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    United States Moderator Deborah (ahamkara)'s Avatar
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    Default Re: Racism

    Last night listened to a live feed on Instagram from Antoine Tucker (montaga) NYD14 candidate for TheNewRightParty. He is not convinced that George Floyd is actually dead - citing the lack of an open casket, and Floyd and Chauvin knew each other, but did not mention or call each other by name during any part of the arrest. Several young Black followers appeared on camera during the chat and echoed a similar scepticism surrounding the events in Minnesota.

    Tucker, along with Hotep Jesus (who recently appeared on Alex Jones!), represent a movement among American Black conservatives along the lines of Malcolm X and WB Dubois. They are wary of the use of the Black community by the Democratic Party, and although they acknowledge the problem of racism in America today, they offer a different solution than the one we see in the protests - and are opposed to the idea of "Defunding the Police". They are worth our time and attention.

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    Default Re: Racism

    I don't really know where this would fit? RE: The Democrat photo op...

    Is it racism? Is it virtue signaling? Is virtue signalling a subtle form of racism?
    I'm seeing a lot of black people get very angry about some of the antics they are seeing ...

    Sharing this one because I enjoyed learning more about her culture and the meaning of the fabrics used. (She's African).

    https://twitter.com/obianuju/status/1270053042340139008

    ¤=[Post Update]=¤

    Quote Posted by ahamkara (here)
    Last night listened to a live feed on Instagram from Antoine Tucker (montaga) NYD14 candidate for TheNewRightParty. He is not convinced that George Floyd is actually dead - citing the lack of an open casket, and Floyd and Chauvin knew each other, but did not mention or call each other by name during any part of the arrest. Several young Black followers appeared on camera during the chat and echoed a similar scepticism surrounding the events in Minnesota.

    Tucker, along with Hotep Jesus (who recently appeared on Alex Jones!), represent a movement among American Black conservatives along the lines of Malcolm X and WB Dubois. They are wary of the use of the Black community by the Democratic Party, and although they acknowledge the problem of racism in America today, they offer a different solution than the one we see in the protests - and are opposed to the idea of "Defunding the Police". They are worth our time and attention.
    I follow Antoine on Twitter. Rooting for him to win that District.
    Last edited by edina; 8th June 2020 at 21:25.

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    Default Re: Racism

    I tried... I worked on it for hours for a week. Every time I would explore a history from the particular view point of the one that was presenting the history... they involved politics which played an intrinsic role in establishing the points they would try and make... in validating their history as "the right history."

    I even tried to extract the political elements out of it yet, when I did, it rendered their conclusions senseless.

    Rarely do I give up on a goal. With regards to this one - I have.
    All the above is all and only my opinion - all subject to change and not meant to be true for anyone else regardless of how I phrase it.

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  7. Link to Post #504
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    Default Re: Racism

    I am genuinely confused and looking for some guidance. I am not trying to be sarcastic or political I am simply looking for some clarification. If Mark or anyone wants to tell me what they think of this issue I would appreciate your comments.

    When I first heard that General Mills was going to remove the Aunt Jemima brand I did not think much about it. I considered it another stereotype that needed to go away. Then I found out that Aunt Jemima was based on a real person, Nancy Green, a freed slave. By all accounts, she was charming, affable, and a great cook. She was a storyteller, activist, and missionary. Apparently she died fairly wealthy. By many accounts a millionaire.

    Other women went on to pick up the mantle of Aunt Jemima and they seemed to do fine financially. The second woman to portray her was Anna Robinson in 1933. She traveled the country promoting the products and made enough money to buy a 22 room house for her children and where she also rented rooms.

    My thoughts are:
    Removing this brand is removing a chance to show the real history of a Black Woman that was successful at a time when it was extremely difficult for any black person to succeed but especially women.

    This appears to be corporate window dressing. A large corporation wanting to be seen as sympathetic. Dropping the name may have resulted from a tiktok video showing a black woman saying "not today" and dumping a box of Aunt Jemima mix down the sink.

