=sr_1_1&s=books&sr=1-1),” by: Hay, William Howard

snippets:

“His entire effort in the practice of his profession for the past twenty-four years has been directed toward making everyone his own physician.”

“The writer does not treat disease, in the strictest sense of the word, but seeks only to build health on whatever foundation remains at the time this is undertaken; so he cannot ever say that he cured a single disease in his whole medical practice, nor does he believe that anyone else ever did. He seeks merely to remove from each case the visible obstacles to Nature's unhampered function, and he knows that this is all that the smartest man in the world can do. Nature alone makes the cure, if it is ever made or to be made. “

“This is the lesson that each must learn if he aspires to be his own physician, and once he has learned this lesson well, he then lacks only the will and initiative to put the whole program to the test, which will thoroughly convince him of the truth of the entire proposition. Let no man who is wounded try to do without the surgeon, for this is his legitimate field, nor should one who is deformed try to do the same thing, for this also is surgery's legitimate field, in both of which surgery has shown its worth; but if one has a pain anywhere in his insides let him stay away from the surgeon, if he wishes to die whole, for he may die otherwise in various sections serially.”

“So fasting has its place in treatment of the sick, but do not make the mistake of thinking that either foods or fasting are curative, for only the body's own resources are in any sense the agents of cure. What fasting does is just what right food does, the mere relieving of the system from former handicaps, and while right foods in the right combinations will relieve a former handicap of wrong foods (or wrong foods in wrong combinations, which is the usual thing), yet even right foods in right combinations may be a handicap when the body is not able to handle even these, and desires in no unmistakable voice to be let strictly alone. It is then that the fast is clearly indicated, and this indication should be as faithfully respected as any other indication in disease or in health, and no food of any kind should be offered or taken till the body announces through normal hunger a return of need for nourishment. Then the need for fasting has passed and feeding may be resumed, and it is then that care must be exercised not to create again a toxic state that will make another such cataclysm necessary. Thus fasting and feeding, as resting and exercise, emphasize again the great law of compensation, of give and take, of action and reaction, each having its definite place in the body's scheme of keeping her balance or regaining it when lost.”

TargeT
24th February 2017, 16:48
Seems like I just keep finding good stuff about "fasting" and "irregular eating"... This one is (potentially) pretty significant.


Fasting diet 'regenerates diabetic pancreas'

The pancreas can be triggered to regenerate itself through a type of fasting diet, say US researchers.
Restoring the function of the organ - which helps control blood sugar levels - reversed symptoms of diabetes in animal experiments.
The study, published in the journal Cell (http://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674%2817%2930130-7), says the diet reboots the body.
Experts said the findings were "potentially very exciting" as they could become a new treatment for the disease.
People are advised not to try this without medical advice.
In the experiments, mice were put on a modified form of the "fasting-mimicking diet".
It is like the human form of the diet when people spend five days on a low calorie, low protein, low carbohydrate but high unsaturated-fat diet.
It resembles a vegan diet with nuts and soups, but with around 800 to 1,100 calories a day.
Then they have 25 days eating what they want - so overall it mimics periods of feast and famine.
Previous research has suggested it can slow the pace of ageing.
Diabetes therapy?

But animal experiments showed the diet regenerated a special type of cell in the pancreas called a beta cell.
These are the cells that detect sugar in the blood and release the hormone insulin if it gets too high.
Dr Valter Longo, from the University of Southern California, said: "Our conclusion is that by pushing the mice into an extreme state and then bringing them back - by starving them and then feeding them again - the cells in the pancreas are triggered to use some kind of developmental reprogramming that rebuilds the part of the organ that's no longer functioning."
There were benefits in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in the mouse experiments.
Type 1 is caused by the immune system destroying beta cells and type 2 is largely caused by lifestyle and the body no longer responding to insulin.
Further tests on tissue samples from people with type 1 diabetes produced similar effects.
Dr Longo said: "Medically, these findings have the potential to be very important because we've shown - at least in mouse models - that you can use diet to reverse the symptoms of diabetes.
"Scientifically, the findings are perhaps even more important because we've shown that you can use diet to reprogram cells without having to make any genetic alterations."
What's it like?

http://ichef-1.bbci.co.uk/news/624/media/images/72004000/jpg/_72004717_blood_sample624.jpg
BBC reporter Peter Bowes took part in a separate trial with Dr Valter Longo.
He said: "During each five-day fasting cycle, when I ate about a quarter of the average person's diet, I lost between 2kg and 4kg (4.4-8.8lbs).
"But before the next cycle came round, 25 days of eating normally had returned me almost to my original weight.
"But not all consequences of the diet faded so quickly."
His blood pressure was lower as was a hormone called IGF-1, which is linked to some cancers.
He said: "The very small meals I was given during the five-day fast were far from gourmet cooking, but I was glad to have something to eat"
Separate trials of the diet (http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/9/377/eaai8700) in people have been shown to improve blood sugar levels. The latest findings help to explain why.
However, Dr Longo said people should not rush off and crash diet.
He told the BBC: "It boils down to do not try this at home, this is so much more sophisticated than people realise."
He said people could "get into trouble" with their health if it was done without medical guidance.
Dr Emily Burns, research communications manager at Diabetes UK, said: "This is potentially very exciting news, but we need to see if the results hold true in humans before we'll know more about what it means for people with diabetes.
"People with type-1 and type-2 diabetes would benefit immensely from treatments that can repair or regenerate insulin-producing cells in the pancreas."

