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Thread: Geopolitics, Culture, History,.... Things to explore about the world

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    Default Re: Geopolitics, Culture, History,.... Things to explore about the world

    Well, here is a brief note from The Saker commenting on a meeting held in North Korea: the 3rd Plenary Meeting of 7th C.C., WPK Held in Presence of Kim Jong Un.

    The Saker is for the most part a military analyst although he does at times discuss wider political and social issues.

    His view is that in this recent meeting, the DPRK effectively declare themselves to be a nuclear power:

    Quote Note by the Saker: please read carefully what this official statement says. There are two key elements here, first, the DPRK has successfully completed its program of nuclear tests and ballistic missiles test and, second, the DPRK will now act as a responsible nuclear power and never use its nuclear power unless she is attacked. In plain English this simply means: we made it, you could not stop us, now we are a nuclear power on par with all the rest of them and there is nothing you can do about it. No doubt, the Hegemony’s propaganda machine will present that as a huge, immense, victory for Trump. In reality, it is anything but. Truth be told, I personally doubt that the DPRK has a real nuclear warhead or anything beyond an intermediate-range missile. But that is neither here nor there because whatever the facts of the matter really are, the fact that they themselves declare that they have real nuclear warheads and ICBMs and that nobody can do anything about it means that they have won. ... So whether these capabilities are real or not, the status of nuclear power claimed by the DPRK will have to be granted to them....
    From here: http://thesaker.is/the-dprk-declares...nuclear-power/

    The remainder of the post is the actual minutes of the meeting. I will just include here the opening to set the context and then the pieces that The Saker highlighted in his post:
    Quote 3rd Plenary Meeting of 7th C.C., WPK Held in Presence of Kim Jong Un

    Pyongyang, April 21 (KCNA) — The 3rd Plenary Meeting of the 7th Central Committee of the Workers’ Party of Korea took place in Pyongyang on April 20.

    Kim Jong Un, chairman of the WPK, guided the plenary meeting.

    Attending the meeting were Presidium members, members and alternate members of the Political Bureau of the Central Committee of the WPK and members and alternate members of the C.C., WPK and members of the Central Auditing Commission of the WPK.

    Present as observers were members of the WPK Central Committee and party and administrative officials of ministries, national institutions, provinces, cities and counties, major industrial establishments and institutions and co-operative farms and members of the armed forces organs.

    ...

    [Kim Jong Un] ... said that no nuclear test and intermediate-range and inter-continental ballistic rocket test-fire are necessary for the DPRK now, given that the work for mounting nuclear warheads on ballistic rockets was verified as the whole processes of developing nuclear weapons were carried out in a scientific way and in regular sequence, and the development of delivery and strike means was also made scientifically. He added that the mission of the northern nuclear test ground has thus come to an end.

    ...

    The resolution “On Proclaiming Great Victory of the Line of Simultaneous Development of Economic Construction and Building of Nuclear Force” specified the following decisions.

    First, we solemnly declare that the sub-critical nuclear test, underground nuclear test, making nuclear weapon smaller and lighter and the development of the super-large nuclear weapon and delivery means have been carried out in order in the course of the campaign for implementing the party’s line of simultaneously developing the two fronts and thus the work for mounting nuclear warheads on ballistic rockets has been reliably realized.

    Second, we will discontinue nuclear test and inter-continental ballistic rocket test-fire from April 21, Juche 107 (2018).

    The northern nuclear test ground of the DPRK will be dismantled to transparently guarantee the discontinuance of the nuclear test.

    Third, the discontinuance of the nuclear test is an important process for the worldwide disarmament, and the DPRK will join the international desire and efforts for the total halt to the nuclear test.

    Fourth, the DPRK will never use nuclear weapons nor transfer nuclear weapons or nuclear technology under any circumstances unless there are nuclear threat and nuclear provocation against the DPRK.

    Fifth, we will concentrate all efforts on building a powerful socialist economy and markedly improving the standard of people’s living through the mobilization of all human and material resources of the country.