    When I found out about Nancy Green the racist stereotype melted away I did not think of her as a caricature, she became a real person, one that succeeded against all odds.

    If the company had only traded on the name an no actual person was involved or benefited from the products then I would say, let it go with no remorse. Because there is a real-life behind the product I say let it stand and educate people instead of taking the expedient easy way out.


    auntjemima.com
    Wikipedia- Nancy Green




    The article below came out a fews days after I made the post above, I am including it for a bit more context.

    Edit: June 23, 2020 To read the full NBC Article: https://www.nbcnews.com/pop-culture/...yhCdjFTQj9ejOU

    Relatives of former Aunt Jemima spokeswomen say they are concerned that their family history will be erased as Quaker Oats' moves to rebrand the syrup and pancake mix.

    "I understand the images that white America portrayed us years ago. They painted themselves Black and they portrayed that as us," Vera Harris, whose great aunt, Lillian Richard, traveled the country promoting the Quaker Oats brand and portraying the Aunt Jemima character for more than 20 years, told NBC News. "I understand what Quaker Oats is doing because I'm Black and I don't want a negative image promoted, however, I just don't want her legacy lost, because if her legacy is swept under the rug and washed away, it's as if she never was a person."

    Harris added that Richard was recruited to work for Quaker Oats in the 1920s, during a time when there were "no jobs for Black people, especially Black women."

    "She took the job to make an honest living to support herself, touring around at fairs, cooking demonstrations and events," Harris said. "When she came back home, they were proud of her and we're still proud of her."
    Last edited by rgray222; 24th June 2020 at 01:39.

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    Default Re: Racism

    I think people need to learn to listen. We need to listen to each other more sincerely.

    "When you've seen beyond yourself, then you may find, peace of mind is waiting there." ~ George Harrison

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    United States Avalon Member TargeT's Avatar
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    Default Re: Racism

    Our current (US) situation is (at it's root) an inequality problem, not a racial one.

    but it's being leveraged very smartly to do terrible things, we are actively un-making the US.

    Good coverage on that topic here:
    Hard times create strong men, Strong men create good times, Good times create weak men, Weak men create hard times.
    Where are you?

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    Default Re: Racism

    If you havnt watched this allready, it is worth watching!

    Nothing of this info have ever crossed my path, not in school or media that I can remember, amazing.

    Last edited by Rawhide68; 3rd July 2020 at 15:27.

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    Default Re: Racism

    Quote Posted by TargeT (here)
    Our current (US) situation is (at it's root) an inequality problem, not a racial one.

    but it's being leveraged very smartly to do terrible things, we are actively un-making the US.

    Good coverage on that topic here:
    I love what Weinstein has to say about a lot of things. We need more minds like his in the public eye. For instance.
    God bless the Fae
    God bless Me

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    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Racism

    Here's a journey back in time, to 1968. Do some folks remember this?

    I'll lay out my stall here immediately. These were three great men. (Yes, three, not just two.)


    U.S. athletes Tommie Smith, center, and John Carlos raise gloved hands skyward during the playing of the Star Spangled Banner after Smith received the gold and Carlos the bronze for the 200 meter run at the Summer Olympic Games in Mexico City, 1968.
    How the Black Power Protest at the 1968 Olympics Killed Careers

    When Tommie Smith and John Carlos raised their fists in protest at the 1968 Summer Games, Australian runner Peter Norman stood by them. It lost him his career.

    It’s an iconic image: Two athletes raise their fists on the Olympic podium. The photograph, taken after the 200 meter race at the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City, turned African-American athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos from track-and-field stars into the center of a roiling controversy over their raised-fist salute, a symbol of black power and the human rights movement at large.

    But look in the photo and you’ll see another man as well: silver medalist Peter Norman, a white Australian runner. Norman didn’t raise his fist that day, but he stood with Smith and Carlos. Though his show of solidarity ended up destroying Norman’s career, the three athletes’ actions that day would be just one in a line of protests on the athletic stage.