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-39070183

conk
24th February 2017, 17:48
I've just come across some interesting info regarding wheat. Dr. Mercola: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/01/22/how-to-safely-bring-wheat-back-into-your-diet.aspx

Dr. Perlmutter, who wrote books against eating wheat, has collaborated with Dr. Douillard and now agrees that there are safe ways to eat wheat and that digestion is critical to that end. This is Dr. Douillard's site for purchase of the particular herbs (ayurvedic) that prepare the intestines for proper digestion of wheat.

Amazon sells an organic, pre-genetically engineered, form of wheat that is supposed to be safer to eat. https://www.amazon.com/Jovial-Foods-Organic-Einkorn-32-0-Ounce/dp/B007SM6NWC/ref=sr_1_1_a_it?ie=UTF8&qid=1486659381&sr=8-1&keywords=elkhorn+flour

Thanks Paul for reinforcing the idea of consuming lots of quality fats. We've begun to eat loads of red palm, coconut, and high quality olive oil. The taste of fresh, pure olive oil is amazing when compared to most of the crap on grocery shelves. If it doesn't have a peppery finish in taste, then it's old or not real olive oil. That peppery taste is the polyphenols that provide such great benefit. Other very good fats are real butter oil and cod liver oil. There are lots of it for sale, but very, very few are of good quality. Green Pastures Blue Ice may be the best of the lot. These two work synergistically. Read Dr. Weston Price for details.

Dr. Johanna Budwig, a protégé of Dr. Otto Warburg (Nobel Prize winner), is perhaps the final word on fatty acids. Her description of the electrical properties of raw fats in very interesting. There is no electron exchange with processed, dead rancid vegetable oils.

TargeT
2nd June 2017, 19:51
Still eating once a day... works great!

(I shoot for 16/8)

ue-qz-9ndfM

Karezza
18th August 2017, 22:15
Still eating once a day... works great!

(I shoot for 16/8)



How does eating once a day affect you energy levels, if at all

TargeT
18th August 2017, 22:48
Still eating once a day... works great!

(I shoot for 16/8)



How does eating once a day affect you energy levels, if at all


Since I eat in the afternoon/evening (I start consuming "other than water" around 2-4pm, and it usualy starts off with some nuts or something to last me until I eat dinner around 7-9 pm then stop by 10) I'm WELL into ketosis by the time I wake up, I've never had "low blood sugar" issues like some people say they do, but I don't feel any lack of energy at all, around 12 I start to notice I'm a bit hungry, but there's never any groggy feelings (my coworkers commonly complain about the "lunch monster" or something how they feel like taking a nap after lunch, I don't experience this even when I do finally eat). My portions are significantly smaller, I "get full" much faster, and it's helped me maintain a weight level that I want while still being able to abuse my liver like a good red blooded american should (Beer and bourbon normally).



Side note on that though. I also have an altered sleep pattern, I generally sleep 4-6 hours a night (from 12-2am until 6:30/7 am) and since I'm forced to take "an hour lunch" at my job I take a nap instead (anything over 20/30 min is too long, but if I can hit REM in that period of time I wake up even sharper and more focused). I can skip this and don't need it, but I work a mental job and I've found this seems to "reset" me very nicely for the last 4 hours of the work day (I often do the "caffeine nap" as well, drink caffeine and lay down for a nap right away, there's some neuroscience behind this).

CaI5LWj6ams

Though I've found a nap followed by caffeine works just as well for the end result (super charged brain!)

So... uhh, I think I answered your question.

Just remeber, ensure you don't eat sugar, or at least keep it to the fermented kind ;) sugar is poison (that's my mantra).


Yes there's a bit of cognitive dissonance in this life style, but I am human.

Napping
4th January 2018, 19:41
Hi Paul,

I’m curious as to how your ketogenic diet has been going and whether (if you had one) you reached your weight loss goal. I’ve slowly adopted a 16/8 largely paleo approach. Whether I go into ketosis or not doesn’t concern me too much, the real goal was to cut out process food as much as possible and reduce alcohol intake. I’m into week 3 of going low carb and am finally starting to feel more energetic. Definitely less food cravings, less brain fog and I’ve lost the pale, tired complexion I used to have.

I was very skeptical about your promotion of the diet as the answer to avoiding/treating cancer, but more research is coming out that has made me pay attention and I’ve had two patients literally reverse their PSA levels with aggressive cancers through fasting/ketogenic diets and the use of cannibas oil. It certainly has more of my attention.

Paul
4th January 2018, 23:41
Hi Paul,

I’m curious as to how your ketogenic diet has been going and whether (if you had one) you reached your weight loss goal. I’ve slowly adopted a 16/8 largely paleo approach. Whether I go into ketosis or not doesn’t concern me too much, the real goal was to cut out process food as much as possible and reduce alcohol intake. I’m into week 3 of going low carb and am finally starting to feel more energetic. Definitely less food cravings, less brain fog and I’ve lost the pale, tired complexion I used to have.

