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Shannon
14th September 2016, 21:54
TRICLOSAN BANNED IN SOAP STILL IN COLGATE TOOTHPASTE: COMPANY ‘OWNS’ FDA, ACTIVISTS ALLEGE

SEPTEMBER 13, 2016
JohnThomas
Didymas

After the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) banned the antibacterial chemical triclosan from antibacterial soaps, activists began questioning the decision by the agency to allow the substance to remain in the best-selling toothpaste brand Colgate Total.

Public health activists have suggested that FDA’s decision to allow triclosan in toothpaste while banning it in soap is baffling and that it is yet another example of the undue influence of large corporations on public health policy.
Experts began pressuring FDA to ban triclosan in soaps and impose tight regulation on similar antibacterial chemicals following studies that suggested that antibacterial soaps were not more effective than non-antibacterial soaps. According to experts, widespread use of triclosan could be causing more harm than good by promoting emergence of strains of bacteria resistant to common antibacterial agents.
“Consumers may think antibacterial washes are more effective at preventing the spread of germs, but we have no scientific evidence that they are any better than plain soap and water,” FDA said in a recent statement announcing its decision to ban triclosan in soaps. “In fact, some data suggests that antibacterial ingredients may do more harm than good over the long-term.”
Concerns about the public health impact of triclosan and related chemicals, such as triclocarban, were heightened by studies that suggested it has a disruptive impact on animal metabolism and development of the reproductive system of young animals through interference with normal hormonal function.


But if the FDA banned triclosan from soap because it is a potentially harmful ingredient, how does the agency justify allowing it to remain in toothpaste?
The explanation FDA provides is flagrantly counter-intuitive, public health activists say.
According to The New York Times, FDA had required Colgate-Palmolive, which manufactures Colgate Total — the only toothpaste in the U.S. that contains triclosan — to conduct toxicology studies on the chemical. And based on the results of the studies, the agency concluded it was safe and effective in toothpastes and approved it in 1997.

The toxicology studies conducted by Colgate-Palmolive, according to FDA spokesperson Andrea Fischer, indicated that the benefit of triclosan in toothpaste outweighs the risks. According to Fischer, the studies showed that toothpastes that contained triclosan were more effective for “reducing plaque and gingivitis.”
“Based on scientific evidence, the balance of benefit and risk is favorable for these products.”

But the decision to ban triclosan in soap, a topical (skin) product, but leave it in toothpaste, an oral product, has left many observers scratching their heads.
The New York Times spoke with an expert, Rolf Halden, director of environmental security at the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University.
According to Halden, the decision to leave triclosan in toothpaste while banning it in soap seems odd because more of the chemical gets rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream through the mouth than through the skin. Thus, if the chemical is harmful, as many experts believe, it will likely do more harm in toothpaste than in soap.
But Colgate-Palmolive spokesperson Thomas DiPiazza insisted that triclosan is safe in toothpastes. He said that toxicology studies that established the safety of triclosan in toothpaste were implemented rigorously. He said the Colgate-Palmolive study reviewed more than 100 toxicology studies covering multiple aspects, such as “carcinogenicity, reproductive and developmental toxicity, eye and skin irritation, and short term and long term toxicity.”
“The full weight of scientific evidence amassed over 25 years continues to support the safety and efficacy of Colgate Total.”

He also said that the company conducts continuous monitoring for regular safety updates.
A review of 30 studies by The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews also supported the conclusion that toothpastes with triclosan and fluoride were more effective for reducing plaque, gum inflammation, bleeding and cavities than toothpastes containing only fluoride.


Is triclosan safe in toothpaste? [image via LunaseeStudios/Shutterstock]
However, Halden insisted that the Cochrane review was not adequate to establish the safety of triclosan because it looked only at data covering six months to three years. It also did not consider the more serious health concerns raised by experts, such as fears that triclosan may have a disruptive impact on cognitive development and metabolism.
Studies also suggest it may impair development of the reproductive system of young animals by disrupting normal regulation of thyroid hormones, testosterone, and estrogen, leading to early puberty, infertility, and even cancer.
“[The review] wasn’t ‘designed to look at hormonal effects, nor did they carry on long enough to measure the outcomes we are concerned about.”
Researchers have also raised concern that widespread use of triclosan in manufactured products could be contributing to contamination of natural water sources and disruption of aquatic ecosystems.
But DiPiazza claimed that FDA actually never proved that triclosan was unsafe or ineffective. The decision to ban triclosan in hand soaps was based solely on the failure of soap manufacturers to prove that soaps containing triclosan were more effective than non-antibacterial soaps, according to DiPiazza.
Triclosan was used originally by surgeons to sterilize their hands, but manufacturers began adding it to common household products, such as soaps, detergents, fabrics, and even toys in the 1990s

http://www.inquisitr.com/3503199/triclosan-banned-in-soap-still-in-colgate-toothpaste-company-owns-fda-activists-allege/