    Smith and Carlos, who had won gold and bronze, respectively, agreed to use their medal wins as an opportunity to highlight the social issues roiling the United States at the time. Racial tensions were at a height, and the Civil Rights movement had given way to the Black Power movement. African-Americans like Smith and Carlos were frustrated by what they saw as the passive nature of the Civil Rights movement. They sought out active forms of protests and advocated for racial pride, black nationalism and dramatic action rather than incremental change.

    It was only months after the assassination of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and protests against the Vietnam War were gaining steam as well. In the lead-up to the Olympics, Smith and Carlos helped organize the Olympic Project for Human Rights, a group that reflected their black pride and social consciousness. The group saw the Olympic Games as an opportunity to agitate for better treatment of black athletes and black people around the world. Its demands included hiring more black coaches and rescinding Olympic invitations to Rhodesia and South Africa, both of which practiced apartheid. Though the project initially proposed a boycott of the Olympics altogether, Smith and Carlos decided to compete in the hopes they could use their achievements as a platform for broader change.


    Mexico City police beating a protester during a student march days before the military gunned down hundreds of students during a similiar peaceful march at Tlatelolco Plaza in Mexico City.

    Then, just 10 days before the opening of the Summer Games, an unarmed group of protesters assembled in Mexico City’s Three Cultures Square to plan the next move of the growing Mexican students’ movement. The Mexican government sent in bulldozers to disperse the thousands gathered, and troops fired into the crowd, massacring between four (the government’s official count) and 3,000 students.

    Carlos and Smith were deeply affected by these events and the plight of marginalized people around the world. “It was a cry for freedom and for human rights,” Smith told Smithsonian magazine in 2008. “We had to be seen because we couldn’t be heard.”

    The third man on the podium became part of the protest, too, albeit in a less direct way. Before winning silver, Norman was a working-class boy from Melbourne, Australia, born in 1942. His family members were devout members of the Salvation Army, an evangelical group connected with the charitable group better known to Americans. Part of that faith was the belief that all men were equal.

    Though he was poor growing up, Norman was an extraordinarily fast runner, and learned to race on spikes that his father, a butcher, borrowed due to lack of funds. In 1960, the teenager burst onto the national running scene as a junior, winning his first major title in Victoria. From then on, he became a major contender in Australian track and field. A powerful sprinter, his specialty was his finishes—an area in which some short-course runners falter.


    The final of the Men’s 200 meter event at the 1968 Summer Games. From left to right: Peter Norman of Australia, and Larry Questad, John Carlos and Tommie Smith of the United States.

    He displayed that skill during the 200 meter final on October 16, 1968, at Mexico City’s Olympic Stadium. Though Norman had finished strong in the qualifying rounds, he was underestimated by the other runners—until, at the very end of the medal race, he edged in front of John Carlos at the finish line. “Out of nowhere, Norman stormed down the last 50 meters, taking the line before a shocked Carlos,” writes CNN’s James Montague. Norman finished his sprint second with a time of 20.06 seconds and qualified for a silver medal.

    At the time, Australia was experiencing racial tensions of its own. For years, it had been governed by its “White Australia Policy,” which dramatically limited immigration to the country by non-white people. While the Australian government welcomed new residents from predominantly white areas like the Baltics, it regularly turned down non-European migrants. In 1966, the government made the first steps toward abolishing the policy, but its effects reverberated throughout Australia. Non-Australians weren’t the only people discriminated against: Aboriginal Australians, too, were historically oppressed in the country, which forced Aboriginal children into boarding schools, while removing others from their families and placing them with white households.

    Norman supported his fellow Olympians’ protest, in part because of the intolerance he had witnessed in Australia. “Australia was not a crucible of tolerance,” notes Steve Georgakis, a sports studies specialist from Australia. “Norman, a teacher and guided by his Salvation Army faith, took part in the Black Power salute because of this opposition to racism and the White Australia Policy.”