I was very skeptical about your promotion of the diet as the answer to avoiding/treating cancer, but more research is coming out that has made me pay attention and I’ve had two patients literally reverse their PSA levels with aggressive cancers through fasting/ketogenic diets and the use of cannibas oil. It certainly has more of my attention.

I had reduced my weight from about 250 to 180 something, on a high fat, modest protein, quite low carb diet. That weight is just about ideal for me. I push a wide variety of nutrients, by both foods and supplements. I drink some quite fine water. I have been refining how I process my water, cleaning out the junk in my typical municipal water, restoring the minerals and re-energizing it. Over half of my entire cash flow goes toward good food, water and supplements.

I say "had reduced", because my son Sam is visiting me for a few months, and he's a good cook. So my consumption of various carbs (pasta, rice, and grains) had gone up, as these are included in his idea of a complete and delicious meal. My weight had gone back up 10 pounds, and some minor, localized, health issues were becoming more evident.

So now I am in the second day of a five day water plus limited fats fast. This still includes supplements, lots of Vitamin C and minerals, but it includes as close to no proteins or carbs as I can comfortably and practically reach. I've been in and out of ketosis frequently over the last year or two, so about the only thing I notice when starting a fast is that I almost stop being hungry ... easy. People on a more standard American diet (SAD) need to pay more attention to how they start training their body to go into ketosis - and for some people I am sure it would not be a good idea at all.

I've just started reading a new book, The Longevity Diet: Discover the New Science Behind Stem Cell Activation and Regeneration to SlowAging, Fight Disease, and Optimize Weight, by Valter Longo (http://a.co/hHRynUs), which goes into more detail of the advantages of periodic fasting that still includes water, vitamins and minerals, optionally includes some fats and oils, but minimizes as much as practical (for that person's body, health and preferences) both carb and protein intake. To quote the this Amazon page: "specific diets can activate stem cells and promote regeneration and rejuvenation in multiple organs to significantly reduce risk for diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer’s, and heart disease."

I remain a strong fan of high fat, modest protein (relatively low protein by most American standards), low to quite low carb diet. Fats and oils must be a combination of a limited amount of the lighter Omega 3 and 6 oils, of high quality, and as much of the more saturated fats as you want (except during periodic fasts). The lighter oils are required nutrients, but they are the most easily damaged by typical processing and storage in the "modern" American food chain, not to mention by the deliberate industrial processing intended to extend the shelf life and "mouth feel" of processed food. The quantities and proportions of the lighter oils should be limited.

As more and more of the people that I "hang out with" (mostly on the Web) have to deal with aging parents and siblings, it becomes increasingly clear to me how important it is to keep one's mind strong. One can deal with rather substantial physical infirmities rather easily, so long as they aren't so bad that one can't take care of one's own food intake and "outtake". (Fortunately, for me the only significant permanent infirmities so far are partial deafness and some dental problems.) But life gets much more difficult for one's self and one's caretakers when one loses one's mind, even if the body is in fine fiddle.

Bill Ryan
22nd January 2018, 00:05
More on this fascinating topic, and to bump the thread:


https://fitness.mercola.com/sites/fitness/archive/2018/01/19/fasting-ketogenic.aspx

Burn Fat for Fuel


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-QO7UG5Hxvk

Story at-a-glance


Low-fat, high-carb diets prevent healthy mitochondrial function, thereby contributing to chronic diseases such as obesity, Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, Alzheimer’s, cancer and more.
Studies suggest low-carb, high-fat diets — and eating less frequently — may be the answer to the obesity epidemic. The benefits of this type of diet is the primary focus of my book “Fat for Fuel,” and my complementary online course.
When your body is able to burn fat for fuel, your liver creates water-soluble fats called ketones that burn far more efficiently than carbs, thus creating far less damaging reactive oxygen species and secondary free radicals.
Multiday water fasting activates autophagy, allowing your body to clean itself out, and triggers the regeneration of stem cells. Having as little as 200 or 300 calories a day is enough to abort the autophagy process.
Fasting has been shown to trigger the regeneration of the pancreas in both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics — a testament to the regenerative power unleashed in your body when fasting.

By Dr. Mercola

The notion that your body needs to regularly consume glucose for energy has become a deeply ingrained myth. As a result of this misguided advice, obesity, diabetes, heart disease and cancer prevalence have all spiked, burgeoning into national if not global epidemics. The truth is, most long term low-fat, high-carb diets prevent healthy mitochondrial function, thereby making a greater contribution to disease than most people are willing to even consider.

Dietary fats are actually the preferred fuel of human metabolism. In 2016, the British National Obesity Forum and the Public Health Collaboration issued a joint report on obesity based on the analysis of 43 studies, warning the policy to encourage people to eat a low-fat diet is having a “disastrous impact on health.” According to the authors, the current guidelines have been manipulated and corrupted for commercial gain by the food and beverage industries, and are based on flawed science.

Low-Carb, High-Fat Diet and Reducing Meal Frequency Can Solve Many Common Ailments

In conclusion, the report suggests a low-carb, high-fat diet — and eating less by cutting out between-meal snacks — may be the answer to the obesity epidemic. The benefits of this type of diet is the primary focus of my most recent book, “Fat for Fuel (http://www.fatforfuel.org/),” and my complementary online course, which guides you through seven engaging lessons to teach you how your body works at the molecular level, and how different foods affect your body.