    Sixth, we will create international environment favorable for the socialist economic construction and facilitate close contact and active dialogue with neighboring countries and the international community in order to defend peace and stability on the Korean peninsula and in the world.

    ...

    source: http://kcna.kp/kcna.user.special.getArticlePage.kcmsf
    From here: http://thesaker.is/the-dprk-declares...nuclear-power/

    Note some article commentators have disagreed with The Saker’s interpretation, follow the link above to see what people say...

    ==========

    So how many states have nuclear weapons?

    Well, there are eight acknowledged states:
    Quote List of states with nuclear weapons

    There are eight sovereign states that have successfully detonated nuclear weapons.[1] Five are considered to be nuclear-weapon States (NWS) under the terms of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). In order of acquisition of nuclear weapons these are: the United States, Russia (the successor state to the Soviet Union), the United Kingdom, France, and China.

    Since the NPT entered into force in 1970, three states that were not parties to the Treaty have conducted nuclear tests, namely India, Pakistan, and North Korea. North Korea had been a party to the NPT but withdrew in 2003.
    And there are states that used to have them:
    Quote States that formerly possessed nuclear weapons are South Africa (developed nuclear weapons but then disassembled its arsenal before joining the NPT)[12] and the former Soviet republics Belarus, Kazakhstan, and Ukraine.
    And then there is Israel which is widely believed to possess them but has not acknowledged this:
    Quote Israel is also generally understood to have nuclear weapons,[2][3][4][5][6] but does not acknowledge it (Israel maintains a policy of deliberate ambiguity), and is not known definitively to have conducted a nuclear test.[7] Israel is estimated to possess somewhere between 75 and 400 nuclear warheads.[8][9] One possible motivation for nuclear ambiguity is deterrence with minimum political cost.[10][11]
    The three quotations above are from Wikipedia here: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List...uclear_weapons

    And there is Japan, which is viewed as being able to create nuclear weapons from their current capabilities. I posted about this earlier in the thread:

    Quote Posted by Searcher (here)
    ...

    On Japanese ability to possess nuclear weapons:
    Quote No nation has suffered more in the nuclear age than Japan, where atomic bombs flattened two cities in World War II and three reactors melted down at Fukushima just three years ago.

    But government officials and proliferation experts say Japan is happy to let neighbors like China and North Korea believe it is part of the nuclear club, because it has a “bomb in the basement” -– the material and the means to produce nuclear weapons within six months, according to some estimates. And with tensions rising in the region, China’s belief in the “bomb in the basement” is strong enough that it has demanded Japan get rid of its massive stockpile of plutonium and drop plans to open a new breeder reactor this fall.

    Japan signed the international Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, which bans it from developing nuclear weapons, more than 40 years ago. But according to a senior Japanese government official deeply involved in the country’s nuclear energy program, Japan has been able to build nuclear weapons ever since it launched a plutonium breeder reactor and a uranium enrichment plant 30 years ago.

    Japan already has the technical capability, and has had it since the 1980s,” said the official. He said that once Japan had more than five to 10 kilograms of plutonium, the amount needed for a single weapon, it had “already gone over the threshold,” and had a nuclear deterrent.

    Japan now has 9 tons of plutonium stockpiled at several locations in Japan and another 35 tons stored in France and the U.K. The material is enough to create 5,000 nuclear bombs. The country also has 1.2 tons of enriched uranium.

    Technical ability doesn’t equate to a bomb, but experts suggest getting from raw plutonium to a nuclear weapon could take as little as six months after the political decision to go forward. A senior U.S. official familiar with Japanese nuclear strategy said the six-month figure for a country with Japan’s advanced nuclear engineering infrastructure was not out of the ballpark, and no expert gave an estimate of more than two years.
    ...
    From here: https://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/fu...t-happy-n48976
    ==========

    So, Dr Farrell and others have speculated that nuclear weapons have been superseded by much more advanced weapons such as the postulated directed energy weapons that might have been used (along with other mechanisms) in the September 11th twin towers operation and perhaps also in the more recent Californian wild fires.