    Peter Norman, Tommie Smith and John Carlos after receiving their medals.

    As the athletes waited to go to the podium, Carlos and Smith told Norman that they planned to use their win as an opportunity to protest. Smith and Carlos decided to appear on the podium bearing symbols of protest and strength: black-socked feet without shoes to bring attention to black poverty, beads to protest lynchings, and raised, black-gloved fists to represent their solidarity and support with black people and oppressed people around the world.

    “I looked at my feet in my high socks and thought about all the black poverty I’d seen from Harlem to East Texas. I fingered my beads and thought about the pictures I’d seen of the ‘strange fruit’ swinging from the poplar trees of the South,” Carlos later wrote.

    Carlos realized he had forgotten his gloves, and Norman suggested the American athletes share a pair. The Australian also asked how he could support his fellow medalists. They suggested he wear a badge for the Olympic Project for Human Rights. Norman didn’t raise his fist, but by wearing the badge he made his stance clear.

    As the American athletes raised their fists, the stadium hushed, then burst into racist sneers and angry insults. Smith and Carlos were rushed from the stadium, suspended by the U.S. team, and kicked out of the Olympic Village for turning their medal ceremony into a political statement. They went home to the United States, only to face serious backlash, including death threats.

    However, Carlos and Smith were both gradually re-accepted into the Olympic fold, and went on to careers in professional football before retiring. Norman, meanwhile, was punished severely by the Australian sports establishment. Though he qualified for the Olympic team over and over again, posting the fastest times by far in Australia, he was snubbed by the team in 1972. Rather than allow Norman to compete, the Australians did not send a sprinter at all.

    Norman immediately retired from the sport and began to suffer from depression, alcoholism and a painkiller addiction. “During that time,” writes Caroline Frost for the BBC, “he used his silver medal as a doorstop.”

    Norman died without being acknowledged for his contributions to the sport. Though he kept his silver medal, he was regularly excluded from events related to the sport. Even when the Olympics came to Sydney in 2000, he was not recognized. When Norman died in 2006, Carlos and Smith, who had kept in touch with Norman for years, were pallbearers at the Australian’s funeral.

    It took until 2012 for the Australian government to apologize for the treatment Norman received in his home country. But even though it cost him his career and much of his happiness, Norman would have done it over again. “I won a silver medal,” he told the New York Times in 2000. “But really, I ended up running the fastest race of my life to become part of something that transcended the Games.”

    Carlos and Smith are still in touch today—and have been publicly supportive of other protesting athletes, including the NFL’s Colin Kaepernick. “What I did was right 48 years ago, and 48 years later it has proven to be right,” Carlos told The Telegraph in 2016. “In 1968 we were on a program for humanity—we are still on the same program today.”

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  19. Link to Post #510
    Canada Avalon Member atman's Avatar
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    Default Re: Racism

    Critical Race Theory concepts (but, to be fair, along with notions of respect and of love for one another) now to be programmed into the minds of... babies, through nine easy steps illustrated in a board book.

    The picture book, described in the article below, is meant to help parents teach their children, from a very young age, to not only be antiracist, but to also become activists.

    Because according to Ibram X. Kendi, the author of the book, kids as young as two years old are internalizing racist ideas, and if one is not taught and pushed to be openly and actively antiracist, one is then racist.

    In other words, one is either for the cause... or against it.

    Racism, according to Ibram X. Kendi (who is an historian and scholar of race and discriminatory policy in America), is any policy that creates inequitable outcomes between people of different skin colors.

    __________________________________________________

    Antiracist Baby: New Book Teaches Babies To ‘Confess’ Their Racism And Spot White Privilege

    by EVELYN RAE — SEPTEMBER 7, 2020


    A #1 New York Times best selling author has released a new children’s book to help parents and their babies fight racism.

    The book, titled Antiracist Baby, was penned by award-winning author Ibram Kendi to “empower parents and children to uproot racism in our society and in ourselves.”