Traditional weight loss advice suggests all you need to do is count calories, eat less and exercise more. Somewhat better recommendations specifically recommend cutting down on sugar. However, while many will initially lose weight doing this, it usually doesn’t take long to gain the weight back. Before you know it, you’re caught in a loop of yo-yo dieting. There’s a better way. A great many of the disease epidemics facing us today could be turned around by educating people about the benefits of:


A diet high in healthy fats, moderate in protein and low in net carbohydrates (total carbs minus fiber)
Intermittent fasting
Longer water fasting

It’s important to realize that calories are not created equal, and this is why counting calories doesn’t work for weight loss and health in the long run. The metabolic effects of calories differ depending on their source — a calorie from a Twinkie is not equivalent to a calorie from an avocado or a nut. That said, excessive snacking is a significant contributing factor to obesity, so, to lose weight and keep it off, you may need to reduce your meal frequency.

The Case for Fasting

I recommend limiting it to two meals per day (https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/09/21/intermittent-fasting-calorie-restriction.aspx), either breakfast/lunch or lunch/dinner, within a six- to eight-hour window each day. This meal timing is a form of intermittent fasting, as by eating all your meals within a certain span of time each day, you end up fasting daily as well. Longer water fasts (https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/10/16/complete-guide-fasting.aspx) also offer powerful health benefits, although you need to work your way into them.

One strategy I’ve found to be extremely helpful is to gradually increase the time of your daily intermittent fasting until you’re fasting 20 hours a day. After about a month of this, doing a four- or five-day long water fast will not be nearly as difficult, as you’re already used to not eating for extended periods.

I was skeptical about water fasting for a long time, but after learning more about the metabolic benefits of it, the relative safety and testing it out for myself, I’ve become convinced it’s a powerful tool that is vastly underutilized. The clarity of thinking alone, which occurs around Day Three or Four, makes it worth it.

That’s not the only benefit though. Importantly, water fasting activates autophagy, allowing your body to clean itself out, and triggers the regeneration of stem cells. Remarkably, whereas low-calorie dieting will cause morbidly obese people to develop skin folds that must be surgically removed after significant weight loss, this typically does not occur when you lose the weight by water fasting. Your body actually metabolizes the excess skin as you go along, because it’s in such efficient regeneration mode.

Even having as little as 200 or 300 calories a day is enough to abort the autophagy process, though, which is why I started doing complete water fasts. I now do a five-day water fast on a monthly basis, and since I was used to doing 20-hour daily intermittent fasting, I experienced no significant hunger at all. It was really pretty effortless right from the start.

If you’re severely overweight or have Type 2 diabetes, water fasting may be the answer you’ve been looking for. Recent research confirms that fasting can effectively reverse Type 2 diabetes in a relatively short amount of time. In this trial, Type 2 diabetics were placed on a severely restricted calorie diet where they ate just 600 calories a day for eight weeks.

By the end of their fast, all were disease-free and three months later, having returned to their regular diet, seven of the 11 participants were still disease-free. Fasting has also been shown to trigger the regeneration of the pancreas in both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics — a testament to the regenerative power unleashed in your body when fasting.

Burning Fat for Fuel Improves Mitochondrial Function

Eating a diet low in net carbs and high in healthy fats and/or fasting will allow your body to burn fat rather than glucose as its primary fuel. This has the sought-after side effect of improving mitochondrial function, which is foundational for disease prevention and optimal health. The mitochondria within your cells are largely responsible for generating the energy (adenosine triphosphate or ATP) your body needs to stay alive and thrive.

They're also responsible for apoptosis (programmed cell death) and act as signaling molecules that help regulate genetic expression. When your mitochondria are damaged or dysfunctional, not only will your energy reserves decrease, resulting in fatigue and brain fog, but you also become vulnerable to degenerative diseases such as cancer, heart disease, diabetes and neurodegenerative decay.

Why Cycling In and Out of Nutritional Ketosis Is Recommended

The devil’s in the details, though, and an important yet rarely discussed facet of nutritional ketosis — which is when your body burns fat as its primary fuel instead of sugar — is feast-and-famine cycling. The reason for this has to do with the fact that long-term uninterrupted nutritional ketosis can trigger a rise in blood sugar by driving your insulin level too low.

This paradoxical situation can arise because the primary function of insulin is not to drive sugar into the cell, but to suppress the production of glucose by your liver (hepatic gluconeogenesis). If your blood sugar is high due to chronically and excessively low insulin, eating a piece of fruit or other sugar-containing food will actually lower your blood sugar rather than raise it. Your microbiome may also be compromised in the long term, as chronic low-carb diets will not optimally feed your gut flora.

All of this can be avoided by cycling in and out of nutritional ketosis, basically going through a one-day-per-week fast and one or two days a week of feasting, where you eat double or quadruple the amount of net carbs. Your body is designed to have the metabolic flexibility to use both glucose and fat for fuel. The problem is, when you eat a high-carb diet for a long period of time, your body ends up losing its ability to burn fat. The good news is, you can regain it by inverting the carb and fat ratios of your diet.