    Given this,
    • Is it now viewed as “okay” by those possessing these more advanced weapons that states such as DPRK have nuclear weapons?
    • And, are they now tacitly allowed to join the very small group or countries that have nuclear but not directed energy weapons - a kind of second tier destructive nations group?
    Or,
    • Has the DPRK been warned about these more advanced weapons?
    • And, duly warned, are they now “playing along” with a public drama?

    Or something else?
    The dogs bark, but the caravan goes on.
    (= History moves ahead, no matter the criticism it may attract. The saying is found in many languages from the Middle East to India.)

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    Default Re: Geopolitics, Culture, History,.... Things to explore about the world

    Here is a broad analysis and comment on India and China great game moves from Nikkei Asian Review. This is a Japanese publication, hence mostly it would take a sceptical view on China.

    The landscape of this analysis is transport links and corridors:

    Quote India and China jostle for influence in Iran and Central Asia
    New Delhi's 7,000km transport corridor cuts across Beijing's Belt and Road

    KIRAN SHARMA and AKIHIRO SANO, Nikkei staff writers
    April 24, 2018 12:00 JST Updated on April 24, 2018 16:26 JST

    NEW DELHI/ISTANBUL -- China and India's new Great Game has reached the playing field of the original imperial power rivalry in the 19th century: Iran and Central Asia.

    Each of the rising giants wants to be the one to shape a new regional order. Their competition for influence continues to unfold in Indian Ocean countries like the Maldives and Sri Lanka. But they are also pressing farther west, up into the Arabian Sea, Iran and the Central Asian states.

    China has a potent weapon in its Belt and Road Initiative, which entails huge infrastructure investments across Central Asia and on to Europe. New Delhi, though, is pushing back hard with an alternative network of sea and rail routes called the International North-South Transport Corridor. So while Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Chinese President Xi Jinping are to meet later this week (https://asia.nikkei.com/Politics/Int...-rapprochement), aiming to mend fences after a military standoff last year, their broader economic and security contest is only just beginning.

    Sushma Swaraj, India's external affairs minister, talked up India's vision for the corridor during a visit to oil-rich Azerbaijan in early April. Swaraj said she and her counterpart, Elmar Mammadyarov, agreed that the INSTC "is an important initiative that can reduce time and cost [of delivering goods] by about 30% to 40%."

    The 7,000km corridor connects India with Russia, though there are still gaps that must be covered with trucks. Compared with the traditional route through the Suez Canal, the completed corridor will reduce the transport time between Mumbai and Moscow to about 20 days, from around 40, according to the Japan External Trade Organization.

    This has the potential to transform Eurasian trade -- and gives India far more flexibility and clout. The country's access to western and Central Asia has long been hindered by the presence of Pakistan. With the corridor, India can bypass its nemesis and procure Central Asian resources through Iran.



    One of the key links along the way is a rail line that crosses the border between Iran and Azerbaijan. The nuclear deal with Iran in 2016, under which Western powers lifted all sanctions, helped pave the way for investment in the Astara railway, as it is known.

    In late March, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani visited Baku, the capital of Azerbaijan, where he and Azerbaijan President Ilham Aliyev welcomed the completion of the 10km stretch of track that crosses the border. The same day, the two leaders presided over a loan signing ceremony, with Azerbaijan lending its neighbor $500 million to connect two cities -- Astara and Rasht -- and finish the final missing piece of the corridor.

    Iran expects the Astara-Rasht segment to be finished in about two years, and all INSTC rail segments are to be connected seamlessly after 2020. "Our southern Iranian ports will be a gateway to the Caucasus, Central Asia, Russia, and onward to Northern Europe and Eastern Europe," Rouhani said.

    For India, Iran is the gateway through which it hopes to send clothing, chemicals and agricultural products to consumers in Central Asia and Europe, while at the same time procuring oil, natural gas and metals from Central Asia's landlocked countries. Gas is a priority, given the urgent need to curb India's air pollution, a byproduct of its brisk economic growth.