    The book sets out nine steps which, if followed, promises to “improve equity, such as opening our eyes to all skin colors and celebrating all our differences.”

    These steps include “naming racism” and prompting toddlers to “confess” their own racist guilt.

    “Nothing disrupts racism more than when we confess the racist ideas that we sometimes express,” the book says.



    “Point at policies as the problem, not people,” the book goes on to say.

    “Some people get more, while others get less… because policies don’t always grant equal access.”



    Katie Miller at The Federalist said, there’s just enough vagueness in the book to “plant the seeds for upcoming generations to push for the utopian, false ‘equity’ [Kendi] seeks.”

    In her piece, Ibram Kendi’s Board Book Teaches Even Babies to Hate White People, Miller notes also the message communicated through the illustrations, such as a brown baby reaching for the butterflies that are being captured by a little white-privileged arm.

    Another image shows a white girl scaling the ladder of success and receiving a trophy, while a brown girl is stuck on a broken ladder with little chance of making it to the top.



    In an interview with Harvard Gazette, Kendi, the director of the Antiracist Research and Policy Center at American University in Washington, DC, said he aims to remove the concept of “not racist” from America, saying instead people should recognize they’re either “racist or antiracist.”

    “The heartbeat of racism itself has always been denial, and the sound of that heartbeat has always been ‘I’m not racist.’

    “What I am trying to do with my work is to really get Americans to eliminate the concept of ‘not racist’ from their vocabulary and realize, we’re either being racist or antiracist,” he said.



    Antiracist Baby was last week added to NPR’s top 100 favorite books for young readers.
    Last edited by atman; 7th September 2020 at 17:47.

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    United States Avalon Member Mike's Avatar
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    Default Re: Racism

    Utter madness, Atman. Wow!

    Trump is on the case though, God bless him:
    https://www.npr.org/2020/09/05/91005...cal-race-theor

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    Scotland Avalon Member Ewan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Racism

    I had my eyes opened a sliver more last night in a completely surprising way.

    I've always enjoyed westerns, my Grandfather used to read them and had a load of books on his shelves by authors like Louis L'Amour and James Fenimore Cooper, the former was easy to read, the latter much more challenging, but I loved them both nevertheless.
    I've always considered that period, (reading all those books), as partly responsible for developing my strong commitment to never bowing to authority, (believing it to be invariably corrupt), and standing up for the underdog.

    I watched a movie last night called simply "Posse". The reviews were not favourable.

    Quote The film has a 29% on Rotten Tomatoes based on 17 reviews.

    Janet Maslin of The New York Times stated, "On the one hand, this obviously talented film maker celebrates all the aggrandizing features of the genre: the laconic tough talk, the manly camaraderie, the proud posturing, the power of walking tall past the awestruck citizenry of a prairie town. On the other hand, "Posse" does its best to reject and avenge what it regards as the flagrant distortions of the past."[4]

    Roger Ebert described it as "an overdirected, overphotographed, overdone movie that is so distracted by its hectic, relentless style that the story line is rendered almost incoherent."[5]

    Entertainment Weekly gave it a C+ and said it was "a glossy, kinetic pastiche of Western conventions."[6]
    I disagree with all of those opinions and can't help but wonder if the reviewers were more uncomfortable that the film exposed the usual rewriting of history.

    So what surprised me so much, though on reflection it shouldn't have?
    The film claims that almost one in three cowboys were black.

    At the end of the film there is some text that I literally type out as I see it on screen.

    "The majority of black towns were destroyed, partly due to laws like the 'Grandfather Clause,' which kept African-Americans from voting on the basis that their Grandfathers as slaves had not voted.
    Ignored by Hollywoood and most history books more than 8,000 Black cowboys roamed the West."