Fat Is Your Body’s Preferred Fuel

When your body is able to burn fat for fuel, your liver creates water-soluble fats called ketones that burn far more efficiently than carbs, thus creating far less damaging reactive oxygen species and secondary free radicals. This is why being an efficient fat burner is so important for optimal health. Ketones also improve glucose metabolism and lower inflammation.

Recent research suggests a ketogenic (high-fat, low-carb) diet may even be key for reducing brain inflammation (https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/10/09/ketogenic-diet-anti-inflammatory-effects.aspx) following stroke and other brain trauma. Chronic inflammation is a hallmark of most chronic disease, including pain-related conditions such as arthritis. As noted in one study, ketogenic diets appear to be helpful for inflammation-associated pain by:


Generating fewer inflammatory reactive oxygen species
Lowering the excitability of neurons involved in pain signaling
Boosting signaling of the neuromodulator adenosine, which has pain-relieving effects

How to Implement a Ketogenic Diet

To implement a ketogenic diet, the first step is to eliminate packaged, processed foods. The emphasis is on real whole foods, plenty of healthy fats and, initially, as few net (nonfiber) carbs as possible. This typically involves dramatically reducing or temporarily eliminating all grains and any food high in sugar, particularly fructose, but also galactose (found in milk) and other sugars — both added and naturally-occurring.

As a general rule, you’ll want to reduce your net carbs to 20 to 50 grams a day or less, and restrict protein to 1 gram per kilogram of lean body mass. To make sure you’re actually meeting your nutritional requirements and maintaining the ideal nutrient ratios, use an online nutrient tracker such as www.cronometer.com/mercola (https://www.cronometer.com/mercola), which is one of the most accurate nutrient trackers available.

It’s also preset for nutritional ketosis, so based on the base parameters you enter, it will automatically calculate the ideal ratios of net carbs, protein and healthy fats required to put you into nutritional ketosis. This is what will allow your body to start burning fat as its primary fuel rather than sugar, which in turn will help optimize your mitochondrial function and overall health and fitness.

Beneficial Fats to Eat More Of

Another key to success is to eat high-quality healthy fats, NOT the fats most commonly found in the American diet (the processed fats and vegetable oils used in processed foods and fried restaurant meals). Just about any fat found naturally in food — whether animal- or plant-based — is in fact healthy for you. For example, saturated fat found in animal products and coconut oil:


Increases your large fluffy LDL particles, which are not associated with an increased risk of heart disease
Increases your HDL levels, which is associated with lower heart disease risk. This also compensates for any increase in LDL
Does not cause heart disease, as made clear in a large number of studies
Serves as a “clean-burning fuel” for your brain and mitochondria, producing far less damaging free radicals than sugars and nonfiber carbs

Examples of healthy fats to eat more of include:


Olives and olive oil (look for third party certification, as 80 percent of olive oils are adulterated with vegetable oils
Avoid cooking with olive oil; use it cold)
Butter made from raw grass fed organic milk
Avocados (http://www.mercola.com/infographics/avocado-uses-health-benefits.htm)
Ghee (clarified butter); lard and tallow (excellent for cooking)
Coconut oil (excellent for cooking as it can withstand higher temperatures without oxidizing)
Raw nuts such as macadamia (http://foodfacts.mercola.com/macadamia.html) and pecans (http://foodfacts.mercola.com/pecans.html)
Grass fed meats
Raw cacao butter
Animal-based omega-3 (https://articles.mercola.com/omega-3.aspx) fat from fatty fish low in mercury like wild caught Alaskan salmon, sardines, anchovies and/or krill oil
Seeds like black sesame, cumin, pumpkin and hemp seeds
MCT oil (https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/08/22/mct-oil-health-benefits.aspx)
Organic, pastured egg.

Harmful Fats to Avoid

The harmful fats you need to steer clear of are all man-made. This includes trans fats, which are pro-oxidant, and all highly refined polyunsaturated vegetable oils (https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/08/31/trans-fat-saturated-fat.aspx), which are high in damaged omega-6 and produce toxic oxidation products like cyclic aldehydes when heated. Vegetable oils promote oxidized cholesterol, which becomes destructive when entering your LDL particles.

Also, when consumed in large amounts, omega-6 polyunsaturated fats — and especially industrially processed ones — cannot be effectively burned for fuel. Instead, they’re incorporated into cellular and mitochondrial membranes where they become susceptible to oxidative damage, which ultimately damages your metabolism. These harmful fats have been shown to:


Contribute to heart disease
Promote gut inflammation
Disrupt arterial blood flow through your brain
Deplete your brain of antioxidants
Attack the cellular architecture of your nerves and impair brain development through mutagenic effects on DNA and altered epigenetic expression

Boost Your Health With Self-Paced Online Course

Current health statistics tell a discouraging story of repeated failure: Two-thirds of the American population is overweight or obese, 1 in 5 deaths are obesity-related, half have prediabetes, diabetes (http://www.mercola.com/diabetes.aspx) or other chronic illness, and 1 in 3 women and half of all men will develop some form of cancer in their lifetime. There’s an answer to all of these health trends, and it all starts with your diet.

If you or a loved one has been struggling with low energy, excess weight or a chronic or degenerative disease like Type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer’s or cancer — or if you simply want to optimize your health and longevity — consider enrolling in my online course on mitochondrial metabolic therapy (https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/05/21/metabolic-mitochondrial-therapy-introduction.aspx) (MMT).