* from my reasearch triclosan is only present in the Colgate total brand of paste. I know a lot of you fellow Avalonians choose to use natural toothpaste, coconut oil and other safer concoctions. Which is fine too. Just a heads up :)

Shannon
15th September 2016, 17:13
Update, not that this is earth shattering news but I want to make note of it anyway. This morning the rep for our Colgate account called and is basically towing the company line. She laid it out like this....even though the chemical is banned it's harmless in toothpaste.


So there you go. Lol

Makes me wonder what the real point of the fda is.

Sigh

DNA
15th September 2016, 17:53
For folks looking for the ultimate in toothpaste hygiene.
Make it yourself.
The recipe: 2 parts turmeric powder to 1 part coconut oil and 1 part baking soda. Mix together to form a paste, and keep in a cool place (coconut oil is liquid at around 74-76 degrees). The Method: Put a generous amount on the toothbrush and brush as normal for 2 minutes.


Word up. Tumeric is crazy, it is used as a natural alternative to yellow dye, but, once it hits your teeth it acts as a natural whitener, it is crazy.
I will also add that this toothpaste recipe will help your gums out big time.
You can not buy a better toothpaste. I swear by this one.

Shannon
15th September 2016, 22:02
^^^ as a dental health professional I agree with the above. Very good for the gums. A soft brush is a must as well. And any hard to reach places the brush can't get, use a cotton cloth or even strong paper towel to wipe the plaque off before it becomes calculus.

Wide-Eyed
15th September 2016, 22:12
Sh*t it's in my RightGaurd Deo! Now that really stinks!

Carmody
16th September 2016, 00:21
60% of what you put on your skin is absorbed by the body.

The armpit has a higher absorption ratio.

Conclusion: Never use any form of deodorant.

ElfeMya
16th September 2016, 09:57
60% of what you put on your skin is absorbed by the body.

The armpit has a higher absorption ratio.

Conclusion: Never use any form of deodorant.

Yeahhhhh ! #stinkyarmpits au naturel !!!
Just joking.
What about home made organic one with minimum ingredients and a few drops of essential oils ?

Hugs to all ![COLOR="red"]

¤=[Post Update]=¤


For folks looking for the ultimate in toothpaste hygiene.
Make it yourself.
The recipe: 2 parts turmeric powder to 1 part coconut oil and 1 part baking soda. Mix together to form a paste, and keep in a cool place (coconut oil is liquid at around 74-76 degrees). The Method: Put a generous amount on the toothbrush and brush as normal for 2 minutes.


Word up. Tumeric is crazy, it is used as a natural alternative to yellow dye, but, once it hits your teeth it acts as a natural whitener, it is crazy.
I will also add that this toothpaste recipe will help your gums out big time.
You can not buy a better toothpaste. I swear by this one.

Thanks for that, I will try that recipe next time I make a batch ! Can't wait to have yellow teeth !

Hugs to you !

DNA
16th September 2016, 10:10
My wife makes our deodorant.
She just called out the ingrediants to me over the sewing machine.
She makes an amazing arthritis rub as well that really works if anyone is interested.
My wife makes soaps, lotions and tinctures and sells them at our local farmers markets and festival type stuff. She is pretty awesome. :)
I personally love this deodorant.


Deodorant
1/4 cup of coconut oil, 1/4 cup of shea butter, a 1/3 cup of bees wax, table spoon of arrow root powder, tablespoon of baking soda, tea spoon of tea tree oil and a teaspoon of lavender.

lucidity
18th September 2016, 00:55
For folks looking for the ultimate in toothpaste hygiene.
Make it yourself.
The recipe: 2 parts turmeric powder to 1 part coconut oil and 1 part baking soda. Mix together to form a paste, and keep in a cool place (coconut oil is liquid at around 74-76 degrees). The Method: Put a generous amount on the toothbrush and brush as normal for 2 minutes.


Word up. Tumeric is crazy, it is used as a natural alternative to yellow dye, but, once it hits your teeth it acts as a natural whitener, it is crazy.
I will also add that this toothpaste recipe will help your gums out big time.
You can not buy a better toothpaste. I swear by this one.