    The 9th and 10th Cavalry were entirely composed of African-Americans, sometimes known as "Buffalo Soldiers"



    I actually feel embarassed that I never knew any of this before yesterday.
    Last edited by Ewan; 7th September 2020 at 19:47. Reason: missed words

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    Avalon Member Star Mariner's Avatar
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    Default Re: Racism

    Quote Posted by TargeT (here)
    White people are the most oppressed currently... prove me wrong...

    BTW, here's proof as of 5 days ago...... hahaha I love how far we've come......



    but then, a racial war is THE BEST and easiest (apparently) way to subjugate a population and bring in the "great reset"..... bizarro world indeed.

    (btw, look at the like to dislike ratio... no one is falling for this **** except the brainwashed MSM watchers...)

    we WILL pull through this, the tactics are stale and easily seen through.
    Re-posting above video here as germane to the issue of this thread.

    *

    In earlier periods of history racism was simply born out of fear, suspicion, and ignorance of people alien/other. Colour of skin was not the only factor of perceived separation, nationality was one also (England/France famously for centuries), caste/class was another, language was another, religion was yet another.

    As time went on and ignorance began to turn to greater awareness the powers that be noted the imperative that one big happy human family was not in their best interests if ever they wanted to stay in control. You see humans have very fragile psyches - it is easy to manipulate, easy to subjugate. Just a bump in the night has the power to override rational thinking and freak us right out. Some of that is naturally primordial, but humans could and should have evolved beyond those instincts by now if only we'd been allowed to claim our individual power. That's been denied us by the weapons of psychological warfare deployed against the social complex and general human relations.

    We've allowed ourselves to be programmed to fear the worst, expect the worst, and see the worst (particularly in others). It is today bred into our system. Control through fear and control through division is the name of the game. Race has always been their trump card.

    I like to feel that perhaps this will work to humanity's benefit in the long run. Because when the illusion does shatter (when people see that they've been manipulated) it will only serve to shatter it more comprehensively.

    At the end of the day this whole black/white (or race in general) dichotomy is pure illusion. At the end of the day we are ALL souls coming together in collective physical experience: its primary objective is to learn love. Racism (hatred) is therefore just a barrier to overcome to arrive at that end (yet it's also a barrier they use to prevent/impede that end).

    Another goal in this grand human experiment is to discover that we are all the same. You can only learn that if, on the surface, we do not look the same, sound the same, think the same, believe the same. The kicker is that across multiple lifetimes we experience ALL the different angles, black/white, man/woman, tall/short, fat/thin, muslim/jew, oppressor/victim, and a million other variations..

    When you see/know the bigger picture, racism, and all other -isms/polarities, vanish.
    "When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace."
    ~ Jimi Hendrix

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  27. Link to Post #514
    Canada Avalon Member Ernie Nemeth's Avatar
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    Default Re: Racism

    Does anyone else find it problematic that Rakyt quit our membership over this thread?

    It has made me rethink much of what I have wrote here.

    And how I have turned to my own experience of this, which is nowhere near the same but my only point of reference.

    When I started grade five I got the mark of our family. A large mole on the corner of my mouth.
    This is hard for me to recount but...for Rakyt...

    I was already a very shy boy, and naive but I had already made a name for myself as the protector of the weak, so I already had enemies.

    When this mark appeared I was ridiculed and for a while I did not want to go to school. But the novelty soon wore off and I was accepted the way I was. Only I retained the stigma. I would suddenly remember my mark and get all embarrassed. No one could understand why I would suddenly get all quiet and unresponsive.

    It would take a force of will to make myself forget the stigma and behave normally. To this day there are times I will remember the mark that sets me apart from others. In my case, however, it seems the stigma was my own doing and was not an act of racism.

    I should say that the rest of my family has the mark removed. I would not do that. So I am the only family member who carries the ancestral mark proudly on their face - even if from time to time it causes me distress.

    Is it clear that this is a form of racism, that the effects are similar, although primarily self-imposed? Like the person who has to wade through a sea of white faces, stigmatized by the constant visual counter-point they represent?