MMT is a whole new way of looking at nutrition, merging decades of my own research with the latest science on mitochondrial health, all of which have been peer-reviewed by more than two dozen experts, including physicians, researchers and scientists.

The MMT diet is a cyclical ketogenic diet (https://articles.mercola.com/ketogenic-diet.aspx), high in healthy fats and fiber, low in net carbs with a moderate amount of protein. Worksheets, additional reading, meal planning resources and recipes are all included. You’ll also learn a number of other nondiet related ways to boost your mitochondrial health, such as sensible sun exposure, exercise and grounding.

In short, this program will teach you everything you need to know to safely and effectively improve your mitochondrial function, thereby regaining your health and boosting your longevity.

If you’ve thought about making changes but lacked the confidence to take the plunge, or have made half-hearted attempts that quickly petered out, this course can set you on the right track, guiding you through the changes to your diet and lifestyle one step at a time, from any computer, tablet or smartphone. And, while a new lesson is released each week, you can go through the lessons at your own pace.

marielle
22nd January 2018, 02:46
I started a ketogenic diet August 2017 (5 months ago) and it completely fixed my triglycerides and fasting blood sugar. A few weeks ago I was reading some info from people who recommend Zero Carbs--essentially an all animal-based diet and it piqued my interest. I am currently trying that and my intestinal tract is LOVING it. Do humans really need to consume fiber?? I don't think so anymore and I cringe when I think how I spent the last 25 years making green shakes every day! Anyway, my diet now is mostly limited to steak, eggs, butter, and heavy cream. I regularly make ice cream from heavy cream, raw eggs, and swerve (a zero carb sweetener) and chocolate. We'll see if it kills me but somehow I think I'll be fine.:bigsmile:

I was reading in another thread about how red meat lowers your "vibration". I guess I'll just have to take that chance...I was a vegan for most of 2009 and suffered greatly even though "The China Study" (a book about veganism) was my bible. The biggest issue I had during that year was repeated bouts of eczema. I'd never had that condition before and it disappeared when I added meat and eggs back into my diet.

I wish I could be vegan. All I can do now is say a silent prayer of gratitude before meals.

Bill Ryan
22nd January 2018, 04:01
I started a ketogenic diet August 2017 (5 months ago) and it completely fixed my triglycerides and fasting blood sugar. A few weeks ago I was reading some info from people who recommend Zero Carbs--essentially an all animal-based diet and it piqued my interest. I am currently trying that and my intestinal tract is LOVING it. Do humans really need to consume fiber?? I don't think so anymore and I cringe when I think how I spent the last 25 years making green shakes every day! Anyway, my diet now is mostly limited to steak, eggs, butter, and heavy cream. I regularly make ice cream from heavy cream, raw eggs, and swerve (a zero carb sweetener) and chocolate. We'll see if it kills me but somehow I think I'll be fine.:bigsmile:

I was reading in another thread about how red meat lowers your "vibration". I guess I'll just have to take that chance...I was a vegan for most of 2009 and suffered greatly even though "The China Study" (a book about veganism) was my bible. The biggest issue I had during that year was repeated bouts of eczema. I'd never had that condition before and it disappeared when I added meat and eggs back into my diet.

I wish I could be vegan. All I can do now is say a silent prayer of gratitude before meals.

Wonderful. :star: Here's a MUST READ book (from 1976):


Not All In The Mind, by (https://www.amazon.com/Not-All-Mind-Richard-Mackarness/dp/0330313541)Richard Mackarness (https://www.amazon.com/Not-All-Mind-Richard-Mackarness/dp/0330313541)

(Alas, I've so far failed to find a digital version.)

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51wjBxxPQNL._SX320_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

Dr Mackarness was a psychiatrist who discovered that a large percentage of patients who'd been institutionalized for psychiatrically diagnosed conditions such as schizophrenia reverted to being TOTALLY NORMAL — once it was discovered what common foods they were severely allergic to.

Everyone should now read that paragraph again. :)

In the book, he also reports how he changed his diet to one EXACTLY as marielle describes above... and all his ailments disappeared. This was years ahead of almost anyone else recommending the same kind of 'caveman' regime.

anandacate
29th January 2018, 22:37
I have been following Dr. Mercola's Metabolic Mitochondrial Therapy (MMT), which includes intermittent fasting, since last summer (June 2017). Am really enjoying the results so far; mainly changing my body composition from fat (lost 24 pounds) to muscle (still working on more muscles, but they are starting to show!), clarity of mind, more strength, more energy, and more stamina. Because I am well over 60, it took awhile for my system to convert from glucose to ketone burning. (BTW, I have been a raw fooder since 2003; however, not necessary for MMT.) The only testing I have done is test my urine with ketone strips.

I have the book "Fat for Fuel," which is useful if you really want to do this. Dr. Mercola emphasizes the necessity, over the long term, to cycle in and out of ketosis once you convert to burning ketones. He also emphasizes to keep protein intake at an adequate level, not excessive.

The first link gives an overview on the basics of Mercola's MMT program with a video interview of Dr. Mercola from May 21, 2017. Near the end of the article there is a section called "Getting Started" that has a link for the CRON-o-Meter, a free tool that I think is essential if you decide to do this.