This isn't even remotely credible.

Turmeric stains absolutely everything yellow.
Try spilling a little on your jeans, a Tee-towel, a wooden spoon (or furniture).

I've regularly been adding turmeric to my meals for approx 5 years.
I have T-shirts and jeans that have _years_old_ turmeric stains in them.
Tea and coffee stains wash out of t-shirts... but turmeric somehow persists.

Tea and coffee are _known_ to stain your teeth.
If Tea and coffee stain your teeth ... you can bet your hind teeth turmeric does too.

We're being asked to believe turmeric stains everything yellow... except for your teeth.
Sorry... that doesn't sound even remotely reasonable.

If some of you (gullible) people want to experiment with turmeric in your toothpaste,
don't be surprised if..... after just a few brushings .... your teeth start turning yellow.

And remember.... I told you so.

be happy :-)

peterpam
18th September 2016, 13:27
Update, not that this is earth shattering news but I want to make note of it anyway. This morning the rep for our Colgate account called and is basically towing the company line. She laid it out like this....even though the chemical is banned it's harmless in toothpaste.


So there you go. Lol

Makes me wonder what the real point of the fda is.

Sigh



Just like the fluoride!!! It's all good...

I know the argument is probably that such a small amount can't be bad. If you think about the principles of homeopathy where just the vibrational energy pattern of a substance can initiate a healing response in the body, how is a small amount going to be inconsequential? I'm sure that over time the triclosan will mess with your internal flora, and not for the better. Is it any wonder that IBS and Chrohns disease are rampant these days? We are getting hit at every angle with some needless chemicals added to products that are supposed to benefit us.

DNA
18th September 2016, 16:10
For folks looking for the ultimate in toothpaste hygiene.
Make it yourself.
The recipe: 2 parts turmeric powder to 1 part coconut oil and 1 part baking soda. Mix together to form a paste, and keep in a cool place (coconut oil is liquid at around 74-76 degrees). The Method: Put a generous amount on the toothbrush and brush as normal for 2 minutes.


Word up. Tumeric is crazy, it is used as a natural alternative to yellow dye, but, once it hits your teeth it acts as a natural whitener, it is crazy.
I will also add that this toothpaste recipe will help your gums out big time.
You can not buy a better toothpaste. I swear by this one.

This isn't even remotely credible.

Turmeric stains absolutely everything yellow.
Try spilling a little on your jeans, a Tee-towel, a wooden spoon (or furniture).

I've regularly been adding turmeric to my meals for approx 5 years.
I have T-shirts and jeans that have _years_old_ turmeric stains in them.
Tea and coffee stains wash out of t-shirts... but turmeric somehow persists.

Tea and coffee are _known_ to stain your teeth.
If Tea and coffee stain your teeth ... you can bet your hind teeth turmeric does too.

We're being asked to believe turmeric stains everything yellow... except for your teeth.
Sorry... that doesn't sound even remotely reasonable.

If some of you (gullible) people want to experiment with turmeric in your toothpaste,
don't be surprised if..... after just a few brushings .... your teeth start turning yellow.

And remember.... I told you so.

be happy :-)



:ROFL: :loco:
I personally use this everyday.
Dude I've got to admit I'm a tad offended by your post.
I've been posting here for a while, what are you saying that I would purposefully steer folks wrong?
You ever stop to question yourself as to why your teeth have never been stained yellow after eating turmeric?


Do some research before posting something so insulting next time. So as not to look like an idiot.


What are you a proctor and gamble rep?

Here you go Lucidity

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4hjrfkl05tY


4hjrfkl05tY


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gNclcWe_pVw


gNclcWe_pVw


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E7dwjzkbn3Q


E7dwjzkbn3Q

Mike
18th September 2016, 16:25
60% of what you put on your skin is absorbed by the body.

The armpit has a higher absorption ratio.

Conclusion: Never use any form of deodorant.




I agree with all this except the last line.

I tried those "Jason" products for about a year in my early 30's(toothpaste, deodorant) Supposedly free of all toxins. But I continued to sweat profusely and frequently reeked like a wet animal. That stuff was pricey too. I think of all the money I could have saved if i'd just stuck with the arm n hammer I was using and I get a little bitter. If I saw this Jason fellow in the street i'd tackle him and apply a rear naked choke with all my might until he agreed to refund all my money. The quantity was always half of what I was accustomed to, and the price double.