    India has been actively courting Iran, and the Iranians have been receptive. Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi welcomed Rouhani to New Delhi in February and told his guest, "It is a matter of great pleasure for us that an Iranian president has traveled to India after a gap of 10 years." Rouhani came bearing a special gift: a lease to manage the first phase of the Chabahar port project in the south of his country.

    India has provided considerable support for Iranian port development and invested $500 million in Chabahar. The management deal allows an Indian company to run part of the port's multipurpose facilities and container terminal for 18 months.

    "Our relations go far beyond trade, economic and diplomatic relations," Rouhani told reporters. "Our relations are historical, cultural and civilizational."

    Clearly, India is convinced of Chabahar's strategic importance. Why? The answer lies along China's Belt and Road.

    The China-Pakistan Economic Corridor is a 3,000km rail and road route from western China to Pakistan's Gwadar port, crossing over Pakistani-controlled territory in disputed Kashmir. The port, a major trading hub on the Indian Ocean, is operated by a Chinese company.

    The Iranian port of Chabahar, meanwhile, is situated just 150km to the east of Gwadar. India's emphasis on the port appears to reflect its desire to contain Chinese activity in what it regards as its own backyard.

    India also plans to fund a rail project from Chabahar to the Iranian city of Zahedan, on the border with Afghanistan. In January, India and Iran signed a railway cooperation agreement under which Tehran will purchase locomotives and freight cars from New Delhi. Upon completion, the project will connect the Iranian port to Afghanistan and onward to Central Asia.

    Not to be outdone, China is also strengthening ties with Iran. It has begun sending freight trains to Tehran via Central Asia, placing the Iranian capital on its main transport route to Europe.

    Within Iran, some sections of the Belt and Road and the INSTC overlap. This could be a boon to businesses but could also pose a political risk, if Beijing and New Delhi decide to play a zero-sum game.

    "Even if China and India seem willing to enlist cooperation from each other, they would remain hostile to each other behind the scenes," said Takuya Murakami, a research fellow at the Middle East Institute of Japan.

    "The INSTC could emerge as a counter to China's BRI," said Pankaj Jha, a professor of defense and strategic studies at O.P. Jindai Global University and a former research director at the Indian Council of World Affairs.

    "While the BRI initiative is dominated by China and addresses only the communist giant's cause, the INSTC will be largely addressing the cause of developing countries and will be more fruitful in terms of complementarities, as well as fulfilling the aspirations of the people of the whole region," Jha said.

    As China and India continue their tug of war, the countries caught in the middle aim to strike a balance and maximize the benefits. Iran, as we have seen, is eager to attract Indian investment. But it is also the biggest supplier of oil to China, and Chinese money is critical for Tehran's infrastructure plans.

    In March, the Iranian government signed a deal with China Machinery Industry Construction Group to build a $700 million train line between the cities of Shiraz and Bushehr.



    But India, which considers Central Asia part of its "extended neighborhood," may be able to take advantage of regional anxiety over China's growing power.

    Belt and Road infrastructure projects have left some countries heavily indebted to China (https://asia.nikkei.com/Politics/Pak...corridor-debt2), particularly small and resource-poor states like Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan. A Center for Global Development report published in March listed eight countries at "particular risk of debt distress" from related projects, including those two central Asian states. This debt trap could give China leverage to demand greater security and economic cooperation.

    Russia, too, is concerned about its heavy dependence on China, despite their long-standing relationship. And Moscow's deteriorating relations with the U.S. and Europe are only increasing the importance of energy and other ties with India and Iran. Russian President Vladimir Putin has promoted the INSTC as a "flagship project."

    India may have an opportunity to act as a counterweight, using the INSTC to increase its political, security, economic and cultural connections across the region.