    Institutional racism does exist. It exists as the fluctuating constituency-based majority. Some of the normal institutional racism then might be systemically instituted by unwitting bias.

    When I travel around this neighborhood, my hood, I am the minority, with hardly a white face to be seen. Here I am institutionally biased against. It is kept quiet, it is unspoken, but it is most certainly there.

    If the constituency base continues trending this way in my neighborhood, it will not be long before systemic racism will arise against whites. Any difference can be exploited and can lead to community bias, that if left unchecked can lead to institutional and then systemic racism.

    Here in Canada, as an example, anti-semetic (sorry, anti-semetism does not deserve special treatment as a new un-hyphenated addition to the lexicon) and anti-Islam speech of any kind is considered hate speech and punishable by law.

    But there was never a need for anti-Polish, anti-Jamaican, anti-Hungarian, anti-Chinese, anti-German, anti-Indigenous, anti-Italian, anti-Mormon, or even anti-Christain doctrines...why?
    Empty your mind, be formless, shapeless — like water...Now water can flow or it can crash. Be water, my friend. Bruce Lee

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  29. Link to Post #515
    Avalon Member Jill's Avatar
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    Default Re: Racism

    I miss Rakyt's great input on this thread and some others. He was so articulate and able to delve into complicated topics and concepts easily with his unique point of view. He presented his ideas/thoughts in such an understandable way that people (me) could grasp and make sense of. Hope in the near future he'll return here.

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  31. Link to Post #516
    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Racism

    Quote Posted by Ernie Nemeth (here)
    Does anyone else find it problematic that Rahkyt quit our membership over this thread?
    No. We didn't want to see him leave, but he was insistent. However, here was the situation.

    If you go back and carefully read through what he wrote, Mark/Rahkyt was a Social Justice Warrior that supported Black Lives Matter and was enthusiastic about their increasing prominence and influence.

    He used many of the SJW/BLM keywords and key phrases in his posts. They can be searched. He was writing racism is prejudice plus power way back in 2012. That's rhetoric copied and pasted straight out of the SJW playbook.

    The All Lives Matter thread offended him. He was intelligent, college-educated (but that, too, can be a dangerous crucible), likeable, and always very courteous. But he was unable to see what was really happening and as early as 2016 was asserting that Avalon members were racist.

    They are not. He would never be able to understand this, but it was actually his own views that were racist, as defined by the stated need to treat people differently based on the color of their skin. That, too, is an inherently racist and divisive SJW ideology.
    Last edited by Bill Ryan; 22nd November 2020 at 20:27.

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  33. Link to Post #517
    United States Moderator Ken's Avatar
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    Default Re: Racism

    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    Quote Posted by Ernie Nemeth (here)
    Does anyone else find it problematic that Rahkyt quit our membership over this thread?
    No. We didn't want to see him leave, but he was insistent. However, here was the situation.

    If you go back and carefully read through what he wrote, Mark/Rahkyt was a Social Justice Warrior that supported Black Lives Matter and was enthusiastic about their increasing prominence and influence.

    He used many of the SJW/BLM keywords and key phrases in his posts. They can be searched. He was writing racism is prejudice plus power way back in 2012. That's rhetoric copied and pasted straight out of the SJW playbook.

    The All Lives Matter thread offended him. He was intelligent, college-educated (but that, too, can be a dangerous crucible), likeable, and always very courteous. But he was unable to see what was really happening and as early as 2016 was asserting that Avalon members were racist.

    They are not. He would never be able to understand this, but it was actually his own views that were racist, as defined by the stated need to treat people differently based on the color of their skin. That, too, is an inherently racist and divisive SJW ideology.
    This sort of post hoc analysis has always made me uncomfortable. It presents only one side of the story. As Mark/Rahkyt is not here to present his side of the story we are left with what might seem to be a lot of hand waving.
    "Love is the only engine of survival.." Leonard Cohen

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  35. Link to Post #518
    UK Avalon Founder Bill Ryan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Racism

    Quote Posted by Ken (here)
    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    Quote Posted by Ernie Nemeth (here)
    Does anyone else find it problematic that Rahkyt quit our membership over this thread?
    No. We didn't want to see him leave, but he was insistent. However, here was the situation.