1. Basic Introduction to Metabolic Mitochondrial Therapy
(https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/05/21/metabolic-mitochondrial-therapy-introduction.aspx)
The second link is from a woman who helped validate what I was going through during the "metabolic shift," which is a name for the process one goes through when switching from burning carbs (glucose) to burning fat (ketones). Also, I appreciated a woman's point of view about the ketogenic diet. Don't know if I will ever get my body to look like hers, though! (BTW, I will be 70 years old in less than a month.)

2. My Experience with Ketogenic Diet (https://zuzkalight.com/nutrition/my-experience-with-ketogenic-diet/)

TargeT
30th January 2018, 13:23
an all animal-based diet and it piqued my interest. I am currently trying that and my intestinal tract is LOVING it.

It could be what your current set of intestinal flora/fauna work best with. I noticed a DRAMATIC difference in my bowel functions after spending time in Iraq (eating local food etc..) it was very impactful to my overall health (and I was 24 at the time) and the change has been consistent ever since.

My theory is that I picked up a whole new set of "gut bugs", stronger... better,,, I can eat anything now; haha... anyway there's a pretty good thread here on "gut health (http://projectavalon.net/forum4/showthread.php?43548-The-gut-of-most-disease...-NOT-what-you-think-&highlight=disease)" it's worth looking into along side your dietary studies.




I was reading in another thread about how red meat lowers your "vibration". I guess I'll just have to take that chance...I was a vegan for most of 2009 and suffered greatly even though "The China Study" (a book about veganism) was my bible. The biggest issue I had during that year was repeated bouts of eczema. I'd never had that condition before and it disappeared when I added meat and eggs back into my diet.

I wish I could be vegan. All I can do now is say a silent prayer of gratitude before meals.

There's a lot of weird emotional manipulation and cult-ish behavior floating around veganism. Postulations on how consuming different forms of life effects your "vibration" always seemed a bit ridiculous to me, denial of your darkside is probably more unhealthy.

onawah
5th October 2018, 18:52
Intermittent Fasting for Weight Loss | Natural Health Blog
Date: 09/20/2018 Written by: Hiyaguha Cohen© 1999-2018 The Baseline of Health Foundation
https://jonbarron.org/detoxing-full-body-detox/intermittent-fasting-health-and-weight-loss?utm_campaign=Daily%20Health%20Tips%2C%20Mon-Fri&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=66267893&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-_87UHTlsULdXgZ4o4_6kIXwUf4bpoqx11QxAjuKsbSDZ4kOW_C WhzyXU7Xlg5LjYa_3htcrB29I-lm40A9RrBm5a-dvQ&_hsmi=66267893

"If you’re a regular reader, you know that Jon Barron has long advocated intermittent fasting for health and weight loss. His recommended protocol includes fasting one day a week on juice plus a superfood such as chlorella, spirulina, stabilized rice bran, or something equivalent. He also suggests a three-day juice and superfood fast once a month, plus a five-day juice/superfood fast twice a year as part of a bi-annual liver detox.

Those who follow Jon’s protocol get great results, but the idea of giving up a day of gluttony once a week may seem too difficult for some people. Fortunately for the fast-phobic, there’s a different type of intermittent fasting that seems to be a bit less daunting, and lately it’s been catching on like a California wildfire. The concept, known as the 16/8 diet, involves limiting food consumption to a narrow window of time each day, but during that time window anything goes.

Here’s how it works: You’re allowed to eat for eight hours a day. Outside of that, you can’t have anything except water or zero-calorie drinks. So, if you finish dinner by 6:00 pm, you essentially fast until 10 am the next morning, giving you 16 hours without food.

Liver Detox Package from Baseline Nutritionals
It sounds so simple, and yet preliminary research indicates that it works on many levels. Animal studies found that rats that were allowed to eat high-fat foods in unlimited quantities within a limited daily time period weighed less and had normal cholesterol and blood glucose levels, while rats allowed to eat whenever they wanted within 24-hour periods gained weight, developed high cholesterol and high blood glucose plus had impaired motor control.1

There’s only been one small human study to date, but the results were equally promising. Twenty-four obese subjects followed the 16:8 plan for 12 weeks. At the end, participants saw significant drops in blood pressure and weight. Strangely, there was also a control group that consisted of subjects who followed a different type of intermittent fasting routine (alternate day fasting), and those on the 16:8 plan lost more weight, consumed fewer calories, and reduced systolic blood pressure more than those fasting every other day. 2

Jon Barron explains some of the benefits of fasting in his book, Lessons from the Miracle Doctors. “First, when you deprive your body of food, your body begins to consume itself to survive. Being geared to self-survival, your body chooses to consume damaged cells and toxic cells first, saving the healthiest for later. It takes a tremendous amount of energy, and puts a tremendous strain on your body's organs, to process food. (Check your heart rate after eating a large meal and observe how exhausted you feel.) When you fast, your body diverts that energy to repair and rebuilding.”