    "It was a great advantage for our country that big states like China and India are initiating such huge projects to export their goods and looking for new routes," Javid Gurbanov, the chairman of Azerbaijan Railway, told the Nikkei Asian Review in an interview. "Everyone needs additional routes. No one wants to depend on one route, and no one likes to put all eggs into the same basket."

    Gurbanov said Azerbaijan has a positive view of both the Belt and Road and the INSTC, and is benefiting from both, though his country will "utilize the INSTC more."

    "When you look at future possibilities of north-south [transport] ... In 2019 we plan to carry 2 million tons minimum, and it will increase in time as people will [become aware of] the route," he said. "In five years I think we can reach 10 million to 12 million tons."

    India, meanwhile, is on the move elsewhere. In February, it achieved a major diplomatic breakthrough at another key point on the Indian Ocean, right under China's nose. It finalized an agreement with Oman that will allow Indian naval vessels to access the strategic port of Duqm. Under the pact, India will use the port for logistical support and ship maintenance.

    Beijing has been investing heavily in an industrial park near the Omani port. "Certainly, that deal was completely unforeseeable," Murakami said. Access to both Duqm and Chabahar enhances India's ability to deter Chinese maritime expansion (https://asia.nikkei.com/Politics/Int...ion-with-China) in the region.

    An X-factor for both India and China remains Iran's global standing. In May, U.S. President Donald Trump is expected to decide whether to reimpose some sanctions on Tehran.

    National interests are becoming increasingly entangled, and the 21st-century Great Game (https://asia.nikkei.com/Spotlight/As...ew-Great-Game2) is about to enter an unpredictable new phase.
    From here: https://asia.nikkei.com/Spotlight/As...d-Central-Asia

    My thoughts:

    1. The “great game” language - which describes a way of looking a the world through a lens described mostly during the 1800s and in the work of Halford Mackinder (https://www.britannica.com/biography/Halford-Mackinder) - is now appearing in more mainstream publications. It had been “out of favour” in international relations: it’s interesting that it should be taken up now.

    Are we emerging out of “ideology” wrapped international politics to something new?

    2. Much is made of the rivalry between India and China and how the north south connections driven by India are competing with the east west connections driven by China.

    Is this really competition? Is is not really more a complementary set of activities? It seems to me they are characterising rivalry where relations may be far more subtle and complex.

    3. Having said that (point 2), this piece should probably be viewed in light of the Quad Alliance, which is a defence initiative seeking to tie Australia, India, Japan and the US together more tightly as a response to growing Chinese dominance in the region.

    See here for example on the Quad Alliance: http://www.atimes.com/article/revive...inas-response/

    4. It is clear that although much is made in the media of the growing ties and cooperation between China and Russia, that Russia is also developing ties with India and others in the Eurasian continent. Russia’s foreign policy is perhaps more multi-faceted than is portrayed.

    5. The citing of the debt burdens incurred by nations who are participating in the belt and road projects is important.

    What is the difference between being tied by debt contracts to western programmes and structures such as the IMF and World Bank and being tied by debt contracts to Chinese OBOR structures?

    I ask this in genuine curiosity. The Chinese narrative has been “win-win”, “we won’t interfere in your local politics”, etc. And they seem not to have interfered so far...l but what happens a couple of elections down the line when new governments seek to change the nature of the debt relationship? Will China interfere then?

    I don’t know the answer to this and there is no way to tell in advance. Perhaps one has to judge by historical Chinese empire behaviour.... what did those empires do?

    6. Interestingly, the role of Iran in all of these plans - whether Chinese or Indian or Russian - is critical. Does this significance indicate some of the less spoken of reasons for US, Saudi et al., and Israeli efforts to counter Iranian regional power?
    The dogs bark, but the caravan goes on.
    (= History moves ahead, no matter the criticism it may attract. The saying is found in many languages from the Middle East to India.)

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    Default Re: Geopolitics, Culture, History,.... Things to explore about the world

    Here are some interesting snippets from commenter C I eh? on Moon Of Alabama blog about the various players behind the scenes in the Syrian war.