    If you go back and carefully read through what he wrote, Mark/Rahkyt was a Social Justice Warrior that supported Black Lives Matter and was enthusiastic about their increasing prominence and influence.

    He used many of the SJW/BLM keywords and key phrases in his posts. They can be searched. He was writing racism is prejudice plus power way back in 2012. That's rhetoric copied and pasted straight out of the SJW playbook.

    The All Lives Matter thread offended him. He was intelligent, college-educated (but that, too, can be a dangerous crucible), likeable, and always very courteous. But he was unable to see what was really happening and as early as 2016 was asserting that Avalon members were racist.

    They are not. He would never be able to understand this, but it was actually his own views that were racist, as defined by the stated need to treat people differently based on the color of their skin. That, too, is an inherently racist and divisive SJW ideology.
    This sort of post hoc analysis has always made me uncomfortable. It presents only one side of the story. As Mark/Rahkyt is not here to present his side of the story we are left with what might seem to be a lot of hand waving.
    Well, three things.
    1. I never said a word until Ernie's new post seemed to ask for a response.
    2. Mark is always most welcome to return here to engage in more discussion.
    3. All his posts, in which his views are very articulately stated, can be found and read — many of them on this thread, easy to do.

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  37. Link to Post #519
    United States Avalon Member rgray222's Avatar
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    Default Re: Racism

    Quote Posted by Bill Ryan (here)
    Quote Posted by Ernie Nemeth (here)
    Does anyone else find it problematic that Rahkyt quit our membership over this thread?
    No. We didn't want to see him leave, but he was insistent. However, here was the situation.

    If you go back and carefully read through what he wrote, Mark/Rahkyt was a Social Justice Warrior that supported Black Lives Matter and was enthusiastic about their increasing prominence and influence.

    He used many of the SJW/BLM keywords and key phrases in his posts. They can be searched. He was writing racism is prejudice plus power way back in 2012. That's rhetoric copied and pasted straight out of the SJW playbook.

    The All Lives Matter thread offended him. He was intelligent, college-educated (but that, too, can be a dangerous crucible), likeable, and always very courteous. But he was unable to see what was really happening and as early as 2016 was asserting that Avalon members were racist.

    They are not. He would never be able to understand this, but it was actually his own views that were racist, as defined by the stated need to treat people differently based on the color of their skin. That, too, is an inherently racist and divisive SJW ideology.
    I always enjoyed reading his posts, he was bright, well written and extremely intelligent. He offered a different point of view on many subjects and explained his thought process thoroughly and clearly. A lot of food for thought. After reading a great deal of his posts I don't believe that he could make the transition away from the left and right political thinking. This is a pitfall for so many, they are tied to party instead of being tied to right and wrong.

    Edit: I hope he returns because when your thinking or beliefs are challenged everyone wins.
    Last edited by rgray222; 22nd November 2020 at 21:42.

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  39. Link to Post #520
    United States Avalon Member Mike's Avatar
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    Default Re: Racism

    Mark basically had carte blanche on this thread for a good long while. He spent that time spamming it with long, meandering posts that promoted Critical Race Theory - a hateful, racist doctrine that is vehemently anti-white. I think his heart was in the right place but he was woefully misguided. And it's not because he's unintelligent; everyone here knows just how smart he is. It's because he didn't want to know about anything else. He frequently asked us to open our minds to new ideas but was unwilling to do the same when it came to certain issues. He was possessed and blinded by certain ideological doctrines and was unwilling to move off them. To see this, all one has to do is scroll back thru the thread and have a look.

    It's no secret I butted heads with him. I could have handled myself better on a few occasions, but I stand by everything I've written in this thread.

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