Advocates of time-restricted eating point out that every time you eat, your liver releases insulin to keep blood sugar levels stable. If you confine eating to an eight-hour window, you’re releasing less insulin into the bloodstream, and that’s good because insulin build-up promotes fat storage and inflammation in the body. As research confirms, when insulin levels drop through fasting, insulin sensitivity increases, blood sugar levels normalize, and the body burns fat.3

Intermittent fasting helps you lose weight in three ways. First, unless you’re succumbing to gluttony during the eight-hour eating period, you’ll most likely end up eating fewer calories each day. But more importantly, because you will tend to use up all of your body’s available glucose during your fasting hours, you force your body to start burning fat for energy, which results in weight loss. And finally, as a result of moving your body into a fat burning state, your insulin levels will drop—since it’s no longer needed at the same levels—while at the same time, growth hormone and noradrenaline levels are increased, which yet again increases your body’s breakdown of fat for energy.

As just mentioned, studies show that intermittent fasting triggers the body to produce more Human Growth Hormone (HGH). HGH is key for strength, muscle development, immunity, resistance to disease, recovery from injury, weight loss, and optimized metabolism. Research also indicates that intermittent fasting can induce a type of cellular repair process called autolysis that helps the body “intelligently” rid itself of waste and toxins, and animal studies show that it might even extend lifespan. Other benefits include increased resistance to injury from cardiac events, heart-rate stabilization, and reduced oxidative damage.4

And finally, research indicates that intermittent fasting might be good for the brain as well. One study of fruit flies found that fasting blocked the synaptic activity of neurons.5 Since overactive synaptic activity is associated with Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Disease, it’s possible that fasting has a protective effect on the brain. Meanwhile, rat studies out of Johns Hopkins found similar results, but in addition, concluded that the brain stimulates chemicals that promote cell growth, and, in fact, the brain creates new cells and becomes more resistant to plaque when stressed by fasting.6 According to study director Dr. Mark Mattson, neuroscience professor at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, "There's an increase in adaptive stress responses when people intermittently fast that is good for maintaining the brain…As is similar to what happens when muscles are exercised, the neurons in the brain benefit from being mildly stressed.”

If you decide to try the 16:8 diet, here are some things to keep in mind:

Experts suggest very young children shouldn’t fast as they need extra calories for growth. On the other hand, fasting has been shown to reduce seizures in epileptic kids. Also, diabetics and those with low blood sugar should check with their health practitioner before fasting.

You can choose any time window you prefer, as long as you restrict food intake to an eight-hour window each day. But do keep in mind that the later you eat, the more difficult weight loss will be for you, as studies show that once the body releases melatonin, which happens close to bedtime, calorie burning naturally slows down. Finishing dinner by six and then fasting until breakfast at 10 the next morning is ideal.

Some sources say it’s okay, or even good, to drink coffee or tea (without cream or sugar) during your fasting hours to help you combat hunger. Others claim that such beverages will trigger metabolic processes in your body, and so it’s better to simply drink water.7

For weight loss, the usual rules apply during eating hours. If you pig out during your eight-hour window, you’ll sabotage any benefits you might have gained during the fasting hours.

Experts say the average person loses seven to 10 pounds within 10 weeks of starting the intermittent fasting regimen.8

You probably won’t get that hungry. 16:8 fasting isn’t like fasting for an entire day, and drinking water (or coffee or tea) will most likely sustain you during your fasting hours. Staying busy helps so you don’t focus on what you’re missing. If you really can’t make it 16 hours without food, try going 15 or 14 hours at first, and work your way up. But keep in mind, you really do need to get up to around 16 hours of fasting a day for the benefits to kick in."

1. Burrell, Susie. “Eight-hour diet is key to weight loss, according to experts.” News.com.au. 6 September 2018. https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/health/diet/eighthour-diet-is-the-key-to-weight-loss-according-to-experts/news-story/1391a5a5113e650b8ffd2cf0322c1b66
2. University of Chicago. “Daily fasting works for weight loss, finds study on 16:8 diet.” 18 June 2018. Science Daily. 6 September 2018. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/06/180618113038.htm
3. Heilbronn, LK et al. “Alternate-day fasting in nonobese subjects: effects on body weight, body composition, and energy metabolism.” 8 January 2005. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 9 September 2018. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15640462
4. Mattson, MP and Wan, R. “Beneficial effects of intermittent fasting and caloric restriction on the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular systems.” 16 March 2005. Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. 9 September 2018. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15741046
5. Lidicker, Gretchen. “New Research Shows How Intermittent Fasting is Like Decluttering for Your Brain.” 14 December 2016. Mindbodygreen. 7 September 2016. https://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-28129/new-research-shows-how-intermittent-fasting-is-like-decluttering-for-your-brain.html
6. Anft, Michael. “Don’t Feed Your Head.” September 2012. Johns Hopkins Magazine. 9 September 2018. https://hub.jhu.edu/magazine/2012/summer/dont-feed-your-head/
7. https://www.telegraph.co.uk/health-fitness/body/11-things-nobody-tells-start-intermittent-fasting
8. Haney, Stephanie. “This is How Long It’ll Take for Intermittent Fasting to Work.” 5 September 2018. MSN Health & Fitness. 9 September 2018. https://www.msn.com/en-gb/health/diet/this-is-how-long-itll-take-for-intermittent-fasting-to-work/ss-BBMTPba?li=BBoPH6F#image=5

TargeT
18th October 2018, 20:01
found a good info-graphic for explanation of Ketosis

https://i.imgur.com/4KyfDi3.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/4KyfDi3.jpg