    Quote Posted by: C I eh? | Apr 24, 2018 9:35:48 PM

    No, not the US cuddling ISIS but the UK-Rothschild 'Octopus' Cabal and it's minions. Recall it is Mike Pompeo who has been responsible for the effort to stop CIA support for ISIS, on directions from Donald J. Trump and the Pentagon faction which essentially controls the White House.

    Mike Pompeo was President of Sentry International, an oilfield equipment company and close partner of Koch Industries. Also recall the recent meeting between the heads of the FSB and SVR, Alexander Bortnikov and Sergey Naryshkin, received by Pompeo, then director of the CIA, and Dan Coats, director of National Intelligence.

    Alexander Bortnikov and Sergey Naryshkin Secretly Received in the United States
    http://www.voltairenet.org/article199603.html

    In hindsight this meeting appears to have been a strategy session conducted by extremely important high level individuals from Russia with their 'partners' in the United States.

    The meeting occurred immediately before the firing of Rex Tillerson, an agent of the UK-Rothchild 'Octopus,' which effectively controls Exxon-Mobil (the Rockefellers sold their interest several years ago) of which Tillerson was formerly head. Tillerson, who once ran the foreign policies of multiple countries dominated by Exxon-Mobil including Qatar, was said to have been caught red-handed by the NSA under James Kelly, of assisting the UK conspiracy to launch a chemical false flag attack in Eastern Ghouta, the discovery of which led to Tillerson's unceremonious dismissal by Donald Trump via Twitter, a truly unprecedented way to fire a US Secretary of State.

    This was immediately followed by the clumsily arranged response of the UK-Rothchild 'Octopus' government of Theresa May, with accusations made that Russia poisoned British spy Segey Skirpal and his daughter minutes away from UK chemical and bio weapons research facility at Porton Down, most likely in an effort to embarass Trump away from cooperating with Russia and to head off the Rockefeller-Koch faction's plan to make good on Trump's pledge to withdraw from Syria.

    Fred C. Koch, founder of Koch Industries, the second largest privately held company in the United States and now run by his sons David and Charles, are well known players on the US political scene and especially in the Republican Party, and according to Wikipedia, developed an innovative crude oil refining process which threatened existing (Rothschild 'Octpopus' controlled) oil companies, who forced the company out of business in the United States.
    In 1925, Fred C. Koch joined MIT classmate Lewis E. Winkler at an engineering firm in Wichita, Kansas, which was renamed the Winkler-Koch Engineering Company. In 1927, they developed a more efficient thermal cracking process for turning crude oil into gasoline. This process threatened the competitive advantage of established oil companies, which sued for patent infringement.[16] Temporarily forced out of business in the United States, they turned to other markets, including the Soviet Union, where Winkler-Koch built 15 cracking units between 1929 and 1932. During this time, Koch came to despise communism and Joseph Stalin's regime.[16][17] In his 1960 book, A Business Man Looks at Communism, Koch wrote that he found the USSR to be "a land of hunger, misery, and terror."[18] According to Charles Koch, "Virtually every engineer he worked with [there] was purged."[16]

    Not only are the Kochs enemies of the Rothschilds but they also have a history of working with the Soviet Union since the time of Joseph Stalin, who gifted the oilfields in the vicinity of Baku to the Rockefellers (now Rockefeller-Kochs) for development, including the construction of multiple refineries for the Soviet Union. By this arrangement the Soviet Union funded it's 5 year development plans under Stalin.

    The relationship between Rockefellers and the Soviet Union is legendary within the alternative history community, including the story of the visit of David Rockefeller to the Soviet Union immediately prior to the removal of Khrushchev for what Brezhnev famously described as "hare-brained schemes," after the Cuban Missile Crisis effectively turned the US and Soviet Union into confirmed enemies in line with the long term objective of the UK-Rothschild 'Octopus' Cabal, to disrupt and destroy Russia according what is sometimes called the Mackinder Doctrine.

    Before the Cuban Missile Crisis relations between the US and Soviet Union had warmed significantly under President Kennedy and there was talk at the time of a massive reduction of nuclear weapons by both sides, with the final nail driven into the coffin of this plan for de escalation occurring with the murder of JFK in Dallas by agents of -- you guessed it -- the UK-Rothschild 'Octopus' Cabal.

    Slowly but surely the whole of the history of the world during the 20th century is coming into view.

    To reiterate and make clear, there are two Deep States involved in this struggle for supremacy in the Anglo-American space, and although heavily intertwined, they are the Rothschild-UK 'Octopus,' which by some estimates controls 40% of all corporate wealth in the world, and the much smaller US-centric Rockefeller-Kochs, perhaps less than 1/10 the size of their UK based but truly global Anglo-American rivals and competitors.

    Watch this short video where Andrei Fursov discusses the relationship between the Rothschilds and Rockefellers.

    Rothschild vs. Rockefeller
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wBw6ZKg3b14

    Trump is attempting to steer his way through the minefiled created by the Deep State War between the UK-Rothschild 'Octopus' Cabal and their US-centric Rockefeller-Koch competitors. Donald Trump, via the Kochs and Mike Pompeo, is clearly tied to the latter group which includes Militarist-Nationalist Pentagon Generals who see the Rothschild 'Octopus' plan to destroy the US dollar and replace it with a Chineses fiat as profoundly threatening to the US ability to spend over 1 trillion dollars annually on defense.

    A reconnection of interests between sovereignty oriented Eurasianists in Russia and the US forms the basis of the alliance between Vladimr Putin and the White House of Donald J. Trump.

    Finally, every time you see someone in alternative media blame solely the United States for anything that is occurring with respect to the Empire of Chaos, and who simultaneously lets the UK based Rothschild Deep State 'Octopus' crime family off the hook, you are witnessing strategems of people who most likely work for the 'Octopus' Cabal and are attempting to scapegoat the US government for their own perfidious acts and devious deeds.
    From here: http://www.moonofalabama.org/2018/04...24e0348326200d

    Well, that’s one view of the world. I wonder where the Chinese fit in with this view?
    The dogs bark, but the caravan goes on.
    (= History moves ahead, no matter the criticism it may attract. The saying is found in many languages from the Middle East to India.)

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    Default Re: Geopolitics, Culture, History,.... Things to explore about the world

    This is a wide ranging interview on Guns and Butter with the Saker.
    • It begins with an analysis of the situation in Syria but
    • then widens to cover the broader propaganda war and power dynamics in geopolitics.
    • It looks at some of the underlying ideological drivers of the US and its allies and
    • towards the end goes on to speculate on the non-state actors - money power interests - who are using US, Israel, and other nations to achieve their objectives.

    I recommend this for its wide ranging discussion.

    Quote Superpower Confrontation in Syria: It's Not Over - The Saker, #387

    Actual targets hit in the April 14th missile strike on Syria; symbolic strike; chemicals would have created toxic cloud; facts no longer matter, only perceptions; Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) investigation resolution blocked by UN; abandonment of international law, conflicts to be resolved by war; Russia announces ahead of time evidence Britain plans to stage false flag chemical event with White Helmets; Russia’s dilemma in responding to US missile barrage; China’s response; goal of the AngloZionist attack on Syria; Russian weapons systems; confrontation with Russia not over; attack consistent with Oded Yinon Plan for the Greater Israel; Syria, Ukraine and Iran in the crosshairs; Russia sending reinforcements; one world hegemon versus a multipolar world order; alliance between Turkey, Russia and Iran; Zionist lobby a pretext used to achieve power in the US; Zionism merged with Anglo/American power to create a one world hegemony.



    Originally Aired: April 18, 2018
    From here: http://gunsandbutter.org/blog/2018/0...a-its-not-over

    Listen here: https://soundcloud.com/guns-and-butt...am-engdahl-386
    The dogs bark, but the caravan goes on.
    (= History moves ahead, no matter the criticism it may attract. The saying is found in many languages from the Middle East to India.)

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